GB2384110A - A wind instrument mouthpiece with moisture trap - Google Patents

A wind instrument mouthpiece with moisture trap Download PDF

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Publication number
GB2384110A
GB2384110A GB0229176A GB0229176A GB2384110A GB 2384110 A GB2384110 A GB 2384110A GB 0229176 A GB0229176 A GB 0229176A GB 0229176 A GB0229176 A GB 0229176A GB 2384110 A GB2384110 A GB 2384110A
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GB
United Kingdom
Prior art keywords
instrument
headpiece
plug
tube
plenum chamber
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Withdrawn
Application number
GB0229176A
Other versions
GB0229176D0 (en
Inventor
John Noel Mccalmont
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
BU Innovations Ltd
Original Assignee
BU Innovations Ltd
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to GB0200440A priority Critical patent/GB0200440D0/en
Application filed by BU Innovations Ltd filed Critical BU Innovations Ltd
Priority claimed from AU2003201990A external-priority patent/AU2003201990A1/en
Publication of GB0229176D0 publication Critical patent/GB0229176D0/en
Publication of GB2384110A publication Critical patent/GB2384110A/en
Withdrawn legal-status Critical Current

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Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10DSTRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACCORDIONS OR CONCERTINAS; PERCUSSION MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; AEOLIAN HARPS; SINGING-FLAME MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G10D9/00Details of, or accessories for, wind musical instruments
    • G10D9/02Mouthpieces; Reeds; Ligatures
    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10DSTRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACCORDIONS OR CONCERTINAS; PERCUSSION MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; AEOLIAN HARPS; SINGING-FLAME MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G10D7/00General design of wind musical instruments
    • G10D7/02General design of wind musical instruments of the type wherein an air current is directed against a ramp edge
    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10DSTRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACCORDIONS OR CONCERTINAS; PERCUSSION MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; AEOLIAN HARPS; SINGING-FLAME MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G10D9/00Details of, or accessories for, wind musical instruments

Abstract

A woodwind instrument, in particular a recorder or a flute, and having a plenum chamber (20, 52, 121) between the mouthpiece (23, 53, 125) and the wind channel (11, 42, 122) thereof to collect exhaled moisture. In the case of a recorder the mouthpiece preferably has an axial embouchure similar to those found in brass instruments so that the inside of the players mouth is not in contact with the instrument and the embouchure is offset from the wind channel. In the case of the flute the plenum chamber (121) may be provided in a training headpiece (120) to the instrument and which is interchangeable with the standard headpiece thereof so that in addition to providing a moisture entrapment facility the instrument may be played with the player's lips covering the embouchure and he can concentrate on learning the operation of the keys.

