GB2514180A - An optical inspection system - Google Patents

An optical inspection system Download PDF

Info

Publication number
GB2514180A
GB2514180A GB201308918A GB201308918A GB2514180A GB 2514180 A GB2514180 A GB 2514180A GB 201308918 A GB201308918 A GB 201308918A GB 201308918 A GB201308918 A GB 201308918A GB 2514180 A GB2514180 A GB 2514180A
Authority
GB
United Kingdom
Prior art keywords
optical sensor
sensor head
configured
optical
light sources
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Withdrawn
Application number
GB201308918A
Other versions
GB201308918D0 (en
Inventor
Martin Butler
Edward Peter Henebry
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
NANOMEX Ltd
Original Assignee
NANOMEX Ltd
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by NANOMEX Ltd filed Critical NANOMEX Ltd
Priority to GB201308918A priority Critical patent/GB2514180A/en
Publication of GB201308918D0 publication Critical patent/GB201308918D0/en
Publication of GB2514180A publication Critical patent/GB2514180A/en
Withdrawn legal-status Critical Current

Links

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01JMEASUREMENT OF INTENSITY, VELOCITY, SPECTRAL CONTENT, POLARISATION, PHASE OR PULSE CHARACTERISTICS OF INFRA-RED, VISIBLE OR ULTRA-VIOLET LIGHT; COLORIMETRY; RADIATION PYROMETRY
    • G01J3/00Spectrometry; Spectrophotometry; Monochromators; Measuring colours
    • G01J3/46Measurement of colour; Colour measuring devices, e.g. colorimeters
    • G01J3/50Measurement of colour; Colour measuring devices, e.g. colorimeters using electric radiation detectors
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01NINVESTIGATING OR ANALYSING MATERIALS BY DETERMINING THEIR CHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL PROPERTIES
    • G01N21/00Investigating or analysing materials by the use of optical means, i.e. using infra-red, visible or ultra-violet light
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01NINVESTIGATING OR ANALYSING MATERIALS BY DETERMINING THEIR CHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL PROPERTIES
    • G01N21/00Investigating or analysing materials by the use of optical means, i.e. using infra-red, visible or ultra-violet light
    • G01N21/84Systems specially adapted for particular applications
    • G01N21/88Investigating the presence of flaws or contamination
    • G01N21/8803Visual inspection
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01NINVESTIGATING OR ANALYSING MATERIALS BY DETERMINING THEIR CHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL PROPERTIES
    • G01N21/00Investigating or analysing materials by the use of optical means, i.e. using infra-red, visible or ultra-violet light
    • G01N21/84Systems specially adapted for particular applications
    • G01N21/88Investigating the presence of flaws or contamination
    • G01N21/8806Specially adapted optical and illumination features
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01NINVESTIGATING OR ANALYSING MATERIALS BY DETERMINING THEIR CHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL PROPERTIES
    • G01N21/00Investigating or analysing materials by the use of optical means, i.e. using infra-red, visible or ultra-violet light
    • G01N21/84Systems specially adapted for particular applications
    • G01N21/88Investigating the presence of flaws or contamination
    • G01N21/91Investigating the presence of flaws or contamination using penetration of dyes, e.g. fluorescent ink

Abstract

An optical inspection system including: an optical sensor head 100 comprising an image capturing device 160 for capturing images of an object 200 to be inspected; and an integrated lighting system comprising a plurality of light sources 180 for illuminating the field of view of the image capturing device, the plurality of light sources comprising at least one ultraviolet (UV) light source and at least one visible light source. The optical sensor head 100 may be integrated into a handheld device or a workstation which can be part of a production line. The sensor head can either move relative to a stationary object or the object can move relative to the sensor head. The optical inspection system can be provided with more than one imaging head, which may be used to obtain different perspectives of the objects being imaged. The inspection system can be provided with a cover 210, which may be made from a flexible material in order to protect the user from UV light. The light sources may be LEDs and the illumination can be changed from UV to visible. The workstation may be provided with a heat source for a heat curing process.

Description

An Optical Inspection System

Field

The present application relates to optical inspection. In particular, the present teaching relates to a multi-wavelength optical inspection system.

Furthermore, the reaching relates to displaying captured image data on a local and/or remote display device.

Background Of The Invention

Optical inspection of articles of manufacture, either finished or in- process, may range from simple visual inspection to sophisticated computer-assisted inspection. Inspection processes may be manual or automated as will be appreciated by those skilled in the art. A manual inspection may include an operator visually inspecting a unit under test. Failure analysis is the process of collecting and analysing data to determine the cause of a failure within materials, structures, devices and circuits fabricated thereon. Such analysis provides vital information when developing new products and improving existing products.

Automated inspection is increasingly becoming commonplace because it is fast, reliable, and can frequently detect production defects that cannot be easily perceived by the naked eye. Nevertheless, both manual and automated optical inspection (AOl) can be used to inspect a wide range of objects and products. These include electronic products such as printed circuit boards (PCBs), LCDs, and transistors, automotive parts, lids and labels on product packages, agricultural vegetation (seed corn, fruits, vegetables, or the like), and medical devices such as stents or the like. In the case of FCB inspection, a camera may autonomously scan the device under test (DUT) for variety of surface feature defects such as scratches, fractures, stains, open circuits, short circuits, thinning of the solder as well as missing components, incorrect components, and incorrectly placed components, etc. Agricultural inspections may check for variations in colour of vegetation, for example, to identify ripe fruit or discoloration which may occur as a result of disease.

Automated or semi-automated optical inspection systems are commonly used in manufacturing processes because they are non-contact test methods.

Automated optical inspection is able to perform most of the visual checks performed previously by manual operators, and far more swiftly and accurately.

AOl systems are implemented at many stages through the manufacturing process, and are used for inspecting pads that have limited and known variations. For defect or flaw detection, an AOl system may look for differences from a standard or reference part. These inspection devices all have some common attributes that affect capability, accuracy, and reliability. Manual or lower end systems use the comparator or golden reference sample approach whereby the device under test is compared to a reference or standard product.

Higher end systems are more analytical and use mathematical algorithms to interpret the data and make decisions based on tolerances defined within the algorithm.

Optical inspection systems may also utilise ultraviolet (UV) lighting.

