HU0400929A2 - Extendible drain members for grounding rfi/emi shielding - Google Patents

Extendible drain members for grounding rfi/emi shielding Download PDF

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Publication number
HU0400929A2
HU0400929A2 HU0400929A HU0400929A HU0400929A2 HU 0400929 A2 HU0400929 A2 HU 0400929A2 HU 0400929 A HU0400929 A HU 0400929A HU 0400929 A HU0400929 A HU 0400929A HU 0400929 A2 HU0400929 A2 HU 0400929A2
Authority
HU
Hungary
Prior art keywords
tube
characterized
fiber elements
shielding according
electrically conductive
Prior art date
Application number
HU0400929A
Other languages
Hungarian (hu)
Inventor
Philip E Marks
Original Assignee
Federal Mogul Powertrain
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US29965601P priority Critical
Priority to US09/993,155 priority patent/US6639148B2/en
Application filed by Federal Mogul Powertrain filed Critical Federal Mogul Powertrain
Priority to PCT/US2002/018928 priority patent/WO2003001566A2/en
Publication of HU0400929A2 publication Critical patent/HU0400929A2/en

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Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05KPRINTED CIRCUITS; CASINGS OR CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS OF ELECTRIC APPARATUS; MANUFACTURE OF ASSEMBLAGES OF ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
    • H05K9/00Screening of apparatus or components against electric or magnetic fields
    • H05K9/0073Shielding materials
    • H05K9/0098Shielding materials for shielding electrical cables
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D03WEAVING
    • D03DWOVEN FABRICS; METHODS OF WEAVING; LOOMS
    • D03D1/00Woven fabrics designed to make specified articles
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D03WEAVING
    • D03DWOVEN FABRICS; METHODS OF WEAVING; LOOMS
    • D03D1/00Woven fabrics designed to make specified articles
    • D03D1/0088Fabrics having an electronic function
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04CBRAIDING OR MANUFACTURE OF LACE, INCLUDING BOBBIN-NET OR CARBONISED LACE; BRAIDING MACHINES; BRAID; LACE
    • D04C1/00Braid or lace, e.g. pillow-lace; Processes for the manufacture thereof
    • D04C1/06Braid or lace serving particular purposes
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D10INDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBLASSES OF SECTION D, RELATING TO TEXTILES
    • D10BINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBLASSES OF SECTION D, RELATING TO TEXTILES
    • D10B2401/00Physical properties
    • D10B2401/04Heat-responsive characteristics
    • D10B2401/041Heat-responsive characteristics thermoplastic; thermosetting
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D10INDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBLASSES OF SECTION D, RELATING TO TEXTILES
    • D10BINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBLASSES OF SECTION D, RELATING TO TEXTILES
    • D10B2403/00Details of fabric structure established in the fabric forming process
    • D10B2403/03Shape features
    • D10B2403/031Narrow fabric of constant width
    • D10B2403/0311Small thickness fabric, e.g. ribbons, tapes or straps
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D10INDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBLASSES OF SECTION D, RELATING TO TEXTILES
    • D10BINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBLASSES OF SECTION D, RELATING TO TEXTILES
    • D10B2505/00Industrial
    • D10B2505/12Vehicles
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01BCABLES; CONDUCTORS; INSULATORS; SELECTION OF MATERIALS FOR THEIR CONDUCTIVE, INSULATING OR DIELECTRIC PROPERTIES
    • H01B11/00Communication cables or conductors
    • H01B11/02Cables with twisted pairs or quads
    • H01B11/06Cables with twisted pairs or quads with means for reducing effects of electromagnetic or electrostatic disturbances, e.g. screens
    • H01B11/10Screens specially adapted for reducing interference from external sources
    • H01B11/1091Screens specially adapted for reducing interference from external sources with screen grounding means, e.g. drain wires

Abstract

Shielding a long electric conductor that shields the conductor from electromagnetic and radio frequency interference and prevents the electromagnetic radiation from the wire from escaping into the environment, characterized in that it includes a long tube (12) having an inner space (36) for receiving the conductor, and the tube (12) consists of interlocking, flexible and elastic first fiber elements (14) comprising at least some of the plurality of electrically conductive threads (14) of the plurality of first fiber elements (14), further comprising a pair of guide strands (16, 18) which are conductive fibers (16, 18) substantially the length of the tube (12) and being lashed with the first fiber elements (14), and which guide threads (16, 18) are flexible, electrically conductive to each other, and electrically contacting the electrically conductive fiber elements (14) in the plurality of first fiber elements (14), and one of the guide wires (16, 18) can be pulled out of the tube (12) and the blade (12) can be pulled out the ground (22) has a longitudinal portion that can be connected to the ground (12) of the tube (12). HE

