GB2353287A - A detergent composition and delivery method - Google Patents

A detergent composition and delivery method Download PDF

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Publication number
GB2353287A
GB2353287A GB9919352A GB9919352A GB2353287A GB 2353287 A GB2353287 A GB 2353287A GB 9919352 A GB9919352 A GB 9919352A GB 9919352 A GB9919352 A GB 9919352A GB 2353287 A GB2353287 A GB 2353287A
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Prior art keywords
spray
alkyl
surfactant
sulphate
detergent
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GB9919352D0 (en
Inventor
Robert Eric Williams
Mark Phillip Houghton
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Robert McBride Ltd
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Robert McBride Ltd
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Priority to GB9919352A priority Critical patent/GB2353287A/en
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Publication of GB2353287A publication Critical patent/GB2353287A/en
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    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C11ANIMAL OR VEGETABLE OILS, FATS, FATTY SUBSTANCES OR WAXES; FATTY ACIDS THEREFROM; DETERGENTS; CANDLES
    • C11DDETERGENT COMPOSITIONS; USE OF SINGLE SUBSTANCES AS DETERGENTS; SOAP OR SOAP-MAKING; RESIN SOAPS; RECOVERY OF GLYCEROL
    • C11D1/00Detergent compositions based essentially on surface-active compounds; Use of these compounds as a detergent
    • C11D1/88Ampholytes; Electroneutral compounds
    • C11D1/94Mixtures with anionic, cationic or non-ionic compounds
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C11ANIMAL OR VEGETABLE OILS, FATS, FATTY SUBSTANCES OR WAXES; FATTY ACIDS THEREFROM; DETERGENTS; CANDLES
    • C11DDETERGENT COMPOSITIONS; USE OF SINGLE SUBSTANCES AS DETERGENTS; SOAP OR SOAP-MAKING; RESIN SOAPS; RECOVERY OF GLYCEROL
    • C11D1/00Detergent compositions based essentially on surface-active compounds; Use of these compounds as a detergent
    • C11D1/66Non-ionic compounds
    • C11D1/83Mixtures of non-ionic with anionic compounds
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C11ANIMAL OR VEGETABLE OILS, FATS, FATTY SUBSTANCES OR WAXES; FATTY ACIDS THEREFROM; DETERGENTS; CANDLES
    • C11DDETERGENT COMPOSITIONS; USE OF SINGLE SUBSTANCES AS DETERGENTS; SOAP OR SOAP-MAKING; RESIN SOAPS; RECOVERY OF GLYCEROL
    • C11D17/00Detergent materials or soaps characterised by their shape or physical properties
    • C11D17/0043For use with aerosol devices

Abstract

A projectable foam 'spray' of specified composition that overcomes the issues of respiratory irritant mists is simply and effectively produced in combination with an spraying device that directs the spray onto an intermediate obstacle at defined velocity. A detergent composition comprising from 0.01 to 20% surfactant with a viscosity of between 1 than 1000 mPa is used as a spray emitted at between 0.1 and 10ms<SP>-1</SP> and impinged upon an obstacle or obstacles placed at a distance of between 1 and 10mm from the point of emission whilst at a velocity between the aforementioned velocities such that a substantial proportion of the resultant droplets contain entrained air and maintain a predominantly ongoing trajectory. The obstacle may be a grill or qauze and the spray produced has reduced misting.

