GB2530370A - Method and apparatus for delivering chemicals to a well head - Google Patents

Method and apparatus for delivering chemicals to a well head Download PDF

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Publication number
GB2530370A
GB2530370A GB1511423.4A GB201511423A GB2530370A GB 2530370 A GB2530370 A GB 2530370A GB 201511423 A GB201511423 A GB 201511423A GB 2530370 A GB2530370 A GB 2530370A
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GB
United Kingdom
Prior art keywords
pump
chemical
gauge
stroke
well head
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Granted
Application number
GB1511423.4A
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GB2530370B (en
GB201511423D0 (en
Inventor
Frank Joseph Prineppi
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Prineppi Frank Joseph
Original Assignee
Prineppi Frank Joseph
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to GBGB1416709.2A priority Critical patent/GB201416709D0/en
Priority to GBGB1504845.7A priority patent/GB201504845D0/en
Priority to GBGB1510257.7A priority patent/GB201510257D0/en
Application filed by Prineppi Frank Joseph filed Critical Prineppi Frank Joseph
Publication of GB201511423D0 publication Critical patent/GB201511423D0/en
Publication of GB2530370A publication Critical patent/GB2530370A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of GB2530370B publication Critical patent/GB2530370B/en
Application status is Active legal-status Critical
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical

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Classifications

    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B37/00Methods or apparatus for cleaning boreholes or wells
    • E21B37/06Methods or apparatus for cleaning boreholes or wells using chemical means for preventing, limiting or eliminating the deposition of paraffins or like substances
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B33/00Sealing or packing boreholes or wells
    • E21B33/02Surface sealing or packing
    • E21B33/03Well heads; Setting-up thereof
    • E21B33/068Well heads; Setting-up thereof having provision for introducing objects or fluids into, or removing objects from, wells
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B33/00Sealing or packing boreholes or wells
    • E21B33/02Surface sealing or packing
    • E21B33/03Well heads; Setting-up thereof
    • E21B33/068Well heads; Setting-up thereof having provision for introducing objects or fluids into, or removing objects from, wells
    • E21B33/076Well heads; Setting-up thereof having provision for introducing objects or fluids into, or removing objects from, wells specially adapted for underwater installations
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B43/00Methods or apparatus for obtaining oil, gas, water, soluble or meltable materials or a slurry of minerals from wells
    • E21B43/16Enhanced recovery methods for obtaining hydrocarbons
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F04POSITIVE DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS FOR LIQUIDS OR ELASTIC FLUIDS
    • F04BPOSITIVE DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS
    • F04B13/00Pumps specially modified to deliver fixed or variable measured quantities
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F04POSITIVE DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS FOR LIQUIDS OR ELASTIC FLUIDS
    • F04BPOSITIVE DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS
    • F04B49/00Control, e.g. of pump delivery, or pump pressure of, or safety measures for, machines, pumps, or pumping installations, not otherwise provided for, or of interest apart from, groups F04B1/00 - F04B47/00
    • F04B49/06Control using electricity

Abstract

A pump controller is claimed for electrical connection between a source of chemical supply 2 and a chemical injection pump 3 of the type having a reciprocating piston for delivering a quantity of chemical to a well head 1 after each compression stroke of the piston. The controller includes a pump activation switch means 10 operable to sequentially deliver activation current to the pump 3; a voltage sensor 11 between the pump 3 and the switch means 10 to extract DC voltage signals indicative of activation of the pump 3; an analogue-to-digital convertor 13 for converting the sensed DC voltage into digital format; digital signal processor 14 operative to differentiate DC stroke voltage signals from the sensed voltage signals, thereby to indicate the occurrence of each stroke of the pump; switch controller 10 programmed with pump parameters and target chemical delivery dosages to sequentially deliver activation current to the pump 3, measured or calculated from the digital DC stroke voltage signals and hence chemical delivery to the well via the injection pump at required intervals. The controller can also be used in a method where the current to the pump 3 is deactivated for a period of time to provide measured or calculated volumes of chemical to the well head via the injection pump 3. In an alternative embodiment a method of delivering a required amount of chemical to a well head from a chemical storage tank 2 involves disconnecting a chemical volume gauge from the tank, taking a reading of the gauge, actuating a pump and then taking another reading from the gauge.