Traditionally ultraviolet (UV) light inspection is carried out in a darkroom by a manual operator with the naked eye wearing UV protective safety glasses. The UV source is typically a mercury bulb or gas discharge bulb. However, such light sources present difficulties as they cannot be switched on and off due to the fact that they take significant time to ramp up to a desired lighting level.

Such light sources generate significant heat as they are typically kept on because they take considerable time to ramp to the desired lighting intensity. As a consequence, such light sources are typically housed in a darkroom with limited access to personal or contained within a shuttered mechanism that opens for the duration of the inspection process. These requirements limit their flexibility in terms of installation into manufacturing or production facilities as there are many factors to consider in the design including health and safety.

For these reasons and others, there is a need for an optical inspection system that addresses at least some of the drawbacks of the prior art.

Summary

The present teaching relates to an optical sensor head which includes an image capturing device and a plurality of light sources. Accordingly, a first embodiment provides an optical sensor head as detailed in claim 1. Also provided are a workstation according to claim 35, a portable device according to claim 42, and a system according to claim 50. Advantageous features are provided in the dependent claims.

Brief Description Of The Drawings

The present application will now be described with reference to the accompanying drawings in which: Figure 1 is a block diagram of an optical inspection system according to the present teaching.

Figure 2 is a perpsective view of an optical sensor head of the optical inspection system, according to an embodiment of the present teaching.

Figure 3 is a perspective view of the optical sensor head of the present teaching installed in a supporting frame.

Figure 4 illustrates the optical sensor head of the present teaching installed in a supporting frame in conjunction with a conveyor apparatus.

Figure 5 illustrates a workstation comprising a supporting frame for the optical sensor head of the present teaching with a light blocking curtain provided at the front of the frame and a display device provided on the frame.

Figure 6 is a perspective view of a workstation comprising a supporting frame for an optical sensor head of the present teaching showing a light blocking curtain provided on front and side portions of the frame.

Figure 7 is a perspective view of a portable device comprising the optical sensor head of the present teaching, showing a light blocking material depending from the sides of an outer housing.

Figure 8 is a perspective view of a portable device comprising the optical sensor head of the present teaching, and a display device such as a tablet or laptop disposed on top of the outer housing.

Figure 9 is a photographic inspection image of a stent acquired using the optical inspection system according to the present teaching.

Detailed Description Of The Drawings

Exemplary arrangements of an optical inspection system provided in accordance with the present teaching will be described hereinafter to assist with an understanding of the benefits of the present teaching. Such a system will be understood as being exemplary of the type of system that could be provided and is not intended to limit the present teaching to any one specific arrangement as modifications could be made to that described herein without departing from the scope of the present teaching.

The present teaching provides an optical inspection system including an optical sensor head 100. The optical sensor head 100 may be configured to visually inspect objects, products, devices under test (DLJT), articles, vegetation, and living creatures. Hereinafter, for purposes of simplicity, any object being inspected in the context of manufacturing or production environments will be referred to as a device under test (DUT). However it will be understood that the object being inspected may be any and all of the above as will be appreciated by those skilled in the art. The optical sensor head 100 may be configured to be mounted in darkrooms, lean manufacturing cells, works cells, and on the end of robotic arms for remote operation. For example, the optical sensor head 100 may be mounted to a multi-axis robotic arm for movement in a plurality of directions. In another application, the optical sensor head 100 may be incorporated in a handheld device such as a scanner or other portable device.

Figure 1 is a block diagram of the optical inspection system according to the present teaching which incorporates the optical sensor head 100. Figure 2 illustrates a perspective view of the optical sensor head 100 of the optical inspection system, according to an embodiment of the present teaching.

Referring to Figure 2, the optical sensor head 100 includes an outer housing 150, an image capturing device 160 such as a charged coupled device (CCD) of a digital camera disposed within the outer housing 150. An integrated lighting system is also contained within the outer housing 150 for illuminating the field of view of the camera 160.

The optical inspection system may also comprise an integrated control system including a local control panel 170 for controlling the operation of the optical sensor head 100. In the exemplary arrangement, the local control panel is provided integrally with the optical sensor head 100. The integrated control system may include a remote control system 175 to enable the optical sensor head 100 to be controlled remotely. The camera 160 may be any digital camera suitable for capturing high resolution still images and/or video data. For example, a high definition (HD) video camera, having zoom, auto focus, and auto exposure features may be used. The camera may be configured manually or automatically according to the device under test. The range of magnification may be increased by altering the lens configuration to meet test requirements.

In the exemplary arrangement, the optical inspection system according to the present teaching may have a magnification of 1 x-50x and up to 300x. The camera 160 may be sized so as to be integrated into the optical sensor head 100. Other components of the optical inspection system according to the present teaching may include a lighting drive circuit 185 for controlling the operation of the integrated lighting system, a signal output generator 174 for converting the images acquired into electronic data to be analysed or stored, and a power supply unit 176 for powering the optical sensor head 100.

However, the present teaching is not limited to such a configuration, and it will be understood by the skilled person that the functionality provided by the lighting drive circuit 185, the signal output generator 174 and the local control panel 170 may be integrated into a single PCB board for compactness and cost savings. These components would be understood by the skilled person and thus further description thereof is not provided herein.

The optical images captured by the camera 160 may be output to a local or remote display device 190 such as a monitor for analysis. The image data may be output to a personal computer for quality assurance (QA) analysis, Statistical Process Control (SPC) data tracking or whatever is desired to facilitate testing. The optical inspection system may also be configured to have an executable software module operable to perform optical character recognition on the captured digital images. Thus the system may be configured to optically read machine readable representations such as barcodes or the like.

In the exemplary embodiment, the optical inspection system is operable to decode tracking data on the DUT such as 1 D and 2D barcodes. In this manner, the results from the optical inspection of the DUT may be logged with a date and timestamp, and other information such as information for identifying the operator who carried out the inspection. For example, each operator may be assigned a personal identification number which may be stored in a central database. In advance of the operator initiating an inspection test, the operator scans his identity card which carries his personal identification number with a barcode reader. As a consequence, the operator is logged into a central computer system. The DUTs may also include a barcode which the operator also scans with the barcode reader during the inspection process. The central computer system is operable to cross reference the personal identification number of the operator against the DUTs which the operator inspected and this data is then archived in the database.