Description

2353287 A detergent composition and delivery method Detergent consumer
products are traditionally provided in packaging which is intended for efficient transportation and has aesthetic appeal. However, packaging is becoming important as a delivery method to provide the detergent in the most effective physical form for cleaning.
Delivery of a detergent composition using a spray is one particularly effective method. A known problem with cleaning sprays are the fine aerosol mists generated which can irritate the respiratory system. This limits the formulation parameters of such products particularly by limiting their use to milder often less effective compositions. Various methods of producing coarser sprays are known by varying the geometry of the spray nozzle etc. but due to the impact of a jet or large droplets on a hard surface fine droplets will often be generated. The user is therefore often advised to spray the product onto a cloth for subsequent application onto the surface. Use of a cloth or sponge in this manner detracts from the convenience of using a spray. Whilst thickening such products will reduce the amount of mist this also reduces their ability to be sprayed.
One solution to these problems is to dispense a foam created at the point of exit of the detergent from the aerosol. The foam has no problem of misting but gains primarily in aesthetic appeal rather than in convenience as the foam needs application and spreading on the surface to be cleaned.
More recently sophisticated foam sprays have been disclosed which require careful engineering but are not reliable in manual, particularly manually powered use.
These issues are illustrated by the following prior art;
EP 0 316 726 (Colgate-Palmolive Company) discloses a clear micro emulsion cleaning composition for use in a "spray and wipe" process.
EP 0 811 053 (Unilever) discloses a packaged, cleaning composition, in a container provided with a spray jet to deliver the composition to a surface in the form of a spray, 1 characterized in that the dosage applied to the surface by each operation of the spraying apparatus falls in the range 0. 15-0.5 ml and the said dose is applied over an area of at least 50 cm2 when the spray is operated 15 cm from the surface. Preferred compositions having a pH of > 10 and comprise aqueous solutions of nonionic surfactant, solvent, an alkanolamine, buffer/alkali and a polymer.
EP 0 811 053 (Unilever) discloses a packaged, cleaning composition, in a container provided with a spray jet to deliver the composition to a surface in the form of a spray, characterized in that the dosage applied to the surface by each operation of the spraying apparatus falls in the range 0.15-0.5 ml and the said dose is applied over an area of at least 50 cm2 when the spray is operated 15 cm from the surface. Preferred compositions having a pH of > 10 and comprise aqueous solutions of nonionic surfactant, solvent, an alkanolamine, buffer/alkali and a polymer.
WO 97 20980, EP 0776966 (Procter & Gamble) provide a liquid peroxygen bleach pretreater compositions packaged in a spray-type dispenser and a process of cleaning fabrics with a liquid composition.
These cases disclose simple sprays which have the aforementioned misting disadvantages.
EP 0 428 816 (Procter & Gamble) discloses a liquid hard surface cleaner comprising anionic surfactant ammonium salts, ethanol, n-butoxy propanol and an alcohol as especially suitable for use as a spray composition.
WO 99 13836 Al (Eastman chemical company) discloses the use of particular solvent mixes with a spraying device for hair care.
The use of solvents giving fast drying compositions of low viscosity which aids spraying but exacerbates misting.
WO 98 17239 (Procter & Gamble), WO 9856889 (Procter & Gamble), also WO 98 17239 (Procter & Gamble) discloses the use of amino compounds with a halogen based sprayable bleach for reduced irritation potential. WO 9720913 discloses a 2 method of cleaning hard surfaces using the same.
The potential safety issues surrounding detergent sprays and mists are adequately substantiated herein.
EP 0 919 612 (Ecolab INC.) Discloses preferred thickening compositions for use in sprayed oven cleaning compositions.
WO 94 28108 (Ecolab Inc.) Provides a low viscosity aqueous cleaning composition with increasing viscosity upon dilution which provides a high viscosity diluted cleaning composition using a rod micelle thickening and cleaning system that clings for an extended period of time in a thickened form after spraying on.
In these cases the desirability of improved cling ability is disclosed but at the expense of a thickened, harder to spray composition.
EP 0 606 707 (The Clorox Company) provides a thickened liquid hypochlorite bleach composition thickened by 0.2-2.0% of a cross-linked polyacrylate polymer that is dispensed onto a surface to be cleaned. The composition exhibiting shear sensitivity or plasticity facilitating its use in the spray-type dispenser.
The problem of the low viscosity needed for spraying versus the high viscosity needed for good product 'cling' to vertical surfaces is addressed. However, such products are still difficult to visually determine where the product has been applied and no mechanism for reducing misting is present.
EP 0 839 907 (Procter & Gamble) discloses a very slightly thickened, shear-thinning, pseudo plastic aqueous liquid detergent compositions are packaged in a non-aerosol spray delivery package specifically configured to produce a minimal amount of visible foam.
WO 94 12259 (ICI) asserts the benefits of using a low foaming surfactant (hydrocarbyl polysaccharide) in a spray dispenser,' thereby reducing the foam which would normally arise, which is especially useful when it is necessary to spray the composition'.
In each of the above the benefit of foam is not recognised.
3 WO 97 48927 (Armor all products corporation) discloses a spray device that prepares part of the product by deionisation of water as part of an integrated cleaning process. Illustrating the benefit obtainable from a detergent, packaging combination.
EP 0 583 382 (Procter & Gamble) provides a foaming hard surface cleaning composition packaged in a non-aerosol spray delivery package. The benefits of foam delivery are realised but no mechanism to project such foam on to a surface is provided.
EP 0 694 061 (Unilever) discloses a surfactant based, hypo-chloritecontaining cleaning composition comprising, 0.05 % wt - 3.0 % wt aqueous alkali metal hypochlorite, 0.1 % wt - 5.0 % wt of a hypochlorite-stable surfactant product and delivery using a hand held spray head container which contains a plurality of apertures so as to produce a spray of foam droplets rather than produce a jet, mist of droplets or aerosol.
The mechanism of spraying foam is identified but uses a method requiring sophisticated interaction of liquid jets. To work effectively such mechanisms require several mutually impinging jets. This gives rise to a significant back pressure when dosing low volumes of detergent as the required orifices are small and the foam generation is critical on the pressure of the interacting jets. Such issues are not limiting when automatic equipment, all be it hand actuated, is used but are notable limitations when used manually, particularly in manually powered and domestic applications. In addition such a mechanism is effectively fixed and cannot be readily de-selected to use a normal spray from the same device for particular cleaning purposes.
The present invention seeks to mitigate the afore mentioned disadvantages by providing a spray of foam droplets. These posses the positive safety aspects of no misting whilst retaining the aesthetic and anti-drip qualities of a foam, is effective at low surfactant levels, is simply engineered and suitable for domestic use.
4