Description

Method and apparatus ford&h.nghernicl to a wehead

BACKGROUND O.F THE INVENTION

This invention relates to wefi heads. such as those used to extract oU from the ground and to inject into the well head a required amount of chemicals at 5. regular intervals by means of a dispacerneiit pump in order to improve the efficiency of the extraction process.

The i.niecflon of chemicals into a weU head is. conventionally undertaken by high pressure reciprocating, pumps which draw small, dicreie, amounts of Uquid chemicals from a storage tank at timed intervals, such as one to ten cycles per minute, cach cycle typically lasting one to six seconds, for delivery to the Well head at a pressure of up to 6000 pst, the operation being controlled by a pump controller sending activation current to the. pump motor. being a DC commutator motor where the current is uppliS by a. redhargeable battery, whh may typ-cally be re-charged by means of a solar paneL WhUst such an arrangement s generaRy cost effectwe n areas wnere mans electncrty s unavailable ft will be apparent that the DC battery voltage cn vary Sjnifi.cantiy during each 24. hour period. Where there is insufficient vo!tae available lb the.

pump, such as at night, it can lead to. the target dosages of chemicals to the. well head being n-issed, which, in turn, leads to tinder-dosing and hence' inefficient use of the dhemicals and.ineffident oil extraction from the well head itselt fri.

contrast, where.:the battery is fUlly charged such as during' the' middle of a sun-lit day, this can lead to an over-dosing of expen'&ve chemicals to the well head'.

Each such occurrence represents an unwanted financial loss to the ed extraction process. The foregoing disadvantages can be overcome by the use' of a flow

I

meter downstream of the ptmp by which an actuM volur, e of Uquid chemical deivered to the wall head can be measuret However, this adds to the coct of the instauation and represents, along with its attendant circuitry, an additional drain on the battery: Another disadvantage is that the flow meter can aso become clogged and malfunction.

*The present invention Is derived from the. reallsatibn that the vothge variations, inherent in battery-powered DC pump dehvery systems which are timebased are not conducive, to accurate delivery of the chemicas and there is a need for an alternative approach which is volume-dependent as opposed to time-dependent.

SUMMARY OE THE INVENTION

According to a first aspect of the invention there is provided a pump controller for electrical connection between a soutce of chemical supply and a DC powered chemical hjection. pump of the type having a reciprocating piston or thaphragm for dolrering a quantity of chenrncal to a well head after each compression stroke of the pump, the wntrdfler inciuding a switch operable to seqtjentiaily deliver actIvation current to the pump; a vo'tage se.nsot between the pump and the Ewitch to extract DC voftage signals indicative o activation of the pump, an sialogue4o-diitaI convertor for converting the serised DC voltage signals into digital format a digital signa processor operative to differentiate D.C stroke voltage signals from the sensed voltage &gnels, thereby to ndcate the occurrence of each stroke; and a swrtch controller programmed with pump parameters and target S chemical delivery dosages. to sequentially deliver activation current the pump, measured or calculated from the dgitat DG. stroke voltage signals, and hence chemical deUery to the Well Via the injection pump at required intervals.

With. this arrangement even though there is little or theoeticaUy no return etectncal stgnal from the DC motor dnvmg the pump, othe than contmuous ba,ckçround voltage noise from the. commutator brushes. of tho DC motor, by extracting what other Signals are present aert from the commutator noise and correlating them to the rotational speed Of the pump, highly accurate delivery of chemical dosage can be. achieved based upon the number of strokes of the pump that are counted during each delivery sequence, the total dosage delivered in each sequence being the sum of the volume of chemical injected at each stroke and the number of trokes irrespective of the voltage available from the battery.

Conveniently, the means to generate pump stroke voltage signals indIcative of strokes of the pump is a shunt ress(or.

Convemently the means to generate pump stroke voltage sgnals indicative of strokEs of the pump is a Haii-.effeot device.

Conveniently, the pump controUer is battery operated, such as by being connected directly ci indireotl to a battery supplying acflvation current to the pump thotor.

Preferably, the digital signal processor means includes one or more band-pass fHten whereby to differentiate stroke voltage signals from background voltage signals from e.g. the commutator of the pump niotor. Such sIgnal differentiation can be ftirtber enhanced by mathematical modelling using. known tools such as Fast Fourier analysis, digital band pass filtering and other numerical transformation methods.

