GB2495249A - Light treatment device for hair removal - Google Patents

Light treatment device for hair removal Download PDF

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Publication number
GB2495249A
GB2495249A GB1300438.7A GB201300438A GB2495249A GB 2495249 A GB2495249 A GB 2495249A GB 201300438 A GB201300438 A GB 201300438A GB 2495249 A GB2495249 A GB 2495249A
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United Kingdom
Prior art keywords
skin
beam
text
lt
gt
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Withdrawn
Application number
GB1300438.7A
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GB201300438D0 (en
Inventor
Kevin Herbert
Philip Mutton
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Dezac Group Ltd
Original Assignee
Dezac Group Ltd
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Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Dezac Group Ltd filed Critical Dezac Group Ltd
Priority to GB1300438.7A priority Critical patent/GB2495249A/en
Publication of GB201300438D0 publication Critical patent/GB201300438D0/en
Publication of GB2495249A publication Critical patent/GB2495249A/en
Withdrawn legal-status Critical Current

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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B18/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body
    • A61B18/18Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by applying electromagnetic radiation, e.g. microwaves
    • A61B18/20Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by applying electromagnetic radiation, e.g. microwaves using laser
    • A61B18/203Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by applying electromagnetic radiation, e.g. microwaves using laser applying laser energy to the outside of the body
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61NELECTROTHERAPY; MAGNETOTHERAPY; RADIATION THERAPY; ULTRASOUND THERAPY
    • A61N5/00Radiation therapy
    • A61N5/06Radiation therapy using light
    • A61N5/0613Apparatus adapted for a specific treatment
    • A61N5/0616Skin treatment other than tanning
    • A61N5/0617Hair treatment
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B18/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body
    • A61B2018/00315Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body for treatment of particular body parts
    • A61B2018/00452Skin
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B18/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body
    • A61B2018/00315Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body for treatment of particular body parts
    • A61B2018/00452Skin
    • A61B2018/00476Hair follicles
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B18/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body
    • A61B2018/00636Sensing and controlling the application of energy
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B18/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body
    • A61B2018/00636Sensing and controlling the application of energy
    • A61B2018/0066Sensing and controlling the application of energy without feedback, i.e. open loop control
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B18/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body
    • A61B2018/00636Sensing and controlling the application of energy
    • A61B2018/00696Controlled or regulated parameters
    • A61B2018/00726Duty cycle
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B18/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body
    • A61B18/18Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by applying electromagnetic radiation, e.g. microwaves
    • A61B18/20Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by applying electromagnetic radiation, e.g. microwaves using laser
    • A61B2018/2015Miscellaneous features
    • A61B2018/202Laser enclosed in a hand-piece
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B18/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body
    • A61B18/18Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by applying electromagnetic radiation, e.g. microwaves
    • A61B18/20Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by applying electromagnetic radiation, e.g. microwaves using laser
    • A61B2018/2035Beam shaping or redirecting; Optical components therefor
    • A61B2018/20351Scanning mechanisms
    • A61B2018/20359Scanning mechanisms by movable mirrors, e.g. galvanometric
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61NELECTROTHERAPY; MAGNETOTHERAPY; RADIATION THERAPY; ULTRASOUND THERAPY
    • A61N5/00Radiation therapy
    • A61N5/06Radiation therapy using light
    • A61N2005/0635Radiation therapy using light characterised by the body area to be irradiated
    • A61N2005/0643Applicators, probes irradiating specific body areas in close proximity
    • A61N2005/0644Handheld applicators

Abstract

A handheld device for removing hairs has a light source such as a laser 66 for delivering a beam of radiation to the skin, a means 60 for detecting the reflectivity of the skin, and a controller which adjusts the amount of energy emitted by the light source to increase the amount of light delivered to locations of higher absorption such as hair follicles or roots. The detector may be sensitive to the reflected portion of the treatment beam and may be an image detector which outputs a 2D image of the skin. More light energy is delivered to areas of lower albedo by increasing the duty cycle of the light source. Also disclosed is an arrangement for modulating the light energy according to the speed with which the device is moved across the skin, and a device having both shaving and epilating modes.

Description

Light Treatment ArjQaratus This invention relates to light treatment apparatus in which light is applied to the surface of the skin. In this specification the term light' is used to incorporate devices that apply optical radiation containing several wavelengths such as intense pulsed light devices, as well as to devices which may emit radiation at a narrow waveband or single wavelength such as from so-called diode lasers. In particular, but not exclusively, the invention relates to light treatment device for hair removal.

