GB2363240A - Incremental teaching method using computer. - Google Patents

Incremental teaching method using computer. Download PDF

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Publication number
GB2363240A
GB2363240A GB0108405A GB0108405A GB2363240A GB 2363240 A GB2363240 A GB 2363240A GB 0108405 A GB0108405 A GB 0108405A GB 0108405 A GB0108405 A GB 0108405A GB 2363240 A GB2363240 A GB 2363240A
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Patent type
Prior art keywords
trainee
personal computer
method
time
teaching
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GB0108405A
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GB0108405D0 (en )
Inventor
Jan Purvis
Mark David Purvis
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Jan Purvis
Mark David Purvis
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G09EDUCATION; CRYPTOGRAPHY; DISPLAY; ADVERTISING; SEALS
    • G09BEDUCATIONAL OR DEMONSTRATION APPLIANCES; APPLIANCES FOR TEACHING, OR COMMUNICATING WITH, THE BLIND, DEAF OR MUTE; MODELS; PLANETARIA; GLOBES; MAPS; DIAGRAMS
    • G09B7/00Electrically-operated teaching apparatus or devices working with questions and answers
    • G09B7/02Electrically-operated teaching apparatus or devices working with questions and answers of the type wherein the student is expected to construct an answer to the question which is presented or wherein the machine gives an answer to the question presented by a student
    • GPHYSICS
    • G09EDUCATION; CRYPTOGRAPHY; DISPLAY; ADVERTISING; SEALS
    • G09BEDUCATIONAL OR DEMONSTRATION APPLIANCES; APPLIANCES FOR TEACHING, OR COMMUNICATING WITH, THE BLIND, DEAF OR MUTE; MODELS; PLANETARIA; GLOBES; MAPS; DIAGRAMS
    • G09B5/00Electrically-operated educational appliances

Abstract

An improved method of teaching in which method incremental pieces of data are made available to the operator of a personal computer over a period of time. A prompt for each increment of data is displayed on a personal computer when it is switched on, or when the operator/trainee has stopped using the personal computer for any length of time, the prompt being displayed instead of a screen saver display. The operator/trainee has means to over-ride a prompt signal; however, the computer is programmed to allow a preset number of over-ride signals before reminding an operator/trainee that it is catch-up time.

Description

1 2363240 IMPROVED METHOD OF TEACHING This invention is concerned with

improvements in or relating to a method of teaching.

For several years traditional training methods have not achieved the desired results; consequently, training industry innovators have been calling for, or predicting, the onset of "granular training", ltraining on demand", "performance support systemC, "just in time training", or 9ncremental change".

Such training is not delivered by intensive short term courses which may be as short as a day or which may be for several days spread over a period of weeks.

In addition, training courses and conferences are becoming prohibitively expensive with the result that only key staff, if any, are able to attend the training courses or conferences on the basis that perhaps there will be some tangible return on the investment.

It is perceived that the following criteria are required by the training industry, Viz. the educators, and the trainees.

1. To keep up with change, and in order to compete, individuals and organisations as a whole must be in a constant state of learning and development 2. With the streamlining of business processes, fewer people are required to achieve, leaving little time for learning. The worker cannot afford to stop working in order to learn. Therefore, training needs to be delivered in a way that is transparent to the flow of the worker/trainee's day.

It is most disadvantageous to the trainee and the employer that the above criteria are rarely achieved K at all.

In conclusion, there is a real need for training, i.e., a method of teaching that does not require the worker/trainee to move from their place of work, that does not unduly interrupt the normal work of the worker/trainee, and that, unlike the majority of training courses presently available, delivers real improvement in practice at a cost to the employer which is most acceptable.

It is, therefore, an object of the present invention that any training must be aligned with the way in which the worker/trainee carries out their daily duties, i.e., the training must be effected at the place of work in the normal flow of business and be unobtrusively injected into the working day.

It is another of the objects of the present invention that the training must be made available to the worker/trainee in small increments so that the content thereof may be readily assimilated and thereafter put into practice for the benefit of all concerned.