1.0 According to a. secon.d aspect of the invention there is provided a method of controlling delivery of chemicals from a DC powered reciprocating chemical injection pump to a well head, the method including the steps, in any convenient order, of collecting voltage analogue sgnals ndicatwe of acthiahon of the pump from the. D.C motor of the chemical injection pump, thereafter convetting the voltage wgrais to digtal signals and analysrng the dgtal sgnals to dentrfy successive strokes of the pump, using the counted strokes to kidicate when a required amount of chemical has been delivered to. the well head, and thereafter deactivating the cvrrent to the pump for a elected time period,, the sequence continuing whereby to regularly provide measured or calculated vclumes of chemical to the well head via the injection pump According to a third aspect of the invention there is provided a method of delivering a req.ured amoun.t of chemical to a well head from a chemical storage tank having an associated chemical volume gauge graduated to provide Cn: indication of volume of chemical deverable to the Well head via an associated displacement pump, the method including the steps of disconnecting the chemical storage tank from the gauge, taking a reading of the gauge as to quantity of chemical in the gauge and thereaf er activating the pump for a given number of pump stro kes measured or calculated in accordance with the second aspect of the invention, thereafter taking Enother reading of: the gauge to determine the volume of chemical remaining in the auge and hence quantity of chemical delivered to the welt head per stroke from the gauge, thereafier reconnecting the chm Foal storage tank to the pump and sequentiafly deliting the required volume of chemical to the éU head at predetermined intervals by 1.0 reference to pump strokes: over time.

ConvenientIy the chemical volume gauge is a graduated sight glass..

BfflF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The invention will ncw be described, by way of example only, with reference to the accomparting. drawihgs in whicft Figure 1 is a schematic view of a conventional phor art chemical delivery system. to w&i. head, and Figure 2 is a schematic view of a chemical delivery system to a weli head in accordance with the invention, a Figure 3 j a graph showinQ DC current variation during each stroke of a chemical deUvery pump.

DETAILE.D DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Turning firstly to Figure 1, -a well head assembly shown generally at is shown hydraulically cor nected Ic a chemical storage tank 2. which provides.

regular doses of chemicals to the. well head 1 via a 12. volt DC ddven reciprocating pump. 3 hmiing a DC commutator-type motor.

The pump:3 is powered by a 12 volt rechargeable battery 4 connected to a so'ar panel 5 by which ft can, be recharged during daylight hours. Between the S pump 3 and hatteiy 4 is a pump controller 6 which includes a timer 7 for reguFating when the pump 3 is Switched on or off via a switch 8.

in operation of this prior art system the voltage available: from the battery 4 typically ranges from between. about 11.5 volts Ia 14 volts but may be considerably lower depending on the charge lev& of the battery 4 This, in turn,.

affects the:powe.r available to the pump. 3 a' hence the amount of chemica.[ it is able to deliver within each specified lime.pedod As a consequence chemical delivery to the we head I can be highly variable, leading to. inefficiencies in the case of under-dosmg of chemicals dis to low battery voltage or over supp of chemicals where the battery voltage is at its highest., thereby ilasting Is commercially valuable chemicals.in the pwcess In contrast to the foregoing prior art system the present invention as illustrated fri Figure 2 does not depend upon time-based delivery of chemicals to the well, head I but instead depends upon the amount of pimip strokes detected durmg each deRvery sequence This is acheved by a pump conboller crcut shown generally at 9 which includes a solid state switch 10., such as a MOSFET switch,, interposed between the battery *4 -and the pump 3. Between the MQ6P swftch 10 and the pump 3 is a current sensor in the form of a resistor and, in particular, a shunt rei.stpr II whibh is therefore able to feed DC noise signals from the commutator of the pump motor as well as low..voltage millivolts) signals generated by the pump.3 du.rinq each compression stroke to a signal amplifier 1.2 and thn to an analogue.-to-diital converter 13 permittIng the digiSed sinás to be analysed by? digital sigr.al processor 14 which is able to Wtferentiate between relatively high voltage, background signals resulting from eg. the commutator of the pump motor a, and the lower voltage signals indicative of each compression stroke. This signal differe.ntiationis possible because. the motor 3 consumes more power when the pump is in. compression mode than when the pump stroke is in induction stroke mode, La. when it is sucking in chemical from the tank 2 prior to injecting it under pressure to the weD head 1. This is illustrated.in Fioure 3, which shows motor current variation between each stroke of pump 3. Such igna,l processing may use any suitabe band-pass filtering and noise suppression techniques including Fast Fourier analysis and other numerical transfOrmation methods. Similarly, although a resistor, such as shunt resistor is used as a current sensor in order to extract the voltage sgnals from the motor, other swiable means may be used, such as for instance a Hell effect Sersor. Thus, by the signal proSssoti4 differentiating between background voltage and successive compression strokes of the pump 3, these strokes can then be counted t establish the exact number of strokes during each chemical Injection cycle and hence an exact. amount. of chemical 2. tnjected into the well head I during each such cycle.

