IES83465Y1 - Environment monitoring system - Google Patents

Environment monitoring system

Info

Publication number
IES83465Y1
IES83465Y1 IE2003/0578A IE20030578A IES83465Y1 IE S83465 Y1 IES83465 Y1 IE S83465Y1 IE 2003/0578 A IE2003/0578 A IE 2003/0578A IE 20030578 A IE20030578 A IE 20030578A IE S83465 Y1 IES83465 Y1 IE S83465Y1
Authority
IE
Ireland
Prior art keywords
sms
message
communication means
event
monitoring
Prior art date
Application number
IE2003/0578A
Other versions
IE20030578U1 (en
Inventor
Kelly Gerard
Original Assignee
Kelly Gerard
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Kelly Gerard filed Critical Kelly Gerard
Publication of IE20030578U1 publication Critical patent/IE20030578U1/en
Publication of IES83465Y1 publication Critical patent/IES83465Y1/en

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Abstract

ABSTRACT An environment monitoring system includes sensors (10) for monitoring the environment and control panel (12) for detecting different system events. A digital communicator (16) automatically sends an SMS text message on a fixed telephone line (18) in response to the detection of a least one event. The digital communicator (16) is also able to receive SMS messages for, e.g. remote arming/disarming of the system.

Description

Environment Monitoring System This invention relates to environment monitoring systems, such as intruder detection (security) systems and fire alarm systems.
Currently, security systems that require remote monitoring contain a so-called digital communicator which will dial a monitoring system following any significant event. Communications to the monitoring system are typically via DTMF tones. The monitoring system is supervised by an operator, who when informed of an event by the monitoring system decides on a course of action to be followed (for example to contact the police or a key holder for the premises).
At present, SMS technology is predominantly used in the mobile phone arena, with users able to send text messages to each other rather than having full phone calls.
Automated services also make use of this system; for example, by advising a user that they have a voice mail message waiting for them or welcoming a user to a new network when travelling abroad. Recently this technology has been incorporated into fixed telephone line (land line) systems. This technology has been implemented in conjunction with the Caller ID systems contained within telephone exchanges, where typically modems are used for the transfer of the relevant data to achieve the SMS functionality. If a customer purchases an SMS—capable phone they can send and receive SMS messages, either to mobile phones or to other fixed line phones that are SMS capable.
S83465 According to the present invention there is provided an environment monitoring system including sensor means for monitoring the environment, a control means for detecting different system events, and a communication means for automatically sending a message on a fixed telephone line in response to the detection of at least one said event, wherein the communication means is adapted to send the message as a text message according to a protocol defined by an international standard for SMS text services on fixed telephone lines.
In a preferred embodiment, the communication means stores a plurality of different SMS numbers and associated event types and automatically sends an SMS message to the relevant number upon detection of an event of the respective type.
Also, the communication means is preferably adapted to receive SMS text messages according to said protocol and the control means is adapted to perform at least one function in response thereto.
The basis of this invention is, that therefore, communications can be made from and, in the preferred embodiment, or other environment to a security system, monitoring system, via a fixed telephone line and the SMS system.
An embodiment of the invention will now be described, by way of example, with reference to the accompanying drawings, wherein: Fig. 1 is a block diagram of the system hardware embodying the invention; and Fig. 2 is a block diagram of the digital communicator forming part of the system of Fig. 1.
This embodiment makes use of the recent introduction of SMS text services on land line based phone systems. The European Telecommunications Standards Institute has specified how this may be implemented (ETSI ES 201 912 v1.1.1). This standard describes two different protocols that may be implemented to achieve the required functionality. The protocol implemented in Ireland, Protocol 1, which is used in the present embodiment, will first be summarised. It should be noted that the protocols are capable of being implemented by equipment that shares a phone line with other devices, such as telephones, faxes, answering machines etc. They also allow for multiple SMS devices to be connected to the same line, as described below.
An SMS host system is combined with the Caller ID services provided by the telecommunications operator and the two services operate together to achieve the SMS functionality. Messages are handled by an SMS Service Centre (SMS—SC) within the telecommunications system.
Messages are sent by the land line based equipment (in the present embodiment a digital communicator) seizing the phone line, dialling a number for the SMS~SC, establishing a link with the SMS—SC, transferring a message request to the SMS—SC and receiving a reply from the SMS—SC indicating if the message has been accepted.
The SMS—SC ‘knows’ where the message has originated from by virtue of data provided to it by the Caller ID system.
Messages can also be transmitted from an SMS-SC to land line based equipment. On all incoming phone calls the equipment checks the Caller ID and compares it to that of the SMS—SC. If the number matches that of the SMS—SC there are a couple of options as to how the message is processed. The first option is for the equipment to immediately answer the phone and initiate a transfer from the SMS—SC. The second option is for the SMS—SC to cease ringing the phone once the Caller ID data has been transmitted and for the SMS equipment to then call the SMS—SC back and request that the message be sent to it.
The protocols also allow for multiple SMS capable devices to be attached to a single phone line. In this case the phone numbers used for the SMS—SC differ slightly for each device. The last number of the phone numbers used is what is known as a sub—address and identifies the particular texting device. In this way up to 10 devices can be uniquely identified (0 to 9).
