GB2600080A - A traffic surface marking - Google Patents

A traffic surface marking Download PDF

Info

Publication number
GB2600080A
GB2600080A GB2013621.4A GB202013621A GB2600080A GB 2600080 A GB2600080 A GB 2600080A GB 202013621 A GB202013621 A GB 202013621A GB 2600080 A GB2600080 A GB 2600080A
Authority
GB
United Kingdom
Prior art keywords
elements
interface
marking
fused
traffic surface
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Pending
Application number
GB2013621.4A
Other versions
GB202013621D0 (en
Inventor
Neville Robson
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Grassmats Ltd
Grassmats Ltd
Original Assignee
Grassmats Ltd
Grassmats Ltd
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Grassmats Ltd, Grassmats Ltd filed Critical Grassmats Ltd
Priority to GB2013621.4A priority Critical patent/GB2600080A/en
Publication of GB202013621D0 publication Critical patent/GB202013621D0/en
Publication of GB2600080A publication Critical patent/GB2600080A/en
Pending legal-status Critical Current

Links

Classifications

    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E01CONSTRUCTION OF ROADS, RAILWAYS, OR BRIDGES
    • E01FADDITIONAL WORK, SUCH AS EQUIPPING ROADS OR THE CONSTRUCTION OF PLATFORMS, HELICOPTER LANDING STAGES, SIGNS, SNOW FENCES, OR THE LIKE
    • E01F9/00Arrangement of road signs or traffic signals; Arrangements for enforcing caution
    • E01F9/50Road surface markings; Kerbs or road edgings, specially adapted for alerting road users
    • E01F9/506Road surface markings; Kerbs or road edgings, specially adapted for alerting road users characterised by the road surface marking material, e.g. comprising additives for improving friction or reflectivity; Methods of forming, installing or applying markings in, on or to road surfaces
    • E01F9/512Preformed road surface markings, e.g. of sheet material; Methods of applying preformed markings

Abstract

The markings 10 comprise one or more first elements 12 and one or more second elements 14. Prior to being applied to a traffic surface, the one or more first elements and one or more second elements are assembled to form a marking pattern. In this way, the one or more first elements are adjacent to or are surrounded by the one or more second elements, forming an interface therebetween. At least a portion of the interface between the one or more first elements and one or more second elements is fused to hold the traffic surface marking together. the fused portion of the interface may be fused by the application of heat to at least the portion of the interface to be fused. The invention also relates to a process for providing a traffic surface marking and a method for applying such a marking to a surface