These digitised compression stroke signals are relayed to a pump' switch QQntrller 15 which receives or into which is programmed pump parameters 16 giving, for example,. the volume ci cbemica.l dispensed after each cop, pressiop stroke of the pump 3 and target chemical delivery information 17 by which the dosage of chemicals beirig delivered to the Well head can be both monitored and adjusted, either on.si or remotely viS a cellular of satellite gateway. In this way the pump switc.h controller 15 is therefore able to provide switching instructions to the saUd-state switch 10 for turning the pump 3 on as required during each cycle wftch may, accor&ng!y, be of varyng duraton cepending upon the charge state of the battery 4. Thus, each chemical dosage deflvery cycle is frIdependent of the time taken so that on* the completion of a required number of compression sfrokes from thö pump 3 each irjection cycle ends wtth a known quantity of chemical having been deUvered to the well head 1. This has considerable advantages over the prior ar time-based delivery system discussed with reference to Figure 1 and has the further advantage in that the pump control circuitry 9 can be located away from the classified hazardous area around the well head 1 The system is therefore ideally suited for retro-fitting to existing well head installations which currently rely upon time-based delivery of chemicals to the well head 3.

The chemical itself is delivered by means of a reciØrocating displacenieht pump, usually an electrically powered piston and cylinder-type pump which delivers a set volume of chemical corresponding to the largest volumetric size of the cylinder when the piston is at its. down-stroke, beiore the piston then pumps the chemical into the well head during or at the top of its up-stroke. Whilst this chemical delivery arrangement is mechanically relatively simple and reliable it suffers from a problern in that it generally does rot take into account vwiables such as the type and size of the pump, the working pressure at the well head and any other variables making the delivery of chemicals to the well head.

dfficutt to measure and administer accurately For examØle, convenhiona technology uses a flow meter pulse count to detect and estImate the amount of chemicals being delivered to a weU head, but at low fkw rates. there are large inaccuracies and, in addition, the flow meter itself can clog up, leading to the adoption at an afternative strategy, that cf using timers to meter out estithated quantities of che icas to the wan head Hover, all weU heads are dIfferent, operating. at dWfthrent. piessures, using diffdren.t pumps for injecting chemicals into well head and having other variables which make it. diffictht to administer an accurate amount of such chemicals to the welt head at pre-selected intervals.

Hence. the delivery of chemicals to weB heads in a controlled and accurate mahier can be considerably improved by calibrating the discharge from a chemu-al volume gauge graduated to provrde, typicalty, a visual inthcahon of votume Of chemicat being delivered to the Well hoad irrespective of the accuracy of the gauge or other variable parameters such as the efficiency of the pump and the pressure atthe well head.

Accordingly, with. the Sbifl' tO detect pump shakes for deliverin Set quant ties of chemlOal at each strobe the invention, also extends in a third aspect to a method of delivering a. reqUired amount of chemical to a WI head from a chemical storage tank having an associated chemical volume gauge, such as a sight gauge, graduated to provide an Indination of volume of chemical deliverable to the well head via a.n associated displacement pump, the rMthod including the steps of disconnecting the chemical storage tank from the gauge, taking a reading of the gauge as to quantity of chemical in the gauge an.d 1 hereafter.ctivating the pump for a given number of pump strokes, thereafter takirg another reathng of the gauge to determine the volume of chemical delivered to the.weli head per stroke from the gauge, thereafter reconnecting the chemical storage. tank to the. pump and sequentlaily delivering the required volume of. chemical to the well head at predeT:errnned. intervals by reference tO S pump strokes With this arrangement a vry accurate meaurement, of chemical delivered to the well head per stroke of the pump can be obtained by e.g. visually hispsc.ting the sight gauge while the chemical tank is disconnected from the gauge in order to calibrate deliver1 per stroke, When the pump is then.

reactivated, and Ui:e pump strokes counted as the gauge loses thernical to the well head the pump cari then be deactivated before the gauge is empty, thereby alkng the volume of chernil dhpensed to the welt per stroke to be easHy and accurately determined, and the tank cafl te.h be reconnected.