Description

Shielding for a long electrical conductor which shields the conductor from electromagnetic and radio frequency interference and prevents the electromagnetic radiation of the conductor from being emitted into an environment characterized by a long conduit (12) having a conductor receiving space (36). ), and the tube (12) is comprised of interconnected, flexible and resilient first fiber elements (14), said plurality of first fiber elements (14) comprising at least some electrically conductive fiber elements (14) and a pair of conductive fibers (14). 16, 18), which guide strands (16,18) are disposed substantially along the length of the tube (12) and are joined to the first strands (14), and which strands (16, 18) are flexible, electrically conductive, to one another and the first strands electrically contacting the electrically conductive filament elements (14) in the plurality of elements (14) and from one of the conductive filaments (16, 18) 12) a longitudinal portion extending and connecting to the electrical ground (22) for grounding the tube (12).

(Figure 1)

Ρ0400929

4793G

Shield for long electric wire

TECHNICAL AREA

The present invention provides shielding for a long electrical conductor which shields the conductor from electromagnetic and radio frequency interference and prevents electromagnetic radiation from the conductor from escaping into the environment.

TECHNICAL STATE

Electromagnetic and radio frequency interference can prevent electronic components from working properly by generating interference signals from nearby, time-varying electrical wires or wires carrying electromagnetic waves. For example, in cars, currents flowing in the ignition system or in the power supply wires can induce false signals in various electronic components, such as the electronic module controlling the engine operation or the braking system. Such false signals can have fatal consequences, cause control modules to malfunction, or control modules to give outputs as if the false signals correspond to real states, thus losing control of the vehicle.

Similarly, inductive coupling between electrical wires and media wires in a computer network or other information transmission system may cause damage to data transmitted over the network.

The harmful effects of electromagnetic and radio frequency interference can be effectively eliminated by shielding sensitive parts and grounding the shielding. For example, control signal wires subjected to induced disturbances may be shielded by a protective tube described in U.S. Patent No. 4,684,762, which consists of electrically conductive and non-conductive yarns interwoven (woven, braided or crocheted) and the electrically conductive yarns are grounded. a guide wire that is threaded into the yarns during manufacture of the tube so that it is electrically contacted with the electrically conductive yarns.

Although this electromagnetic and radio frequency shielding effectively eliminates electrical interference, it is difficult to properly earth the shielding tube. First, the shielding tube is cut to a length greater than the length of the shielded wires to leave a free conductor wire for grounding. The end of the guide wire is then released by cutting off the shield tube around the guide wire. The tube is placed on the wires to be shielded and the free end of the guide wire is connected to the ground. This procedure is uneconomical and time-consuming because the installer will have to cut a larger shield tube than is necessary and then cut off a portion of the shield tube without damaging the guide wire required to connect to the ground. Obviously, there is a need for better electromagnetic and radio frequency shielding, which is more economical and less costly to install in less time.

DISCLOSURE OF THE INVENTION

It is an object of the present invention to provide radio frequency and electromagnetic shielding that is easy to earth.

Another object of the present invention is to provide tubular radio frequency and electromagnetic shielding for long electrical wires.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a radio frequency and electromagnetic shield comprising conductive fibers that can be pulled out of the shield and connected to an electrical ground.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to the shielding of a long electrical wire, which shields the wire from radio frequency and electromagnetic interference. The shielding includes a long tube having an interior space receiving the electrical conductor. The tube consists of a plurality of flexible and flexible first fiber elements connected to each other. The plurality of first fiber elements includes at least some electrically conductive fiber elements. Two guide strands are disposed substantially in the longitudinal direction of the tube and are joined to the first strands. The conductive filaments are flexible, electrically conductive and electrically contact with each other and electrically conductive filament elements in a plurality of first filament elements. The longitudinal portion of one of the guidewires can be pulled out of the tube and connected to the electrical ground to ground the tube.

Preferably, one of the guide strands is joined to the first strands of fibers in a plurality of separate threaded sections spaced apart along the length of the tube. One guide wire thus has a plurality of sections where the guide wire runs freely on the surface of the tube, and there is always a free running section between the threaded region ranges. One of the guidewires can be cut at one of the free-running sections so that it can be pulled out of the tube for connection to the electrical ground. The free-running sections of the guide strand are preferably longer than the threaded sections.

In a preferred embodiment of the shielding according to the invention, a slot is provided along the length of the tube which allows access to the inner space of the tube. The gap is defined by the longitudinal free edges of the tube mantle. The tensioning means formed in the tube flexibly clamp the free edges together in an overlapping position, which closes the gap.

Preferably, one of the free edges overlaps the other and the guidewires are arranged so that one of the free edges overlaps them.