Description

<Desc/Clms Page number 1>
IMPROVEMENTS IN OR RELATING TO WIND INSTRUMENTS Field of the Invention The present invention relates to wind instruments, in particular to recorders and flutes. It is primarily concerned with means to reduce, even attenuate, the accumulation of moisture, such as saliva, and other detritus in the instrument. However, secondary concerns are to provide a learning aid for the flute and to improve the range of the recorder.
Recorders generally comprise a body tube and a head piece tube, the body tube having a plurality of holes including a basic'letterbox"incorporating a bevel whereover the primary sound-waves are generated in use, and other holes coverable by a player's fingers to determine the notes being played, and the head piece tube incorporating the instrument's mouthpiece and a wind channel through which the performer blows onto the letterbox. The mouthpiece is shaped to permit the performer to close his lips therearound. It is typical of the problem of moisture and detritus accumulation in recorders that this occurs in the instrument wind channel, wherefrom its removal is not always easy.
It is well understood by persons skilled in the recorder art that variations in the axial length, depth, transverse breadth and even wedge angle of the letterbox have a significant effect upon the range of notes that can be played on the instrument and the tone and volume of those notes. Generally however an improvement in one parameter is achieved at the expense of another and the instruments in general use reflect a compromise dependent on the context of use.
Background to the Invention The problem of body fluid accumulation in recorders is quite well known, being discussed for example in Nicholas S. Lander's website article dated 1996-2000 and entitled'instrument of Torture or Instrument of Music". Various provisions have been suggested for the avoidance of the problem of moisture accumulation. For example Moeck, in US Patent Specification 3,178, 986, provided an adsorbent lining to the wind channel. He improved on this in US Patent Specification 3,988, 956 by providing a core as a base to the wind channel and made of an adsorbent material such as plaster of paris. Neither of these provisions is particularly effective, and does not much lengthen the time that the instrument can be played without requiring cleaning. Besides, as Lander points out, they result in a"ghastly cocktail" accumulating in the instrument, which can be difficult to remove if not deleterious to the instrument itself.
<Desc/Clms Page number 2>
It is an object of the present invention to provide a recorder in which a deleterious accumulation of moisture during playing is very significantly reduced, even attenuated.
It is a further object of the present invention to provide a training aid for a flute.
It is a yet further object of the present invention to improve the flexibility of the recorder and to provide for improvements in the tone of the instrument and the ease of playing it throughout two full octaves.
Summary of the Invention According to the present invention a wind instrument having a body tube and a headpiece tube and defining a wind channel, the body tube incorporating a letterbox having a bevel toward which the wind channel is arranged in use to direct air and the headpiece tube having a mouthpiece incorporating an embouchure is characterised by a plenum chamber between the mouthpiece and the wind channel and arranged for the collection of moisture blown into the mouthpiece by the player.
It is an important feature of the invention that the mouthpiece may comprise a flange member projecting radially at the end of the head member, whereby the player's lips may be pressed thereagainst as they would against a brass instrument, e. g. trumpet, mouthpiece, rather than formed therearound. The flange may be circular, possibly bell-mouthed, and advantageously forms the blowhole, hereinafter called the embouchure, through which the player blows, the embouchure being preferably central or coaxial to the instrument. In this manner the embouchure will be not merely offset with respect to the wind channel but also, in the usual playing configuration, below it.
It will be perceived that in an instrument incorporating all these features, with the plenum chamber serving to collect moisture before it might reach the wind channel, the flanged mouthpiece means that the moist surfaces of the player's mouth interior are not in direct communication with the instrument and this in itself very significantly reduces the amount of moisture which may be blown into the instrument. Moreover, the offsetting of the embouchure with respect to the wind channel makes it likely that such moisture and other detritus as enters the plenum chamber during playing will strike the rear of the plenum chamber and then flow to the base thereof. Given then that the plenum chamber, by definition, does not so closely bound such collected moisture and detritus as would the instrument wind channel, which characteristically is of large capillary proportions, the moisture and detritus is much more readily shaken from the plenum chamber than from the wind channel.
<Desc/Clms Page number 3>
In a further feature of the invention the sides and front of the plenum chamber and mouthpiece may constitute the headpiece and this is detachable from the body tube, and there is a plug in the body tube the front face of which plug forms the rear wall of the plenum chamber and the rear face of which plug is adjacent the letterbox.
