GB2515502A - Apparatus and method - Google Patents

Apparatus and method Download PDF

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Publication number
GB2515502A
GB2515502A GB201311264A GB201311264A GB2515502A GB 2515502 A GB2515502 A GB 2515502A GB 201311264 A GB201311264 A GB 201311264A GB 201311264 A GB201311264 A GB 201311264A GB 2515502 A GB2515502 A GB 2515502A
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GB
United Kingdom
Prior art keywords
apparatus
smokable material
heater
temperature
storage tube
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Withdrawn
Application number
GB201311264A
Other versions
GB201311264D0 (en
Inventor
Joanna Soffe
Jeremy Robert Lipscombe
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
British American Tobacco (Investments) Ltd
Original Assignee
British American Tobacco (Investments) Ltd
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by British American Tobacco (Investments) Ltd filed Critical British American Tobacco (Investments) Ltd
Priority to GB201311264A priority Critical patent/GB2515502A/en
Publication of GB201311264D0 publication Critical patent/GB201311264D0/en
Publication of GB2515502A publication Critical patent/GB2515502A/en
Application status is Withdrawn legal-status Critical

Links

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A24TOBACCO; CIGARS; CIGARETTES; SMOKERS' REQUISITES
    • A24FSMOKERS' REQUISITES; MATCH BOXES
    • A24F47/00Smokers' requisites not provided for elsewhere, e.g. devices to assist in stopping or limiting smoking
    • A24F47/002Simulated smoking devices, e.g. imitation cigarettes
    • A24F47/004Simulated smoking devices, e.g. imitation cigarettes with heating means, e.g. carbon fuel
    • A24F47/008Simulated smoking devices, e.g. imitation cigarettes with heating means, e.g. carbon fuel with electrical heating means
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A24TOBACCO; CIGARS; CIGARETTES; SMOKERS' REQUISITES
    • A24BMANUFACTURE OR PREPARATION OF TOBACCO FOR SMOKING OR CHEWING; TOBACCO; SNUFF
    • A24B15/00Chemical features or treatment of tobacco; Tobacco substitutes
    • A24B15/18Treatment of tobacco products or tobacco substitutes
    • A24B15/22Treatment of tobacco products or tobacco substitutes by application of electric or wave energy or particle radiation
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01NINVESTIGATING OR ANALYSING MATERIALS BY DETERMINING THEIR CHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL PROPERTIES
    • G01N1/00Sampling; Preparing specimens for investigation
    • G01N1/28Preparing specimens for investigation including physical details of (bio-)chemical methods covered elsewhere, e.g. G01N33/50, C12Q
    • G01N1/44Sample treatment involving radiation, e.g. heat

Abstract

An apparatus configured to heat smokable material to volatilise at least one component of the smokable material, the apparatus having a smokable material storage tube; a heater for heating contents of the smokable material storage tube; and a first temperature measuring device extending into the smokable material storage tube to measure a temperature therein. The apparatus may further comprise a second temperature measuring device e.g. a thermocouple to measure the temperature of the heater. The apparatus may also have heat shields and means for cooling. Also shown is a stand for the apparatus and a method of heating smokable material to volatilise at least one component of the smokable material using the apparatus.

Description

Apparatus and Method

Field

The present invention relates to an apparatus configured to heat smokable material.

Background

Smoking articles such as cigarettes and cigars burn tobacco dunng use to create io tobacco smoke. Attempts have been made to provide alternatives to these smoking artiëles by creating products which release compounds without creating tobacco smoke.

Examp'es of such products are so-called heat-not-burn products which r&ease compounds by heating, but not burning, tobacco.

i Summary

The present invention provides an apparatus configured to heat smokable material to volatilise at least one component of the smokable material, the apparatus comprising a smokable material storage tube; a heater for heating contents of the smokable material storage tube; and a first temperature measuring device extending into the smokable material storage tube to measure a temperature therein.

The apparatus may further comprise a second temperature measuring device arranged to measure the temperature of the heater.

The apparatus may further comprise a controller for controlling the heater, wherein the controfler, the heater and the second temperature measuring device form a feedback loop.

The apparatus may further comprise a plurality of heat shields.

The plurality of heat shields may be located coaxially around the heater.

The apparatus may further comprise an outer surface having a plurality of perforations 3s to facilitate cooling of the apparatus.