Preferably, the guide strands are wound copper wires, the first strands are woven together, and the strands are woven into the first strands. Effective radio frequency and electromagnetic shielding can be achieved if the electrically conductive fiber elements comprise from about 10% to about 80% by weight of the tube.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The invention will now be described with reference to the preferred embodiments illustrated in the drawings, wherein:

Fig. 1 is an axonometric view of a preferred embodiment of electromagnetic and radio frequency shielding according to the present invention comprising retractable conductive fibers;

Figure 1A is an enlarged axonometric view of a portion of the shield shown in Figure 1, a

Fig. 2 shows a further embodiment of the electromagnetic and radio frequency shielding according to the invention, which includes retractable conductive fibers;

Figure 3 is a sectional view taken along line 3-3 of Figure 2, a

Figure 4 is an axonometric view of the shield shown in Figure 2 with one of the guidewires pulled out of the shield,

Figure 5 is an axonometric view of the shield shown in Figure 2 with one of the guidewires cut off and removed from the shield;

6-8. Figs. 4 to 5 show further embodiments of electromagnetic and radio frequency shielding according to the invention comprising retractable guidewires;

Fig. 9 is an axonometric view of another embodiment of the electromagnetic and radio frequency shielding according to the present invention, wherein the shielding is braided and no longitudinal gap is formed on the shield,

Figure 10 is an axonometric view of an embodiment of an electromagnetic and radio frequency shielding according to the present invention, wherein the shielding comprises non-interlaced fiber elements, and

Figure 11 shows an axonometric view of conductive filaments used in planar electromagnetic and radio frequency shielding.

PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION

Figure 1 shows a shield 10 for protecting a long electrical wire from radio frequency and electromagnetic interference. The shield 10 comprises a long tube 12 consisting of a plurality of flexible, elastic fiber elements 14 bonded together. The generic term for a fiber element as used herein is a continuous filament, a fiber composed of filaments, filaments, yarn, or a material of a shape suitable for looping, weaving, spinning, or otherwise interlocking to form a structure. The fiber elements 14 are woven from multiple fibers, are composed of multiple fibers without twisting, are composed of multiple filaments or are wound or consist of a single filament.

The fiber elements 14 are preferably stitched together by weaving, but it is possible to sew them together by spinning or crocheting. At least some of the fiber elements 14 are electrically conductive. The electrically conductive filament elements 14 are preferably silver-plated nylon single-filament yarns, and the non-electrically conductive filament elements 14 are preferably twisted, two-component polyester filaments. Effective shielding is obtained when the electrically conductive fiber elements 14 form a weight ratio of the tube 12 of between about 10% and about 80%.

A pair of guide strands 16, 18 are threaded together with the strands 14. The conductive fibers 16, 18 are electrically conductive and electrically in contact with each other and with the electrically conductive fiber elements 14. In Figure 1, the guidewires 16, 18 are shown separately for better visibility, but are in fact in the tube 12. The conductive fibers 16, 18 are preferably wound copper wires to provide flexibility and are coated with tin to prevent corrosion. In practice, the guidewires 16, 18 have a diameter of 0.5 mm and 1 mm

- It falls between 6. The preferred 0.5 mm diameter guide wire 16, 18 may consist of twisted 19 pieces of 0.125 mm diameter tin plated fibers. Other configurations are possible, for example, 7 pieces of 0.2 mm diameter fiber.

The guidewires 16, 18 are disposed substantially along the length of the tube 12, and the longitudinal portion 20 of the guidewire 16 may be pulled out of the tube 12 (see dashed line) and connected to the electrical ground 22 for grounding. ·

In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 1, the guide wire 18 is substantially continuously threaded along the length of the tube 12, while the guide wire 16 is stitched over a plurality of discrete threaded region 24 sections along the length of the tube 12. they are at a certain distance from each other. Between the threaded sections 24, sections 26 of guide wire 16 run freely on surface 28 of tube 12, thereby forming a plurality of guide sections 20 that can be pulled out of tube 12 when tube 12 and guide wire 16, 18 are cut. In this embodiment, the free-running sections 26 are preferably longer than the threaded sections 24, so wherever the tube 12 is cut, it is more likely to be cut across the section 26 between two threaded sections 24.

In the preferred embodiment illustrated in Figure 1A, both the guide wire 16 and the guide wire 18 are stitched to the fiber elements 14 in a plurality of separate threaded sections 24 along the length of the tube 12. Between these regions, portions 26 of each of the guide wires 16, 18 run freely on the surface 28 of the tube 12, thereby forming a plurality of guide wires 20 that can be pulled out of the tube 12 for connection to the electrical ground 22. The regions of the threaded sections 24 of the guide wire 16 are preferably adjacent to the free running sections 26 of the guide wire 18, and the sections of the threaded sections 24 of the guide wire 18 are preferably adjacent the free sections 26 of the guide wire 16. This embodiment allows there to always be a section 26 for extraction from the tube 12, regardless of where the tube 12 is cut along its length.

