GB2490538A - Heating system with a boiler in a grate and heat storage - Google Patents

Heating system with a boiler in a grate and heat storage Download PDF

Info

Publication number
GB2490538A
GB2490538A GB1107546.2A GB201107546A GB2490538A GB 2490538 A GB2490538 A GB 2490538A GB 201107546 A GB201107546 A GB 201107546A GB 2490538 A GB2490538 A GB 2490538A
Authority
GB
United Kingdom
Prior art keywords
stove
boiler
liquid
grate
heat
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Withdrawn
Application number
GB1107546.2A
Other versions
GB201107546D0 (en
Inventor
Geoffrey Asprey
Original Assignee
Geoffrey Asprey
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Geoffrey Asprey filed Critical Geoffrey Asprey
Priority to GB1107546.2A priority Critical patent/GB2490538A/en
Publication of GB201107546D0 publication Critical patent/GB201107546D0/en
Priority claimed from PCT/GB2011/001651 external-priority patent/WO2012076834A1/en
Publication of GB2490538A publication Critical patent/GB2490538A/en
Withdrawn legal-status Critical Current

Links

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24COTHER DOMESTIC STOVES OR RANGES; DETAILS OF DOMESTIC STOVES OR RANGES, OF GENERAL APPLICATION
    • F24C5/00Stoves and ranges for liquid fuels
    • F24C5/02Stoves and ranges for liquid fuels with evaporation burners, e.g. dish type
    • F24C5/04Stoves and ranges for liquid fuels with evaporation burners, e.g. dish type wick type
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B1/00Constructions in general; Structures which are not restricted either to walls, e.g. partitions, or floors or ceilings or roofs
    • E04B1/62Insulation or other protection; Elements or use of specified material therefor
    • E04B1/74Heat, sound or noise insulation, absorption, or reflection . Other building methods affording favourable thermal or acoustical conditions, e.g. accumulating of heat within walls
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B5/00Floors; Floor construction with regard to insulation; Connections specially adapted therefor
    • E04B5/48Special adaptations of floors for incorporating ducts, e.g. for heating or ventilating
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23BMETHODS OR APPARATUS FOR COMBUSTION USING ONLY SOLID FUEL
    • F23B60/00Combustion apparatus in which the fuel burns essentially without moving
    • F23B60/02Combustion apparatus in which the fuel burns essentially without moving with combustion air supplied through a grate
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23BMETHODS OR APPARATUS FOR COMBUSTION USING ONLY SOLID FUEL
    • F23B80/00Combustion apparatus characterised by means creating a distinct flow path for flue gases or for non-combusted gases given off by the fuel
    • F23B80/04Combustion apparatus characterised by means creating a distinct flow path for flue gases or for non-combusted gases given off by the fuel by means for guiding the flow of flue gases, e.g. baffles
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23HGRATES; CLEANING OR RAKING GRATES
    • F23H3/00Grates with hollow bars
    • F23H3/02Grates with hollow bars internally cooled
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24BDOMESTIC STOVES OR RANGES FOR SOLID FUELS
    • F24B7/00Stoves, ranges or flue-gas ducts, with additional provisions for convection heating
    • F24B7/02Stoves, ranges or flue-gas ducts, with additional provisions for convection heating with external air ducts
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24BDOMESTIC STOVES OR RANGES FOR SOLID FUELS
    • F24B9/00Stoves, ranges or flue-gas ducts, with additional provisions for heating water
    • F24B9/04Stoves, ranges or flue-gas ducts, with additional provisions for heating water in closed containers
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24COTHER DOMESTIC STOVES OR RANGES; DETAILS OF DOMESTIC STOVES OR RANGES, OF GENERAL APPLICATION
    • F24C5/00Stoves and ranges for liquid fuels
    • F24C5/18Liquid-fuel supply arrangements forming parts of stoves or ranges
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F28HEAT EXCHANGE IN GENERAL
    • F28DHEAT-EXCHANGE APPARATUS, NOT PROVIDED FOR IN ANOTHER SUBCLASS, IN WHICH THE HEAT-EXCHANGE MEDIA DO NOT COME INTO DIRECT CONTACT
    • F28D20/00Heat storage plants or apparatus in general; Regenerative heat-exchange apparatus not covered by groups F28D17/00 or F28D19/00
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F28HEAT EXCHANGE IN GENERAL
    • F28DHEAT-EXCHANGE APPARATUS, NOT PROVIDED FOR IN ANOTHER SUBCLASS, IN WHICH THE HEAT-EXCHANGE MEDIA DO NOT COME INTO DIRECT CONTACT
    • F28D7/00Heat-exchange apparatus having stationary tubular conduit assemblies for both heat-exchange media, the media being in contact with different sides of a conduit wall
    • F28D7/16Heat-exchange apparatus having stationary tubular conduit assemblies for both heat-exchange media, the media being in contact with different sides of a conduit wall the conduits being arranged in parallel spaced relation
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23HGRATES; CLEANING OR RAKING GRATES
    • F23H2900/00Special features of combustion grates
    • F23H2900/03021Liquid cooled grates
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24HFLUID HEATERS, e.g. WATER OR AIR HEATERS, HAVING HEAT GENERATING MEANS, IN GENERAL
    • F24H1/00Water heaters having heat generating means, e.g. boiler, flow- heater, water-storage heater
    • F24H1/0063Water heaters having heat generating means, e.g. boiler, flow- heater, water-storage heater using solid fuel
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24HFLUID HEATERS, e.g. WATER OR AIR HEATERS, HAVING HEAT GENERATING MEANS, IN GENERAL
    • F24H1/00Water heaters having heat generating means, e.g. boiler, flow- heater, water-storage heater
    • F24H1/18Water storage heaters
    • F24H1/187Water storage heaters using solid fuel
    • Y02A30/256
    • Y02B80/40

Abstract

A stove 10 for a heating system has a housing 12 with a combustion chamber 14, and a fuel grate 18 containing a liquid boiler 26. The heating system also has a heat storage device (figs 3 & 4) embedded in a wall or floor that stores heat from hot air or water in an air void (100, fig 3), aggregate (102, figs 3 & 4), or water vessel (112, fig 4). The grate 18 can have pipes between manifolds 27,28, the pipes angled at 2-10° a thermo-siphon effect. A second boiler 40 near the top of the combustion chamber 14 has a curved housing 41. An oil burning tray (64, fig 2) can be mounted in the combustion chamber 14 to make the stove multi-fuel, and the housing can have convective air ducts (78, fig 2).

