GB2406064A - Cyclonic separating apparatus - Google Patents

Cyclonic separating apparatus Download PDF

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Publication number
GB2406064A
GB2406064A GB0412897A GB0412897A GB2406064A GB 2406064 A GB2406064 A GB 2406064A GB 0412897 A GB0412897 A GB 0412897A GB 0412897 A GB0412897 A GB 0412897A GB 2406064 A GB2406064 A GB 2406064A
Authority
GB
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
air
cyclone
outlet
dust
cyclones
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Granted
Application number
GB0412897A
Other versions
GB2406064B (en )
GB0412897D0 (en )
Inventor
Jang-Keun Oh
Hyun-Ju Lee
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Samsung Gwangju Electronics Co Ltd
Original Assignee
Samsung Gwangju Electronics Co Ltd
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L9/00Details or accessories of suction cleaners, e.g. mechanical means for controlling the suction or for effecting pulsating action; Storing devices specially adapted to suction cleaners or parts thereof; Carrying-vehicles specially adapted for suction cleaners
    • A47L9/10Filters; Dust separators; Dust removal; Automatic exchange of filters
    • A47L9/16Arrangement or disposition of cyclones or other devices with centrifugal action
    • A47L9/1616Multiple arrangement thereof
    • A47L9/1625Multiple arrangement thereof for series flow
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L9/00Details or accessories of suction cleaners, e.g. mechanical means for controlling the suction or for effecting pulsating action; Storing devices specially adapted to suction cleaners or parts thereof; Carrying-vehicles specially adapted for suction cleaners
    • A47L9/10Filters; Dust separators; Dust removal; Automatic exchange of filters
    • A47L9/16Arrangement or disposition of cyclones or other devices with centrifugal action
    • A47L9/1616Multiple arrangement thereof
    • A47L9/1641Multiple arrangement thereof for parallel flow
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B04CENTRIFUGAL APPARATUS OR MACHINES FOR CARRYING-OUT PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES
    • B04CAPPARATUS USING FREE VORTEX FLOW, e.g. CYCLONES
    • B04C5/00Apparatus in which the axial direction of the vortex is reversed
    • B04C5/02Construction of inlets by which the vortex flow is generated, e.g. tangential admission, the fluid flow being forced to follow a downward path by spirally wound bulkheads, or with slightly downwardly-directed tangential admission
    • B04C5/06Axial inlets
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B04CENTRIFUGAL APPARATUS OR MACHINES FOR CARRYING-OUT PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES
    • B04CAPPARATUS USING FREE VORTEX FLOW, e.g. CYCLONES
    • B04C5/00Apparatus in which the axial direction of the vortex is reversed
    • B04C5/12Construction of the overflow ducting, e.g. diffusing or spiral exits
    • B04C5/13Construction of the overflow ducting, e.g. diffusing or spiral exits formed as a vortex finder and extending into the vortex chamber; Discharge from vortex finder otherwise than at the top of the cyclone; Devices for controlling the overflow
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B04CENTRIFUGAL APPARATUS OR MACHINES FOR CARRYING-OUT PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES
    • B04CAPPARATUS USING FREE VORTEX FLOW, e.g. CYCLONES
    • B04C5/00Apparatus in which the axial direction of the vortex is reversed
    • B04C5/24Multiple arrangement thereof
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B04CENTRIFUGAL APPARATUS OR MACHINES FOR CARRYING-OUT PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES
    • B04CAPPARATUS USING FREE VORTEX FLOW, e.g. CYCLONES
    • B04C5/00Apparatus in which the axial direction of the vortex is reversed
    • B04C5/24Multiple arrangement thereof
    • B04C5/26Multiple arrangement thereof for series flow

Abstract

Cyclonic dust-collecting apparatus for use in (and used in) a vacuum cleaner comprises a first cyclone (111, fig. 1). Disposed around the outside of the first cyclone is a plurality of second cyclones (113, fig. 1) in parallel. A dust-collecting unit (165) is detachably connected to the first and second cyclones and collects dust form the first cyclone separately to dust separated by the second cyclones. An inlet-outlet cover (190) is installed on the upper portions of the first and second cyclones such that air flowing from the first cyclone's outlet (123) is guided towards the second cyclones' inlets (141). The dust-collecting apparatus has transparent wall sections such that a user may view the interior of each dust-collector. The first cyclone outlet may further be provided with a grille (131) and a shielding member (135) to enhance separation in the first stage.