Preferably, a gap 30 is formed along the length of the tube 12 defined by the longitudinal free edge 32 and the free edge 34 of the tube 12. The slot 30 allows access to the inner space 36 surrounded by the tube 12 when a long conduit is inserted into the tube 12. The tube 12 includes tensioning means 38 for resiliently tensioning the free edge 32 so that it overlaps the free edge 34 and thereby substantially closes the gap 30. Slit 30 can be opened by manually removing edges 32 and 34 from each other. The guidewires 16, 18 are positioned in the tube 12 so that they are covered by the free edge 32, thereby avoiding the possibility of short-circuiting by the free-running sections 26. Preferably, the guidewires 16, 18 are located near the free edge 34 as shown in FIG.

Preferably, the tensioning means 38 comprise a plurality of auxiliary fiber members 40 joined to the first fiber members 14, which are substantially perpendicular to the longitudinal axis 42 of the tube 12. Preferably, the auxiliary fiber elements 40 are single-filament yarns of an elastic material such as thermoplastic or metal, stainless steel or nickel-titanium alloy. The single-filament yarns made of such materials allow the additional fiber elements 40 to be elastically stretched, e.g.

In use, the shield 10 of the preferred embodiment shown in Figure 1 is cut to the length of the long electrical conductor to be shielded. The free edges 32 and 34 are pulled by hand and the tube 12 is placed around the electrical conductor. The cut-off portion 20 of one of the free running sections 26 is pulled between the free edges 32 and 34 and connected to the nearby electrical ground 22. When the tube 12 is cut to a size corresponding to the length of the electrical conductor, the cut may fall into the section 26, whereby the cut section 26 may be pulled close to the cut end of the tube 12. If the tube 12 is cut in the region of the threaded sections 24 and not at the section 26, the guide wire 16 can be slid out of the area of the threaded sections 24 to pull it out of the tube 12. It is also possible to cut a section 26 and retract it between the edges 32, 34 anywhere along the length of the tube 12 to connect it to the electrical ground 22.

Figure 2 shows another embodiment of the shielding according to the invention with its tube 50 into which the thin guidewires 52, 54 according to the invention are threaded. Preferably, the tube 50 is woven and comprises both electrically conductive fiber elements 56 and non-conductive fiber elements 58.

The resilient, flexible auxiliary fiber elements 60, which are made of a material that allows them to stretch or adjust to a given shape and resiliently return to that shape, are preferably stitched to the fiber elements 56 and 58 so that the tube 50 is desired. shape and stiffness. The preferred embodiment is approximately tubular having a slot 62 in the longitudinal direction of the tube 50 defined by the overlapping edges 64 and 66. The flexibility of the auxiliary fiber elements 60 allows the gap 62 to be temporarily opened by extending the edges 64 and 66 to access the interior of the tube 50. Elastic tensioning of the auxiliary fiber elements 60 closes the slot 62 such that the edges 64 and 66 return to their original overlapping state and the tube 50 regains its tubular shape when the edges 64 and 66 are released.

In this embodiment, the tube 50 consists of twisted twin-component yarns and the electrically conductive fiber element 56 is a silver-coated nylon fiber and the non-conductive fiber element 58 is polyester. In the woven embodiment, the electrically conductive fiber elements 56 are both in the chain direction and in the weft direction, with a relatively higher percentage of silver-coated fibers in the chain direction than in the weft direction. The elastic auxiliary fiber elements 60 are woven in the weft direction and are preferably single-stranded yarns of thermoplastic material, such as polyester, which allow the fiber elements 60 to be thermally adjusted or stretched to a tubular shape.

In addition to knitting the yarns into weaving, the tube 50 may be made by knitting or spinning. The electrically conductive fiber elements 56 may consist of yarns of other conductive materials, such as carbon, graphite or electrically conductive polymers, or other non-conductive yarns having a conductive layer other than silver. Effective radio frequency and electromagnetic t

Shielding 9 is obtained when the electrically conductive fiber elements 56 comprise from about 10% to about 80% by weight of the fabric forming the tube 50.

The guide strands 52, 54 are joined to the electrically conductive fiber elements 56 and the non-electrically conductive fiber elements 58 and the elastic auxiliary fiber elements 60 and, as shown in Figures 2 and 3, they are woven along the length of the tube 50. The conductive filaments 52 and 54 are electrically in contact with each other and the electrically conductive filament elements 56 over substantially the entire length of the tube 50, thereby providing excellent grounding of the tube 50. Preferably, the conductive fibers 52 and 54 are wound from copper fibers so that they are very flexible and have very good conductivity. Preferably, the copper fibers are coated with a tin layer to prevent corrosion and the conductive conductors 52, 54 have a diameter in the range of 0.5 mm to 1 mm. The preferred 0.5mm diameter guide wire 52, 54 may consist of twisted 19 pieces of 0.125mm diameter tin plated fibers. Other configurations are possible, for example, 7 pieces of 0.2 mm diameter fiber.