Claims (5)

  1. DLAIMS1 A pump controller for electrical connection beteen a source of chemical supply end a DC powered chemical injection pump of the type havbig a reciprocating piston or diaphragmS **tr dSivsri.ng a quantity of chemical to a well head after each Qompression stroke of the pump, the cOntroller including: a switch o'peffible to sëquenti&ly deliver acUvanon current to the pump; a voltage sensor between the pump and the switch to extract DC voltage signas indicative of.ctiva6on of the pUmp, an analogue-to-digftal convertor for ccnverting the, sensed DC voltage signals into digital format;.a digital signal p'rocesor operative to: difterenflate' DC stroke volta9e signals from the sensed voltage signals, thereby to indicate the 000urrepoc of each stroke; and a switch controller programmed with pump parameters and target chemical delivery dosages to sequentially deliver activation current to the pump, measured or calculated from the thgftal DC stroke voltage: signals. and hence chemical delivery to the weU vie, the injection. pump at required intervals..
  2. 2. The pump confrofl r of claim 1, Whëtein said voltage senbt is a shunt re&stor.. ii
  3. 3. The pump controller of Claim 1 wherein said voltage sensor is a Hall-effect devica,
  4. 4. A pump controller according to Claim 1 wherein the pump controller is battery operated, such as by bein.g connected directly or indirecty.o a ballery Supplying activation current to the pump motot.
  5. 5. A pump controller according to Claim I wterein the digital signal ploOcasor includes one or more band*pass filters Whereby to differentiate stroke 10: voltage signals. from background voltage signals from the pump rnotqr.ft A method of controlling delivery of chemicals from a DC powered reciprocating chemicai injection:Pthhlp Ip a well head, the method including the steps, in any convenient, order, of collecting voltage anaknue signals indicative of activation of the pump from the DC motor of the themical injection pump, thereafter converting the voltage signals to digital signals and analysing the thgtal signals to identity successive strokes of the pump, usng the counted strokes to indicate when a required amount of. .cheni has been delivered to the well head,, and thereafter deactbrating the current to the pump for a selected time period, the sequence continuing whereby to regularly provide measured cr calculated volumes of chemical tO the wefi head via the injectkn pump.7. A method of delivering a required amount of chemical to a well head from a chemical storage tank having an associated dheniial volume gauge graduated to provide an indication of ye lume of chemical dellverat.le to the Well head via an. associated displacement pump, the method including the steps of *diconnecting the. chemical storage tank from the gauge., taking a reading of the gauge as tp quamily of chemical in the gauge and thereafter ativating the pump for.a given number of pump strokes measured:..or calculated in accordance wfth the second aspect of the invention., thereafter taking anctter reading of the gauge to determine the volume of chemical remaining in the gauge and hence quantity of chemical delivered to the veIl head per stroke frmi the gauge, thereafter reconnecting the chemical storage tank to the pump and sequentially delivering the required, volume of chemical to the weil head at.predetermthed Intervals by reference to pump strokes over time.8. A method according to Claim 7 wherein, the chemical %oiurne gauge' is a graduated sight glass 9. A pump controile.r circUit u:bstantiaiIy as hereinbefore described With reference to Figure 2
GB1511423.4A 2014-09-22 2015-06-30 Method and apparatus for delivering chemicals to a well head Active GB2530370B (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GBGB1416709.2A GB201416709D0 (en) 2014-09-22 2014-09-22 Method and apparatus for delivering chemicals to a well head
GBGB1504845.7A GB201504845D0 (en) 2014-09-22 2015-03-23 Method and apparatus for delivering chemicals to a well head
GBGB1510257.7A GB201510257D0 (en) 2014-09-22 2015-06-12 Method and apparatus for delivering chemicals to a well head