Description

Cyclonic Separating Apparatus This invention relates to a cyclonic

separating apparatus and to a vacuum cleaner having the same, and in particular to a cyclonic separating apparatus comprising a first cyclone; a plurality of second cyclones; and an inlet-outlet cover installed on the upper part of the first cyclone and the second cyclones for communication between the first cyclone and the second cyclones and, through which air from which dust has been separated at the second cyclone, is discharged.

l O Generally, a cyclonic separating apparatus operates to separate dust and dirt (hereinafter referred to as "dust") using centrifugal force by generating a rotational current inside a cyclone chamber. A cyclonic separating apparatus of this type is widely used in a variety of fields. US Patents Nos.. 3,425,192 and 4,373,228 disclose embodiments adopting the structure of the aforementioned cyclonic separating apparatus in a vacuum cleaner.

The above-mentioned U.S. Patents disclose a cyclonic dust-collecting apparatus for separating dust from dust-carrying air using a plurality of cyclones. Large dust particles are separated by a first cyclone, and the air thus cleaned flows into a second (auxiliary) cyclone where it is filtered again to separate small dust particles. Clean air is discharged to the outside.

U.S.Patent No. 3,425,192 discloses that the auxiliary cyclone is arranged on the upper part of the first cyclone, so that large dust particles are separated at the first main cyclone and partially cleaned air flows into the auxiliary cyclone, where small dust particles are separated. U.S. Patent No. 4,373,228 discloses a plurality of auxiliary cyclone units which are installed inside the first cyclone. The conventional cyclonic separating apparatuses, however, have the following problems.

Firstly, the structure where the first cyclone is connected to the auxiliary cyclone(s) is complicated, and the suction force generated from the main body of the vacuum cleaner is hard to deliver, thus causing the suction operation and cleaning efficiency to deteriorate. Secondly, since the arrangement of the first cyclone and the auxiliary cyclone(s) is not compact, the cyclonic separating apparatus must be large if it is adequately to perform the dust-collecting operation. Accordingly, a vacuum cleaner with such a cyclonic separating apparatus is bulky, difficult to maintain, and is inconvenient to use. Thirdly, the conventional cyclonic separating apparatuses are problematic in that, since a connection path between the first cyclone and the auxiliary cyclone is complicated, the production process is complicated, and, therefore, the number of parts, and hence the production cost is increased.

Thus, a heretofore unaddressed need exists in the industry to address the aforementioned deficiencies and inadequacies.

An aim of the invention is to provide a cyclonic separating apparatus of a compact structure, and to provide a vacuum cleaner having the same, which cleaner is capable of increasing dust-collecting efficiency, and also preventing deterioration of its suction force.

The present invention provides a cyclonic separating apparatus for use in a vacuum cleaner, the apparatus comprising: a first cyclone for centrifugally separating dust from dust-carrying air in a first separation operation; a plurality of second cyclones for centrifugally separating minute particles of dust from the dust-carrying air in a second separation operation; and an inlet-outlet cover disposed on upper parts of the first and second cyclones, the inlet-outlet cover providing fluid communication between the first cyclone and the second cyclones, and the cover defining an outlet through which air cleaned by the second cyclones is discharged.

The inlet-outlet cover includes an air channel connected such that air discharged from the first cyclone flows into the second cyclones; and a plurality of outlet channels provided in the inlet-outlet cover so air can be discharged therethrough from the second cyclones. A predetermined portion of each outlet channel may be inserted into an outlet of a respective second cyclone when the inlet-outlet cover is positioned over the second cyclones, so that air is discharged through the outlet channels.

S One end of each outlet channel may be connected to the outlet formed on one side of the respective second cyclone, and the other end is upwardly open. The other end of each outlet channel may be cut into a slope inclined towards the centre of the inlet-outlet cover.

In a preferred embodiment, the apparatus further comprises a cyclone cover installed on an upper part of the inlet-outlet cover. Advantageously, the cyclone cover is substantially frustoconical with open upper and lower ends. Preferably, the open upper end of the cyclone cover constitutes the outlet through which air cleaned by the second cyclones is discharged.

Advantageously, the first cyclone comprises: a first chamber in which dust is separated from the dust-carrying air by a centrifugal force; a first inlet formed in the first chamber, through which first inlet the dust-carrying air enters the first chamber; and a first outlet formed in the first chamber, from which first outlet air is discharged.