This facilitates the removal of moisture from the plenum chamber. The plug's front and rear faces may be planar and right radial to the instrument axis; however if the rear face slopes downward rearward this will assist still further the diversion of moisture from the wind channel and increase the moisture collecting volume of the plenum chamber.
In the case of a flute incorporating the plenum chamber the flanged mouthpiece may be formed in a side wall of a practice headpiece interchangeable with the normal headpiece or head end of the instrument. In this way the mouthpiece may be formed so that the flute is otherwise presented to the player's mouth in such a way that his fingers adopt the configuration they would if he were playing the flute in the normal way, that is by judicious blowing across the embouchure. This feature confers the advantage that the learner can concentrate upon mastering his finger positions in a learning phase separate to that of mastering the positions and configurations of his lips in relation to the embouchure. The head end of this flute headpiece may also be detachable therefrom to facilitate the removal of moisture collected in the plenum chamber.
Such a practice headpiece may be arranged for use with a recorder body tube whereby the player can practice flute finger movements with a recorder body.
It will now be appreciated that in a particularly economical embodiment of the recorder the wind channel is a straight and radial sided void in the body tube, which tube may be right cylindrical in form, with the inner boundary of the wind channel formed by the outer circumference of the plug and the outer boundary thereof formed by the inner circumference of the headpiece. This arcuate rectangular cross section to the wind channel confers some advantage to the tone of the instrument but the construction indicated in this paragraph in its turn confers the advantage that the headpiece or the plug, or both simultaneously, may be axially movable with respect to the body tube to vary the musical behaviour of the instrument. For example, the longer the letterbox axially the"breathier"or more"pan-pipe-like"the sound until finally, musical sound disappears, while the shorter the letterbox the more"reedy"the sound until only a squeak is achieved. Again, a plug closer into the body tube improves the accessibility of the lower octave, whilst a plug further out of the body tube improves the accessibility of the upper octave.
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In another embodiment of the recorder, the plug contains entirely the wind channel and the latter is at an angle to the instrument axis, being closer thereto at the rear, or plenum chamber, end of the plug, and the plug is movable longitudinally with respect to the tube whereby the division of air at the bevel can be modified.
Alternatively the wind channel may be formed as a groove in the plug and which is deeper toward the rear end thereof. In yet further arrangements for modulating the division of air by the bevel, the plug may have the wind channel formed therein and be arranged to rock in the instrument, by being for example barrel-or truncated cone-shaped.
In a particularly simple construction of a recorder the headpiece is not readily detachable from the body tube, since it can be relatively simple to shake moisture therefrom via the embouchure, particularly if there is a smooth, non-discontinuous route from the plenum chamber to the embouchure.
The axial movement of the recorder headpiece and/or the plug may be achieved by ensuring that these items are a push fit with respect to the body tube. If this fine tuning were to be obtained with either the headpiece or the plug or both screw-threaded to the body tube or one to the other then this screw threading is preferably arranged not to cross the wind channel, for example by the incorporation of suitable collars. The plug may be provided with a suitable grip to facilitate its axial movement or screwing.
In particularly advantageous versions of the invention the plug and/or the headpiece are slidable longitudinally with respect to the body tube in real-time, that is, whilst the instrument is being played. For moving the plug in this way knobs may project therefrom through slots in the body tube and headpiece.
The invention also makes it possible to have a collection of plugs since, for example, recessed rear face to the plug affects accurate tuning of octaves. It may also be possible to employ a plug the shape whereof can be modified in use, or a reversible plug.
These various features mean that the octave hole traditionally located in the lower rear of the body tube is unnecessary.
Of course the recorder wind channel need not be bounded by body tube radial wall but by a recess in or channel through the plug or headpiece or by a combination of these.
It may be determined to place an adsorbent pad, even a filter, in the plenum chamber. Whilst this pad may be constituted by a sponge or a small ball of cotton wool the invention envisages the provision of consumable pads or filters which may be jettisoned and replaced when soggy. Alternatively or additionally there may be
<Desc/Clms Page number 5>
incorporated in the mouthpiece a tube projecting into the plenum chamber to restrict the flowback of moisture and detritus, thus making the instrument even more congenial and hygienic against the event of it being passed from player to player.