The image data captured using the optical sensor head 100 may also be transmitted to a data server or the cloud. The images captured may be still images or HD video imaging data. Referring to Figure 1, an object or device under test (DUT) 200 to be inspected is presented to the camera 160. The DUT may be presented to the camera 160 in the presence of an operator and/or under visible light conditions. The camera 160 may capture images of the DUT 200 and the optical sensor head 100 is configured to relay the captured images to the display device 190. Still images or live video data of the captured images may be displayed on the display device 190. The images transmitted to the display device 190 may be modified to a magnification / zoom that may be altered or set depending on the customer needs.

Referring to Figure 5, an inspection area 209 may be provided for receiving the DUTs 200. The inspection area 209 is arranged to be illuminated by the the integrated lighting system. The field of view of the camera 160 extends into the inspection area 209 for facilitating capturing the images of the DUTs 200 located in the inspection arera 209. In the exemplary arrangment, the inspection area is enclosed by a curtain or some other flexible member such that the operator is able to manually insert the DUTs 200 into the inspection area 209 by pushing the DUT 200 through the curtain 210. The operator is able to view the DUTs 200 that are located in the enclosed inspection area 209 on the display device 190 which is located in the vicinty of the inspection area 209.

The integrated lighting system may comprise a plurality of light sources 180 of various wavelengths and intensities. It will be appreciated that the intensities of the light sources 180 may be configured according to the device under test. The integrated lighting system comprises a plurality of light sources 180 for illuminating the field of view of the camera 160. In the exemplary arrangement, the light sources 180 may include at least one ultravolet (UV) light source and/or at least one visible light source. The use of UV light has the effect of highlighting or magnifying the visibility of a particular material being inspected.

This feature may be useful in the medical and food industry for inspecting drug coated stents or food that has been washed or treated with chemical dyes or the like. The plurality of light sources 180 including the at least one ultravolet (UV) light source may be provided as light emitting diodes (LED5). LED light sources are instantly switchable in that they do not need significant time to ramp up to a desired intensity, and can be configured in various specific wavelengths or colours, have low power, long lifetime, dissipate a low amount of heat and are generally safer than other light sources. The plurality of light sources 180 are configured to be focusable and direct light to a specific region of interest in the inspection area 209. The integrated lighting system of the optical sensor head 100 may be switched from visible light to a UV light when the object is being inspected. That is, UV light may only be switched on when desired, for example, when an object is being inspected. However, the default setting of the integrated lighting system may be visible light or UV light. The optical sensor head 100 is configured to have a minimum UV leakage outside the inspection area 209. In this regard, the outer housing 150 may be configured relative to the camera 160 and light sources 180 to reduce the leakage of UV light and contain the LJV light within the inspection area 209. The flexible curtain 210 provides a barrier to ambient light entering the inspection area 209. Additionally, the flexible curtain 210 may be used to provide a UV barrier that at least partially prevents the leakage of UV radiaiting from the inspection area 209. It is known that UV radiation may damage DeoxyriboNucleic Acid (DNA) which makes up the genetic material of a human cell. When DNA is damaged by UV radiation it may lead to the formation of skin cancer or the like. It will therefore be appreciated by those skilled in the art that by providing a flexible curtain or similar type member allows the operator to load the DLJT into the inspection area 209 and allows the operator to remain in the vicinty of the inspection area 209 during the test without risking contamination from UV radiation. The flexible curtain 210 protects the operator from the UV radiation that may be present in the inspection area 209 when the LJV lights are active.

The light sources 180 comprise at least one ultraviolet light source 181 and at least one visible light source 182. In one embodiment, as illustrated in Figure 2, the light sources 180 may comprise a first set of ultraviolet (UV) light sources 181 and a second set of visible light sources 182. The at least one visible light source 182 may comprise white light sources or visible light sources of other colour wavelengths. It will be understood that the at least one visible light source 182 has a wavelength in the range of about 380 nm to about 740 nm, that is, the visible light spectrum. It will be also be understood that the at least one UV light source 181 has a wavelength in the range of about 10 nm to about 380 nm that is the UV light spectrum. The light sources 180 may be switchable according to the desired inspection process. For instance the default setting may be visible light and UV light may only be turned on when required, such as when the DUT 200 is being inspected. The optical sensor head 100 according to the present teaching may be configured in multiple ways according to the object being inspected. For example, the position and orientation of the camera 160 and light sources 180 may be varied in relation to one another manually or by a motor. Also the light sources 180 may be operated at a range of wavelengths and intensities.

The first set of UV light sources 181 are oriented in two parallel arrays in the embodiment illustrated in Figure 2, but it will be understood by the skilled person that this arrangement is merely exemplary of the type of arrangements that are possible. Any configuration in which the light sources 180 are disposed relative to the camera such that the light sources 180 illuminate the field of view of the camera 160 is possible. The number of UV light sources 181 may be various. For example, the UV light sources 181 may be oriented in an orbital configuration surrounding the camera 160. The light sources 180 may be aligned with the camera 160. That is, the longitudinal axis of the light sources may be parallel to the longitudinal axis of the camera 160. However, the present teaching is not limited to such an arrangement. That is, the light sources 180 may be angularly disposed with respect to the longitudinal axis of the camera 160, as illustrated in Figure 1. At least one of the light sources may be configured to be movable in a longitudinal axis direction of the light source.

Also, the camera 160 may be configured to be movable in a longitudinal axis direction thereof. The light sources 180 may be configured to be fixedly positioned, adjustable, rotatable, or pivotable, etc. The camera 160 may also be fixedly positioned, adjustable rotatable, or pivotable, etc. It will therefore be appreciated that the camera 160 andlor light sources 180 may be mounted on a knuckle that facilitates angular movement thereof.

The optical sensor head 100 may be configured manually or according to one of a plurality of preset programs according to the object being inspected.

Referring specifially to the lighting, the integrated lighting system may be configured to operate in a number of predetermined programs. In this regard, the one or more light sources 180 may be programmed according to the object or product being inspected. For instance, at least one of the light sources 180 may be switched on and off in a pre-programmed sequence, and at various intensities and wavelengths. As mentioned above, the integrated lighting system may be programmed according to the object or product being inspected.