Preferably, each of the second cyclones comprises a second chamber for separating the dust by using a centrifugal force from the air which was previously separated in the first cyclone, a second inlet formed in the second chamber, through which second inlet air discharged from the first cyclone flows, and a second outlet formed in the second chamber, through which second outlet dust-separated air is discharged.

Conveniently, the first chamber is substantially cylindrical, and each second chamber is formed such that one end thereof is substantially frustoconical.

Preferably, the second cyclones are installed on an outer periphery of the first cyclone so as to enclose the first cyclone, and the first cyclone and the second cyclones are integrally formed.

Conveniently, the apparatus further comprises a partition defining and separating the second cyclones.

The invention also provides a vacuum cleaner comprising: a vacuum cleaner main body for generating a suction force to draw in dust-carrying air; a nozzle unit for drawing in dust from a surface to be cleaned using the suction force, the nozzle unit being in fluid communication with the vacuum cleaner main body; and a cyclonic separating apparatus in the vacuum cleaner main body, wherein the cyclonic separating apparatus comprises: a first cyclone for centrifugally separating dust from dustcarrying air in a first separation operation; a plurality of second cyclones for centrifugally separating fine dust particles from air which was previously separated in the first cyclone; and an inlet-outlet cover disposed on upper parts of the first and second cyclones, the inletoutlet cover providing fluid communication between the first cyclone and the second cyclones, and the inlet-outlet cover defining an outlet through which air from the second cyclones is discharged.

Preferably, the inlet-outlet cover comprises: an air channel connected such that air discharged from the first cyclone flows into the second cyclones; and a plurality of outlet channels provided in the inlet-outlet cover so that air can be discharged therethrough from the second cyclones.

The invention will now be described in greater detail, by way of example, with reference to the drawings, in which: Figure 1 is an exploded, perspective view of the main part of a cyclonic separating apparatus constructed according to the invention; Figure 2 is a cross-sectional view of the cyclonic separating apparatus of Figure 1; Figure 3 is a perspective, cross-sectional view of part of the cyclonic separating apparatus of Figure 1; Figure 4 is a perspective view showing an inletoutlet cover forming part of the cyclonic separating apparatus of Figure 1; Figure 5 is a schematic, cross-sectional view of a canister vacuum cleaner incorporating the cyclonic separating apparatus of Figure 1; and Figure 6 is a schematic, perspective view of an upright vacuum cleaner incorporating the cyclonic separating apparatus of Figure 1.

Referring to the drawings, Figure 1 shows a cyclonic separating apparatus 100 having a first cyclone 111; a plurality of second cyclones 113; an inlet-outlet cover 190 installed on the upper parts of the first and second cyclones; a cyclone cover 191; and a dust-collecting unit 165. The second cyclones 113 are installed around the outer periphery of the first cyclone 111, thereby enclosing the first cyclone.

The first cyclone 111 is integrally formed with each of the second cyclones 113, a partition 250 defining and separating the second cyclones (see Figure 3). The presence of the partition 250 increases the firmness of the cyclonic separating apparatus 100.

A cylindrical chamber wall 147 is formed around the second cyclones 113. The chamber wall 147 can take a variety of shapes depending on the shape of the recess into which the chamber wall 147 is received in a vacuum cleaner main body 10 (see Figures and 6).

The first cyclone 111 comprises (see Figure 2) a first chamber 115, a first inlet 121, a first outlet 123, and a grille 130. The first chamber 115 is cylindrical, and separates dust from incoming air using the centrifugal force of a rotating air current. The grille 130 is installed upstream of the first outlet 123, to prevent dust separated from drawn-in air from flowing backwards through the first outlet. The grille 130 comprises a grille body 131 having a plurality of channels, a grille opening 133, and a shield 135. The grille opening 133 is formed at one end of the grille body 131 to discharge partially-cleaned air through the first outlet 123. The shield 135 is formed at the other end of the grille body 131, and prevents the separated dust from flowing backwards. s

Each second cyclone 113 comprises a respective second chamber 145, a respective second inlet 141, and a respective second outlet 143. Each second chamber 145 is formed such that one end thereof is frustoconical, and separates dust from dust-carrying air using centrifugal force. Air discharged from the first cyclone 111 flows into the second inlets 141, and air separated by the second chambers 145 using centrifugal force is discharged to the second outlets 143.