Brief Description of the Drawings Embodiments of recorders and a flute in accordance with the invention will now be more particularly described with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which: Figure 1 is a general side view of a simple recorder in accordance with the invention; Figure 2 is a detail view of the headpiece end of an instrument such as that shewn in figure 1; Figures 3A, 3B, 3C illustrate forms of wind channel plug for a recorder of the types illustrated in figures 1 and 2; Figure 4 is a part section of the rear end of a recorder in which the plug and headpiece are axially movable with respect to the body tube in real-time ; Figure 5 is a longitudinal section of a recorder in which the plug is movable and has a non-axial wind channel ; Figures 6 and 6a illustrate a flute with a second headpiece in accordance with the invention; and Figure 7 is a section of a recorder headpiece having a flow back trap tube.
Detailed Description of Embodiments The recorder shewn in Figures 1 and 2 comprises a body tube 10, a headpiece 20 and a plug 30. The body tube 10 is rebated at its rear end to provide the sides of a wind channel 11 leading to a letterbox 12 at the forward end of which is a bevel 13. The body 10 has finger holes 14. The headpiece 20 is waisted, at 21, to define a plenum chamber 22 and a mouthpiece 23 with an embouchure 24. The headpiece 20 fits over the rear end of the body tube 10 and defines the radially outer wall of the wind channel 11. The plug 30 has a rear face 31 and a forward face 32 and fits within the body tube to define the forward wall of the plenum chamber 22, the rear wall of the body tube 10 and the radially interior wall of the wind channel 11.
The headpiece 20 and the plug 30 are tight push fits respectively onto and into the body tube 10, the plug 30 rear face 31 being approximate the rear end of the body tube 10 which in turn abuts the commencement of the waist of the headpiece 20.
<Desc/Clms Page number 6>
To play a recorder assembled as shewn in figure 1, the player holds the instrument in both hands so that he can selectively close and open the finger holes 14 in the manner typical of the instrument. He places his lips to the embouchure 24 and blows therethrough. The expiratory air enters the plenum chamber 22, then the wind channel 11 before being split by the bevel 13 in the letterbox 12 to excite sound waves.
It can be seen that this playing mode obviates the interior of the player's mouth coming into contact with the instrument, thus reducing the amount of moisture being blown thereinto during playing. Moreover, as the embouchure 24 and the wind channel 11 are not in alignment one with the other such moisture and detritus as might be blown into the instrument are the more likely to strike the plug 30 rear face 31 and drop to the bottom of the plenum chamber 22. When convenient this moisture and detritus can be shaken from the plenum chamber 22 via the mouthpiece 23.
In essence the figures 1 and 2 illustrate several embodiments of the invention.
In the simplest form the plug 30 and headpiece 20 are so tightly fitted, possibly even attached, to the body tube 10 as not to be movable with respect thereto or removable therefrom.
However, if the headpiece 2d is removable from the body'abe 10 a-'mufe"- thorough cleaning of the plenum chamber 22 can be effected whilst, if it is slidable with respect to the body tube 10 to vary the length of the letterbox 12, possibly during playing, modulation of the tone of the recorder can be effected.
Likewise if the plug 30 is slidable longitudinally in the body tube 10 the tone of the instrument can be varied. The further into the body tube 10 is the plug 30, the greater the emphasis on the lower octave. Likewise, the further out of the body tube 10 is the plug 30 the greater the emphasis on the upper octave.
Figures 3A, 3B and 3C illustrate varieties of shapes of the plug 30. In figure 3A the plug 30a has a rear face 31a at right angles to the axis thereof and a recessed forward face 32a. In figure 38 the plug 30b has a rear face 31 b at an angle of about 750 to the instrument axis and a recessed forward face 32b. The plug 30b is inserted into the body tube 10 with the rear face sloping downwards forwards with respect to the instrument, to enlarge the plenum chamber 22 and to encourage moisture to drop to the bottom thereof. In either case the plug may be reversible in the body tube 10.
In Figure 3C the plug 30c has a right circular rear face 31 c, that is it is right transverse to the plug axis, and a recessed forward face 32c. A grip handle 33c is attached to the rear face 31c of the plug to facilitate axial movement of the plug 30c.
<Desc/Clms Page number 7>
The recorder depicted in figure 4 has a body tube 40, a headpiece 50 and a plug 60. The headpiece 50 fits over the rear end of the body tube 40 and is a close slidable fit with respect thereto. The plug 60 fits into the rear end of the body tube 40 and is a close slidable fit with respect thereto. The body tube 40 is rebated to form the side walls of a wind channel 41 leading to a letterbox 42 having a sound-wave exciting bevel 43. As with the recorders described with reference to figures 1 and 2 the headpiece 50 and the plug 60 form the outer and inner walls respectively of the wind channel 41, which thereby extends from the letterbox 42 to the plenum chamber 52. The body tube 40 also has two diametrically opposed longitudinal guide slots 44 for plug position controls. The body tube 40 has the finger holes, of which two are shewn at 45, usual in recorders except that the standard upper octave enabling hole on the underside is obviated.