Description

A TRAFFIC SURFACE MARKING
The present invention relates to a traffic surface marking, in particular for use in playground and road surface markings. More particularly, the present invention relates to a process for providing a traffic surface marking and a method for applying such a marking to a surface.
INTRODUCTION
It is known to provide traffic surface markings on surfaces such as asphalt, concrete or other suitable substrates. For example, traffic surface markings may include playground layouts, outlines for sports/games activities and warning signs or messages on road surfaces.
Indeed, surface markings are a staple of playgrounds in many schools and nurseries with a multitude of patterns now offered to help promote healthy outdoor activities and education. As a result, the variety and complexity of surface markings now available has increased considerably.
Markings on road surfaces and car parks are also commonly used, for example, to provide visual information to road users and pedestrians. Modern road markings commonly incorporate contrast to help to draw the attention of the general motorist, and alert them to potential hazards. For example, a road marking may comprise multiple colours.
For any traffic surface marking, it is preferable that the marking is hard wearing, inexpensive and easy to install. A typical traffic surface marking may comprise a preformed thermosetting or thermoplastic. During an installation process, the traffic surface markings are placed in the desired position and exposed to heat causing the marking to soften and firmly adhere to the surface as it solidifies. Alternatively, an adhesive may be used to affix the marking pattern to the surface.
While the cost of the marking patterns themselves are relatively inexpensive, the increase in the variety and complexity of modern traffic surface markings has resulted in significant time and labour being spent at the job site to assemble and maintain the integrity of a traffic surface marking prior to heat treatment.
In particular, many traffic surface markings consist of two or more independent sections. Such independent sections must be assembled and correctly aligned prior to heat treatment in order to achieve the desired traffic surface marking. The marking pattern must therefore be carefully assembled before applying the traffic surface marking to a surface.
For example, a traffic surface marking may be a numbered grid pattern formed from a number of discrete grid squares, with each grid square being formed from two or more independent sections. In such a case, the assembly process would require inserting each independent section within the corresponding section for each grid square and aligning each grid square to form the overall grid pattern. If the sections become unaligned during handling or positioning of the markings on a surface, further time may be spent repositioning. As would be understood, such an assembly process can be extremely time consuming.
One solution to maintain the integrity of a traffic surface marking having two or more sections is to manually join the bottom surface by bridging the intersections with an adhesive to hold the marking pattern together. However, this approach introduces an additional substance between the surface and the traffic surface marking, which may affect the installation process. In particular the adhesive material may raise the profile of the traffic surface marking above the surface to which it is to be affixed.
Further, the adhesive may not be applied evenly across the bottom surface of the traffic surface marking or may aggregate in certain regions following application. This may cause the traffic surface marking to sit unevenly against the surface to which it is to be affixed, potentially compromising the integrity of the final traffic surface marking.
This invention aims to obviate or mitigate the existing disadvantages associated with traffic surface markings in the art.
SUMMARY OF INVENTION
In a first aspect, there is provided a traffic surface marking comprising one or more first elements and one or more second elements; wherein, prior to being applied to a traffic surface, the one or more first elements and one or more second elements are assembled to form a marking pattern such that the one or more first elements are adjacent to or are surrounded by the one or more second elements, forming an interface therebetween; and wherein at least a portion of the interface between the one or more first elements and the one or more second elements is fused to hold the traffic surface marking together.
This provides the advantage that the first and second elements are held together to maintain the integrity of the traffic surface marking during handling, transport and application. It is not necessary to assemble to components at the installation site. As a result, a significantly more efficient and cost effective installation process can be achieved.
In accordance with the invention at least a portion of the interface between the one or more first elements and the one or more second elements is fused to hold the traffic surface marking together. It follows that the fused portion of the interface need only be a sufficient portion of the entire length of the interface to hold the traffic surface marking together as an integral assembly for handling, transport and application. It is not necessary for the entire length of the interface to be fused.
It further follows that it may not be necessary for the part of the length of the interface that is fused to be fused for its entire depth. The fused portion of the interface need only be fused to a sufficient depth to hold the traffic surface marking together as an integral assembly for handling, transport and application.