For effective grounding of the tube 50, one of the guidewires 52, 54 must be connected to an electrical ground 22, such as a car chassis or body, or a metal bracket on the housing of an electronic device, which is also grounded. Figure 4 illustrates that the connection to ground 22 can be easily accomplished because one of the guide strands 52 is partially pulled out of the tube 50 so that a portion 68 thereof protrudes from the tube 50. The portion 68 extending from the tube 50 may be well connected to the ground 22 by a grounding stud or grounding screw. Although part 68 of guide wire 52 is pulled out of tube 50, guide wire 54 is substantially in contact with tube 50 over its entire length, thereby providing an electrically conductive earth conductor over the entire length of tube 50.

As illustrated in Figure 4, the outer portion of the tube 50 may have a non-textile coating or layer 51, or such layer may be provided on the inner portion thereof. The non-textile coating 51 may be made of a resilient polymer such as polypropylene · ABS plastic or polyester. The coating 51 serves to insulate the tube 50 against electrical insulating, waterproofing, abrasion or other physical damage.

In the case of a relatively long tube 50, it may be difficult to pull out the guide wire 52 due to friction between the guide wire 52 and electrically conductive fiber elements 56 and non-conductive fiber elements 58 as well as the guide wire 52 and elastic auxiliary fiber elements 60. , in which the guide wire 52 is threaded, occurs. This difficulty can be easily overcome as illustrated in Fig. 5 by cutting the guide strand 52 at a location 70 near the end 72 of the tube 50 and pulling the guide strand 52 therefrom. The location 70 is selected such that a portion 74 of sufficient length protrudes from tube 50, which may be easily connected to a suitable electrical ground 22, but sufficient portion 76 will remain threaded within tube 50 to provide good electrical contact with the other conductor 54 and and electrically conductive fiber elements 56; and that the conductive fiber 52 remains physically in contact with the tube 50 without the portion 76 being so long as to facilitate easy extraction by friction.

Figures 6 to 8 show further embodiments of the shielding according to the present invention, wherein the conductive wires 52 and 54 in the tube 50 are arranged differently than in the previously described embodiments.

In Figure 6, the guide strands 52 and 54 are twisted together with the first strands 56, 58 forming the tube 50 and the auxiliary strands 60. The twisted wires 52, 54 provide good electrical contact, but it is somewhat more difficult to pull the wires 52, 54 out of the tube.

In Figure 7, the guide wire 52 is wound around the guide wire 54, which is substantially straight along the length of the tube 50. In this embodiment, since the guide wire 54 is straight, it is easier to pull it out to connect it to the ground 22. The helical arrangement of the guide wire 52 still provides good electrical contact.

In Figure 8, the guide wire 54 is also substantially straight along the length of the tube 50, but the guide wire 52 consists of a plurality of interconnected portions 78 which intersect the guide wire 54. Each portion 78 of the guide wire 52 is angled 80 with the guide wire 54 so that the adjacent portions 78 are inclined so that the guide wire 52 is disposed along the tube 50 and intersected by the guide wire 54! 82 points of contact.

Fig. 9 illustrates another embodiment in which the tube 84 has no open, longitudinal slit. The tube 84 may be woven or crocheted, but is preferably spun from the electrically conductive fiber element 56 and the electrically non-conductive fiber element 58 and the guide strands 52 and 54. Preferably, the guide strands 52 and 54 are unbroken so that they can be easily electrically contacted with each other and with the electrically conductive fiber elements 56 forming the tube 84 without disrupting the spinning structure. The insertion of the guide wires 52 and 54 makes it easier to pull them out of the tube 84 to form a ground connection, because the guide wires 52, 54 are substantially straight and attached to the tube 84 at fewer stitching points than they are woven, resulting in less friction. between the tube and the guide strands 52, 54. Due to the "lattice effect" of the braided structures only, the braided tube 84 expands radially when pressed longitudinally and shrinks radially when stretched longitudinally, this may be particularly useful for pulling out the guide strands 52, 54. Longitudinally pressed against the tube 84, the fiber elements 56 and 58 forming the tube 84 are spaced apart due to the radial extension, thereby reducing the pinching of the guide strands 52, 54 and allowing them to be pulled out more easily. The relative stiffness and straightness of the guide strands 52, 54 also help to resist the compressive force acting on the tube 84, which has the effect of pushing the ends of the guide strands 52 and 54 out of the tube 84 when compressing the tube 84. end by hand or with a tool.