Claims (2)

  1. A detergent composition comprising from 0.01 to 20% surfactant with a
    viscosity of between 1 than 1000 mPa used in conjunction with as aerosol spray characterised in that it is emitted at between 0.1 and 10ms-1 and impinged upon an obstacle or obstacles placed at a distance of between 1 and 1Omm from the point of emission whilst at a velocity between the aforementioned velocities such that a substantial proportion of the resultant droplets contain entrained air and maintain a predominantly ongoing trajectory is claimed.
    The invention consists of a detergent composition and a spray device used in combination.
    The detergent composition will comprise a surfactant, an optional thickeners, alkalinity control agents and other minor components.
    The spray device is any device which is capable of emitting a liquid from an orifice such that the resultant liquid exists in discrete droplets predominantly free from entrained (as opposed to dissolved) gas Suitable detement compositions The detergent composition will comprise a surfactant, optional thickeners, alkalinity control agents and other minor components.
    Surfactants The detergent formulation in accordance with the invention will include at least one surface active agent which may, for example, be an anionic, cationic, non-anionic or amphoteric surface active agent. Any of the surface active agents widely used in detergent formulations may be employed in the present invention.
    The total surfactant in the composition of the detergent for use in the invention is from 0.01 to 20%, preferably from 0.2 to 10%, more preferably from 0.5 to 5%.
    Amphoteric surfactants If an amphoteric surface active agent is used it may be present in the formulation in an amount of 0. 1 to 10% by weight, more preferably 0.5 to 5%, even more preferably 1 to 4% on the same basis.
    The amphoteric surface active agent may be betaine surface active agent. Preferred betaines may be either of the formula (1) or (11).
    R' 1 R 3 -W-CH2-COO- (1) 1 R 2 R' 1 R 3CONI-ICH2CH2CH2W-CH2C00- 1 R 2 In the above formula, R' and R 2 may be the same or differentCl-4alkyl groups whereas R3 is an alkyl group having 8-22 carbon atoms, more preferably 12 to 18 carbon atoms e.g. mixedC10 to C14' The preferred betaine for use in the formulation of the invention is cocoamidopropyl betaine.
    An alternative amphoteric surface active agent for use in the formulation of the invention is a glycinate of the formula R 3 NHCH2CO2H where R 3 is as defined above.
    Other suitable materials are as given in chapter 1 of "Amphoteric Surfactants", 6 e.g. Lomax Ed, Marcel Decker, New York 1996.
    Cationic surfactant It is highly preferred that a cationic surface active agent is employed in conjunction with any amphoteric surface active agent. The cationic surface active agent is preferably used in an amount of up to 2% by weight of the formulation and is conveniently added in conjunction with the clay. Examples of suitable cationic surface active agents include quaternary ammonium salts having three lower (C,-J alkyl groups (preferably methyl groups) and a long chain (C8-20) alkyl group, e.g. coco trimethyl ammonium chloride. Further examples include alkyl pyridinium salts and other compounds in which the nitrogen atom of the pyridine assumes a quaternary form, e.g. as in an alkyl pyridinium bromide.
    Further examples of cationic surface active agents which may be used include amine and imidazoline salts.
    Anionic surfactants If an anionic surface active agent is used then it is preferably present in the formulation in an amount of up to 20%, more preferably up to 10%, even more preferably up to 5% by weight of the formulation. Examples of anionic surface active agents which may be employed include alkylaryl sulphonates, alkyl sulphates, ether sulphates and ether carboxylates all as conventionally employed in laundry detergent formulations.
    A preferable component of the composition is anC8-22alkyl sulphate used in an amount of 1-18% by weight of the formulation, more preferably 2-12%, even more preferably 3-10%.
    The alkyl sulphate is preferably an alkali metal n-alkyl sulphate with the preferred alkali metal being sodium.
    Preferably, the alkyl group of the alkyl sulphate has 8-16 carbon atoms. The alkyl sulphate may be a single compound (preferably C,J or may comprise a mixture of alkyl sulphates of different chain lengths, preferably withC12predominating. For preference 7 the alkyl groups are primary alkyl groups and preferably straight chain.