The heater may have an internal thermal mass suitable for fast heating the contents of the smokable material storage tube.

The apparatus may further comprise a handle for a user to hold the apparatus.

The present invention may provide a stand arranged to support one or more apparatuses.

io The present invention also provides a method of heating smokable material to volatilise at least one component of the smokable material, the method comprising storing the smokable material in a smokable material storage tube; heating contents of the smokable material storage tube; and measuring a temperature inside the smokable material storage tube using a first temperature measuring device extending into the smokable material storage tube.

Brief Description of the Drawings

So that the present invention may be frilly understood, embodiments thereof will be described, by way of example only, with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which: Figure 1 is a perspective view of an apparatus and a sample tube; Figure 2 is a perspective view of the sample tube of Figure 1 inserted inside the apparatus; Figure 3 is a cross sectional perspective view of the apparatus shown iii Figure 2; Figure 4 is a perspective view of a heater; Figure 5 is a side view of a sample tube; Figure 6 is a perspective view of an apparatus according to an alternative embodiment; Figure 7 is a perspective view of an apparatus having a handle; Figure 8 is a perspective view of an apparatus according to an akemative embodiment; Figure 9 is a perspective view of a stand supporting several apparatuses; and Figures 10-23 are graphs showing temperature data obtained from the apparatus.

Detailed Description

io As used herein, the term smokahie materiaF includes any materi& that provides v&atilized components upon heating and inchides, but is not Bmited to, any tobacco-containing material and may, for example, include one or more of tobacco, tobacco derivatives, expanded tobacco, reconstituted tobacco or tobacco substitutes.

Figure 1 shows a heating apparatus 1 according to a first embodiment comprising a heating body 5, a sample tube 10, a ockable guard plate 15, an umbilical cable 20 and a sample tube thermocouple 25. As shown in Figure 1, the guard plate i is in an open position. The guard plate 15 must be in the open position to insert or remove the sample tube 10.

Figure 2 shows the apparatus of Figure 1 when the sample tube 10 has been inserted into the heating body 5 and the lockable guard plate 15 has been placed into the locked position. In the locked position, the guard plate 15 locks the sample tube 10 inside the heating body 5 of the apparatus 1. The guard plate 15 also helps to prevent accidental contact between a user and parts of the apparatus 1 which may become hot during use.

An alternative embodiment can have a fixed, non lockable enlarged circular guard plate set on adjustable length spacers to perform the same function.

Figure 3 shows a cross scction of the heating apparatus 1 shown in Figure 2. The heating body 5 of the heating apparatus 1 comprises a hollow cyhndrical resistance heater 30.

The heating body comprises a phirabty of coaxial heat shi&ds 45 having air gaps therebetween. The heat shields 45 are arranged to be coaxial with the hollow cylindrical heater 30 and to reduce the temperature of the outer surface of the body.

The outer surface and/or heat shields 45 may comprise a plurality of perforations 50 to assist in reducing the temperature of the outer surface.

As may be seen in Figure 3, the sample thermocouple 25 comprises a thermocoup'e needle 35 extending from a thermocouple plug 40. The needle 35 measures the temperature inside the sample tube 10 at the tip of the needle. The thermocouple plug is configured to engage with a complementary socket (not shown) so that temperature data may be transferred from the sample thermocouple 25 and logged.

io Figure 4 shows the hollow cylindrical heater 30 that may be used in various embodiments. The heater 30 comprises a wire 60 wound around a former 65. The former 65 may be formed from a ceramic although other materials may be used that can conduct heat. The wire 6o may be formed from nichrome or any other suitable material used in resistance heaters. In some embodiments, the heater 30 is powerful enough to be heated to up to approximately 600 degrees Celsius or higher. In alternative embodiments tower maximum temperatures, for examp'e 400 degrees C&sius, may be used. The heater 30 may have a voltage of approximately 24 volts and have a maximum current of approximately 10 amps although other operational parameters may be employed. The heater 30 may have a suitable internal thermal mass to enable fast heating of a sample.