In the method according to the invention, a double guidewire is also used in the tube 86 shown in the embodiment of FIG. The non-bonded tube 86 is preferably laminated, which may include multiple layers, having at least one outer tube member 88 and an inner tube member 90 between which the guide strands 52 and 54 are disposed. Preferably, the guide strands 52, 54 are in a channel 92 which links the guide strands 52, 54 with one another and with the outer 88

We

- in electrical contact with the inner surface 94 of the tubular member 12 and the outer surface 96 of the inner tubular member 90. Electrically conductive coatings 98 may be deposited on either surface 94 or 96 to provide electromagnetic and radio frequency shielding. Figure 10 shows the coating 98 on the surface 96. The conductive wires 52, 54 are electrically in contact with the coating 98, slip in and out of channel 92 for connection to ground 22.

The non-bonded tube 86 is preferably made of a flexible, flexible polymer, such as polyester, polypropylene or ABS plastic, and the electrically conductive coating 98 may be a relatively thin layer of vacuum-evaporated aluminum.

As illustrated in Figure 11, the retractable guide strands 52, 54 of the present invention may also be used in a flat shield 100 in which the guide strands 52 and 54 are woven with electrically conductive fiber elements 56 and non-electrically conductive fiber elements 54, make up shading.

The radio frequency and electromagnetic shielding comprising the retractable guide wire of the present invention allows for a more efficient application of such shields, since less operation is required to ground the tube, since the tube does not have to be cut out and the material of the tube wasted. cut the pipe longer than enough to have enough guide wire to connect to the ground.

Claims

Claims (30)