Description

Improvements in or Relating to Multi-Fuel Stoves and Storage Heater Apparatus

Technical Field

The invention relates to improvements in or relating to multi-fuel stoves and storage heater apparatus.

Background

Stoves may be used with many different types of solid and liquid fuel such as wood, coke, coal, charcoal, and oil. Typically, such stoves burn either a solid fuel or a liquid fuel, but not both types of fuel. Such stoves may be used in a home or a factory to provide heat to a room in which the stove is located, or to heat water for a central heating system, or to provide a hot water supply. The water heater may also be known as a boiler. It is a general aim of most stoves to provide a complete burn of the fuel which is used so that the efficiency of operation of the stove is improved. Providing a more complete bum may also reduce the amount of unburned combustion gases emitted from the stove which may also help to reduce air pollution.

In the case of a stove used for heating a room in which it is located the principal form of heat transfer from the stove to the room is provided by radiating heat from an external surface of the stove. In the case of a stove used for heating water it is typically the case that a large body of water is provided in a back-boiler which is a part of the stove. The back-boiler typically contains around 40 litres of water which represents a very large volume of liquid to be heated. Furthermore, the large volume of water means that the boiler requires a large amount of heat energy for operation. The back-boiler is typically a large unit which is at an upper part of the stove which may not be the hottest part of the stove. Furthermore such a large unit may be cumbersome and awkward to handle during installation of the stove.

In an oil burning stove, the oil is typically injected from a spray nozzle into a combustion chamber under high pressure using a high pressure pump. Such an arrangement is complex, and has multiple working components that may fail. For example, the spray nozzle often becomes blocked due to lumps in the oil. Furthermore, the spray nozzle erodes over time and is typically required to be replaced every year. n addition, the pump may wear or fail. All of these failures increase the cost of operation for the known oil burning stove.

In general, heating systems typically comprise a central heating arrangement whereby is heat from a boiler is distributed around a building using a closed water circuit having wall mounted radiators or under floor pipe work. Whereas this is typically a suitable arrangement for distributing heat when the boiler is operational, the radiators and under floor pipe work typically have a low thermal capacity. Such a low thermal capacity means that the radiators and under floor pipe work may cool down quickly after the boiler has shut down. This may be a problem at night when a central heating system may be switched off, and results in the building cooling down rapidly, which may be undesirable.

It is broadly an object of the present invention to address one or more of the above mentioned disadvantages of previously known stoves and storage heater apparatus.

Summary

What is required is a stove and a storage heater apparatus, which may reduce or minimise at least some of the above-mentioned problems.

According to a first aspect of the invention, there is provided a stove for a heating system, comprising a housing having a combustion chamber and a grate for the combustion of fuel thereon, wherein the grate at least partially comprises a first boiler suitable for a liquid, the stove being operable to heat a liquid in the first boiler from the combustion of the fuel on the grate.

Such a stove provides the advantage that the liquid within the first boiler is close to the is fuel on the grate which may provide an improved heating of the liquid. It has been realised by the inventor that locating the first boiler closer to the burning fuel may also increase the thermal efficiency for the overall operation of the stove. Furthermore, the first boiler is combined with the grate which provides for a less complex stove, that may also be easier to install.

Preferably the first boiler comprises at least one liquid duct. Preferably the first boiler comprises a plurality of liquid ducts. Preferably the plurality of liquid ducts comprise the grate. Such arrangements provide an effective way for combining the gate and the first boiler.

Preferably the at least one duct is at an angle of greater than 2° from a horizontal for promoting a thermal siphon effect. In a preferred embodiment said angle is between 2° - 100, and more preferably substantially 6°. This has the advantage of providing an improved movement for the liquid through the first boiler.

Preferably the first boiler is in fluid communication with a first manifold. Preferably the first boiler is in fluid communication with a second manifold. Preferably the first boiler is between the first and second manifolds. Such an arrangement has the advantage that the volume of liquid that is required for operation of the first boiler may be reduced.

It has been realised by the inventor that the provision of a smaller volume of liquid may increase the thermal efficiency for the overall operation of the stove.

Preferably a portion of at least one manifold is provided on an exterior of the stove.

is Such an arrangement may provide an advantageous way of connecting the first boiler to the manifold to construct the stove.

Preferably the first boiler has an inlet and an outlet such that the inlet is lower than the outlet for promoting a thermal siphon effect. This has the advantage of providing an improved movement for the liquid through the first boiler.

In one embodiment the stove further includes at least one air duct on an exterior of the stove, the air duct having a lower opening and an upper opening, the air duct operable to promote heat convection therethrough. This has the advantage of creating an additional heat transfer mechanism from the stove to a room in which the stove is located.

Preferably the lower opening comprises a curved part of a free end of the at least one air duct. Such an arrangement may provide a convenient way for providing the lower opening.

Preferably the lower part of the at least one air duct is adjacent to the portion of the at least one manifold. This may further promote heat convection through the air duct because the manifold is typically hot when liquid is within the first boiler.

Preferably the stove includes a plurality of air ducts on an exterior of the stove. Such an arrangement may further improve the transfer of heat from the stove to the room in which it is located by heat convection.

In one embodiment the stove further including a second boiler within the combustion chamber and which is above the grate, the second boiler being suitable for a liquid, wherein the stove is operable to heat the liquid in the second boiler from the combustion of the fuel therein. Such a second boiler may further be used to extract heat from the combustion chamber to heat the liquid.

Preferably at least a portion of an underneath part of the second boiler is curved.

Preferably the underneath part is convex. Preferably the second boiler comprises a convex housing with a chamber therein for the liquid. Such arrangements provide an improved heating of the second boiler by the combustion gases due to a swirling effect thereof created by the curved underneath part.

Preferably the second boiler is adjacent to an exhaust of the combustion chamber. Such a configuration may provide a baffle for the exhaust using the second boiler.

Preferably the second boiler has an inlet and an outlet such that the inlet is lower than the outlet for promoting a thermal siphon effect. This has the advantage of providing an improved movement for the liquid through the second boiler.

In one embodiment the stove further includes a liquid fuel burner within the combustion chamber, the liquid fuel burner comprising a receptacle for holding the liquid fuel, the receptacle having an open top and being operable to allow the liquid fuel within the receptacle to at least partially vaporise for promoting combustion thereof Such a liquid is fuel burner provides a straight forward way to burn liquid fuel in a simple device which does not require frequent replacement of parts. Such an arrangement allows the combustion of many types of liquid fuel such as oil, fat, and candle wax.