In a conventional hair removal process, light or laser radiation is directed to the skin to be absorbed in the hair follicle to cause the follicle to be damaged to the extent that the hair may be removed. In such devices, in order to ensure that mast of the energy deposited by the beam is absorbed in the hair follicle rather than above the skin surface, it is usual practice to advise the user to shave prior to the hair removal process. This however is time-consuming and requires the user to use different appliances first to shave and then to remove the hair.

We have however found that it is possible to use a hair removal beam initially to perform a shaving operation by directing it over the surface of the skin so that it ablates or severs the hairs in its path. We have therefore designed a laser hair treatment device which is configurable from a position in which it may be used initially to crop or shave the hair above the skin to prepare it ready for the hair removal process, to a position where it may be used as a hair remover.

Accordingly, in one aspect, this invention provides a hair treatment apparatus, comprising: a housing for being placed on or adjacent the skin of a treatment subject; a source of optical radiation disposed generally within said housing for emitting a beam of optical radiation; characterised fti that said apparatus is configurable between: a cropping mode in which the beam of optical radiation or a portion thereof is directed in a cropping direction to pass a pre-set distance from the skin of the treatment subject and operable in use to provide a cropping beam to ablate or sever hairs upstanding from the skin surface, and a hair removal mode in which the beam or a portion thereof is directed in a hair removing direction to be incident on the skin and/or one or more hairs upstanding therefrom and operable in use to provide a hair removal beam to effect hair removal.

In a preferred arrangement, in the cropping mode, the beam of optical radiation passes closely spaced from, but parallel to the surface of the skin. With this apparatus, having first prepared the skin surface by cropping the upstanding hairs, the device can then be changed to the hair removal configuration.

There is a wide range of different ways in which a reconfigurable device may be implemented. For example the laser source may itself be movable between a position in which its output beam is aligned with the cropping direction and a position in which its output beam is aligned with the hair removal direction. However, it is preferred to provide a beam deflector which is operable to deflect a portion of the beam between the cropping direction and the hair removing direction.

Of course, two arrangements here are possible; the light source may emit the beam in the cropping direction, with the beam deflector deflecting a downstream portion of the beam from the cropping direction to the hair removal direction, or the reverse arrangement could be provided in which the source of optical radiation emits a beam in the hair removal direction and the beam deflector deflects a downstream portion of the beam from the hair removal direction to the cropping direction.

In one arrangement, the beam deflector is movable between a deflecting position, in which it deflects the beam to pass in the hair removing direction and a non-deflecting position, in which the beam extends in the cropping direction only. In this latter arrangement, the beam deflector may conveniently include an absorber surface upon which the beam is incident when the deflector is in its non-deflecting position. This prevents unwanted reflections of the beam outside the housing during the cropping operation.

Where a beam deflector is used to deflect the beam into the hair removing direction, the beam deflector is preferably movable to effect scanning of the deflected beam across the surface of the skin of a treatment subject.

Scanning may be achieved by linear movement and/or angular movement.

Preferably, the apparatus includes a height adjustment arrangement for adjusting the spacing of the cropping beam from the skin of a treatment subject.

The deflector may take many forms. It may be a simple reflector or it may be a prism with an internally reflecting surface. In the latter instance, one or both of the surfaces of the prism through which the beam passes to and from the reflecting surface may be powered or have a lens attached thereto.

We have therefore identified a need to provide a way of ensuring that the exposure is appropriate and not excessive.

In the light treatment of skin, whether it be using intense pulsed light or laser radiation, and whether for hair removal or other skin treatment, it is important to ensure that the skin is not overexposed to light as this can cause skin damage or discomfort. However, in order to reduce treatment times, it is desirable to use relatively large amounts of energy. It is also desirable to be able to move the device over the surface of the skin to treat an extended area. If however a device is designed to be drawn over the skin of a user, there is a risk that the user may move the device too quickly, resulting in inadequate treatment or too slowly resulting in overexposure.

Accordingly, in another aspect of this invention, there is provided a skin treatment apparatus wherein a hand held skin treatment apparatus, comprising: a housing; a light source disposed in said housing for generating a beam of radiation to be incident on the skin of a treatment subject; a movement detector responsive to movement of said apparatus over the skin in use, and control means for modulating in use the amount of energy from said light source incident upon the skin in use in inverse proportion to the speed of movement of said apparatus.