  1. A shield for a long electrical conductor which shields the conductor from electromagnetic and radio frequency interference and prevents the electromagnetic radiation of the conductor from being emitted into the environment, characterized in that it comprises a long conduit (12) having 36) and which tube (12) is comprised of interconnected, flexible and resilient first fiber elements (14) comprising at least some electrically conductive fiber elements (14) of the plurality of first fiber elements (14) and further comprising a pair of conductive fibers (16). , 18), which guide strands (16,18) are arranged substantially along the length of the tube (12) and are joined to the first strands (14), and which strands (16, 18) are flexible, electrically conductive, to each other and electrically contacting the electrically conductive fiber elements (14) in the plurality of fiber elements (14) and from one of the conductive fibers (16, 18) A longitudinal portion (12) extending and connecting to the electrical ground (22) for grounding the tube (12)
  2. Shielding according to claim 1, characterized in that said one of the guide strands (16) is joined to the first strands (14) in a plurality of separate threaded sections (24) which are spaced along the longitudinal direction of the tube (12). are spaced apart, and one of the guidewires (16) thus has a plurality of sections (26) where the guidewire (16) runs freely on the surface (28) of the tube (12), and there is always a free-running section (26) Between the ranges (24) and one of the guidewires (16), it is cut away from the tube (12) to be cut off and connected to the electrical ground (22) at one of the free-running sections (26).
  3. Shielding according to claim 2, characterized in that the free-running sections (26) are longer than the stretched-on sections (24).
  4. Shielding according to Claim 2, characterized in that the second guide thread (18) is joined to the first thread elements (14) in a plurality of separate regions of the second threaded section (24) which are spaced along the longitudinal direction of the tube (12). are at a distance and the other lead (18) * · '*
    14 thus has a plurality of other sections (26) in which the other guide thread (18) runs freely on the surface of the tube (12) and there is always another free running section (26) between the regions of the other threaded section (24); the other guide wire (18) being cut off at one of the other free-running sections (26) and extending from the tube (12) for connection to the electrical ground (22).
  5. Shielding according to claim 4, characterized in that the threaded regions (24) of one of the guidewires (16) are adjacent to the other free-running portions (26) of the other guidewire (18) and the other guidewire (18) is of other threaded sections. The regions (24) are adjacent to the free-running portions (26) of one of the guide strands (16).
  6. Shielding according to Claim 2, characterized in that along the length of the tube (12) a gap (30) for accessing the inner space (36) of the tube (12) is formed, the gap (30) being the tube (12). defined by longitudinal free edges (32, 34) of its mantle, and in the tube (12) there is a tensioning means (38) for resiliently clamping the free edges (32, 34) to close the gap (30) and one of the free edges (32) overlaps the other free edge (34), and the guidewires (16, 18) are disposed so that said one free edge (32) covers them.
  7. Shielding according to claim 6, characterized in that the tensioning means (38) comprise additional fiber elements (40) joined to the first fiber elements (14) which are substantially perpendicular to the longitudinal axis (42) of the tube (12), the tensioning means (38) comprising additional fiber elements made of resiliently adjustable material, and the additional fiber elements (40) being resiliently adjustable to hold the free edges (32, 34) in an overlapping position.
  8. Shielding according to claim 7, characterized in that the auxiliary fiber elements (40) consist of single-filament yarns.
  9. Shielding according to claim 8, characterized in that the single-filament yarns are made of thermoplastic material.
  10. Shielding according to claim 8, characterized in that the single-filament yarns are metal fibers.
    «· * T
    - 15
  11. Shielding according to claim 6, characterized in that the first non-conductive fiber elements (14) are made of polyester.
  12. Shielding according to claim 11, characterized in that the electrically conductive first fiber elements (14) are silver-coated nylon fibers.
  13. 13. Shielding according to claim 12, characterized in that the conductive fibers (16, 18) are wound copper wires.
  14. Shielding according to claim 2, characterized in that the first fiber elements (14) are woven together and the guide fibers (16, 18) are woven into the first fiber elements (14).
  15. Shielding according to claim 1, characterized in that the electrically conductive first fiber elements (14) comprise from about 10% to about 80% by weight of the tube (12).
  16. Shielding according to Claim 1, characterized in that the guide strands (52, 54) are stitched in contact with the first strands (56, 58) substantially along the length of the tube (50) and said guiding strands (52). 52) is longitudinally slidable along the tube (50) and extendable from one end of the tube (50) to connect it to the electrical ground (22).
  17. Shielding according to claim 16, characterized in that along the length of the tube (50) there is provided a slot (62) for access to the inner space of the tube (50), which slot (62) is in the longitudinal direction of the periphery of the tube (50). The free edges (64, 66) are defined, and in the tube (50) there is a tensioning means for flexibly clamping the free edges (64, 66) and thereby closing the gap (62), and one of the free edges (64) overlaps on the other free edge (66), and the guidewires (52, 54) are disposed such that they are covered by said one free edge (64).
  18. Shielding according to claim 17, characterized in that the guidewires (52, 54) are arranged near the other free edge (66).
  19. Shielding according to claim 17, characterized in that the tensioning means comprise additional fiber elements (60) joined to the first fiber elements (56, 58) which are substantially perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the tube (50), the elements (60) can be flexibly adjusted
    They are made of 16 materials, and the auxiliary fiber elements (60) are configured in a flexible manner to hold the free edges (64, 66) of the tube (50) in an overlapping position.
  20. Shielding according to Claim 16, characterized in that the first fiber elements (56, 58) are stitched together and that the guidewires (52, 54) in the tube (50) are substantially parallel to the longitudinal axis of the tube (50). placed.
  21. Shielding according to Claim 16, characterized in that the first fiber elements (56, 58) are woven together, the tube (50) has an approximately longitudinal chain direction and the guidewires (52, 54) are substantially stitched in the chain direction. .
  22. Shielding according to Claim 1, characterized in that the guidewires (52, 54) are wound substantially along the length of the tube (50) so that they are electrically in contact along their entire length, and one of the guidewires (54) is in the tube (50). ) is slidably extending along its length and extending from one end of the tube (50) to connect it to the electrical ground (22).
  23. Shielding according to Claim 1, characterized in that the other conductor (52) is wound substantially helically about one of the conductor (54) along its length so that they are electrically in contact over their entire length, and the guide wire (54) being slidably slidable along the length of the tube (50) and extending from one end of the tube (50) to the electrical ground (22).
  24. Shielding according to claim 1, characterized in that one of the guidewires (54) is substantially parallel to the longitudinal axis of the tube (50) and the other guidewire (52) consists of a plurality of interconnected portions (78), each of which is a guidewire (54). 54) closes an angle (80) such that the adjacent portions (78) are inclined at an opposite angle, and the other guide strand (52) with one guide strand (54) is a plurality of intersections spaced apart along the length of the tube (50)! 82, and one of the guidewires (54) is slidably slidable along the length of the tube (50) and pulled out of the tube (50) at one end to connect it to the electrical ground (22).
    /
    17
  25. A shield for a long electrical conductor, which shields the conductor from electromagnetic and radio frequency interference and prevents electromagnetic radiation from the conductor from escaping into the environment, comprising: a long flexible conduit (84) which having a conductor receiving interior and an electrically conductive surface surrounding the interior, further comprising a pair of conductive filaments (52, 54) disposed substantially along the length of the tube (84), and which conductive filaments (52, 54) flexible, electrically conductive and electrically in contact with each other and with the electrically conductive surface of the tube (84) and having a longitudinal portion of the guidewires (52, 54) which can be pulled out of the tube (84) and connected to an electrical ground .
  26. Shielding according to claim 25, characterized in that the tube (84) consists of threaded fiber elements (56, 58), at least a portion of which are electrically conductive, and which are distributed along the tube (84) such that forming an electrically conductive surface, the guidewires (52, 54) being joined to the filament members (56, 58), and said one of the guidewires (54) slidably extending along the length of the tube (84) and one of its (84) it is extensible at its end and thus forms a longitudinal portion which can be connected to the electrical ground (22) for grounding the tube (84).
  27. Shielding according to Claim 25, characterized in that the long flexible tube (86) consists of a first tube element (88) and a second tube element (90) with a common axis having facing faces (94, 96) facing each other. one of said electrically conductive surfaces, which surfaces (94, 96) surround the conductive filaments (52, 54) and said one of the conductive filaments (54) slidably extending between the surfaces (94, 96) along the length of the tube (86) and being extensible at one end of the tube (86) to form a longitudinal portion to be connected to the electrical ground (22) for grounding the tube (86).
  28. Shielding according to claim 27, characterized in that the common-axis tubular members (88, 90) consist essentially of a continuous plastic sheet.
  29. Shielding according to claim 28, characterized in that said electrically conductive surface is a metal coating (98) applied to one of the facing surfaces (94, 96).
  30. 30. The shielding of claim 28, wherein said electrically conductive surface is a metal film.
    (Sheet 6, Figure 12), Μ'.Ια n. . i.'oda firoiy π 1 l4793G
    Ρ 04 Ο 0 3 2 9
    List of notations
    Shield 10 tube 12 fiber element 16 guide wire 18 guide wire 20 part 22 ground 24 section 26 section 28 surface 30 slot 32 edge 34 edge 36 space
    38 tensioning means 40 fiber element 42 shafts
    50 tubes
    51 coatings
    Guide wire 54 guide wire 56 fiber element 58 fiber element 60 fiber element 62 slot
    64 Edge 66 Edge 68 Part 70 Space 72 End Part Part Part Angle Intersection! point pipe pipe pipe element pipe element channel surface surface coating shielding t
    P0400929 PCT / US02 / 18928
    DISCLOSURE
    2/6 EXAMPLE
    FIG. 2
HU0400929A 2001-06-20 2002-06-13 Extendible drain members for grounding rfi/emi shielding HU0400929A2 (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US29965601P true 2001-06-20 2001-06-20
US09/993,155 US6639148B2 (en) 2001-06-20 2001-11-14 Extendible drain members for grounding RFI/EMI shielding
PCT/US2002/018928 WO2003001566A2 (en) 2001-06-20 2002-06-13 Extendible drain members for grounding rfi/emi shielding