Preferably the liquid fuel burner is located above the grate. This may further assist with allowing the liquid fuel to vaporise for promoting combustion thereof due to heat from the combustion of fuel on the grate. The vapours from the liquid fuel burner may also slow the combustion process and promote down-burning of fuel on the grate.

Preferably the liquid fuel burner is below the second boiler. Such an arrangement may provide a convenient location for the liquid fuel burner so that it can heat the second boiler.

Preferably the receptacle includes a wick for the liquid fuel. Preferably the wick comprises a glass fibre, a stone fibre, or a ceramic fibre. Such a wick may improve combustion, and is less likely to degrade due to heat within the stove.

Preferably the receptacle has an upright wall for concentrating the vaporised liquid fuel.

Preferably the upright wall has a plurality of holes for promoting combustion of the liquid fuel. Such arrangements may further aid combustion of the liquid fuel.

According to a second aspect of the invention there is provided a storage heater apparatus, comprising at least one duct for a liquid or gas, and a void space for air, the apparatus for location within a wall or a floor, wherein the apparatus is adapted for operation such that when a heated liquid or gas is flowing in the at least one duct the heat is retained in the void space, and when the liquid or gas is not flowing in the at least one duct said retained heat is conducted to a wall or floor in which the apparatus is located.

Such a storage heater apparatus may provide the advantage of an improved thermal capacity because the void space provides a reservoir of heat. Such an arrangement may mean that a wall or a floor in which the storage heater apparatus is located retains heat for a longer period of time after the liquid or gas has stopped flowing in the at least one duct. It will be appreciated that the void space typically contains air. The liquid or gas within the at least one duct may alternatively be termed a fluid.

Preferably the storage heater apparatus further includes a conduit for providing the void space. Preferably the at least one duct is adjacent to the void space. Such arrangements may provide a convenient way of creating the void space when the conduit is embedded in a wall or floor.

Preferably the storage heater apparatus comprising a plurality of ducts. Preferably the plurality of ducts are adjacent to the void space. Such an arrangement may further improve the transfer of heat from the ducts to the wall or floor and/or the void space.

Preferably the at least one duct and the void space is embedded in an aggregate material within the wall or floor. This may be a convenient way of embedding the storage heater apparatus in a wall or floor and providing the required thermal capacity.

Preferably the storage heater apparatus includes insulation provided on an exterior of the aggregate material. Such insulation may help to retain heat within the storage heater apparatus.

According to a third aspect of the invention there is provided a storage heater apparatus for location within a wall or a floor, comprising a vessel for storing water, the vessel having a heat exchanger device, the apparatus being adapted for operation such that when a heated liquid or gas is flowing in the heat exchanger device the heat is retained in the water within the vessel, and when the liquid or gas is not flowing in the heat exchanger device said retained heat is conducted to a wall or floor in which the apparatus is located.

Such a storage heater apparatus may provide the advantage of an improved thermal capacity because the water within the vessel provides a reservoir of heat. Such an arrangement may mean that a wall or a floor in which the storage heater apparatus is located retains heat for a longer period of time after the liquid or gas has stopped flowing in the heat exchanger device.

Preferably the vessel is embedded in an aggregate material within the wall or floor. This may be a convenient way of embedding the storage heater apparatus in a wall or floor and providing the required thermal capacity.

Preferably the storage heater apparatus includes insulation provided on an exterior of the aggregate material. Such insulation may help to retain heat within the storage heater apparatus.

According to a fourth aspect of the invention there is provided a wall or a floor including a storage heater apparatus according to the second or third aspects of the invention.

Preferably the plurality of ducts are between the void space and a surface of the wall or the floor. Such a configuration may provide an improved operation of the storage heater apparatus.

According to a fifth aspect of the invention there is provided a method of operating a stove for a heating system, the stove comprising a housing having a combustion chamber and a grate for the combustion of fuel thereon, wherein the grate at least partially comprises a first boiler suitable for a liquid, the method including: combusting fuel on the grate; and heating the liquid in the first boiler from the combustion of the fuel on the grate.

Such a method provides the advantage that the liquid within the first boiler is close to the fuel on the grate which may provide an improved heating of the liquid. It has been realised by the inventor that locating the first boiler closer to the burning fuel may also increase the thermal efficiency for the overall operation of the stove. Furthermore, such a method provides for a less complex stove because the first boiler is combined with the grate.

Preferably the first boiler is inclined at an angle of greater than 2° from a horizontal, the method including creating a thermal siphon effect within the first boiler. This has the advantage of providing an improved movement for the liquid through the first boiler.

In one embodiment the stove further includes at least one air duct on an exterior of the stove, the air duct having a lower opening and an upper opening, the method including providing heat transfer by heat convection through the at least one air duct. This has the advantage of creating an additional heat transfer mechanism from the stove to a room in which the stove is located.

In one embodiment the stove further includes a second boiler within the combustion chamber and which is above the grate, the second boiler being suitable for a liquid, the second boiler having a curved portion of an underneath part thereof, the method including swirling the combustion gases using the curved portion to heat the liquid in the second boiler. Such a second boiler may further be used to extract heat from the combustion chamber to heat the liquid whereby. An improved heating of the second boiler by the combustion gases may be provide due to a swirling effect thereof created by the curved underneath part.

Preferably the second boiler has an inlet and an outlet such that the inlet is lower than is the outlet, the method including creating a thermal siphon effect within the second boiler. This has the advantage of providing an improved movement for the liquid through the second boiler.

In one embodiment the stove further includes a liquid fuel burner within the combustion chamber, the liquid fuel burner comprising a receptacle for holding the liquid fuel, the method including at least partially vaporising the liquid fuel for promoting combustion thereof Such a method provides a straight forward way to burn liquid fuel in a simple liquid fuel burner which does not require frequent replacement of parts. Such an arrangement allows the combustion of many types of liquid fuel such as oil, fat, and candle wax.

According to another aspect of the invention there is provided a stove for a heating system, comprising a housing having a combustion chamber for the combustion of fuel therein, the stove having at least one air duct on an exterior of the stove, the air duct having a lower opening and an upper opening, wherein the air duct is operable to promote heat convection therethrough.

According to another aspect of the invention there is provided a stove for a heating system, comprising a housing having a combustion chamber for the combustion of friel therein, the stove having a boiler at an upper region of the combustion chamber which is suitable for a liquid, at least a portion of an undemeath part of the boiler being curved, wherein the stove is operable to heat the liquid in the boiler from the combustion of the is fuel in the combustion chamber.