Thus, for example, some DUTs may require one or more of the light sources to be angular disposed to the DUT at a specific angle. The light sources 180 may also be calibrated according to defined operating parameters. For example, the light sources 180 may be calibrated using a pulse wave modulation (PWM) signal. Alternatively, the calibration may also be performed with an analog voltage signal. However, PWM allows a "truer" light as it regulates the on/off time (too fast for the human eye) but results in a stable colour hue. Another advantage of the PWM method is that the lights may be pulsed at a frequency corresponding to the frame rate of the camera. This creates a scenario in say a dark room environment where the white lights may be pulsed and synchronised with the camera. This allows a white light image to be collected for display on the monitor but the white light is not seen by the human eye hence requiring no pupil adjustment time. From the above description, it will be understood that the lighting system may be configured to be synchronised with the image capturing operation if desired.

The object to be inspected or DUT 200 may be presented to the camera and an operator under visible light conditions. The DUT 200 may be disposed on a supporting platform or base 250, as illustrated in Figure 1. In one arrangement, the supporting platform 250 may be rotatable to allow the DUT to rotate in relation to the camera 160. For example, the supporting platform 250 may be a gimbal which is pivotable. It will be appreciated that the supporting platform or base 250 may define the inspection area 209 as illustrated in Figure 5.

The operator may press and hold a switch so as to switch the integrated lighting system from visible light to UV light. In an exemplary arrangement, the switch is provided as a footswitch which allows the operator to activate the swich by foot while being seated at a workstation. When the UV light is irradiated to the DUT 200, any defects present in the DUT 200 may be instantly highlighted on a local and/or remote display device and the operator may switch back to visible light to validate or inspect the area of interest. The area to be inspected may also be magnified as required to suit the process needs. It is also possible to capture this image to a computer for subsequent use if required. Alternatively, the integrated lighting system may be switched from visible light to UV light by activation of a sensor such as a proximity sensor or the like. The sensor may detect the presence of a DUT in the proximity of the camera and an appropriate signal may be sent to the the control system that causes the integrated lighting system to switch to UV lighting. This is useful in the context of an automated production line where DUTs are being transported along a conveyor. Apart from configuring the light sources to be switched, the camera settings may also be configured to predetermined or programmed optimum settings such as zoom, focus, intensity, and exposure to obtain the best possible image quality of the DUT under either UV or visible light.

Figure 3 is a perspective view of the optical sensor head 100 of the present teaching installed in a supporting frame. Such an arrangement may be installed in a production line with conveyors on either side. It will be appreciated that the optical sensor head 100 may be configured and controlled to be movable in the X, Y, and 7 axes in relation to the DUT or a platform on which the DUT is positioned. The optical sensor head 100 may also be rotated in relation to a stationary DUT.

Figure 4 illustrates the optical sensor head of the present teaching installed in a supporting frame in conjunction with a conveyor apparatus 450.

During an inspection process, the DUT 200 may be moved past the optical sensor head 100 generally in the direction of arrow 400 to provide a full scan or picture of the DUT. In some embodiments, the DUT 200 may also be moved by being rotated in relation to the optical sensor head 100. Those of skill in the art should appreciate that in other configurations the DUT may be stationary and the optical sensor head 100 moved as, for example, might be employed in a desktop flatbed scanner. The optical sensor head 100 may also be installed on a multi-axis robotic arm. Referring to Figure 4, in an exemplary embodiment, a pair of optical sensor heads 1 OOA and 1 OOB may be provided for capturing different perspective views of the DUT 200. The optical sensor head 1 OOA is located to capture a top plan view of the DUT 200 while the optical sensor 1 OOB is located to capture a bottom plan view thereof. The optical inspection system may include an image software module configured to combine the images captured from the first and second optical sensor heads 1 OOA and 1 OOB. In one arrangement, the image software module is configured to generate a panoramic view of the DUT 200.

Images acquired by the camera 160 may be output in multiple formats.

The image data collected by the camera 160 produces electronic images of the objects being inspected using well-known principles known to those of skill in the art. The electronic images may be sent to a suitably programmed computer. The image data may include time and date information as mentioned previously. The time and date information may be linked to the operator carrying out the inspection in order to implement traceability within the system. The method of image acquisition may be programmed. In this regard, the control system may have programmable image acquisition settings. The camera 160 may be configured to relay captured images to a display at a magnification I zoom that can be altered or set depending on the test requirements. Images and data collected by the system may be stored locally or transmitted to a central monitoring station. The image data may be sent to a database or an archive storage system. The optical inspection system according to the present teaching may be configured to magnify the image data to a zoom of between lx and 300x for display on the display device 190. The image data may also be networked to a cloud server or an offsite server. The image data sent to the computer may be evaluated to determine structural characteristics of the DIJT.

In particular, a computer program may evaluate the structural integrity of the DUT. Determination of structural integrity may be perforned in a number of ways. The collected structural image data may be compared to similarly collected data from a sample or reference object. In alternative embodiments, the collected structural image data may be compared to a previously saved data file that may be stored as an electronic file on the computer used for the evaluation. Alternatively such data may be stored on any suitable medium, including, but not limited to, external storage devices including hard drives, USB type drives or memory sticks, CDs, or any other suitable machine readable storage device.

An evaluation process may be performed on a suitably programmed general-purpose or special purpose computer specifically designed to perform the desired evaluation. Such a program running on a general-purpose computer may include criteria for establishing whether the DUT being inspected has been produced to meet desired specifications or not. Such specifications may include predetermined tolerances or any other criteria required for the specific application to which the DUT is to be applied. Further the program may be configured such that certain criteria may be manually or automatically adjusted depending on the exact nature of the inspection to be performed and the specific object being tested.

As part of the evaluation of the collected structural image data, the program may be configured to provide an indication of the results of the evaluation. Such results may be as simple as a pass-fail analysis with suitable visual or audible indication of results or may include such information as a derived percentage difference between the inspected DUT and the reference or master object or data file with numeric or other results indications that may be observed by a system operator for final determination of structural integrity.

In another embodiment, images from an inspection process conducted by the optical inspection system may be transmitted to a quality assurance (QA) workstation located remotely from the optical sensor head. In this manner, a QA manager or supervisor may check the quality of the process at regular or random intervals. Random false images of the DUT 200 may be sent from a central computer to the display device 190 and override the live images captured by the optical sensor head 160. This provides motivation for the operator to remain alert and maintain inspection performance over a prolonged inspection period during which a significant number of inspections are performed. A log of when the random false images were displayed on the display device 190 may be maintained so that the operators' inspection results may be cross-referenced to when the false images were displayed. For example, the false images may include images of fractured or damaged DUTs and if the operator indicates that these damaged DUTS have passed the visual inspection it provides evidence that the operator is not accurately performing his inspection tasks.