Figure j shows a sample tube 10 according to one embodiment. The sample tube 10 has a proximate end and a distal end and a main body extending between the proximate end and the distal end. The main body is tubular and may be formed from quartz or stainless steel, although other materials may be used. The distal end of the sample tube 10 may be provided with an end cap 70 to prevent a sample stored in the sample tube 10 from falling out accidentally. The end cap 70 may be provided with holes of a suitable size to allow air to flow therethrough whilst helping to prevent accidental loss of a sample stored inside the sample tube to. Selection of hole size and the pattern of the h&es allows for control of the air flow, e.g. thmina, turbtilent, cyclonic etc and pressure drop.

A mouthpiece 6 maybe provided at the proximate end. The mouthpiece 6 maybe formed from a plastic or any other material that is suitable to be placed in a user's mouth and withstand elevated temperatures.

Figure 6 shows an apparatus 100 according to a second embodiment. The apparatus is substantially similar to the apparatus 1 hereinbefore described with reference to Figures 1-5 in most respects.

The apparatus shown in Figure 6 comprises a second thermocouple io although other temperature measuring devices may be used. The second thermocouple 105 measures the temperature of the heater 30 shown in Figure 3. Temperature measurements thereby obtained may then be logged.

io The heater may be connected, through the umbilic& cable 20, to a controller configured to contrcil the temperature of the heater 30. The heater thermocoup'e io, heater 30 and controller may form a feedback loop. That is, in response to a temperature measurement obtained from the heater thermocouple 105 the controller may vary or maintain the temperature of the heater 30. The temperature may be controlled in response to user input or may be automated.

Another thermocoup'e may be provided to measure the temperature of the outer surface of the apparatus 1.

The apparatus may be supported in any of a variety of ways. The apparatus 1 shown in Figures 1 and 2 may have a support bolt 107 positioned on opposite sides of the main body to which a bracket 108 may be attached which, in turn, may be connected to a handle 106 shown in Figure 7.

An apparatus 200 may be provided with a handle 109 as shown in Figure 8 which may be held by a user's hand or may be held using a clamp. In this embodiment the sample tube may be loaded from the rear end of the apparatus 200, i.e. the opposite end to the apparatus 1 described above. The apparatus 200 may have a lower maximum temperature than the apparatus 1. For example, the apparatus 200 may have a maximum temperature of approximatdy 400 degrees Celsius. Lower maximum temperatures allow for improved temperature control by the controller.

Aiternativ&y, apparatuses 1, 200 may be attached to a stand 110. The stand 110 maybe arranged to hold several apparatuses in an array 300 as shown in Figure 9. Where several apparatuses 1, 200 are provided, their layout may be arranged to aid cooling of the apparatuses 1, 200.

In use, smokable material is placed in the sample tube 10. The sample tube 10 is inserted into the body 5 of the apparatus 1, 200. In embodiments where a lockab'e guard p'ate 15 is provided then it is ocked, as shown in Figure 2. In embodiments where a fixed circular guard is provided the sample tube will come to rest against the fixed circular guard. The controller controls the heater 30 to heat the contents of the sample tube 10 to a predetermined temperature. The smokable materia' comprises constituent substances that become volatilised at or above a particular temperature. As the heater 30 heats contents of the samp'e tube 10 certain constituent substances io become v&atflised. A user may draw on the mouthpiece 65 and inha'e the volatilised substances. Alternativdy, a smoking engine may be used to draw in volatflised substances from the contents of the samp'e tube 10. Volatilised substances may be analysed thereafter using various sensory tests.

After smoking the smokab'e material, the contents of the samp'e tithe 10 may be ana'ysed using suitable chemica' analysis techniques that wifi be apparent to those skilled in the art.

In embodiments of the present invention, temperature data may be logged using a temperature data ogger connected to one or more thermocouples. The temperature data logger maybe connected to a computer and uses software to log temperature data from any thermocouple connected thereto. The temperature data logger may be connected to more than one thermocouple so that temperature data may be obtained from more than one source and then compared. Up to ten temperature measurements may be recorded per second from each thermocouple to which the logger is connected.

During use of the apparatus 1, temperature data may be obtained from the sample tube using the thermocouple 25. In embodiments where a second thermocouple 105 is employed, temperature data may be obtained from the heater 30.

Figures 10 and 11 are graphs showing the time taken for apparatuses according to an embodiment to achieve a steady state temperature. Figure to shows the time taken for a heater heated to 600 degrees C&sius to reach a steady state. Figure ii shows the time taken for a heater heated to 50 degrees C&sius to reach a steady state.