According to another aspect of the invention there is provided a stove for a heating system, comprising a housing having a combustion chamber, the stove including a liquid fuel bumer within the combustion chamber for the combustion of liquid fuel, the liquid fuel bumer comprising a receptacle for holding the liquid fuel, the receptacle having an open top and being operable to allow the liquid fuel within the receptacle to at least partially vaporise for promoting combustion thereof Any preferred or optional features of one aspect of the invention may be preferred or optional feature of other aspects of the invention.

Brief Description of the Drawings

Other features of the invention will be apparent from the following description of preferred embodiments shown by way of example only with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which; Figure 1 shows a perspective view of a stove according to an embodiment of the invention; Figure 2 shows a perspective view of the stove of Figure 1 with a liquid fuel burner and a convection device; Figure 3 shows a cross section through a storage heater device for use with the stove of Figures 1 and2; is Figure 4 shows a cross section through a storage heater device according to an alternative embodiment for use with the stove of Figures 1 and 2; and Figure 5 shows a diagram of a method according to an embodiment of the invention.

Detailed Description

Figure 1 shows a perspective view of a stove according to an embodiment of the invention, generally designated 10. Hidden detail of the stove 10 is shown with dashed lines. The stove 10 has a body 12 of steel with a combustion chamber 14 and an ash pit 16 therein. The body 12 may altematively be termed a housing. The body 12 has a front panel which has been omitted for the purposes of clarity. The front panel may be detachable from the body 12, for example, with bolts. The front panel has an opening for accessing to the combustion chamber 14 and an opening for accessing the ash pit 16.

The openings have respective doors. A grate 18 is provided between the combustion chamber 14 and the ash pit 16 for combustion of fuel thereon. The body 12 has feet 20 so that the stove 10 can stand on a floor. The combustion chamber 14 has an exhaust 22, also known as a flue, to allow the exhaust gases from combustion of fuel to escape from the stove 10 as shown at 24. The stove 10 has a vent or air inlet, for example, in the door for accessing the ash pit 16 which is suitable for controlling the amount of air in the combustion chamber 14 which in tum controls the combustion of the fuel. It will be appreciated that the combustion chamber 14 is substantially a sealed chamber, having an air inlet and an exhaust 22 for exhaust gases, so that the burning process can be controlled.

In Figure 1 the stove 10 is shown to comprise a first boiler 26. The first boiler 26 comprises the grate 18 which has five substantially parallel pipes or ducts for a liquid. It will be appreciated that there may be more than five pipes as required. The first boiler 26 also comprises a first and second manifold 27, 28 on either side of the body 12. The pipes are located between the manifolds 27, 28. The first manifold 27 has an inlet 30, and the second manifold 28 has an outlet 32. In operation a liquid, such as water, which is to be heated in the stove 10 enters the first manifold 27 via the inlet 30 as shown at 34. The liquid then passes through the grate 18 towards the second manifold 28 as shown at 36. The liquid then leaves the second manifold 28 via the outlet 32 as shown at 38. It will be appreciated that the liquid is heated by fuel burning on the grate 18 as it passes through the first manifold 27, through the grate 18, and through the second manifold 28. Tn particular the liquid is heated as it passes through the grate 18 most effectively because it is very close to fuel which is burning on the grate 18. Tt will be appreciated that the pipe work for connecting the liquid supply and return to the first boiler 26 has been omitted for clarity.

In Figure 1 the inlet 30 is shown to be lower than the outlet 32 to promote a thermal siphon effect for the liquid within the first boiler 26. In addition the first manifold 27 may be lower than the second manifold 28 to promote a thermal siphon effect.

Furthermore, the pipes of the grate 18 may be included at an angle of greater than 2° from the horizontal to promote a thermal siphon effect. In one embodiment the angle is between 2° -10°, and more preferably substantially 6°.

The stove 10 also includes a second boiler 40 at an upper region of the combustion chamber 14. The second boiler 40 is above the grate 18, and is suitable for heating a liquid, such as water, from heat produced by combustion of the fuel on the grate 18. The second boiler 40 comprises a housing 41 which is curved, and which has a chamber within it for the liquid. It will be appreciated that an underneath side of the housing 41 is convex from the perspective of viewing it from the grate 18. The second boiler 40 is adjacent to the exhaust 22 of the combustion chamber 14 such that it is a baffle for the exhaust 22.

The second boiler 40 has an inlet 42 and an outlet 44 for the liquid. The pipe work for connecting the liquid supply and return to the second boiler 40 has been omitted for clarity. The inlet 42 is shown to be lower than the outlet 44 to promote a thermal siphon effect for the liquid within the second boiler 40. Tn operation the liquid to be heated in the second boiler 40 enters via the inlet 42 as shown at 46. The liquid then passes through the second boiler 40 where it is heated. The liquid then leaves the second boiler 40 via the outlet 44 as shown at 48. It will be appreciated that the liquid in the second boiler 40 is heated by fuel burning on the grate 18 due to the heat within the combustion chamber 14 and by the combustion gases as they travel upwards as shown at 50. In particular the liquid is heated by swirling combustion gases as shown at 52 which is due to the curved under side of the second boiler 40. In one embodiment the second boiler 40 has a horse shoe cross section, which may improve the heating effect by the swirling combustion gases.

It will be appreciated that the first and second boilers 26, 40 have a relatively low volume when compared to the prior art. For example, the first boiler 26 comprising the is first and second manifolds 27, 28 and the grate 18 may hold about 10 litres of liquid, and the second boiler 40 comprising the housing 41 may hold about S litres of liquid.

The inventor has realised that the provision of such a small volume of liquid may increase the thermal efficiency for the overall operation of the stove 10.

Figure 2 shows a perspective view of the stove 10 of Figure 1 with an oil burner 60 and a convection device 62. In Figure 2 like features to the arrangements of Figure 1 are shown with like reference numerals. In Figure 2 the oil burner 60 comprises a fray 64 for burning oil 66 which is located in the combustion chamber 14. In one arrangement the oil burner 60 is removably mounted within the combustion chamber 14, for example by locating it on brackets attached to an inside of the body 12. The oil 66 is held in a reservoir 68 outside of the stove 10, and is fed into the tray 64 via a pipe 70 which passes through the body 12. A control device 72 in the pipe 70 may be used to control the amount of oil 66 delivered to the tray 64. The tray 64 is above the grate 18. The tray 64 is below the second boiler 40. In operable the tray 64 is heated by fuel buming on the grate 18 so that the oil 66 within the tray 64 at least partially vaporises. It will be appreciated that the tray 64 is relatively flat to present a large area to be heated. The tray has a low perimeter wall to hold a shallow pool of oil 66. Such an arrangement promotes combustion of the oil because the oil vapour is readily produced by heat from the fuel on the grate 18.