It is still another object of the present invention that training must be delivered constantly and consistently over a period of time to achieve high long-term retention of data imparted to the worker/trainee in order to instil healthy and productive habits, which become part of the worker/trainee's normal practice.

Thus the present invention conveniently provides a method of teaching by making data available to a trainee in small increments over a period of time, the method being characterised by the provision of a prompt signal on the display screen of a personal computer on which the trainee is otherwise carrying out normal tasks as a computer operative, the prompt signal being programmed to appear on the display screen each time the personal computer is switched on andlor at an interval between work periods when a screen saver signal would normally be displayed.

Preferably the teaching method is further characterised in that, when the personal computer is in use and a prompt signal is displayed on the display screen, the trainee causes a small increment of data to be displayed and having assimilated the data andlor having effected a training task associated therewith, the trainee continues with the normal tasks of the day.

The novel method of teaching may conveniently be modified to enable the trainee to override the prompt signal at any time.

Preferably, after having assimilated the data andlor having effected a training task associated therewith, the trainee may continue by effecting the display of a further small increment of data before returning to the normal tasks of the day.

Preferably, the personal computer may be programmed so that, over any given time period, a trainee may abort several prompt signals before a catchup prompt signal is displayed on the display screen each time the personal computer is switched on and/or at an interval between work periods when a screen saver signal would normally be displayed, thereby reminding the trainee that an allotted time for completion of a teaching programme is almost ended.

In a further preferred method of teaching provided by the present invention the personal computer may be programmed to vary the number of small increments of data made available to a trainee over a period of time commensurate with completing a teaching programme within that period of time.

The present invention also conveniently provides a personal computer programmed to facilitate the method of teaching according to the last six preceding paragraphs.

The present invention also conveniently provides an input means, preferably a computer disc, whereby the personal computer may be operated in accordance with the method.

There now follows by way of example of the invention a detailed description of a novel method of teaching.

In attempting to overcome the drawbacks of present teaching methodology, we set out to determine how small increments of data could be injected into the flow of an office worker's daily routine and to deliver real performance improvements.

The work horse at most, if not all, modern offices is the personal computer and a typical office worker will spend a great deal of their time at the work station.

Thus, when a worker/trainee begins their working day he or she switches on their personal computer in order to carry out an appointed task.

Obviously, at intervals during a normal working day, the worker/trainee will stop working for various reasons and leave the personal computer. At such times a screen saver facility will cut into the working programme; however, in the present case, the computer is programmed to reveal a prompt signal as part of the method of teaching provided by the present invention, The prompt signal is in the form of an appropriate animation.

This prompt signal, in whatever form, acts as and replaces the conventional screen saver facility. In addition to serving as a screen saver, the animation, more importantly, acts as a stimulus, conditioning the worker/trainee to anticipate the learning experience that follows. The aim is to make the worker/trainee more receptive to the training intervention in his, or her, normal working day as effected by the method of teaching of the present invention.

Thus, when the worker/trainee returns to the personal computer, he, or she, is faced by the displayed prompt/animation which has cut in to replace and act as a normal screen saver. The worker/trainee responds by moving the mouse attached to the personal computer to activate a part of the training programme rather than returning to the task of the moment.

This introduces the trainee to a significant increment of data displayed on the computer screen for interactive manipulation by the trainee.

The increment of data may be in the form of a 'tenet' or "phrase", or a brief exercise or self assessment related to the training to be imparted to the worker/trainee in the following time period.

The time period is chosen for maximum effect; thus, its duration is chosen as a function of the complexity of the data to be imparted and/or the progress being made by the trainee.

Having assimilated the learning, and/or having effected the training Aask associated therewith, the worker/trainee clicks on an appropriate icon to hide the training screen and continues with the tasks of the day. The worker/trainee can also select an icon that enables the storage of the just displayed training screen for review purposes when the opportunity avails itself.

Obviously, there will be times when the worker/trainee will need to start or recommence his, or her, daily tasks without first completing the task set by the increment of data. To do this the worker/trainee merely strikes any key of the computer keyboard or clicks on an appropriate icon.

On the other hand, if a worker/trainee, having assimilated the data and/or having effected a training task associated therewith, requires to continue with the training, he, or she, merely clicks on an appropriate icon provided for that purpose.