Preferably, the fused portion of the interface between the one or more first elements and one or more second elements is fused for only part of its depth, and is not fused in the region of an upper face of the traffic surface marking (that is to say, the face intended to sit uppermost in use, opposite the face intended to sit upon the traffic surface when in use). In this way, any blurring caused by fusion at the interface between the first and second elements is not visible at the upper face of the traffic surface marking. This ensures that the clarity of the exposed face of the traffic surface marking after installation on a desired surface is not comprised.
The fused portion of the interface between the one or more first elements and one or more second elements may be fused by application of heat to at least the portion of the interface to be fused. In other words, the portion of the interface between the one or more first elements and one or more second elements that is to be fused may be fused at least in part by applying heat.
The fused portion of the interface between the one or more first elements and one or more second elements may be fused by application of pressure to at least the portion of the interface to be fused. That is, the portion of the interface between the one or more first elements and one or more second elements that is to be fused may be fused at least in part by applying pressure.
The portion of the interface between the one or more first elements and one or more second elements that is to be fused may be fused at least in part by applying heat and/ or pressure to the traffic surface marking over a predetermined period of time.
This provides the advantage that at least a portion of the interface between the one or more first elements and one or more second elements may be fused in the absence of an adhesive. This is particularly important in warmer climates, where environmental conditions may cause an adhesive to melt during handling.
Preferably, the one or more first elements and the one or more second elements may be made of a thermoplastic material.
The second element may comprise at least one cut out corresponding in size and shape to the first element. This further assists in enabling a rapid assembly of the marking pattern.
In a second aspect there is provided a process for providing a traffic surface marking, comprising: assembling one or more first elements and one or more second elements to form a marking pattern, wherein the one or more first elements are adjacent to or are surrounded by the one or more second elements forming an interface therebetween; and fusing at least a portion of the interface between the one or more first elements and the one or more second elements.
In a possible case, the portion of the interface between the one or more first elements and one or more second elements to be fused is preferably fused by application of heat to at least that part of the portion of the interface to be fused.
Optionally, the portion of the interface between the one or more first elements and one or more second elements to be fused is fused by application of heat to the whole marking pattern.
In a possible case, at least a part of the portion of the interface between the one or more first elements and one or more second elements to be fused is preferably fused by application of pressure to at least that part of portion of the interface to be fused Optionally, the portion of the interface between the one or more first elements and one or more second elements to be fused is fused by application of pressure to the whole marking pattern.
Optionally, the portion of the interface between the one or more first elements and one or more second elements is fused by application of pressure to the whole marking pattern for a predetermined period of time.
In a possible case, at least a part of the portion of the interface between the one or more first elements and one or more second elements to be fused is preferably fused by application of heat and pressure to at least that part of the portion of the interface to be fused for a predetermined period of time.
Optionally the portion of the interface between the one or more first elements and one or more second elements to be fused is fused by application of heat and pressure to the whole marking pattern for a predetermined period of time.
A heat press apparatus may be used to fuse at least a portion of the interface between the one or more first elements and the one or more second elements. In particular, in a preferred case a heat press apparatus may be used to apply heat and pressure to the whole marking pattern for a predetermined period of time.
Preferably, a temperature setting of the heat press is between 80-200 °C.
Preferably, a pressure setting of the heat press apparatus is at least 70 kpa (10 psi).
Preferably, a time dwell setting of the heat press apparatus is at least 2 seconds.
Optionally, the marking pattern may be assembled on a support surface.
In a possible case, the step of assembling the marking pattern may comprise assembling at least one marking pattern on a portable base surface, wherein the base surface is subsequently transferred to the support surface.
This provides the advantage that the marking patterns may be assembled remote from the support surface, which may facilitate a high-throughput process.
A cover sheet of anti-stick material may be positioned between the support surface or the base surface and the marking pattern.
In a possible case, the base surface is preferably a sheet of aluminium. This provides an advantage by helping to dissipate heat applied.
The process may further comprise the step of curing the marking pattern.
Optionally, the second element may comprise at least one cut out corresponding in size and shape to the first element.
In a possible case, the step of assembling the marking pattern preferably comprises inserting the first element into the cut out in the second element.