Figures 12 and 13 are graphs comparing the temperature of the heater such as the heater 30 with the temperature inside the sample tube 10. The temperature of the heater is represented by a solid line while the temperature of the sample tube is represented by a dashed line. As can be seen from Figures 12 and 13, there is a steady difference in temperature between the heater and the samp'e in embodiments of the invention. It is therefore possible to vary the temperature of the sample in response to a measured sample temperature by varying the temperature of the heater using the controller as hereinbefore described with respect to embodiments of the present invention. For example, as shown in Figure 13, the sample temperature was measured as above 650 degrees Celsius, the heater temperature was reduced by approximately 6o degrees Celsius to approximately 540 degrees Celsius. The sample tube temperature io dropped to approximately 600 degrees Cdsius.

Figures 14-17 are graphs comparing the sample tube temperature with the heater temperature. Again, the temperature of the heater is represented by a solid line while the temperature of the sample tube is represented by a dashed line. Figures 14-17 show the stability of the samp'e tube and heater temperatures when the apparatus is not being drawn on by a user or a smoking engine. Figures 14-17 demonstrate the temperature stability when the heater is heated to 50, 150, 250 and 600 degrees Celsius. As may be seen from Figures 14-17, sample tube and heater temperatures remain stable over a wide range of temperatures.

Figures 18-21 are graphs comparing the sample tube temperature with the heater temperature when the heater is heated to 50, 150, 250 and 600 degrees Celsius respectively. Again, the temperature of the heater is represented by a solid line while the temperature of the sample tube is represented by a dashed line. These figures compare heater and sample tube temperatures while a user or a smoking engine draws on the apparatus according to a 55/2/30 smoking mode. 55/2/30 is an expression used in the art to denote a puff volume of 55 ml, a puff duration of 2 seconds and a time between puffs of 30 seconds. In general, a greater temperature stability is achieved at higher temperatures, as shown in Figures 20 and 21.

The apparatus may also be operated in a 35/2/60 smoking mode wherein a puff v&ume of 35 m is drawn for a duration of 2 seconds every 60 seconds with resuks similar to those shown in Figures 18-21 with respect to the 55/2/30 smoking mode.

Figures 22 and 23 show the time taken for the apparatus to cool down after use when the heater is heated to 50 degrees Celsius and 600 degrees Celsius respectively. Again, the temperature of the heater is represented by a solid line while the temperature of the sample tube is represented by a dashed line.

In order to address various issues and advance the art, the entirety of this disclosure shows by way of illustration various embodiments in which the claimed invention(s) may be practiced and provide for superior apparatus configured to heat smokable material to volatilise at least one component of the smokable material. The advantages and features of the disclosure are of a representative sample of embodiments only, and are not exhaustive and/or exclusive. They are presented only to assist in understanding io and teach the daimed features. It is to be understood that advantages, embodiments, examples, functions, features, structures, and/or other aspects of the disclosure are not to be considered limitations on the disclosure as defined by the claims or limitations on equivalents to the claims, and that other embodiments may be utilised and modifications may be made without departing from the scope and/or spirit of the disclosure. Various embodiments may suitably comprise, consist of, or consist essentially of, various combinations of the disclosed dements, components, features, parts, steps, means, etc. In addition, the disclosure includes other inventions not presently claimed, but which may be claimed in future.

Claims (10)

  1. Claims 1. An apparatus configured to heat smokab'e material to v&atilise at least one component of the smokable materi&, the apparatus comprising: a smokable material storage tube; a heater for heating contents of the smokable material storage tube; and a first temperature measuring device extending into the smokable material storage tube to measure a temperature therein.
    Jo
  2. 2. An apparatus according to daim i, further comprising a second temperature measuring device arranged to measure the temperature of the heater.
  3. 3. An apparatus according to claim 2, further comprising a controller for controlling the heater, wherein the controller, the heater and the second temperature measuring device form a feedback loop.
  4. 4. An apparatus according to any preceding claim, fin'ther comprising a pthrahty of heat shields.
  5. 5. An apparatus according to claim 4, wherein the plurality of heat shields is located coaxially around the heater.
  6. 6. An apparatus according to any preceding claim, further comprising an outer surface having a plurality of perforations to facilitate cooling of the apparatus.
  7. 7. An apparatus according to any preceding claim, wherein the heater has an internal thermal mass suitable for fast heating of the contents of the smokable material storage tube.
  8. 8. An apparatus according to any preceding claim, further comprising a handle for a user to hold the apparatus.
  9. 9. A stand arranged to support one or more apparatuses according to any of claims i-8. -10-
  10. 10. A method of heating smokable material to volatilise at least one component of the smokable material, the method comprising: storing the smokable material in a smokable material storage tube; heating contents of the smokable material storage tube; and measuring a temperature inside the smokable material storage tube using a first temperature measuring device extending into the smokable material storage tube.
    ii. An apparatus or method or a stand substantially as hereinbefore described with reference to the accompanying drawings.
GB201311264A 2013-06-25 2013-06-25 Apparatus and method Withdrawn GB2515502A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB201311264A GB2515502A (en) 2013-06-25 2013-06-25 Apparatus and method