In another embodiment, the optical inspection system may be configured to require an operator to log on to the system. The log on operation may be linked to the operator's human resource file to ensure that the operator is a qualified person capable of interpreting the information they receive through use of the inspection system. Once logged on the system, the optical sensor head may be configured to perform a self-calibration of the light sources in terms of lighting intensity by displaying an array of test points where calibrated light readings are taken. Based on the results of each of these readings the system may calibrate the light intensities of the light sources, and verify the new readings if significant adjustments are required. If calibration is successful the system may log the calibration data for traceability. Alternatively, if the required lighting levels are not achieved, the system may not allow inspection to be carried out. As mentioned previously, the light sources may be calibrated using a pulse wave modulation (PWM) signal or an analog voltage signal.

The optical inspection system of the present teaching may comprise a plurality of optical sensor heads 100 described above. It will be appreciated that a plurality of optical sensor heads 100 according to the present teaching may be used in conjunction with each other in a networked environment. The optical sensor heads 100 may be located in the same manufacturing or inspection facility or separate from each other. For instance, in a multi-production line facility, at least one optical sensor head according to the present teaching may be installed on each line. Data from all of the optical sensor heads may be collated within the facility or shared with data from devices in other locations in a networked arrangement.

The optical sensor head according to the present teaching may be used as an open system for use in darkrooms, or retrofitted to arms, robotic systems and the like. The optical sensor head may be installed in an automated production line. For example, the optical sensor head may be fitted to a moveable arm at a workstation in line with a conveyor in a production line. In this way, an inline inspection system is provided. Multiple optical sensor heads according to the present teaching may be employed for the same inspection process. For example, a plurality of optical sensor heads positioned above, below, downstream and upstream of the DUT may be utilised for inline inspection. Alternatively, the optical sensor head may be configured for handheld operation. In this arrangement, the optical sensor head may be integrated into a handheld device such as a tablet or laptop. In such configurations, video output and software components may be provided on the back of the handheld device, such as a tablet or laptop.

In other embodiments, and referring to Figure 1, the light blocking curtain 210 may be fitted to the optical sensor head 100 for controlled light distribution within the inspection area 209. The light blocking curtain 210 may extend from outer edges of the outer housing 150 on all sides. It will be appreciated that this arrangement provides a controlled and calibrated light space, whereby ambient light is prevented from reaching the inspection area 209. This allows the light intensity within the inspection area to be controlled. It will be understood that the light blocking curtain 210 may be oriented such that the light blocking curtain 210 hangs down and encloses the inspection area 209. The light blocking curtain 210 also functions to prevent UV leakage outside the area of interest. It will also be understood that the optical sensor head 10 in this configuration will be arranged to inspect objects underneath, and for example may be mounted on a supporting frame or robotic arm extending above a workstation, as illustrated in Figure 3. In this manner, the inspection area is sealed from ambient light surrounding the optical sensor head 100 and UV leakage is minimised.

Figure 5 illustrates a workstation comprising a supporting frame 350 for the optical sensor head 100 of the present teaching with a light blocking curtain 210 provided at the front side 351 of the supporting frame 350. The supporting frame 350 defines an inspection area 209 for receiving objects to be inspected.

This arrangement allows an operator to insert objects to be tested through the light blocking curtain 210 for positioning under the optical sensor head 100. The light blocking curtain 210 is configured to prevent ambient light from reaching the inspection area 209. When the device to be inspected is being inserted through the curtain 210, the lighting system of the optical sensor head 100 may display visible light. When the device has been positioned in the inspection area 209 inside the curtain 210 and is ready for optical inspection, the optical sensor head 100 may be switched to UV light. The display device 190 of Figure 5 may be provided on the supporting frame 350. Captured image data may be displayed on the display device 190. In an alternative arrangement to a light blocking curtain, the optical sensor head 100 may include a flexible but resilient material extending from the outer edges of the outer housing 150 of the optical sensor head 100. In this configuration, the optical sensor head 100 may be pressed laterally against objects to be inspected with the flexible material enclosing the inspection area. It will be appreciated that the provision of such flexible material allows for the optical sensor head to be used in a handheld mode and thus provides more portability for inspecting objects in hard to reach areas. The flexible material may comprise brushes, foam or rubber to conform to non-standard shapes. Figure 6 illustrates a further embodiment in which a light blocking curtain 210 is provided at front and side portions of the supporting frame 350. It will be understood by the skilled person that the light blocking curtain 210 may extend around at least a portion of one or more sides of the supporting frame 350. For example, in the arrangement illustrated in Figure 6, the light blocking curtain 210 extends along a front portion 351 and part of a side portion 352 of the supporting frame 350. It will be appreciated that the arrangements of Figures 5 and 6 provide a desktop arrangement where the supporting frame 350 is positioned on a floor or desktop.

Figure 7 is a perspective view of a portable device comprising the optical sensor head of the present teaching, showing a flexible material provided on all sides of the outer housing 150. The flexible material may be a light blocking material similar to the light curtain described above. The flexible material may comprise a flexible member 210 which acts as a UV barrier to minimise UV light leakage from the inspection area. As stated previously, the flexible material may comprise brushes, foam or rubber to conform to non-standard shapes of devices or products being inspected. The portable device may be a handheld device that allows the operator to handle the device using handles 157 at one or more sides of the outer housing 150.

Figure 8 is a perspective view of a portable device comprising the optical sensor head is housed, according to another embodiment of the present teaching. A display device 195 such as a tablet or laptop may be disposed on top of the outer housing 150. It will be appreciated also that one or more handles 157 on one or more sides of the outer housing 150 allow the portable device to be handheld. In use, an operator may hold the portable device of Figure 7 or 8 and abut the flexible member 210 against a surface of an object to be inspected. The outer housing 150 and the flexible material 210 together define an enclosed inspection area from which ambient light is blocked.