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB1600848.4A GB2539298A (en) 2014-09-22 2015-06-30 Method and apparatus for delivering chemicals to a well head

Publications (3)

Publication Number Publication Date
GB201511423D0 GB201511423D0 (en) 2015-08-12
GB2530370A true GB2530370A (en) 2016-03-23
GB2530370B GB2530370B (en) 2017-05-17

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ID=51869285

Family Applications (5)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
GBGB1416709.2A Ceased GB201416709D0 (en) 2014-09-22 2014-09-22 Method and apparatus for delivering chemicals to a well head
GBGB1504845.7A Ceased GB201504845D0 (en) 2014-09-22 2015-03-23 Method and apparatus for delivering chemicals to a well head
GBGB1510257.7A Ceased GB201510257D0 (en) 2014-09-22 2015-06-12 Method and apparatus for delivering chemicals to a well head
GB1511423.4A Active GB2530370B (en) 2014-09-22 2015-06-30 Method and apparatus for delivering chemicals to a well head
GB1600848.4A Pending GB2539298A (en) 2014-09-22 2015-06-30 Method and apparatus for delivering chemicals to a well head

Family Applications Before (3)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
GBGB1416709.2A Ceased GB201416709D0 (en) 2014-09-22 2014-09-22 Method and apparatus for delivering chemicals to a well head
GBGB1504845.7A Ceased GB201504845D0 (en) 2014-09-22 2015-03-23 Method and apparatus for delivering chemicals to a well head
GBGB1510257.7A Ceased GB201510257D0 (en) 2014-09-22 2015-06-12 Method and apparatus for delivering chemicals to a well head

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Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
GB1600848.4A Pending GB2539298A (en) 2014-09-22 2015-06-30 Method and apparatus for delivering chemicals to a well head

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US (2) US20160084242A1 (en)
GB (5) GB201416709D0 (en)

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20050166961A1 (en) * 1998-12-21 2005-08-04 Baker Hughes Incorporated Closed loop additive injection and monitoring system for oilfield operations
US20060228226A1 (en) * 2005-04-06 2006-10-12 Lg Electronics Inc. Apparatus and method for controlling stroke of reciprocating compressor
US20090114391A1 (en) * 2007-11-02 2009-05-07 National Coupling Company, Inc. Method for autonomous control of a chemical injection system for oil and gas wells
US20100312401A1 (en) * 2009-06-08 2010-12-09 Dresser, Inc. Chemical Injection System
CN102322415A (en) * 2011-09-08 2012-01-18 北京恩瑞达科技有限公司 Wellhead photovoltaic remote-sensing intelligent chemical agent injection pump system and intelligent injection method

Family Cites Families (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6648072B1 (en) * 1999-07-20 2003-11-18 Smith International, Inc. Method and apparatus for delivery of treatment chemicals to subterranean wells
US7318476B2 (en) * 2004-11-16 2008-01-15 Ayres Robert M Automatic chemical treatment system with integral flush fluid dispenser

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20050166961A1 (en) * 1998-12-21 2005-08-04 Baker Hughes Incorporated Closed loop additive injection and monitoring system for oilfield operations
US20060228226A1 (en) * 2005-04-06 2006-10-12 Lg Electronics Inc. Apparatus and method for controlling stroke of reciprocating compressor
US20090114391A1 (en) * 2007-11-02 2009-05-07 National Coupling Company, Inc. Method for autonomous control of a chemical injection system for oil and gas wells
US20100312401A1 (en) * 2009-06-08 2010-12-09 Dresser, Inc. Chemical Injection System
CN102322415A (en) * 2011-09-08 2012-01-18 北京恩瑞达科技有限公司 Wellhead photovoltaic remote-sensing intelligent chemical agent injection pump system and intelligent injection method

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
GB2530370B (en) 2017-05-17
GB201511423D0 (en) 2015-08-12
US20180187517A1 (en) 2018-07-05
GB201416709D0 (en) 2014-11-05
GB201510257D0 (en) 2015-07-29
US20160084242A1 (en) 2016-03-24
GB2539298A (en) 2016-12-14
GB201600848D0 (en) 2016-03-02
GB201504845D0 (en) 2015-05-06

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