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB201311264A GB2515502A (en) 2013-06-25 2013-06-25 Apparatus and method

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GB2515502A true GB2515502A (en) 2014-12-31

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Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2016124932A1 (en) 2015-02-05 2016-08-11 British American Tobacco (Investments) Limited Method
WO2016128750A1 (en) 2015-02-13 2016-08-18 British American Tobacco (Investments) Limited Method
WO2017223129A1 (en) 2016-06-22 2017-12-28 North Carolina State University Method for increasing nitrogen-use efficiency and or nitrogen-utilisation efficiency in plants
WO2018148169A1 (en) 2017-02-07 2018-08-16 University Of Kentucky Research Foundation Method
WO2018237107A1 (en) 2017-06-23 2018-12-27 University Of Kentucky Research Foundation Method
WO2019012261A1 (en) 2017-07-11 2019-01-17 British American Tobacco (Investments) Limited Hybrid tobacco plants from crosses between flue-cured and air-cured tobacco types

Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6095153A (en) * 1998-06-19 2000-08-01 Kessler; Stephen B. Vaporization of volatile materials
WO2007098337A2 (en) * 2006-02-17 2007-08-30 Jake Brenneise Portable vaporizing device and method for inhalation and/or aromatherapy without combustion
WO2013034452A1 (en) * 2011-09-06 2013-03-14 British American Tobacco (Investments) Limited Heating smokeable material
WO2013034454A1 (en) * 2011-09-06 2013-03-14 British American Tobacco (Investments) Limited Heating smokeable material
WO2013138384A2 (en) * 2012-03-12 2013-09-19 Uptoke Llc Electronic vaporizing device and methods for use
WO2013160112A2 (en) * 2012-04-23 2013-10-31 British American Tobacco (Investments) Limited Heating smokeable material

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6095153A (en) * 1998-06-19 2000-08-01 Kessler; Stephen B. Vaporization of volatile materials
WO2007098337A2 (en) * 2006-02-17 2007-08-30 Jake Brenneise Portable vaporizing device and method for inhalation and/or aromatherapy without combustion
WO2013034452A1 (en) * 2011-09-06 2013-03-14 British American Tobacco (Investments) Limited Heating smokeable material
WO2013034454A1 (en) * 2011-09-06 2013-03-14 British American Tobacco (Investments) Limited Heating smokeable material
WO2013138384A2 (en) * 2012-03-12 2013-09-19 Uptoke Llc Electronic vaporizing device and methods for use
WO2013160112A2 (en) * 2012-04-23 2013-10-31 British American Tobacco (Investments) Limited Heating smokeable material

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2016124932A1 (en) 2015-02-05 2016-08-11 British American Tobacco (Investments) Limited Method
WO2016128750A1 (en) 2015-02-13 2016-08-18 British American Tobacco (Investments) Limited Method
WO2017223129A1 (en) 2016-06-22 2017-12-28 North Carolina State University Method for increasing nitrogen-use efficiency and or nitrogen-utilisation efficiency in plants
WO2018148169A1 (en) 2017-02-07 2018-08-16 University Of Kentucky Research Foundation Method
WO2018237107A1 (en) 2017-06-23 2018-12-27 University Of Kentucky Research Foundation Method
WO2019012261A1 (en) 2017-07-11 2019-01-17 British American Tobacco (Investments) Limited Hybrid tobacco plants from crosses between flue-cured and air-cured tobacco types

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Publication number Publication date
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