The inlet-outlet cover 190 is installed on the upper parts of the first and second cyclones 111 and 113, and comprises an air channel 197 for fluid communication between the first outlet 123 of the first cyclone 111 and the second inlets 141 of the second cyclones 113, and outlet channels 199.

The outlet channels 199 fluidly communicate with the second outlets 143 of the second cyclones 113. When the inlet-outlet cover 190 is in position, a portion of each outlet channel 199 is inserted into the respective second outlet 143, so that "clean" air can be discharged through the outlet channels. One end of each outlet channel 199 is connected to the respective second outlet 143, and the other end is upwardly open towards the top of the inlet-outlet cover 190.

The other end of each outlet channel 199 is cut to slope towards the centre of the inlet-outlet over 190, so that air discharged from the second cyclones 113 gathers at the cyclone cover 191 (see Figure 4).

The cyclone cover 191 is frustoconical, and is upwardly and downwardly open. The cyclone cover 191 is detachably disposed on the upper part of the inlet-outlet cover 190.

The air discharged from the second outlets 143 of the second cyclones 113 gathers in the cyclone cover 191, and is discharged to the outside of the cyclonic separating apparatus 100 through an upper opening 193 formed at the upper end of the cyclone cover.

The dust-collecting unit 165 comprises a first dust-collecting container 161 and a second dust-collecting container 163. The first dust-collecting container 161 is formed integrally with the second dust-collecting container 163. The second dust-collecting container 163 is formed as a hollow cylinder or substantially as a hollow cylinder. The second dustcollecting container 163 is detachably connected to the chamber wall 147 which is formed on the outside of the second cyclones 113. The first dustcollecting container 161 is formed as a hollow cylinder or substantially as a hollow cylinder. The first dust-collecting container 161 is formed inside the second dust-collecting container 163, and is detachably connected to the first chamber 115 of the first cyclone 111.

Hereinafter, a vacuum cleaner having the cyclonic separating apparatus according to an embodiment of the present invention will be described As shown in Figure 5, a dust-collecting chamber 12 is defined by a partition 17 formed in the main body 10 of a canister vacuum cleaner, the cyclonic separating apparatus 100 being positioned inside the dust-collecting chamber.

The first inlet 121, which is formed in one side of the upper part of the periphery of the cyclonic separating apparatus 100, permits dust-carrying air to pass therethrough as air is drawn into the cyclonic separating apparatus through a flexible hose 15 of the vacuum cleaner by the suction force being generated by the operation of a motor (not shown). The upper opening 193, which is formed in the central part of the upper end of the cyclonic separating apparatus 100, permits air to pass therethrough when the air ascends after dust-filtering by the centrifugal force.

The cyclonic separating apparatus 100 can also be incorporated in an upright vacuum cleaner. Thus, referring to Figure 6, a vacuum generating apparatus (such as a motor) (not shown) is provided in the main body 10 of the cleaner. A nozzle unit 60 is movably connected to the lower side of the cleaner main body 10, and a cyclone-receiving chamber 65 is provided in the front centre of the cleaner main body 10. An air suction channel 70 connected to the nozzle unit 60, and an air discharge channel 75 connected to the motor, are also provided, these channels terminating in the cyclone-receiving chamber 65.

The first inlet 121 of the cyclonic separating apparatus 100 fluidly communicates with the air suction channel 70, and the upper opening 193 fluidly communicates with the air discharge channel 75. Accordingly, dust is separated from the air drawn in through the nozzle unit 60 as it passes through the cyclonic separating apparatus 100. The "clean" air is then discharged to the outside by way of the upper opening 193 and the air discharge channel 75.

The operation of the cyclonic separating apparatus 100 will now be described with reference to Figures I to 4 and 6. As the suction force is generated in the vacuum cleaner main body 10, the nozzle unit 60, which is connected to the vacuum cleaner main body 10, draws in dust-carrying air from a surface to be cleaned.

The air then flows into the first chamber 115 in a tangential direction via the first inlet 121 of the cyclonic separating apparatus 100, and is filtered centrifugally by the first cyclone 111. As a result, large particles of dust are separated from the air, and collected in the first dust- collecting container 161.

More specifically, the first cyclone 111 operates mainly to separate large particles of dust from the drawn-in air, using the suction force generated by the motor in the vacuum cleaner main body 10. The first chamber 115 of the first cyclone 111 generates a centrifugal force by rotating air flowing in through the first inlet 121, along the inner wall of the first chamber in a tangential direction with respect to the first chamber.