The tray 64 may have a wick 74 for the oil 66 within the tray 64. The wick 74 may be lit by a user to bum the oil 66, and/or to sustain buming of the oil 66. The wick 74 may comprise any suitable material and may comprise a glass fibre, a stone fibre, or a ceramic fibre. Such fibres have the advantage that they are less likely to melt due to the high temperatures in the combustion chamber 14. The tray 64 may also be provided with a combustion vessel 76 which is a duct open at both ends. The combustion vessel 76 is placed on the tray 64 so that one end of the combustion vessel 76 is substantially closed at the bottom and the other end is open at the top. Placement of the combustion vessel 76 on the tray 64 also permits oil 66 to pass between the vessel 76 and the tray 64 so that it can enter the combustion vessel 76. The wick 74 may be also located within the combustion vessel 76. The combustion vessel 76 has an upright wall for concentrating the vaporised oil, and promoting burning thereof The upright wall may have a plurality of holes therein to allow air to enter for promoting combustion of the oil 66. It will be appreciated that together the tray 64 and the combustion vessel 76 may be known as a receptacle, and the upright wall of the combustion vessel 76 may be an upright wall of the receptacle.

In operation the oil burner 60 may be used to burn waste oils, fats and candle wax, which might otherwise be thrown away. The oil burner 60 may also be used with fuel oil. In either case, the oil 66 may be bumed instead of solid fuel on the grate 18, or in addition to such solid fuel. Accordingly, the stove 10 may burn either a solid fuel or a liquid fuel, or both types of fuel at the same time. The vapours from the oil burner 60 may also slow the combustion process and promote down-burning of fuel on the grate 18. In addition the oil burner 60 may promote combustion of liquid fuel within it due to heat within the combustion chamber 14.

The oil burner 60, may alternatively be termed a liquid fuel burner. The liquid fuel burner may be used to combust many types of liquid fuel such as oil, fat, candle wax, or other waste liquid that are burnable such as sugar based products. Similarly the grate 18 may be used to burn any suitable type of solid fuel such as wood, coke, coal, charcoal, biomass, and mulch. Accordingly, the stove 10 may be termed a multi.fuel stove.

The convection device 62 is shown to comprise four air ducts 78 on an exterior of the stove 10. Each air duct 78 has a lower opening and an upper opening to promote convection of air therethrough as shown at 80 and 82. Each air duct 78 has a cross section which is large enough to promote convection therethrough. The air ducts 78 may be of any suitable material, for example, steel tube. The lower opening of each air duct 78 may comprise a curved part of a free end thereof It will be appreciated that whereas only four air ducts 78 are shown on one side of the stove, there may be additional air ducts 78 on the opposite side of the stove 10 and on the back of the stove 10. These additional air ducts 78 have been omitted for the purposes of clarity. The air ducts 78 may be attached to the body 12 by straps. In operation the air ducts 78 heat up, due to heat conduction from the stove 10, which causes air within them to rise. A heat convection current is therefore generated through each air duct 78. A room in which the stove 10 is placed may therefor heat up in an improved manner due to the convection currents. In addition, the air ducts 78 may extend into a room above the stove 10 thereby providing heat to that room.

Figure 2 shows that a free end of each of the four air ducts 78 rests on the second manifold 28. A similar arrangement is provided for air ducts 78 on the opposing side of the stove 10 so that they rest on the first manifold 27. This may be advantageous because the first and second manifolds 27, 28 are relatively hot when the stove 10 is in operation which may further promote a heat convention current to flow through each of the air ducts 78.

Figure 1 shows the stove 10 with the first boiler 26 and the second boiler 40, and Figure 2 shows the stove 10 with the first boiler 26, the second boiler 40, the oil burner 60 and the convection device 62. However, it will be appreciated that the stove 10 may have one or more of any of the features of the first boiler 26, the second boiler 40, the oil burner 60 and the convection device 62. Accordingly any of the features of the first boiler 26, the second boiler 40, the oil burner 60 and the convection device 62 may be used independently of each other, and in combination with a known stove or boiler.

Figure 3 shows a cross section through a storage heater device for use with the stove 10 of Figures 1 and 2, generally designated 90. The storage heater device 90 is for embedding within a floor to provide heating to a room and accordingly is shown to be substantially horizontal. Alternatively the storage heater device 90 may be embedded within a wall in which case it may oriented so that it is substantially vertical. The storage heater device 90 is shown to comprise three groups 92, 94, 96 of ducts 98 and void spaces 100. Each duct 98 may be a steel tube. Each group 92, 94, 96 may be considered to be a storage heater apparatus, and it will be appreciated that there may be more or less groups depending on the application of the storage heater device 90 to heat a particular room. Each storage heater apparatus 92, 94, 96 has five ducts associated with a single void space 100, although there may be more or less ducts as required. The is void spaces 100 contain air. The storage heater apparatus 92, 94, 96 is embedded within a settable aggregate material 102 such as concrete. The aggregate material 102 may be any suitable material such as heavyweight or lightweight aggregate such that it is a particulate material such as sand, gravel, crushed stone, slag, recycled concrete and/or geosynthetic aggregates. The aggregate material 102 is encased in an insulation material 104 on all sides thereoL apart from a surface 106 that faces the room in which storage heater apparatus 92, 94, 96 is located. Typically the aggregate material 102 is about 80 -100mm deep for a domestic application as shown at 103, although the dimension 103 may be larger than this for an industrial application, such as 100 -150mm deep. It will be appreciated that the ducts 98 provide reinforcement to the aggregate material 102.

Figure 3 shows that the ducts 98 are adjacent to the void space 100, and the ducts 98 are between the void space 100 and the surface 106 of the wall or the floor. Typically the ducts 98 are about 30mm from the surface 106 as shown at 108. It will be appreciated that whereas Figure 3 shows a cross section, the ducts 98 and the void spaces 100 may extend in a direction which is perpendicular to the cross section for an appropriate length to suit a particular room. A typical length might be 1 -Sm or more. The ducts 98 are coupled to a central heating system to provide hot water to the ducts 98 according to known methods and will not be described further. The ducts 98 may be connected to the first boiler 26 and/or the second boiler 40 shown in Figures 1 and 2. In Figure 3 the void spaces 100 extend to substantially the same length as the ducts 98 within the wall or floor, and are closed to the atmosphere such that they trap air within them. It is envisaged that there may be up to 30 or more duets 98 in the storage heater device 90, which may be provided with a heated liquid from the stove 10.