The headpiece 50 is waisted at 51 to define a plenum chamber 52 and a mouthpiece 53 with an embouchure 54. An internal rib 55 in the plenum chamber provides a stop for inward movement of the headpiece 50 over the body tube 40.
The headpiece 50 also has two diametrically opposed longitudinal slots 56 for plug position controls. The slots 56 correspond with the slots 44 in the body tube 40 but continue to the forward end of the headpiece 50 to enable removal of the headpiece from the body tube 40 and access to the plenum chamber 52. Removably contained within the plenum chamber 52 is an adsorbent pad 70.
The plug 60 has a recessed forward end 61, a flat rear face 62 and two diametrically opposed slide controls 63. These slide controls 63 project through the slots 44 and 56 to enable the player to move the plug 60 axially with respect to the body tube 40.
This recorder is played substantially as are those described with reference to figures 1 and 2, with the player's mouth presented to the embouchure. In this case however the player can, whilst playing or in a very short interlude, move the plug 60 via the controls 63 to facilitate playing at the upper or lower octaves, and move the headpiece 50 to modulate the tone of the instrument between a more"pipes-of-pan" and a more"reedy"sound. When the adsorbent pad 70 is deemed sufficiently soggy it can be replaced with a new one.
The recorder illustrated in Figure 5 has a body tube 80, a headpiece 81 and a plug 82. The body tube 80 has a letterbox 83 with a note forming bevel 84, and a series of finger holes 85. As with the recorders described with reference to Figures 1 and 2 and 4, the headpiece 81 is waisted to define a plenum chamber 86 and a mouthpiece with an embouchure 87. The plug 82 has formed therein a wind channel 88 extending from the rear face to the forward face thereof and which
<Desc/Clms Page number 8>
emerges from the rear face closer to the axis of the instrument than it does from the forward end. The plug is a close sliding fit within the rear end of the body tube 80 and the headpiece 81 is a close sliding fit over the rear end of the body tube 80. The body tube 80 and the headpiece 81 have corresponding slots 89 and the plug 82 has two control pegs 90 protruding through the slots 89. The slots 89 are axially aligned and serve both to maintain the radial alignment of the plug 82 with respect to the body tube 80 and to govern the extent of longitudinal movement that the plug 82 may make with respect to the body tube 80. A filter 91, of cigarette filter proportions, is retained at the core of the plenum chamber In this embodiment the wind channel 88 is arranged for directing air at the bevel 84, and quite slight longitudinal movement of the plug 82 makes a considerable difference to the share of the air from the wind channel 88 which is directed into the interior of the body tube 80 and hence to the ease of playing in the upper and lower registers. Accordingly the slots 89 in the body tube extend only a millimetre or so more than the pegs 90.
Figures 6 and 6a show a flute according to the invention. The flute shewn in figure 6 comprises a body tube 100 having the keys 101 which are standard in such instruments and a standard head piece 110. The headpiece 110 incorporates a mouthpiece 111 standard for flutes, that is having a lip rest 111 a ancf. r, an embouchure 111 b. The headpiece 110 is detachable from the body tube 100 at 100a.
Figure 6a shows a training headpiece 120 which fits to the body tube 100 in place of the standard headpiece 110. The training headpiece 120 has a plenum chamber 121, a wind channel 122 leading to a letterbox 123 and a plenum chamber access stopper 124. The headpiece body is pierced adjacent the plenum chamber and thus provides a mouthpiece with an embouchure 125. The embouchure 125 is sited on the headpiece 120 at a location such that when the training headpiece 120 is fitted to the flute body tube 100 in place of the standard headpiece 110, the embouchure 125 is the same distance from the flute keys 101.
The headpiece 120 is fitted to the body tube 100 with the embouchure 125 displaced 900 with respect to the position occupied by the standard mouthpiece 111 whereby the player can blow directly into the embouchure 125, where he would have blown across the mouthpiece 111, and the keys will be in the same orientation for his fingers.
When, after a period of playing the flute with the training headpiece 120 fitted, the plenum chamber 121 may be deemed to require emptying of accumulated
<Desc/Clms Page number 9>
moisture and possibly detritus, the stopper 124 can be removed and the contents of the plenum chamber 121 shaken and possibly washed and/or swabbed out.
The recorder illustrated in Figure 7 has a body tube 170 and a headpiece 180.
The body tube 170 has a letterbox 171 and a tapered projection 172 arranged to interfit with and hold the headpiece 180. The projection 172 incorporates a windway 173. As with the recorders described with reference to figures 1,2 and 4 the headpiece is waisted to define a plenum chamber 181 and a mouthpiece with an embouchure 182. Attached within the mouthpiece is a tube 183 which projects well into the plenum chamber 181. The tube 183 acts to ensure that moisture in the plenum chamber does not flow back into the mouthpiece and perhaps affect the playing of the instrument, and this moisture can effectively only be removed by detaching the headpiece 180 from the body tube 170. This feature also ensures a degree of congeniality and hygiene in the event that the instrument is passed from one player to another.