The air, being relatively light in weight, is less influenced by the centrifugal force, and so converges towards the central portion of the first chamber 115. It is then discharged in a whirling air current towards the first outlet 123.

Dust which is relatively heavy compared to air, is subjected to the centrifugal force, and so flows along the inner wall of the first chamber 115 to be collected in the first dust-collecting container 161.

Once-filtered air flows through the first outlet 123 of the first chamber 115, passes along the air channel 197, and tangentially into the second chambers 145 through the second inlets 141 of the second cyclones 113. Since the air channel 197 is divided into small channels in a radial pattern from the centre, one large air stream is branched into small air streams. Accordingly, the air stream is diverted to the second cyclones 113 efficiently.

Air that has flowed into the second chambers 145 is filtered again by centrifugal force, so that small dust particles are separated, and collected in the second dust-collecting container 163. The fine dust particles are collected in the second dust-collecting container 163 after separation by the plurality of the second cyclones 113.

The partition 250, which is formed between the second cyclones 113, prevents, to some extent, dust from flowing backwards and allows efficient dust collecting when the separated dust particles fall down into the second dust-collecting container 163.

After the second dust separation process using centrifugal force, the air flows through the second outlets 143 of the second cyclones l l 3, passes along the outlet channels l 99 of the inlet-outlet cover 190, converges along the cyclone cover 191, and is discharged through the upper opening 193 formed in the upper part of the cyclone cover (see Figure 2).

The outlet channels 199 of the inlet-outlet cover 190, project upwardly from the inlet-outlet cover, and the sloping ends of the outlet channels allow the discharged air to converge within the cyclone cover 191 more efficiently. The air discharging structure using slope-cutting can prevent suction force deterioration, and increase dust-collecting efficiency.

The second cyclones 113 operate to separate fine dust particles from the air that has already been filtered by the first cyclone 111. In other words, the cyclonic separating apparatus 100 improves dust-collecting efficiency by performing an initial dust-separation process using the first cyclone 111, and then performing a second separation process using the plurality of second cyclones 113.

In the cyclonic separating apparatus 100, the distance between the first outlet 123 of the first cyclone 111 and the second inlets 141 of the second cyclones 113 is reduced compared to the cleaners of the related art such as that disclosed in US Patent 3,425,192 and US Patent 4,373,228, so that suction force deterioration is prevented and dust-collecting efficiency is improved.

After the filtration processes described above, the air from the cyclonic separating apparatus 100 is discharged to the outside through the vacuum cleaner main body 10.

As is apparent from the foregoing, the conventional cyclonic separating apparatus has a problem of low dust-collecting efficiency, and was limited to some extent in terms of suction force efficiency. However, the inlet-outlet cover of the cyclonic separating apparatus described above enables a compact structure to be realised. Moreover, suction force deterioration is prevented, and dust-collecting efficiency is increased.

Also, since it is possible to provide a cyclonic separating apparatus and a vacuum cleaner having the same, that are satisfactory from the viewpoint of user preference, the product can have higher competitiveness.

The foregoing embodiment and advantages are merely exemplary, and are not to be construed as limiting the present invention. The present teaching can be readily applied to other types of apparatus. Also, the description of the embodiments of the present invention is intended to be illustrative, and not to limit the scope of the claims, and many alternatives, modifications, and variations will be apparent to those skilled in the art.

Claims (15)