Preferably, the one or more first elements and the one or more second elements may be made of a thermoplastic material.
Optionally, a least a portion of the interface between the one or more first elements and the one or more second elements of a plurality of marking patterns is fused simultaneously.
This provides the advantage that multiple traffic surface markings may be prepared in a single process cycle, which may facilitate a high-throughput process.
In a possible case, the marking pattern is preferably arranged with the reverse face facing upwards, and heat is applied to the reverse face of the marking pattern to fuse at least a portion of the interface between the one or more first elements and the one or more second elements.
Preferably, an anti-stick cover sheet may optionally be laid on top of the reverse face of the marking pattern.
The anti-stick cover acts as a barrier to prevent the marking pattern from sticking and/or fouling during the process.
Optionally, the interface between the one or more first elements and the one or more second elements is not fused at the upper face of the marking pattern.
In a third aspect there is provided a method of applying a traffic surface marking according the first aspect to a surface.
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS
The accompanying drawings illustrate presently exemplary embodiments of the disclosure, and together with the general description given above and the detailed description of the embodiments given below, serve to explain, by way of example, the principles of the disclosure.
Figure 1 shows a top view of an assembled traffic surface marking according to the present invention.
Figure 2 illustrates the assembly of the marking pattern of the traffic surface marking shown in Figure 1.
Figure 3 shows a schematic representation of a heat press used in accordance with the present invention.
Figure 4 shows an expanded view of a marking pattern arranged on the pressing table of the heat press shown in Figure 3.
Figure 5 shows a schematic representation of the installation of a traffic surface marking according the present invention on a suitable surface
DETAILED DESCRIPTION
In the context of this specification, terms such as "reverse", "upper" and "top" refer to respective positions of the marking pattern when in situ i.e. when the marking pattern is installed and adhered to the surface.
Figure 1 illustrates a typical traffic surface marking 10 for application to a suitable surface such as asphalt or concrete. Examples of traffic surfaces include, but are not limited to, pavements, pathways, playgrounds, car parks and road surfaces.
A conventional traffic surface marking is formed from thermoplastic materials. It would be understood that traffic surface marking 10 is shown for illustration purposes only and various pre-cut thermoplastic patterns are commercially available. Additionally or alternatively, thermoplastic patterns may be custom made for a particular purpose. A traffic surface marking 10 typically comprises two or more independent sections that may be the same or different from one another.
Additionally, the traffic surface marking 10 may form part of a larger design, for example, a numbered grid pattern.
The traffic surface marking 10 shown is a planar square design and consists of two separate thermoplastic elements. The first element 12 is a number '1' section and the second element 14 is a background section. The first element 12 is positioned centrally within the second element 14. The first and second elements are independently formed of different coloured thermoplastic materials. For example, the second element may be green and the first element white to provide contrast.
As best seen in Figure 2, the second element 14 is provided with a cut out 16 which corresponds in size and shape with the first element 12. The marking pattern is assembled by manually inserting the first element 12 into the cut out 16 in the second element 14 such that the first element 12 is surrounded by the second element 14 and an interface 15 is formed therebetween (see Figure 1). Optionally, the first element 12 could be adjacent to the second element 14.
The marking pattern 10' is assembled with the reverse face 17 facing upwards, as shown in Figure 2. At least a portion of the interface 15 between the first element 12 and the second element 14 is then fused so as to hold the first element 12 and the second element 14 together. In this way, the traffic surface marking 10 is held together as a single unit. In particular, at least a portion of the interface 15 between the first element 12 and the second elements 14 is fused together in the absence of an adhesive.
The fusion process comprises inducing softening of the thermoplastic materials such that they interdiffuse across the interface. That is, at least a portion of the interface 15 between the first element 12 and the second element 14 may merge or blend. This is followed by re-solidification of the thermoplastic material. In this way, the thermoplastic polymer chains are intertwined across the interface during the fusion process. This may result in appearance of a continuous bonded surface.
This fusion process ensures that the independent sections of the traffic surface marking 10 are held together to maintain the integrity of the traffic surface marking 10 during handling, transport and application. This has the effect of dramatically decreasing handling and installation time. As a result, a significantly more efficient and cost effective installation process can be achieved. This offers benefits to both the service providers and their clients. Additionally, a rapid installation process is particularly important in warmer climates, where environmental conditions may cause the thermoplastic materials to quickly soften during handling. This may compromise the integrity of a traffic surface marking during a prolonged installation procedure, such as where the independent sections are assembled at the job site.