In an alternative arrangement the ducts are heated by a heated gas flowing in them. The gas may be air, and may be provided by the stove 10. In one arrangement the heated air is provided by the air ducts 78, for example, by coupling the upper opening of the air ducts 78 to the ducts 98 with pipe work. The skilled person will know the arrangements for such pipe work.

In use the storage heater device 90 is adapted for operation such that when a heated liquid or gas is flowing in the ducts 98 the void space 100 is heated to retain heat therein. The aggregate material 102 also heats up and provides heat to the room in which the storage heater device 90 is located. When the liquid or gas is not flowing in the ducts 98 the retained heat in the void space 100 is conducted to a wall or floor in which the storage heater apparatus 90 is located. Such an arrangement may provide the advantage of an improved thermal capacity because the void space 100 provides a reservoir of heat. Such an arrangement may mean that a wall or a floor in which the storage heater apparatus 90 is located retains heat for a longer period of time after the liquid or gas has stopped flowing in the at least one duct 98.

In one embodiment the storage heater apparatus 92, 94, 96 includes a conduit for providing the void space 100. The conduit may be a convenient way of forming the void space 100 in the aggregate material 102. The ducts 98 and the conduit comprising the void space 100 are provided as a single unit, for example, the ducts 98 may be strapped to the conduit. Such an arrangement may be a convenient way of embedding the storage heater apparatus 92, 94, 96 in the aggregate material 102.

When the storage heater device 90 of Figure 3 is embedded in a wall the void space 100 may be omitted. With such an arrangement the aggregate material 102 surrounds the ducts 98. Omission of the void space 100 may provide an improved strength for the wall in which the storage heater device 90 is located.

Figure 4 shows a cross section through a storage heater device according to an alternative embodiment for use with the stove 10 of Figures 1 and 2, generally designated 110. In Figure 4 like features to the arrangements of Figure 3 are shown with like reference numerals. The storage heater device 110 is for embedding within a floor to provide heating to a room and accordingly is shown to be substantially horizontal.

Alternatively the storage heater device 110 may be embedded within a wall in which case it may be oriented so that it is substantially vertical. In Figure 4 the storage heater device 110 comprises a vessel 112 which is shown to be embedded in the aggregate material 102. The vessel 112 is for containing water, and has an inlet 114 and an outlet 116. The vessel 112 also has a heat exchanger device 117 which is, for example, a series of pipes within the vessel 112. The heat exchanger device 117 has an inlet 118 and an outlet 119. It will be appreciated that whereas Figure 4 shows a cross section, the vessel 112 may extend in a direction which is perpendicular to the cross section for an appropriate length to suit a particular room. A typical length might be 1 -5m. The inlet 118 and the outlet 119 of the heat exchanger 117 may be coupled to the first and/or second boiler 26, 40 of the stove 10 shown in Figures 1 and 2. Accordingly, the water within the vessel 112 is heated by the heat exchanger 117 so that it can be used, for example in a domestic hot water supply. It will be appreciated that the vessel 112 has its own supply of water, for example, from a small remote tank, or from a mains water supply. The small remote tank may also operate as an expansion and overflow tank for the storage heater device 110.

In an alternative arrangement the heat exchanger 117 is heated by a heated gas flowing therein. The gas may be air, and may be provided by the stove 10. In one arrangement the heated air is provided by the air ducts 78, for example, by coupling the upper opening of the air ducts 78 to the heat exchanger 117 with pipe work. The skilled person will know the arrangements for such pipe work.

In use the storage heater device 110 is adapted for operation such that when a heated liquid or gas is flowing in the heat exchanger 117 the water within the vessel 112 is heated to retain heat therein. The aggregate material 102 also heats up and provides heat to the room in which the storage heater device 110 is located. When the liquid or gas is not flowing in the heat exchanger 117 the retained heat in the water in the vessel 112 is conducted to a wall or floor in which the storage heater apparatus 110 is located. Such an arrangement may provide the advantage of an improved thermal capacity because the water within the vessel 112 provides a reservoir of heat. Such an arrangement may mean that a wall or a floor in which the storage heater apparatus 110 is located retains heat for a longer period of time after the liquid or gas has stopped flowing in the heat exchanger 117. It is envisaged that the storage heater apparatus 110 may retain heat for several days after the liquid or gas has stopped flowing in the heat exchanger 117.

Figure 5 shows a diagram of a method according to an embodiment of the invention, generally designated 120. The method 120 is a method of operating a stove 10 for a heating system. The stove 10 comprises a housing 12 having a combustion chamber 14 and a grate 18 for the combustion of fuel thereon. The grate 18 at least partially comprises a first boiler 26 suitable for a liquid. The method includes combusting fuel on the grate 18 and heating the liquid in the first boiler 26 from the combustion of the fuel on the grate 18, as shown at 122.

The first boiler 26 is inclined at an angle of greater than 2° from a horizontal, and in one arrangement the angle is between 2° -100 from a horizontal, the method including creating a thermal siphon effect within the first boiler 26, as shown at 124. The stove 10 further includes at least one air duet 78 on an exterior of the stove 10, the air duet 78 having a lower opening and an upper opening, the method including providing heat transfer by heat convection through the at least one air duet 78, as shown at 126. The stove 10 further includes a second boiler 40 within the combustion chamber 14 and which is above the grate 18, the second boiler 40 being suitable for a liquid, the second boiler 40 having a curved portion of an underneath part thereof, the method including swirling the combustion gases 52 using the curved portion to heat the liquid in the second boiler 40, as shown at 128. The second boiler 40 has an inlet 42 and an outlet 44 such that the inlet 42 is lower than the outlet 44, the method including creating a thermal siphon effect within the second boiler 40, as shown at 130. The stove 10 further includes an oil burner 60 within the combustion chamber 14, the oil burner 60 comprising a receptacle 64 for holding the oil 66, the method including at least partially vaporising the oil 66 for promoting combustion thereot as shown at 132.

In the above embodiments the first and second boilers 26, 40 are described for use to heat a liquid such as water. Accordingly, the first and second boilers 26, 40 may alternatively be termed heat exchangers, liquid heaters or water heaters. It will be appreciated that any suitable liquid may be used to provide the required working effect of removing heat from the stove 10. It will also be appreciated that the stove 10 may be coupled to a conventional central heating system or to a water storage tank to heat the water therein. A pump may be used for circulation of the liquid within the first boiler 26, and/or the second boiler 40, and/or the storage heater apparatus 90, and/or the storage heater device 110. A fan or blower may be used for circulation of air through the air duets 78 of the convection device 62. Alternatively the stove 10 may be coupled to the storage heater device 90, 110 shown in Figures 3 and 4. Such arrangements may be used to provide heating and/or a supply of hot water.