Claims (34)

Claims:
1. A wind instrument having a body tube and a headpiece and defining a wind channel and a letterbox for forming sound, the headpiece tube having a mouthpiece incorporating an embouchure and characterised by a plenum chamber between the mouthpiece and the wind channel, the plenum chamber being arranged for the collection of moisture blown into the mouthpiece by the player.
2. A wind instrument as claimed in claim 1 and wherein the mouthpiece comprises a flange member surrounding the embouchure, whereby the player's lips may be pressed thereagainst.
3. A wind instrument as claimed in claim 2 and wherein the flange member projects radially at the end of the head member.
4. An instrument as claimed in claim 2 or claim 3 and wherein the flange is circular.
5. An instrument as claimed in any one of claims 2 to 4 and wherein the flange is bell-mouthed.
6. An instrument as claimed in any one of the preceding claims and wherein the embouchure is coaxial thereto.
7. An instrument as claimed in any one of the preceding claims and wherein the embouchure is offset in relation to the wind channel.--
8. An instrument as claimed in any one of the preceding claims and wherein the headpiece is detachable from the body tube.
9. An instrument as claimed in any one of the preceding claims and wherein the headpiece and the mouthpiece define circumferential and rear walls to the plenum chamber, whereby detaching the headpiece from the body tube opens the plenum chamber.
10. An instrument as claimed in any one of the preceding claims and having a plug lodged in the body tube adjacent the rear end thereof providing, when the instrument is assembled, a front wall to the plenum chamber.
11. An instrument as claimed in any one of the preceding claims and wherein the wind channel is defined between the plug and the headpiece and rebated side walls to the body tube.
12. An instrument as claimed in claim 10 and wherein the plug is movable longitudinally in relation to the body tube, for modifying the tone of the instrument.
13. An instrument as claimed in claim 10 and wherein the plug has handle means for effecting the said movement.
<Desc/Clms Page number 11>
14. An instrument as claimed in claim 10 and wherein the handle means projects laterally through a slot in the body tube and the headpiece to effect realtime longitudinal movement of the plug.
15. An instrument as claimed in any one of claims 10,12 or 13 and wherein the wind channel has a principal axis at an angle to the instrument axis, the rear of the wind channel longitudinal axis being closer to the instrument axis than the forward end of the wind channel axis.
16. An instrument as claimed in claim 10 and wherein the wind channel is formed in the plug and the plug is rockable within the tube to modify the direction of the longitudinal axis of the wind channel with respect to that of the instrument.
17. An instrument as claimed in claim 12 or claim 13 and having screw thread means for effecting the longitudinal movement of the plug.
18. An instrument as claimed in claim 10 and wherein the plug, or another plug for occupying the same location in the instrument, has a rear wall sloping forwards downwards to assist in the collection of moisture in the plenum chamber.
19. An instrument as claimed in claim 10 or claim 18 and wherein the plug, or another plug for occupying the same location in the instrument, has a front wall sloping downwards and forwards for qualifying the sensitivity of the instrument.
20. An instrument as claimed in claim 10 or claim 18 and wherein the plug, or another plug for occupying the same location in the instrument, has a recessed front wall for qualifying the tone of the instrument.
21. An instrument as claimed in claim 10 and wherein the plug has one end wall recessed and is reversible to present different end wall shapes within the body tube.
22. An instrument as claimed in claim 10 and wherein the plug is modifiable in shape for qualifying the tone of the instrument.
23. An instrument as claimed in any one of the preceding claims and wherein the headpiece is movable longitudinally with respect to the body tube for modifying the size of the letterbox and thereby the tone of the instrument.
24. An instrument as claimed in claim 23 and having screw thread means for effecting the longitudinal movement of the headpiece.
25. An instrument as claimed in any one of the preceding claims and having a detachable filter located in the plenum chamber.
26. An instrument as claimed in any one of the preceding claims and having a tube in the mouthpiece, the tube projecting into the plenum chamber for restricting the flow back of moisture.
<Desc/Clms Page number 12>
27. An instrument according to any one or more of the preceding claims and which is a recorder.
28. An instrument as claimed in claim 1 or claim 2 and which is a flute.
29. A flute as claimed in claim 28 and having two, interchangeable headpieces of which a first headpiece incorporates an embouchure across which the player blows in use and a second, training, headpiece incorporates the letterbox, the wind channel, the plenum chamber and an embouchure into which the player blows in use, the positioning of the second headpiece embouchure being such that the player can hold the flute in the same configuration as he would with the first headpiece fitted.
30. A training headpiece for a wind instrument and incorporating a letterbox as herein defined, a wind channel, a plenum chamber, and an embouchure in a side-wall thereof, and being adapted to fit onto the body tube of a wind instrument such as a flute or recorder.
31. A training headpiece as claimed in claim 30 and having an end plug removable to permit moisture to be emptied from the plenum chamber.
32. A recorder substantially as described herein with reference to any one or more of figures 1 to 5 and 7 of the accompanying drawings.
33. A flute substantially as hereinbefore described with reference to figure 6 and 6a of the accompanying drawings.
34. A training headpiece substantially as described with reference to figure 6a of the accompanying drawings.
GB0229176A 2002-01-10 2002-12-13 A wind instrument mouthpiece with moisture trap Withdrawn GB2384110A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB0200440A GB0200440D0 (en) 2002-01-10 2002-01-10 Improvements in or relating to wind instruments