The interface between the first element 12 and the second element 14 may be fused by application of heat to at least the portion of the interface 15 to be fused. For example, the portion of the interface 15 to be fused may be heated using a conventional soldering iron, or the like.
Alternatively, at least a portion of the interface 15 between the first element 12 and the second elements 14 may be fused by application of heat and, optionally, pressure to the whole marking pattern 10' for a predetermined period of time.
For example, a conventional heat press apparatus 18 may be used to apply heat and, optionally, pressure to the whole marking pattern 10' for a predetermined period of time. The operation of the heat press 18 is described below with reference to Figures 3 and 4.
As best seen in Figure 4, the marking pattern 10' is assembled on a support surface, such as a pressing pad 20. In the embodiment shown, the pressing pad 20 is arranged on a pressing table 22. Optionally, the marking pattern 10' may be assembled remote from the pressing pad 20 on a portable base surface 24, such as a metal sheet to aid heat dissipation, and subsequently transferred to the pressing pad 20. For example, the portable base surface 24 may be a sheet of aluminium. Preferably, an anti-stick cover sheet 26, such as a silicone sheet, is laid on top of the reverse face 17 of the marking pattern 10' (i.e. the face facing upwards during the pressing cycle). An anti-stick cover sheet may also be positioned between the pressing pad 20 or the base surface 24 and the marking pattern 10'. The silicone cover sheet acts as an anti-stick barrier to prevent the marking pattern 10' from sticking and fouling the heat plate 30 and/or pressing pad 20 during the pressing cycle.
The pressing table 22 is inserted fully into the heat press 18 to undergo the pressing cycle. The conditions applied to the marking pattern 10' are such that the thermoplastic materials soften during the pressing cycle. This causes the interface 15 between the first element 12 and second element 14 to fuse such that at least a portion of the first and second elements combine to hold the first and second elements together.
The fusion process involves softening the thermoplastic materials such that they interdiffuse across the interface. That is, at least a portion of the interface 15 between the first element 12 and the second element 14 may merge or blend. This is followed by re-solidification of the thermoplastic material. In this way, the thermoplastic polymer chains are intertwined across the interface during the fusion process.
The marking pattern 10' is arranged with the reverse face 17 facing upwards, such that heat is applied to the reverse face 17 of the marking pattern 10'. The pressing cycle parameters are carefully controlled to provide conditions such that the fused interface between the first and second elements is not visible at the upper surface of the marking pattern 10'. That is, the heat is insufficient to transfer through to the upper surface of the marking pattern 10'. As a result, any blurring caused by fusion of the first and second elements is not visible at the upper surface of the marking pattern (i.e. the upper surface is the surface visible after installation on desired surface). This ensures that the clarity of the traffic marking pattern after installation on a desired surface is not comprised.
A typical pressing cycle is operated at a temperature between 80-200 °C, a pressure of at least 10 psi and for a dwell time of least 2 seconds. More generally, the dwell time is between 2 -30 seconds. However, it will be appreciated that the temperature, pressure and dwell time setting will vary depending on a number of factors, including the particular thermoplastic material used and the quantity of material undergoing the pressing cycle. It will also be appreciated that the pressing cycle may be operated at atmospheric pressure.
It will also be appreciated that a plurality of marking patterns can undergo the pressing cycle at any one time.
After the pressing cycle is complete, the pressing pad 20 is withdrawn from the heat press 18 and the traffic surface marking 10 allowed to cool. Once dry, the traffic surface marking 10 can be removed from the pressing pad 20. *11
The traffic surface marking pattern 10 may now be handled and transported for application to a desired surface.
The preferred method of applying a traffic surface marking 10 to a desired surface 32 is shown in Figure 5. The fused traffic surface marking 10 is positioned onto a prepared surface 32, such as asphalt or concrete. The surface 32 is prepared to ensure the surface is dry, free of dust and debris. The traffic surface marking 10 can be handled and moved for precise placement without fear of the pattern sections separating or becoming misaligned. After suitable placement, the traffic surface marking 10 is heated with a conventional heat torch 34, as shown in Figure 5. Heating the traffic surface marking 10 causes the thermoplastic material to soften. After the heat is removed, the thermoplastic hardens, resulting in a secure and permanent adherence of the traffic surface marking 10 to surface 32. The preferred softening point range of traffic surface marking 10 is 200-220°C, although other thermoplastic materials may be used having different softening points. Additional traffic surface markings 10 may be subsequently applied in a similar manner as necessary for the desired coverage of the particular surface.
It will be appreciated by persons skilled in the art that the above embodiment has been described by way of example only and not in any!imitative sense, and that various alterations and modifications are possible without departing from the scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims.