Claims (50)

  1. CLAIMS1. A stove for a heating system, comprising a housing having a combustion chamber and a grate for the combustion of fuel thereon, wherein the grate at least partially comprises a first boiler suitable for a liquid, the stove being operable to heat a liquid in the first boiler from the combustion of the fuel on the grate.
  2. 2. A stove according to claim 1, wherein the first boiler comprises at least one liquid duct.
  3. 3. A stove according to claim 2, wherein the first boiler comprises a plurality of liquid ducts.
  4. 4. A stove according to claim 3, wherein the plurality of liquid ducts comprise the grate.
  5. 5. A stove according to claim 2, 3 or 4, wherein the at least one duct is at an angle of greater than 2° from a horizontal for promoting a thermal siphon effect.
  6. 6. A stove according to claim 5, wherein said angle is between 2° -10°.
  7. 7. A stove according to any preceding claim, wherein the first boiler is in fluid communication with a first manifold.
  8. 8. A stove according to claim 7, wherein the first boiler is in fluid communication with a second manifold.
  9. 9. A stove according to claim 8, wherein the first boiler is between the first and second manifolds.
  10. 10. A stove according to claim 7, 8 or 9, wherein a portion of at least one manifold is provided on an exterior of the stove.
  11. 11. A stove according to any preceding claim, wherein the first boiler has an inlet and an outlet such that the inlet is lower than the outlet for promoting a thermal siphon effect.
  12. 12. A stove according to any preceding claim, and further including at least one air is duct on an exterior of the stove, the air duct having a lower opening and an upper opening, the air duct operable to promote heat convection therethrough.
  13. 13. A stove according to claim 12, wherein the lower opening comprises a curved part of a free end of the at least one air duct.
  14. 14. A stove according to claim 12 or 13, when dependent on claim 10, wherein the lower part of the at least one air duct is adjacent to the portion of the at least one manifold.
  15. 15. A stove according to claim 12, 13 or 14, and further including a plurality of air ducts on an exterior of the stove.
  16. 16. A stove according to any preceding claim, and further including a second boiler within the combustion chamber and which is above the grate, the second boiler being suitable for a liquid, wherein the stove is operable to heat the liquid in the second boiler from the combustion of the fuel therein.
  17. 17. A stove according to claim 16, wherein at least a portion of an underneath part of the second boiler is curved.
  18. 18. A stove according to claim 17, wherein the underneath part is convex.
  19. 19. A stove according to claim 18, wherein the second boiler comprises a convex housing with a chamber therein for the liquid.
  20. 20. A stove according to any of claims 16 -19, wherein the second boiler is adjacent to an exhaust of the combustion chamber.
  21. 21. A stove according to any of claims 16 -20, wherein the second boiler has an inlet and an outlet such that the inlet is lower than the outlet for promoting a thermal siphon effect.
  22. 22. A stove according to any preceding claim, and further including a liquid fuel burner within the combustion chamber, the liquid fuel burner comprising a receptacle for holding the liquid fuel, the receptacle having an open top and being operable to allow the liquid fuel within the receptacle to at least partially vaporise for promoting combustion thereof
  23. 23. A stove according to claim 22, wherein the liquid fuel burner is located above the grate.
  24. 24. A stove according to claim 22 or 23, when dependent on any of claims 16 -21, wherein the liquid fuel burner is below the second boiler.
  25. 25. A stove according to claim 22, 23 or 24, wherein the receptacle includes a wick for the liquid fuel.
  26. 26. A stove according to claim 25, wherein the wick comprises a glass fibre, a stone fibre, or a ceramic fibre.
  27. 27. A stove according to any of claims 22 -26, wherein the receptacle has an upright wall for concentrating the vaporised liquid fuel.
  28. 28. A stove according to claim 27, wherein the upright wall has a plurality of holes for promoting combustion of the liquid fuel.
  29. 29. A stove barrier as substantially described herein with reference to Figures 1 and 2 of the accompanying drawings.
  30. 30. A storage heater apparatus, comprising at least one duct for a liquid or gas, and a void space for air, the apparatus for location within a wall or a floor, wherein the apparatus is adapted for operation such that when a heated liquid or gas is flowing in the at least one duct the heat is retained in the void space, and when the liquid or gas is not flowing in the at least one duct said retained heat is conducted to a wall or floor in which the apparatus is located.
  31. 31. A storage heater apparatus according to claim 30, and further including a conduit for providing the void space.
  32. 32. A storage heater apparatus according to claim 30 or 31, wherein the at least one is duct is adjacent to the void space.
  33. 33. A storage heater apparatus according to claim 30, 31 or 32, comprising a plurality of ducts.
  34. 34. A storage heater apparatus according to claim 33, wherein the plurality of ducts are adjacent to the void space.
  35. 35. A storage heater apparatus according to any of claim 30 -34, wherein the at least one duct and the void space is embedded in an aggregate material within the wall or floor.
  36. 36. A storage heater apparatus according to claim 35, and further including insulation provided on an exterior of the aggregate material.
  37. 37. A storage heater apparatus for location within a wall or a floor, comprising a vessel for storing water, the vessel having a heat exchanger device, the apparatus being adapted for operation such that when a heated liquid or gas is flowing in the heat exchanger device the heat is retained in the water within the vessel, and when the liquid or gas is not flowing in the heat exchanger device said retained heat is conducted to a wall or floor in which the apparatus is located.is
  38. 38. A storage heater apparatus according to claim 37, wherein the vessel is embedded in an aggregate material within the wall or floor.
  39. 39. A storage heater apparatus according to claim 38, and further including insulation provided on an exterior of the aggregate material.
  40. 40. A storage heater apparatus according to any of claim 30 -39, as substantially described herein with reference to Figure 3 or 4 of the accompanying drawings.
  41. 41. A wall or a floor including a storage heater apparatus according to any of claims 30-40.
  42. 42. A wall or a floor according to claim 41, when appended to claim 33 or 34, wherein the plurality of ducts are between the void space and a surface of the wall or the floor.
  43. 43. A wall or a floor according to claim 41 or 42, as substantially described herein with reference to Figure 3 or 4 of the accompanying drawings.
  44. 44. A method of operating a stove for a heating system, the stove comprising a housing having a combustion chamber and a grate for the combustion of fuel thereon, wherein the grate at least partially comprises a first boiler suitable for a liquid, the method including: combusting fuel on the grate; and heating the liquid in the first boiler from the combustion of the fuel on the grate.
  45. 45. A method according to claim 44, wherein the first boiler is inclined at an angle of greater than 2° from a horizontal, the method including creating a thermal siphon effect within the first boiler.
  46. 46. A method according to claim 44 or 45, wherein the stove further includes at least one air duct on an exterior of the stove, the air duct having a lower opening and an upper opening, the method including providing heat transfer by heat convection through the at least one air duct.
  47. 47. A method according to claim 44, 45 or 46, wherein the stove further includes a second boiler within the combustion chamber and which is above the grate, the second boiler being suitable for a liquid, the second boiler having a curved portion of an underneath part thereof, the method including swirling the combustion gases using the curved portion to heat the liquid in the second boiler.
  48. 48. A method according to claim 47, wherein the second boiler has an inlet and an outlet such that the inlet is lower than the outlet, the method including creating a thermal siphon effect within the second boiler.
  49. 49. A method according to any of claims 44 -48, wherein the stove further includes a liquid fuel burner within the combustion chamber, the liquid fuel burner comprising a receptacle for holding the liquid fuel, the method including at least partially vaporising the liquid fuel for promoting combustion thereof
  50. 50. A method as substantially described herein with reference to Figure 5 of the accompanying drawings.
GB1107546.2A 2011-05-06 2011-05-06 Heating system with a boiler in a grate and heat storage Withdrawn GB2490538A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB1107546.2A GB2490538A (en) 2011-05-06 2011-05-06 Heating system with a boiler in a grate and heat storage