There is a wide range of ways in which the amount of energy from the light source may be modulated. This could be done by varying the output intensity of the light source, but this is not feasible in many applications. In many implementations, the light source may comprise a pulsed beam, and the control means may modulate by varying the duty cycle of the pulse beam. Thus the proportion of ON:OFF may be increased as the speed of movement of the apparatus increases, and vice versa. Generally it is easier to vary the duty cycle of a pulsed laser of a pulsed light source as opposed to its intensity.

In another arrangement, where the apparatus is designed to scan the beam of radiation relative to the housing, across the skin, the control means may modulate by varying the scan speed of the scanning arrangement. In these instances it will be appreciated that the control means modulates the energy density applied to the skin, that is the energy per unit area per second (watts/centrimetre2). It will be appreciated that a combination of the above modulation techniques may be used where required, for example to provide greater dynamic range.

The movement detection may be achieved in a number of different ways.

For example there may be a roller element associated with the housing and a sensor for detecting rotation of the roller as the housing is moved over the surface of the skin.

In another arrangement the device may use a technique commonly used for optical mice. Thus the movement detector may comprise an image detector for capturing successive images of the skin and for comparing the images thereby to determine a movement vector to indicate the speed and/or extent of movement of said apparatus.

In an enhanced safety arrangement, it is advantageous for the control means to reduce the amount of energy delivered to the skin to a nil value or a relatively low value when the device is stationary.

In known hair treatment devices, the skin of a treatment subject is exposed to a substantially uniform energy density. We have developed a system whereby the absorption of the skin is monitored to identify areas of higher absorption (corresponding to the location of hair follicles) so that the energy applied to the skin is selectively increased in those areas thereby to increase the energy in areas containing hair follicles and reducing the energy where there is just skin.

Accordingly, in yet another aspect, this invention provides a hair treatment apparatus comprising: a housing; a light source in said housing for generating a beam of radiation to be incident on the skin of a treatment subject; detector means for detecting reflectance/absorption of the skin area to be treated, and control means responsive to the reflectant/absorption of said skin area to adjust the amount of energy from said light source incident upon the skin thereby selectively to increase the amount of energy in locations of higher absorption.

There are a number of different ways in which absorption may be measured. In one arrangement it is measured by monitoring the amount of radiation reflected when the treatment light beam is incident on the skin, and so power modulation is carried out on the fly. In another arrangement, the detector means may comprise an image detector for viewing a two-dimensional image of a selected area of the skin of the treatment subject and an analyser for determining areas of relatively high absorption (greater than a pre-set threshold) indicative of the presence of a hair, and means for modulating in use the amount of energy of said light source incident upon the skin selectively to apply relatively high amounts of energy (above a pre-set threshold) to be incident on hairs, and a relatively low energy to be incident on skin.

In one arrangement, the apparatus may use a single image detector arrangement for both determining movement of the device relative to the skin and the capture of a two-dimensional image in order to determine locations of the hair follicles in the viewed scene. Thus the control means may use data from the image detector relating to movement, along with positional data relating to the scan head, to determine the current position of the radiation beam relative to the 2D captured frame, and then modulate the beam accordingly as it traverses the skin to deposit greater energy onto the hair follicles.

In addition or instead, the device may modulate the intensity of the laser power applied to the skin by adjusting the power level/scan speed, for other purposes. For example, the device may modulate the intensity to allow for different skin tones or pigmentation so that, for example, the intensity of the laser incident on the skin (as opposed to the hair) is reduced for tanned or otherwise pigmented skin. This may allow the device to be used by those with darker skin types who are usually advised against using such devices.

Whilst the invention has been described above, it extends to any inventive combination of the features set out above or in the following

description.

The invention may be performed in various ways, and an embodiment therefore with various modifications will now be described by way of example only, reference being made to the accompanying drawings in which: Figure 1 is a schematic view of a hair treatment device of this invention in a hair remover mode; Figure 2 is a schematic view of a hair remover device of Figure 1, but in a laser shaver or cropper mode; Figure 3 is a schematic view of a second embodiment of skin treatment apparatus designed to be moved over the skin during treatment and in which the power per unit area delivered to the skin is modulated in proportion with the speed with which the device is drawn across the skin; Figure 4 is a block diagram illustrating a control circuit for the embodiment of Figure 3; Figure 5 is a schematic view of a third embodiment of hair treatment device in which the hair removal radiation reflected by the skin is detected to allow the power output per area to be selectively increased when incident upon a hair follicle, and Figure 6 is a schematic view of a fourth embodiment of hair treatment device in which a 2D image detector is used both to determine movement of the device over the skin and also to map areas of high absorption so that the power output per unit area may be selectively increased in areas corresponding to a follicle.