Claims (26)

  1. CLAIMS1 A traffic surface marking comprising one or more first elements and one or more second elements; wherein, prior to being applied to a traffic surface, the one or more first elements and one or more second elements are assembled to form a marking pattern such that the one or more first elements are adjacent to or are surrounded by the one or more second elements, forming an interface therebetween; and wherein at least a portion of the interface between the one or more first elements and one or more second elements is fused to hold the traffic surface marking together.
  2. 2 A traffic surface marking according to claim 1, wherein the fused portion of the interface between the one or more first elements and one or more second elements is fused by application of heat to at least the portion of the interface to be fused.
  3. 3 A traffic surface marking according to claim 1 or 2, wherein the fused portion of the interface between the one or more first elements and one or more second elements is fused by application of pressure to at least the portion of the interface to be fused.
  4. 4 The traffic surface marking according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the one or more first elements and the one or more second elements are made of a thermoplastic material.
  5. The traffic surface marking according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the interface between the one or more first elements and one or more second elements is not fused in the region of an upper face of the traffic surface marking.
  6. 6 The traffic surface marking according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the second element comprises at least one cut out corresponding in size and shape to the first element.
  7. 7 A process for providing an traffic surface marking, comprising: assembling one or more first elements and one or more second elements to form a marking pattern, wherein the one or more first elements are adjacent to or are surrounded by the one or more second elements, forming an interface therebetween; and fusing at least a portion of the interface between the one or more first elements and the one or more second elements.
  8. 8. The process of claim 7, wherein the portion of the interface between the one or more first elements and one or more second elements is fused by application of heat to at least the portion of the interface to be fused.
  9. 9 The process of claim 7, wherein the portion of the interface between the one or more first elements and one or more second elements is fused by application of heat to the whole marking pattern.
  10. 10. The process of any one of claims 7 to 9, wherein the portion of the interface between the one or more first elements and one or more second elements is fused by application of pressure to the whole marking pattern for a predetermined period of time.
  11. 11. The process of any one of claims 7 to 10, wherein a heat press apparatus is used to fuse at least a portion of the interface between the one or more first elements and the one or more second elements.
  12. 12. The process of claim 11, wherein a temperature setting of the heat press is between 80-200 °C.
  13. 13. The process of claim 11 or 12, wherein a pressure setting of the heat press apparatus is at least 70 kpa (10 psi).
  14. 14. The process of any one of claims 11 to 13, wherein a time dwell setting of the heat press apparatus is at least 2 seconds.
  15. 15. The process of any one of claims 7 to 14, wherein assembling the marking pattern comprises assembling at least one marking pattern on a portable base surface, and wherein the base surface is subsequently transferred to a support surface.
  16. 16. The process of claim 15, wherein a cover sheet of anti-stick material is positioned between the support surface or the base surface and the marking pattern.
  17. 17. The process of claim 15 or 16, wherein the base surface is a sheet of aluminium.
  18. 18. The process of claim any one of claims 7 to 17, further comprising the step of curing the marking pattern.
  19. 19. The process of any one of claims 7 or 18, wherein the second element comprises at least one cut out corresponding in size and shape to the first element.
  20. 20. The process of claim 19, wherein the step of assembling the marking pattern comprises inserting the first element into the cut out in the second element.
  21. 21. The process of any one of claims 7 to 20, wherein the one or more first elements and the one or more second elements are made of a thermoplastic material.
  22. 22. The process of any one of claims 7 to 21, where at least a portion of the interface between the one or more first elements and the one or more second elements of a plurality of marking patterns is fused simultaneously.
  23. 23. The process of any one of claims 7 to 22, wherein the marking pattern is arranged with a reverse face facing upwards, and heat is applied to the reverse face of the marking pattern to fuse at least a portion of the interface between the one or more first elements and the one or more second elements
  24. 24. The process of claim 23, wherein an anti-stick cover sheet is laid on top of the reverse face of the marking pattern.
  25. 25. The process of claim 23 or 24, wherein the interface between the one or more first elements and the one or more second elements is not fused at the upper face of the marking pattern.
  26. 26. A method of applying a traffic surface marking according to any one of claims 1 to 6 to a surface.
GB2013621.4A 2020-08-30 2020-08-30 A traffic surface marking Pending GB2600080A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB2013621.4A GB2600080A (en) 2020-08-30 2020-08-30 A traffic surface marking