It will be appreciated that the work and training habits of trainees will vary quite considerably in that some trainees will readily enter into the spirit of the teaching process white others may find it more difficult to effectively "down tools" in order to better themselves.

The teaching programme is tailored to meet these eventualities that should a trainee continue to override the prompt signal to continue with his, or her, normal work tasks; after several prompts have been aborted, the programme will display a "catch up" prompt to remind a trainee that there are several increments of data to be assimilated in a prescribed time period.

In this connection, the personal computer is programmed to vary the number and size of the small increments of data made available to a trainee over a period of time commensurate with completing the teaching programme within that period.

Thus, in this example of using the personal computer as 6 delivery medium, the present invention provides a method of teaching, the key concepts of which are:

1. Using the idle time of a personal computer to deliver small doses of learning to a trainee.

2. Optimising learning by delivering training over time in readily assimilated doses.

3. Encouraging the trainee to apply the skills they are learning, immediately and consistently, leading to the development of new and healthy habits, which become a permanent part of practice.

The programming of the personal computer may be effected by any suitable input means, e.g. a computer disc or the like.

Claims (8)

1. A method of teaching by making data available to a trainee in small increments over a period of time, the method being characterised by the provision of a prompt signal on the display screen of a personal computer on which the trainee is otherwise carrying out normal tasks as a computer operative, the prompt signal being programmed to appear on the display screen each time the personal computer is switched on and/or at an interval between work periods when a screen saver signal would normally be displayed.
2. A method of teaching according to Claim 1, further characterised in that, when the personal computer is in use and a prompt signal is displayed on the display screen, the trainee causes a small increment of data to be displayed and having assimilated the data and/or having effected a training task associated therewith, the trainee continues with the normal tasks of the day.
3. A method of teaching according to either one of Claims 1 and 2, characterised in that, the trainee may override the prompt signal at any time.
4. A method of teaching according to either one of Claims 2 and 3 characterised in that, having assimilated the data and/or having effected a training task associated therewith, the trainee may continue by effecting the display of a further small increment of data before returning to the normal tasks of the day.
5. A method of teaching according to Claim 4, characterised in that, the personal computer is programmed so that, over any given time period, a trainee may abort several prompt signals before a catchup prompt signal is displayed on the display screen each time the personal computer is switched on and/or at an interval between work periods when a screen saver signal would normally be displayed, thereby reminding the trainee that an allotted time for completion of a teaching programme is almost ended.
6. A method of teaching according to any one of the preceding Claims, characterised in that, the personal computer is programmed to vary the number of small increments of data made available to a trainee over a period of time commensurate with completing a teaching programme within that period of time.
7. A personal computer programmed to facilitate the method of teaching according to Claims 1 to 6.
8. An input means for programming the personal computer of Claim 7 to be operated in accordance with the method of Claims 1 to 6.
GB0108405A 2000-04-07 2001-04-04 Incremental teaching method using computer. Withdrawn GB2363240A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB0084905 2000-04-07

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GB0108405D0 true GB0108405D0 (en) 2001-05-23
GB2363240A true true GB2363240A (en) 2001-12-12

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Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5680535A (en) * 1995-06-06 1997-10-21 Galerie 500 Screen saver for exhibiting artists and artwords
US5738527A (en) * 1996-08-08 1998-04-14 Lundberg; Steven W. Screen saver
US5827071A (en) * 1996-08-26 1998-10-27 Sorensen; Steven Michael Method, computer program product, and system for teaching or reinforcing information without requiring user initiation of a learning sequence

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5680535A (en) * 1995-06-06 1997-10-21 Galerie 500 Screen saver for exhibiting artists and artwords
US5738527A (en) * 1996-08-08 1998-04-14 Lundberg; Steven W. Screen saver
US5827071A (en) * 1996-08-26 1998-10-27 Sorensen; Steven Michael Method, computer program product, and system for teaching or reinforcing information without requiring user initiation of a learning sequence

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GB0108405D0 (en) 2001-05-23 application

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WAP Application withdrawn, taken to be withdrawn or refused ** after publication under section 16(1)