Fig. 1 is a block diagram of a security system embodying the invention. The system comprises a plurality of sensors 10 distributed about the environment to be monitored. The sensors 10 may, for example, be intruder detectors and/or flame/smoke detectors according to the nature of the event(s) being monitored. The sensors 10 are connected to a control panel 12 which is responsible for monitoring the system to detect different system events, raising an alarm (via a siren, strobe light, etc.) when appropriate, communicating with a local user through a menu system via a keypad 14, and communicating with remote monitoring stations and SMS servers via a digital communicator 16 via a fixed land line 18. The keypad 14 is used by local users to arm and disarm the system and by an engineer to configure the system. Apart from the SMS messaging capability, the system may be entirely conventional.
The SMS messaging capability is implemented by the digital communicator, Fig. 2, which is capable of initiating calls to remote monitoring stations, SMS servers and modem-based computers and receiving calls from SMS—SCs. The digital communicator 16 is connected to the control panel l2 via control panel interface circuitry 20 and to the telephone line 18 via line interface circuitry 22. A suitably programmed microcontroller 24 and modem chip 26 implement the SMS protocol in known manner. As mentioned above, the protocols also allow for multiple SMS capable devices to be attached to a single phone line. Thus, in the present embodiment a further item 30 of SMS—capable phone line terminating equipment is connected to the digital communicator 16 and the latter is adapted to discriminate between SMS messages addressed to itself and SMS messages addressed to the further item of equipment 30. Although the digital communicator 16 is shown as a separate device from the control panel l2 its functionality may be integrated into the control panel as an additional logical block or function.
This system has two mechanisms for the transmission of SMS messages. The first mechanism is the automatic transmission of the notification of relevant events to various users. The digital communicator 16 contains, in a memory 28, a list of target SMS numbers and associated configuration data defining the type(s) of messages to send to each number. Options include: — alarm activations. — system armed or disarmed. — system part inhibited. — system events such as telephone line faults, mains power failure, system in engineer mode. — activation of sensors which have been placed into test mode (soak events).
Each time a relevant event occurs, as detected by the control panel 12, the digital communicator 16 scans the configuration data and if the event matches a type that should be sent to any of the stored SMS numbers the digital communicator dials the SMS—SC and sends the relevant message(s).
The second mechanism is the transmission of messages as a result of a local user command at the system keypad l4.
The types of message(s) that can be sent in this fashion are: — transmit a test SMS message to one of the numbers stored in the memory 28. — transmission of engineer log data (see below) to all SMS numbers in the memory that are configured to take this data. to a — transmission of engineer log data (see below) number inputted by the user.
The transmission of these messages can be achieved either through the standard user menu interface or through the pressing of ‘quick keys’. Quick keys are effectively menu shortcuts. For example, the pressing of the # or * key on the keypad followed by an option number. Quick keys are currently used in many security systems to achieve functions such as system arming without a user code, inhibiting of sensor zones, etc.
The digital communicator l6 is also capable of receiving SMS text messages on the phone line l8 from a remote SMS text system according to the protocol. Such messages can be interpreted by the control panel l2 as commands for the control panel to carry out some pre-defined function defined by the command. Such functions include: — remote arming or disarming of the system. — remote switching on/off of lights or other electrical equipment on the premises. — change of options (e.g. enable or disable texting to their number).
In addition to using the SMS system for communicating typical status messages of a security system to various users, the invention allows a new method of being able to check a system and diagnose faults remotely.
In many cases diagnosis of faults within a system can be quickly achieved by an engineer reviewing the system log of the security system. For example this can enable him/her to identify faulty sensors or some system option that requires modification for correct operation.
With the SMS functionality in place it is possible for the security system to transmit a number of entries from the system log to an SMS number. The number of events can be configurable and the SMS number can either be preset within the system or entered by the user when starting the process. An engineer can now remotely review the system log (or a relevant portion) using an SMS device and may be able to determine corrective action without having to visit the customer site. This will result in greater efficiency in fixing faults and could reduce significantly the number of visits an engineer has to make to customer sites to diagnose problems.
The invention is not limited to the embodiment described herein and may be modified or varied without departing from the scope of the invention.

Claims (5)

Claims
1. An environment monitoring system including sensor means for monitoring the environment, a control means for detecting different system events, and a communication means for automatically sending a message on a fixed telephone line in response to the detection of at least one said event, wherein the communication means is adapted to send the message as a text message according to a protocol defined by an international standard for SMS text services on fixed telephone lines.
2. A system as claimed in claim 1, wherein the communication means stores a plurality of different SMS numbers and associated event types and automatically sends an SMS message to the relevant number upon detection of an event of the respective type.
3. A system as claimed in claim 2, wherein the communication means is further adapted to send an SMS message under local user command.
4. A system as claimed in claim 3, wherein the SMS message is sent to a number selected by the local user.
5. A system as claimed in claim 3, wherein the SMS message is sent to a number automatically determined by the nature of the message.
IE2003/0578A 2003-08-06 Environment monitoring system IE20030578U1 (en)

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
IE20030578U1 IE20030578U1 (en) 2004-06-16
IES83465Y1 true IES83465Y1 (en) 2004-06-16

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