Referring initially to Figure 1, in this arrangement, a light source 10 is mounted within a housing 12 on a vertical track arrangement 14 so that the height of the light source 10 relative to a treatment aperture 16 maybe varied.

The light source generates a beam 18 of radiation which is capable of cropping or shaving hair by severing or ablating the hairs when the beam is in a direction parallel to the skin surface, or of destroying or damaging the hair follicles to allow hair removal if the beam is directed generally perpendicular to the skin surface. The beam may have the same intensity for both applications, or it may be adjusted between the two. The light source 10 emits a beam which passes generally parallel to the surface of the skin and then is reflected through 900 by a reflector 20 to pass horizontally. The reflector 20 itself is mounted on a track 22 which allows it to be moved back and forth to scan the light beam across the surface of the skin. It will be appreciated that this linear scanning could also be affected by pivoting of the reflector 20.

The reflector 20 may also be pivoted to a non-reflecting position where, instead of presenting a reflecting surface 24 to the light beam it presents a non-reflective target absorber 26. In this configuration, the light source 10 and reflector 20 can be brought close to the surface of the skin so the light beam passes parallel to but spaced just above the surface of the skin to shave or crop the hairs on which it is incident. This movement is achieved by means of the height adjuster mechanism 14.

The height adjuster mechanism 14 allows the height to be set at different heights according to the grade of cut required. Also, if required, the height adjuster could adjust the height dynamically as the device is drawn across the surface of the skin so as to follow skin contours. For this purpose a height detector may be provided which may operate using optical or other suitable technologies. This could be done in a variety of different ways, for example by using a reflected pulsed light beam possibly (using either the reflected time shift, or a Doppler shift, to determine distance). Alternatively, sound could be used to determine distance using echo measurements. Most likely however is the whole laser head could be mounted so as to move with the skin (similar to a razor head being tilted and movable) so that the distance is always fixed. Finally, a camera could monitor detail on the skin and compare sizes in successive frames and determine the distance accordingly. Alternatively for hair removal, a camera and controller could monitor the size of the beam spot -as the distance changed the spot would get larger as the beam is diverging.

In the above arrangement, the reflector 20 is a mirrored external surface.

It will be appreciated that this of course could be an internal reflecting surface of a prism. In this instance, the inlet and/or outlet surfaces of the prism may be powered and/or have a lens attached thereto for focussing or other beam shaping functions.

In use, the user will first set the device to shaver or crop mode as seen in Figure 2, drawing the device across their skin as the light source is energised to cut the hair close to the skin. Having done this and cleared away the cut hair and other debris, the device is switched to the configuration of Figure 1 by flipping the reflector and moving the mechanism away from the skin if required by the height adjuster. The light source can then be used to effect laser hair removal treatment of the cropped/shaved follicles.

Referring now to the embodiment of Figure 3, in this arrangement a light source 30, which as previously may be an intense pulsed light or a laser device, directs a light beam 32 towards the skin. Also associated with the device is a movement detector 34 which provides an output as the device is moved across the skin. A controller 36 receives the output of the detector and modulates the power of the laser of the light being delivered to the skin so that the intensity of the output is varied in relation to velocity to give constant power output per unit area. In this arrangement, the light source is pulsed and the controller varies the duty cycle (marklspace ratio) of the pulses to vary the energy per unit time.

Thus, as the movement of the device slows, so the duty cycle is reduced to maintain the same constant power output area. As an important safety feature, the controller reduces 36 the power to zero if no movement is detected. It is to be particularly emphasised that this latter feature also means that, if the device is lifted away from the skin (even it is still moving) the movement read out will be nil and so this feature ensures that the light output is inhibited as soon as the device is lifted away, irrespective of whether it is still moving.

Figure 4 is a block diagram illustrating the control functions of the embodiment of Figure 3. Thus, as just described, if there is no movement, the controller ensures the power output of the laser is zero 40. On detecting movement 42, the detection device passes position signals to the controller 36 which calculates the velocity of the device. The controller outputs the signal to control the power of the laser 44, increasing the power of the optical beam if the velocity is too fast 46 and decreasing it if the velocity is too slow 48.