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
AU2003201990A AU2003201990A1 (en) 2002-01-10 2003-01-07 Improvements in or relating to wind instruments
PCT/GB2003/000028 WO2003058598A1 (en) 2002-01-10 2003-01-07 Improvements in or relating to wind instruments

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GB0229176D0 GB0229176D0 (en) 2003-01-22
GB2384110A true GB2384110A (en) 2003-07-16

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GB0229176A Withdrawn GB2384110A (en) 2002-01-10 2002-12-13 A wind instrument mouthpiece with moisture trap

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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
AU2006202701B1 (en) * 2006-06-23 2007-11-08 Peter Neil Madge Modification of or for recorder blocks
GB2469054A (en) * 2009-03-31 2010-10-06 Thomas Thomson Alexander Spit trap for a wind instrument
GB2480886A (en) * 2010-06-02 2011-12-07 William Kerr Mcneil Mouthpiece adaptor for flageolet types of wind instrument
GB2577155A (en) * 2018-07-03 2020-03-18 Macisaac Robbie Wind instruments

Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB2171238A (en) * 1984-07-13 1986-08-20 Univ Cardiff Mouthpieces or musical wind instruments
US4700606A (en) * 1986-12-30 1987-10-20 Nobuo Toyama Recorders
CA1248792A (en) * 1987-09-21 1989-01-17 Lawrence D. Campbell Practice chanter spittle trap

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB2171238A (en) * 1984-07-13 1986-08-20 Univ Cardiff Mouthpieces or musical wind instruments
US4700606A (en) * 1986-12-30 1987-10-20 Nobuo Toyama Recorders
CA1248792A (en) * 1987-09-21 1989-01-17 Lawrence D. Campbell Practice chanter spittle trap

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
AU2006202701B1 (en) * 2006-06-23 2007-11-08 Peter Neil Madge Modification of or for recorder blocks
GB2469054A (en) * 2009-03-31 2010-10-06 Thomas Thomson Alexander Spit trap for a wind instrument
GB2480886A (en) * 2010-06-02 2011-12-07 William Kerr Mcneil Mouthpiece adaptor for flageolet types of wind instrument
GB2577155A (en) * 2018-07-03 2020-03-18 Macisaac Robbie Wind instruments

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