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB2013621.4A GB2600080A (en) 2020-08-30 2020-08-30 A traffic surface marking

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
GB202013621D0 GB202013621D0 (en) 2020-10-14
GB2600080A true GB2600080A (en) 2022-04-27

Family

ID=72749722

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
GB2013621.4A Pending GB2600080A (en) 2020-08-30 2020-08-30 A traffic surface marking

Country Status (1)

Country Link
GB (1) GB2600080A (en)

Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP0213338A2 (en) * 1985-07-23 1987-03-11 Mining And Manufacturing Company Minnesota Method for applying adhesive road-marking tapes
WO2007143988A1 (en) * 2006-06-15 2007-12-21 Lkf Vejmarkering A/S A pavement marking pattern and a method for its applying
WO2015053743A2 (en) * 2013-10-07 2015-04-16 Flint Trading Inc. Composition and system for preformed thermoplastic road marking with sequential features
JP2017031795A (en) * 2015-07-28 2017-02-09 積水樹脂株式会社 Road sign sheet
EP3202554A1 (en) * 2016-01-26 2017-08-09 SC Metalbac&Farbe S.A. Pre-assembled thermoplastic markings
CN213328730U (en) * 2020-07-22 2021-06-01 浙江逸雅新材料有限公司 Traffic reflecting sticker

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP0213338A2 (en) * 1985-07-23 1987-03-11 Mining And Manufacturing Company Minnesota Method for applying adhesive road-marking tapes
WO2007143988A1 (en) * 2006-06-15 2007-12-21 Lkf Vejmarkering A/S A pavement marking pattern and a method for its applying
WO2015053743A2 (en) * 2013-10-07 2015-04-16 Flint Trading Inc. Composition and system for preformed thermoplastic road marking with sequential features
JP2017031795A (en) * 2015-07-28 2017-02-09 積水樹脂株式会社 Road sign sheet
EP3202554A1 (en) * 2016-01-26 2017-08-09 SC Metalbac&Farbe S.A. Pre-assembled thermoplastic markings
CN213328730U (en) * 2020-07-22 2021-06-01 浙江逸雅新材料有限公司 Traffic reflecting sticker

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
GB202013621D0 (en) 2020-10-14

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US7189025B1 (en) Preformed pavement warning assembly and method
US8119202B2 (en) Method of applying a thermally settable coating to a patterned substrate
US9822500B2 (en) Pavement marking pattern and method
US8950971B2 (en) Composition and system for preformed thermoplastic road marking with sequential features
US9163368B2 (en) Pavement marking arrangement
GB2600080A (en) A traffic surface marking
EP2032764B1 (en) A pavement marking pattern and a method for its applying
US8864409B2 (en) Method of forming an inlaid pattern in an asphalt surface from preformed template isometries
ES2469667T3 (en) Method for applying a thermally hardenable coating to a substrate with patterns
CN109267506B (en) Blind guide mark formed by fusing metal and resin and mounting method
US20060070698A1 (en) Method of applying a thermally settable coating to a patterned substrate
WO2015053743A2 (en) Composition and system for preformed thermoplastic road marking with sequential features
US10611134B2 (en) Groutless patterns for pavement surfaces using thermoplastic preforms
KR0156883B1 (en) Method of making the anti-slip plate for road
SE1751449A1 (en) Thermoplastic pavement marking and method of producing the same
JP2897955B1 (en) Tile unit manufacturing method and tile unit manufacturing cradle
EP3412433A1 (en) Method for producing a preformed thermoplastic surface covering and a such a covering
WO2016164055A1 (en) Groutless patterns for pavement surfaces using thermoplastic preforms
EP1154097B1 (en) Tile with connection means, and process for laying such tile
JP4597635B2 (en) Marking method for pavement surface
JP2871552B2 (en) Manufacturing method of decorative concrete using decorative aggregate mounting sheet
JP2001262524A (en) Projected road marking and method of manufacturing therefor
JP2006144233A (en) Method for repairing damaged section of embossed layer of elastic pavement
CN102605918A (en) A decorative tile and method of manufacturing same
JPH09195210A (en) Footpath paving block and its manufacture