In specific applications, the optical inspection system according to the present teaching may be used for inspection of medical devices such as medical balloons, catheters, stents and the like. Figure 9 is a photographic inspection image of a stent acquired using the optical inspection system according to the present teaching. The system may also be used for UV inspection of gluing processes such as in a curing mode. In this manner, real time curing inspection may be provided. Separate camera heads can be employed at different stages in the gluing process, for example, at the glue dispensing stage, and at the glue curing stage. Glued parts may also be inspected using the optical inspection head. In addition, workstation including the optical sensor head may be specially configured for curing applications by including specific curing UV LEDs, as shown by the UV LED curing bank 188 in Figure 5. The curing Liv LEDS have a different wavelength and higher powered for the curing process than the other LEDs in the optical sensor head. In one arrangement, the application of UV glue may be monitored and the glue coverage assessed prior to curing. Once coverage is determined to be satisfactory the system may be configured to turn on the curing LEDs via the available outputs for a period of time while inspecting the curing during and post curing for QA purposes. Thus some of the light sources in the lighting system may be configured to provide controlled heating to aid the curing process, while the other light sources are configured to provide controlled lighting for aiding inspection.

The optical sensor head may also be used for inspecting different stages of surface mount technology (SMT) processes, such as solder paste dispensing, surface mounted components, and post reflow. The system may also be used in dye penetrant inspection for inspecting components that have undergone a dye penetrant process. The system may be used for inspection of aircraft engine components, landing gear and structural components. The system of the present teaching may be used in forensics inspection for bodily fluids. Other applications may include UV inspection and magnification of legal tender, stamps, chemicals, minerals, fluorescent materials, plants, fruit, and vegetables, at various levels of magnification. The optical sensor head may be used in portable applications for analysis and magnification of animals and fish such as jellyfish and scorpions. For example, the optical sensor head may be adapted to fit into a handheld device for remote inspection. Images captured may be relayed wirelessly to a central monitoring station for expert review.

The operator may press and hold a footswitch and the visible light is switched off and the UV light is switched on. Any defects in the DUT 200 or object may be instantly highlighted and the operator can switch back to visible light to validate or inspect the area of interest. This area may also be magnified as required to suit the process needs. The area may be magnified to a zoom level of between lx and 300x. It is also possible to capture this image to a computer for subsequent use if required. This configuration is reversible to meet customer requirements. That is, the system may be configured in any default lighting configuration, UV or visible light. Further, the image capturing device may be configured according to the device under test.

Using a switchable LED design where the default setting is visible light means that UV light is only on when required and is focussed in a specific region of interest within the target area of the camera. The system is configured to have minimum UV leakage outside the inspection area 209 making it safer for an operator and less restrictive.

The optical sensor head is configured such that UV light irradiated from one or more of the light sources is not directly viewed by the user. Also, as mentioned above, a light blocking curtain or other material may be used to prevent harmful UV light leakage. The switch from UV light to visible light or vice versa may be almost instantaneous on the display device and the image intensity remains constant. Accordingly, there is no need for the human eye to adjust from a dark environment to a visible light environment to verify a fault identified.

This system may be set up in multiple cells side by side so that users can interact with fellow employees rather than being contained in a darkroom or remote area. The system facilitates quality assurance (QA) managers as it is possible at a glance to monitor or manage any inspection process without having to approach or engage with the operator as the image is displayed on a display such as a flat screen monitor over the system. LED lighting technology has a longer life that traditional bulbs and is more energy efficient and has long term reduced running costs.

The system presents a better ergonomic solution for users as it allows for the maintenance of better posture. Eye fatigue may be reduced as a result of using the system.

The combination of the video camera and monitor coupled with a fast acting switchable light source offer a significant improvement over the existing methods. The system offers the user the ability to inspect Liv fluorescent materials that require a specific wavelength of light at specific controlled levels for QA purposes in a real time environment utilizing high quality video and switchable lighting. It is the combination of these features that define the inspection system according to the present teaching. The use of LED light sources means that the light sources can be instantly switchable, can be configured in various specific wavelengths or colours, and can be configured in multiple arrays using multiple LEDS.

The camera may be any off the shelf camera suitable for capturing high resolution still images and video data, such as a HD video camera, having zoom, auto focus, and auto exposure features. Image data acquired from the camera may be output to a PC for QA analysis, SPC data tracking or whatever format that is desired.

The words comprises/comprising when used in this specification are to specify the presence of stated features, integers, steps or components but does not preclude the presence or addition of one or more other features, integers, steps, components or groups thereof.

While the present teaching has been described with reference to some exemplary arrangements it will be understood that it is not intended to limit the present teaching to such arrangements as modifications can be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the present teaching. In this way it will be understood that the present teaching is to be limited only insofar as is deemed necessary in the light of the appended claims.

Claims (68)