As discussed above, there are a number of different ways in which the power output may be varied in addition to the control of the duty cycle. Thus, where the beam is scanned in use, the extent and/or velocity of the scan may be modulated in accordance with the detected velocity.

Instead of the mechanical roller detection device shown in Figure 3, other optical position detectors may be used such as those commonly utilised in optical computer mice. In these devices a succession of 20 images is taken and by comparison with these, a movement vector is deduced and this can be used by the controller to derive a velocity signal.

Referring now to Figures 5 and 6, in these embodiments, during a hair removal process by laser or optical radiation, the reflectivity/absorption of the skin is monitored to distinguish areas which are, or are likely to be, hair follicles, and the device then selectively deposits more energy in these areas to maximise the hair removal effect and also reducing the exposure of the skin in areas between follicles.

In Figure 5, radiation from the laser 50 reflected by the skin 52 is detected by a detector 54 whose output passes to a controller 56 which controls the power output of the laser by varying the duty cycle and/or varying the scan speed to adjust the amount of power delivered per unit area, as discussed above. Thus in the arrangement of Figure 5, as the hair removal device is drawn across the skin, the power output is modulated on the fly dependent on whether the beam is incident on bare skin or a hair follicle. It will be appreciated that this arrangement may be used in a scanning or non-scanning arrangement, by monitoring the instantaneous amounts of radiation reflected.

The arrangement of Figure 6 is more appropriate where an optical, 2D image based scheme is used to detecting movement of the device. In this arrangement a 2D detector 60 not only fulfils its function of providing a read out of the position vector indicating movement of the device but it also is processed by a controller 62to determine a map of the pixels representing areas of higher absorption corresponding to hair follicles in the viewed image. By mapping these, and knowing the direction and extent of movement of the device relative to the skin, and the position of the beam 64 within its scan envelope, the controller may modulate the duty cycle of the laser 66 andlor the scan speed so as to selectively deliver increased energy per unit area to the hair follicles.

In a yet further embodiment, not illustrated, the device includes a contact/proximity detector (e.g. skin contact pins) for detecting when the device is close to or in contact with the skin, and a safety circuit inhibits full operation of the laser or light device until the device is at or adjacent the skin. For example, until proximity/contact is detected, the height adjustment device may hold the light or laser in an elevated position in the housing so that the light or laser beam is divergent if it exits the housing. Alternatively, the light or laser may have a focussing lens which until proximitylcontact is detected is in a defocused position so that the light or laser beam is diffuse or divergent, but on detection of proximity/contact with skin, the lens is moved to a focussing position to focus the beam on the skin. These features provide additional safety.

Claims (1)

  1. <claim-text>CLAIMS1. A skin treatment apparatus comprising: a housing; a light source (50, 66) in said housing for generating a beam of radiation for being incident on the skin of a treatment subject; detector means (54, 60) for detecting reflectances/absorption of the skin area to be treated, and control means (50, 62) responsive to the reflectance/absorption of said skin area to adjust the amount of energy from said light source incident upon the skin thereby selectively to increase the amount of energy in locations of higher absorption.</claim-text> <claim-text>2. A skin treatment apparatus according to Claim 1, wherein said detector means (54, 60) comprises a sensor responsive to the amount of radiation from said beam of radiation reflected by said skin, to determine the absorption of the skin illuminated by said beam.</claim-text> <claim-text>3. A skin treatment apparatus according to Claim 1, wherein said detector means comprises an image detector (60) for providing a 2D image of said skin area, and said apparatus includes means (62) for controlling the amount of energy of said light beam selectively to apply relatively high amounts of energy (above a pre-set threshold) to be incident on hairs and a relatively low energy to be incident on said skin.</claim-text> <claim-text>4. A skin treatment apparatus substantially as hereinbefore described with reference to, and as illustrated in, any of the accompanying drawings.</claim-text>
GB1300438.7A 2013-01-10 2013-01-10 Light treatment device for hair removal Withdrawn GB2495249A (en)

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GB1300438.7A GB2495249A (en) 2013-01-10 2013-01-10 Light treatment device for hair removal

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GB2495249A true GB2495249A (en) 2013-04-03

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Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2000062700A1 (en) * 1999-04-14 2000-10-26 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Hair-removing device with a controllable laser source

Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2000062700A1 (en) * 1999-04-14 2000-10-26 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Hair-removing device with a controllable laser source

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