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HU0400929A2 true HU0400929A2 (en) 2004-08-30

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HU0400929A HU0400929A2 (en) 2001-06-20 2002-06-13 Extendible drain members for grounding rfi/emi shielding

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EP (1) EP1410447B1 (en)
JP (2) JP4112488B2 (en)
KR (1) KR100881927B1 (en)
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AU (1) AU2002316250A1 (en)
BG (1) BG108525A (en)
BR (1) BRPI0210562B1 (en)
CA (1) CA2451207A1 (en)
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HR (1) HRP20040029A2 (en)
HU (1) HU0400929A2 (en)
MX (1) MXPA04000062A (en)
PL (1) PL367304A1 (en)
RU (1) RU2286613C2 (en)
TN (1) TNSN03152A1 (en)
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BG108525A (en) 2005-02-28
TW533762B (en) 2003-05-21
JP4740968B2 (en) 2011-08-03
PL367304A1 (en) 2005-02-21
KR20040034616A (en) 2004-04-28
MXPA04000062A (en) 2004-05-21
RU2004100810A (en) 2005-04-10
BR0210562A (en) 2004-06-22
JP2008193106A (en) 2008-08-21
ZA200309832B (en) 2004-09-27
JP2004531898A (en) 2004-10-14
TNSN03152A1 (en) 2005-04-08
US20020195260A1 (en) 2002-12-26
KR100881927B1 (en) 2009-02-04
JP4112488B2 (en) 2008-07-02
AU2002316250A1 (en) 2003-01-08
RU2286613C2 (en) 2006-10-27
US6639148B2 (en) 2003-10-28
WO2003001566A3 (en) 2003-05-15
WO2003001566A2 (en) 2003-01-03
CN1319076C (en) 2007-05-30
BRPI0210562B1 (en) 2016-03-15
EP1410447A4 (en) 2008-03-19
EP1410447A2 (en) 2004-04-21
HRP20040029A2 (en) 2004-08-31
CN1543654A (en) 2004-11-03
CZ200464A3 (en) 2004-06-16
EP1410447B1 (en) 2013-04-10
CA2451207A1 (en) 2003-01-03

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