  1. Claims 1. An optical sensor head comprising an image capturing device for capturing images of an object to be inspected; and an integrated lighting system comprising a plurality of light sources for illuminating the field of view of the image capturing device, wherein the light sources comprises at least one ultravolet (UV) light source and at least one visible light source.
  2. 2. The optical sensor head of claim 1, wherein the light sources are configured to be focusable and direct light in a specific region of interest.
  3. 3. The optical sensor head of claim 1 or 2, wherein the integrated lighting system is configured to be switchable between visible light and UV light.
  4. 4. The optical sensor head of claim 3, wherein the integrated lighting system is configured to switch to UV light when the object to be inspected is presented to the image capturing device.
  5. 5. The optical sensor head of claim 3 or 4, wherein the integrated lighting system is switchable by activation of a sensor.
  6. 6. The optical sensor head of claim 3 or 4, wherein the the integrated lighting system is switchable by manual activation.
  7. 7. The optical sensor head of any preceding claim, wherein the default setting of the integrated lighting system is to provide light in the visible spectrum.
  8. 8. The optical sensor head of any of claims 3 to 7, wherein the light sources are instantly switchable.
  9. 9. The optical sensor head of any preceding claim, wherein at least one of the light sources has a longitudinal axis parallel to the longitudinal axis of the image capturing device.
  10. 10. The optical sensor head of any of claims 1 to 8, wherein at least one of the light sources is angularly disposed with respect to the image capturing device.
  11. 11.The optical sensor head of any preceding claim, wherein the light sources are configured to be fixedly positioned or adjustable.
  12. 12. The optical sensor head of any preceding claim, wherein at least one of the light sources is configured to be movable in a longitudinal axis direction thereof.
  13. 13.The optical sensor head of any preceding claim, wherein the light sources comprise a first set of UV light sources and a second set of visible light sources.
  14. 14.The optical sensor head of any preceding claim, wherein each of the plurality of light sources comprises an LED.
  15. 15. The optical sensor head of any preceding claim, wherein at least one of the light sources is configured to be switched on and off in a pre-programmed sequence.
  16. 16. The optical sensor head of any preceding claim, wherein the plurality of light sources are configured to have various intensities and wavelengths.
  17. 17.The optical sensor head of any preceding claim, being configured to perform a self-calibration of the light sources by displaying an array of test points where calibrated light readings are taken.
  18. 18.The optical sensor head of any preceding claim, wherein the light sources are configured to be calibrated according to defined operating parameters.
  19. 19.The optical sensor head of claim 18, wherein the light sources are calibrated using a pulse wave modulation (PWM) signal or an analog voltage signal.
  20. 20.The optical sensor head of any preceding claim, wherein the image capturing device is fixedly positioned or adjustable.
  21. 21.The optical sensor head of any preceding claim, wherein the image capturing device is configured to be movable in a longitudinal axis direction thereof.
  22. 22.The optical sensor head of any preceding claim, wherein the image capturing device comprises a high definition video camera, having zoom, auto focus, and auto exposure features.
  23. 23.The optical sensor head of any preceding claim, wherein the optical sensor head is configured manually or according to one of a plurality of preset programs according to the object being inspected.
  24. 24.The optical sensor head of any preceding claim, further comprising a flexible material configured to minimise UV light leakage from the inspection area.
  25. 25.The optical sensor head of claim 24, wherein the flexible material comprises a flexible resilient material, the material configured to extend from outer edges of an outer housing of the optical sensor head.
  26. 26.The optical sensor head of claim 24 or 25, wherein the optical sensor head is configured to be pressed laterally against objects to be inspected.
  27. 27.The optical sensor head of any of claims 24 to 26, wherein the flexible material comprises brushes, foam or rubber.
  28. 28.The optical sensor head of any preceding claim, wherein the optical sensor head is configured to be moved relative to a stationary object to be inspected.
  29. 29.The optical sensor head of any of claims ito 27, being configured to be stationary relative to a moving object to be inspected.
  30. 30.The optical sensor head of any preceding claim, being configured for medical device inspection, gluing processes, surface mount technology (SMT), dye penetrant inspection, inspection of aircraft engine components, landing gear and structural components, forensics inspection for bodily iS fluids, inspection and magnification of legal tender, stamps, chemicals, minerals, fluorescent materials, plants, animals, fruit, and vegetables.
  31. 31.The optical sensor head of any preceding claim, wherein the optical sensor head is configured to be retrofitted to a robotic arm.
  32. 32.The optical sensor head of any preceding claim, wherein the optical sensor head is configured to be installed in an automated production line.
  33. 33.The optical sensor head of any preceding claim, wherein the optical sensor head is configured to be attached to a moveable arm at a workstation in line with a conveyor.
  34. 34.The optical sensor head of any of claims 1 to 30, wherein the optical sensor head is configured to be integrated in a handheld device.
  35. 35.A workstation comprising the optical sensor head of any of claims ito 30.
  36. 36.The workstation of claim 35, comprising a supporting frame for housing the optical sensor head and an inspection area is defined for receiving an object to be inspected.
  37. 37.The workstation of claim 36, further comprising a flexible member which acts as a UV barrier to minimise UV light leakage from the inspection area.
  38. 38.The workstation of claim 37, wherein the flexible member is configured to facilitate access for manual loading of objects to the inspection area.
  39. 39.The workstation of claim 37 or 38, wherein the flexible member is provided in at least a front portion of the supporting frame.
  40. 40.The workstation of any of claims 35 to 39, further comprising a display device provided on the supporting frame for viewing image data obtained by the optical sensor head.
  41. 41.The workstation of any of claims 35 to 40, further comprising one or more curing heat sources for providing heat during a curing process.
  42. 42.A portable device comprising the optical sensor head of any of claims ito 30.
  43. 43.The portable device of claim 42, further comprising a flexible member which acts as a UV barrier to minimise UV light leakage from an inspection area.
  44. 44.The portable device of claim 43, wherein the flexible member extends from an outer housing of the optical sensor head.
  45. 45.The portable device of claim 44, wherein the flexible member and the outer housing define the inspection area.
  46. 46.The portable device of claim 45, wherein, in use, the device is configured to abut a surface of an object to be inspected, the flexible member abutting the surface and enclosing the inspection area.
  47. 47.The portable device of any of claims 42 to 46, being configured to be handheld.
  48. 48.The portable device of claim 47, comprising one or more handles.
  49. 49.The portable device of any of claims 42 to 48, further comprising a display device provided on an outer housing of the optical sensor head for viewing image data obtained by the optical sensor head.
  50. 50.An optical inspection system, comprising the optical sensor head as claimed in any of claims ito 34, the workstation of any of claims 35 to 41, or the portable device of any of claims 42 to 49.
  51. 51.The optical inspection system of claim 50, comprising a plurality of the optical sensor heads.
  52. 52.The optical inspection system of claim 51, comprising a pair of optical sensor heads for capturing different perspective views of the object to be inspected.
  53. 53.The optical inspection system of claim 51 or 52, wherein the plurality of optical sensor heads are connected to each other in a networked environment
  54. 54.The optical inspection system of any of claims 50 to 53, further comprising an integrated control system for controlling operation of the system.
  55. 55.The optical inspection system of claim 54, wherein the integrated control system comprises a local control panel on the optical sensor head for controlling the operation of the optical sensor head.
  56. 56. The optical inspection system of claim 54 or 55, wherein the integrated control system comprises a remote control system to enable the optical sensor head to be controlled remotely.
  57. 57.The optical inspection system according to any of claims 50 to 56, further comprising a local or remote display device for viewing image data obtained by the optical sensor head.
  58. 58.The optical inspection system of claim 57, wherein the optical sensor head is configured to relay the captured image data to the display device.
  59. 59.The optical inspection system of claim 57 or 58, wherein the image data is viewable at a magnification that is adjustable.
  60. 60.The optical inspection system according to claim 59, being configured to magnify the image data to a zoom of between lx and 300x for display on the display device.
  61. 61.The optical inspection system according to any of claims 57 to 60, wherein the image data displayed on the display device is still image data or live video image data.
  62. 62.The optical inspection system according to any of claims 50 to 61, further comprising a local or remote computer for analysing image data obtained by the optical sensor head.
  63. 63.The optical inspection system of any of claims 50 to 62, wherein image data obtained from the optical sensor head comprises time and date information.
  64. 64.The optical inspection system of claim 63, wherein the computer is configured to decode the time and date information contained in the image data.
  65. 65.The optical inspection system of any of claims 50 to 64, being configured to transmit images captured by the optical sensor head to a quality assurance (QA) workstation located remotely from the optical sensor head.
  66. 66.The optical inspection system of any of claims 50 to 65, being configured to display a random false image for overriding the display of a live image captured by the image capturing device.
  67. 67.The optical inspection system of any of claims 50 to 66, wherein the optical sensor head is configured to relay the image data to a data server or cloud server.
  68. 68. A system substantially as hereinbefore described with reference to Figures ito 8.
GB201308918A 2013-05-17 2013-05-17 An optical inspection system Withdrawn GB2514180A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB201308918A GB2514180A (en) 2013-05-17 2013-05-17 An optical inspection system