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB1107546.2A GB2490538A (en) 2011-05-06 2011-05-06 Heating system with a boiler in a grate and heat storage
PCT/GB2011/001651 WO2012076834A1 (en) 2010-12-09 2011-11-28 Stove for a heating system

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
GB201107546D0 GB201107546D0 (en) 2011-06-22
GB2490538A true GB2490538A (en) 2012-11-07

Family

ID=44243690

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
GB1107546.2A Withdrawn GB2490538A (en) 2011-05-06 2011-05-06 Heating system with a boiler in a grate and heat storage

Country Status (1)

Country Link
GB (1) GB2490538A (en)

Citations (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1211728A (en) * 1916-01-07 1917-01-09 C A Londelius & Sons Co Builder's portable hot-water heater.
GB2034347A (en) * 1978-10-28 1980-06-04 Philips Nv Thermal storage device
US4257557A (en) * 1978-10-27 1981-03-24 Thomasma William S Fluid heating system utilizing solid fuel
US4296798A (en) * 1977-11-15 1981-10-27 Horst Schramm Integrated house
US4303198A (en) * 1980-08-11 1981-12-01 Dulac Robert R Wood-burning boiler
US4360152A (en) * 1980-09-08 1982-11-23 Schlatter Lester E Auxiliary heating system
US4534319A (en) * 1984-03-13 1985-08-13 Manno Joseph T Wood burning stove heat exchanger
JP2000035229A (en) * 1998-07-17 2000-02-02 Taisei Corp Air conditioning system utilizing heat storage of building frame
JP2009007900A (en) * 2007-06-29 2009-01-15 Takenaka Komuten Co Ltd Combined hollow floor structure and air conditioning system
US20100147503A1 (en) * 2008-12-16 2010-06-17 Doo Nyun Kim Method for producing heating panel and heating panel resulting therefrom
US20100252232A1 (en) * 2009-04-02 2010-10-07 Daniel Reich Thermal energy module

Patent Citations (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1211728A (en) * 1916-01-07 1917-01-09 C A Londelius & Sons Co Builder's portable hot-water heater.
US4296798A (en) * 1977-11-15 1981-10-27 Horst Schramm Integrated house
US4257557A (en) * 1978-10-27 1981-03-24 Thomasma William S Fluid heating system utilizing solid fuel
GB2034347A (en) * 1978-10-28 1980-06-04 Philips Nv Thermal storage device
US4303198A (en) * 1980-08-11 1981-12-01 Dulac Robert R Wood-burning boiler
US4360152A (en) * 1980-09-08 1982-11-23 Schlatter Lester E Auxiliary heating system
US4534319A (en) * 1984-03-13 1985-08-13 Manno Joseph T Wood burning stove heat exchanger
JP2000035229A (en) * 1998-07-17 2000-02-02 Taisei Corp Air conditioning system utilizing heat storage of building frame
JP2009007900A (en) * 2007-06-29 2009-01-15 Takenaka Komuten Co Ltd Combined hollow floor structure and air conditioning system
US20100147503A1 (en) * 2008-12-16 2010-06-17 Doo Nyun Kim Method for producing heating panel and heating panel resulting therefrom
US20100252232A1 (en) * 2009-04-02 2010-10-07 Daniel Reich Thermal energy module

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
GB201107546D0 (en) 2011-06-22

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US4141336A (en) Fireplace stove
RU2250417C2 (en) Furnace for bath house and steam superheating method
JP5706478B2 (en) Biomass boiler
CA1125117A (en) Vertical feed stick wood fuel burning furnace system
US9568214B2 (en) Systems and methods for heating water using biofuel
US8186286B2 (en) Wood fired boiler
US6817354B2 (en) Wood burning furnace
US4179065A (en) Circulating air building heating system
US10627112B2 (en) Combustion apparatus
CA2648454C (en) High efficiency wood or biomass boiler
KR20150060137A (en) Stove air circulation system
RU2347980C1 (en) Bath-house furnace
US20130186313A1 (en) Low emission, wood fueled hydronic heater
RU61851U1 (en) Heating device lukasheva
US4121563A (en) Fuel saving furnace improvement
US4126118A (en) Modular fireplace assembly
RU121042U1 (en) WATER-SOLID FUEL BOILER
RU165769U1 (en) Bath and heating furnace
RU2365824C1 (en) Heating-cooking fireplace
RU46561U1 (en) Bath furnace
RU174432U1 (en) Bath furnace
US4466420A (en) Modular masonry heating system
US4724798A (en) Outdoor woodburning furnace
RU2363890C2 (en) Combustive furnace
DE202005004244U1 (en) Portable comfort heater has outer casing of fireproof concrete, chamotte, magnesite or other comparable storage materials and combustion chamber to accommodate defined firebox for burning of liquid fuel such as ethanol

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
WAP Application withdrawn, taken to be withdrawn or refused ** after publication under section 16(1)