  1. Claims 1. A cyclonic separating apparatus for use in a vacuum cleaner, the
    apparatus comprlsmg: a first cyclone for centrifugally separating dust from dust-carrying air in a first separation operation; a plurality of second cyclones for centrifugally separating minute particles of dust from the dust-carrying air in a second separation operation, and an inletoutlet cover disposed on upper parts of the first and second cyclones, the inlet-outlet cover providing fluid communication between the first cyclone and the second cyclones, and the cover defining an outlet through which air cleaned by the second cyclones is discharged.
  2. 2. Apparatus as claimed in claim 1, wherein the inlet-outlet cover comprises: an air channel connected such that air discharged from the first cyclone flows into the second cyclones, and a plurality of outlet channels provided in the inlet-outlet cover so that air can be discharged therethrough from the second cyclones.
  3. 3. Apparatus as claimed in claim 2, wherein a predetermined portion of each outlet channel is inserted into one outlet of a respective second cyclone when the inlet-outlet cover is positioned over the second cyclones so that air is discharged through the outlet channels.
  4. 4. Apparatus as claimed in claim 3, wherein one end of each outlet channel is connected to the outlet formed on one side of the respective second cyclone, and the other end is upwardly open.
  5. 5. Apparatus as claimed in claim 4, further comprising a cyclone cover installed on an upper part of the inlet-outlet cover.
  6. 6. Apparatus as claimed in claim 5, wherein the cyclone cover is substantially frustoconical with open upper and lower ends.
  7. 7. Apparatus as claimed in claim 6, wherein the open upper end of the cyclone cover constitutes the outlet through which air cleaned by the second cyclones is discharged.
  8. 8. Apparatus as claimed in any one of claims 4 to 7, wherein the other end of each outlet channel is cut into a slope inclined towards the centre of the inlet-outlet cover.
    lO
  9. 9. Apparatus as claimed in any one of claims l to 8, wherein the first cyclone comprises: a first chamber in which dust is separated from the dust-carrying air by a centrifugal force; a first inlet formed in the first chamber, through which first inlet the dust-carrying air enters the first chamber; and a first outlet formed in the first chamber, from which first outlet air is discharged.
  10. 10. Apparatus as claimed in claim 9, wherein each of the second cyclones comprises: a second chamber for separating the dust by using a centrifugal force from the air which was previously separated in the first cyclone; a second inlet formed in the second chamber, through which second inlet air discharged from the first cyclone flows; and a second outlet formed in the second chamber, through which second outlet dust- separated air is discharged.
  11. 11. Apparatus as claimed in claim 10, wherein the first chamber is substantially cylindrical, and each second chamber is formed such that one end thereof is substantially frustoconical.
  12. 12. Apparatus as claimed in any one of claims 1 to 11, wherein the second cyclones are installed on an outer periphery of the first cyclone so as to enclose the first cyclone, and the first cyclone and the second cyclones are integrally formed.
  13. 13. Apparatus as claimed in claim 12, further comprising a partition defining and separating the second cyclones.
  14. 14. A vacuum cleaner comprising: a vacuum cleaner main body for generating a suction force to draw in dust-carrying air; a nozzle unit for drawing in dust from a surface to be cleaned using the suction force, the nozzle unit being in fluid communication with the vacuum cleaner main body; and a cyclonic separating apparatus in the vacuum cleaner main body, wherein the cyclonic separating apparatus comprises: a first cyclone for centrifugally separating dust from dust-carrying air in a first separation operation; 1 S a plurality of second cyclones for centrifugally separating fine dust particles from air which was previously separated in the first cyclone; and I an inlet-outlet cover disposed on upper parts of the first and second cyclones, the inlet-outlet cover providing fluid communication between the first cyclone and the second cyclones, and the inlet-outlet cover defining an outlet through which air from the second cyclones is discharged.
  15. 15. A cleaner as claimed in claim 14, wherein the inlet-outlet cover comprises: an air channel connected such that air discharged from the first cyclone flows into the second cyclones; and a plurality of outlet channels provided in the inlet-outlet cover so that air can be discharged therethrough from the second cyclones.
GB0412897A 2003-09-08 2004-06-09 Cyclonic separating apparatus Expired - Fee Related GB2406064B (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
KR20030062520A KR100554237B1 (en) 2003-09-08 2003-09-08 A cyclone separating apparatus and vacumm cleaner equipped whth such a device
KR20030063211A KR100536506B1 (en) 2003-09-09 2003-09-09 A cyclone separating apparatus and vacumm cleaner equipped whth such a device

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Publication Number Publication Date
GB0412897D0 GB0412897D0 (en) 2004-07-14
GB2406064A true true GB2406064A (en) 2005-03-23
GB2406064B GB2406064B (en) 2006-11-08

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GB2410911B (en) * 2004-02-11 2006-02-08 Samsung Kwangju Electronics Co Cyclonic dust-collector
GB2418162A (en) * 2004-05-12 2006-03-22 Samsung Kwangju Electronics Co Cyclonic dust collecting apparatus.
GB2424606A (en) * 2005-03-29 2006-10-04 Samsung Kwangju Electronics Co Cyclonic dust-separating apparatus
GB2428210A (en) * 2005-07-12 2007-01-24 Samsung Kwangju Electronics Co Dust collecting apparatus for a cyclonic vacuum cleaner
GB2445050A (en) * 2006-12-22 2008-06-25 Hoover Ltd Cyclone array
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