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB201308918A GB2514180A (en) 2013-05-17 2013-05-17 An optical inspection system
PCT/EP2014/060057 WO2014184337A1 (en) 2013-05-17 2014-05-16 An optical inspection system

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
GB201308918D0 GB201308918D0 (en) 2013-07-03
GB2514180A true GB2514180A (en) 2014-11-19

Family

ID=48746920

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
GB201308918A Withdrawn GB2514180A (en) 2013-05-17 2013-05-17 An optical inspection system

Country Status (2)

Country Link
GB (1) GB2514180A (en)
WO (1) WO2014184337A1 (en)

Families Citing this family (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US10175171B2 (en) 2015-08-01 2019-01-08 Aron Vecht Compact multi-UV-LED probe system and methods of use thereof
US10180248B2 (en) 2015-09-02 2019-01-15 ProPhotonix Limited LED lamp with sensing capabilities
US10054552B1 (en) 2017-09-27 2018-08-21 United Technologies Corporation System and method for automated fluorescent penetrant inspection
WO2019094442A1 (en) * 2017-11-07 2019-05-16 Abb Schweiz Ag Method and apparatus for imaging analysis of a switchgear or the like

Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP1167964A1 (en) * 1999-03-31 2002-01-02 Hitachi, Ltd. Method and apparatus for non destructive testing
US20080082000A1 (en) * 2004-05-16 2008-04-03 Michael Thoms Medical Camera
WO2008063605A2 (en) * 2006-11-21 2008-05-29 Carestream Health, Inc. Apparatus for dental oct imaging
US20080291439A1 (en) * 2007-05-24 2008-11-27 Applied Vision Company, Llc Apparatus and methods for container inspection
WO2009120951A2 (en) * 2008-03-28 2009-10-01 Nordson Corporation Automated conformal coating inspection system and methods of use
US20120249779A1 (en) * 2011-03-28 2012-10-04 Samsung Led Co., Ltd. Apparatus for inspecting light emitting diode and inspecting method using said apparatus

Family Cites Families (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3296439A (en) * 1963-10-07 1967-01-03 Edgar P Barnhart Portable collapsible lightproof enclosure having exteriorly housed light source
CA2314679A1 (en) * 1999-07-28 2001-01-28 William Kelly Improvements in and relating to ring lighting
DE102007024059B4 (en) * 2007-05-22 2017-11-09 Illinois Tool Works Inc. Apparatus and method for evaluating a control body in a color penetration method

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP1167964A1 (en) * 1999-03-31 2002-01-02 Hitachi, Ltd. Method and apparatus for non destructive testing
US20080082000A1 (en) * 2004-05-16 2008-04-03 Michael Thoms Medical Camera
WO2008063605A2 (en) * 2006-11-21 2008-05-29 Carestream Health, Inc. Apparatus for dental oct imaging
US20080291439A1 (en) * 2007-05-24 2008-11-27 Applied Vision Company, Llc Apparatus and methods for container inspection
WO2009120951A2 (en) * 2008-03-28 2009-10-01 Nordson Corporation Automated conformal coating inspection system and methods of use
US20120249779A1 (en) * 2011-03-28 2012-10-04 Samsung Led Co., Ltd. Apparatus for inspecting light emitting diode and inspecting method using said apparatus

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
GB201308918D0 (en) 2013-07-03
WO2014184337A1 (en) 2014-11-20

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
Lee et al. Hyperspectral near-infrared imaging for the detection of physical damages of pear
KR101829850B1 (en) Systems and methods for spatially controlled scene illumination
US9476865B2 (en) System and method for analyzing properties of meat using multispectral imaging
ES2587236T3 (en) Medication identification and verification
AU707671B2 (en) Skin examination device
AU2001245710B2 (en) Apparatus and method for measuring and correlating characteristics of fruit with visible/near infra-red spectrum
US8581977B2 (en) Apparatus and method for inspecting labeled containers
US8046055B2 (en) Lymph node detector
ES2325199B1 (en) Addition to the main patent p200700514.por "system for automatic selective separation of citrics affected by podredumbre".
DE60223956T3 (en) Examination device and system for the examination of foreign objects in containers filled with liquid
US7787111B2 (en) Simultaneous acquisition of fluorescence and reflectance imaging techniques with a single imaging device for multitask inspection
US7233392B2 (en) Spectral imaging device with tunable light source
US8290239B2 (en) Automatic repair of electric circuits
JP4017363B2 (en) Surface inspection apparatus and method
US9476839B2 (en) Device and method for detection of counterfeit pharmaceuticals and/or drug packaging
KR100996335B1 (en) Apparatus and methods for inspecting a composite structure for inconsistencies
Gómez-Sanchis et al. Automatic correction of the effects of the light source on spherical objects. An application to the analysis of hyperspectral images of citrus fruits
JP6321668B2 (en) Efficient modulation imaging
EP2140251B1 (en) Apparatus and methods for assessment, evaluation and grading of gemstones
US6998614B2 (en) Hyperspectral imaging workstation having visible/near-infrared and ultraviolet image sensors
JP2008304487A (en) Machine for testing contour and barrier of bottle
US9575005B2 (en) Inspection apparatus
JP2004209227A (en) Method and apparatus of image diagnosis for skin
US20100097451A1 (en) Optical Inclusion Sensor
US7821629B2 (en) Device and method for detecting contamination in a container

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
WAP Application withdrawn, taken to be withdrawn or refused ** after publication under section 16(1)