    The carbon chain of the alkyl sulphate may be produced synthetically or may be derived from natural products (e.g. coconut oil) so that the chain length distribution of the alkyl group will correspond to that in the natural product from which it is derived.
    The alkyl sulphate is more preferably a "narrow cut" lauryl sulphate having carbon chains principallyof C12 to C14 (C12predominating. For preference the alkyl groups are primary alkyl groups and preferably straight chain.
    A preferred alkyl sulphate is available under the name Empicol LX28 (Albright & Wilson).
    Another preferred surfactant is an alkyl (C,,-22) ether sulphate ffl(E0)nSO3M used in an amount of 1 to 15% by weight of the formulation, more preferably 4 to 12%, even more preferably 6 to 10%.
    The cation (M)present in this material may, for example, be an alkali metal (particularly sodium) or ammonium. It is particularly preferred that the alkyl ether sulphate be an alkyl (C8-22) ethoxylated (n =1 to 5) sulphate. The most preferred alkyl ether sulphate for use in the invention is sodium lauryl ether sulphate where n= 2 or 3.
    The alkyl group (R) of the ether sulphate is otherwise as in the alkyl sulphate description.
    An alkyl ether sulphate which may be used is available under the name Empicol 0251 (Albright & Wilson).
    The formulation of the invention contains 0 to 7%, more preferably 0 to 3%, of an amine oxide containing at least oneC,-22 alkyl group. The amine oxide preferably has one such groupof C8-22 carbon atoms and two C1-4 aikyl groups. Most preferably the latter alkyl groups are methyl groups. Preferred amine oxides are therefore (C8-22) alkyl dimethyl amine oxides. The long chain alkyl group may, for example, have 8-18 carbon atoms and the compound may comprise a mixture of alkyl groups, which are preferably ClotO C18 (withC12predominating).
    8 A suitable amine oxide is available under the name Genaminox CSX (Hoechst).
    Nonionic surfactants If a non-ionic surface active agent is used then it is preferably present in an amount of up to 20% by weight of the formulation, more preferably 2 to 10% on the same basis. Examples of non-ionic surface active agent which may be used include alkoxylates, ethylene oxide/propylene oxide block copolymers, alkanolamides (e.g. mono ethanol amides and di ethanol amides), esters and amine oxides.
    A preferred nonionic surfactant of the invention includes at least one ethoxylated alkanol (C,-,,) used in an amount of by 1-16% weight of the formulation, more preferably 2 - 9%, even more preferably 6 - 7%.
    Examples of such ethoxylated alkanols which may be used are those in which the alkanol (from which the product is derived) is a primary alcohol and is preferably linear. Preferably the alkanol has 6 to 11 carbon atoms (e.g. mixed C.-Cjj and in which the degree of ethoxylation is 5-15 (particularly 8-10). The alkyl chain has from 1 to 55% by weight branching, more preferably from 10 to 25% branched material by weight.
    A suitable fatty alcohol ethoxylate is available under the name Lutensol ON80 (BASF).
    In addition formulations in accordance with the invention may usefully additionally contain an alkyl (C8-22)poly glycoside which is an acetal of glucose with a primary alcohol (e.g. Cj-Cjj with an average degree of polymerisation of (1.4). If present, the preferred amount of the alkyl poly glycoside is up to 16% e.g. 0.1 to 16% by weight.
    A suitable poly glycoside is available under the name Glucopon 600CSUP (Henkel).
    Polymers A variety of water soluble polymers may be added to perform variety of functions. For example as thickeners and anti scaling agents.
    Suitable polymers include, Addition polymers - e.g. Poly Vinyl; ethers, esters, amides, carboxylates, maleates, methacrylates, acrylates, alcohols, acetates, sulphonated 9 polymers and amphoteric polymers and copolymers thereof.
    Condensation polymers - eg Poly; esters, and urethanes, gelatin, xanthan gums, guar gum and alginates.
    Preferred molecular weights are from 5,000 to 100,000. More preferably from 10,000 to 30,000.
    Suitable polymeric materials known in the art are Hydrogenated caster oils (eg Croduret 50 ex Croda), acrylic acid polymers (eg ex National Starch) Acrylate maleate polymers (eg Sokolan CP-5 and CP-11 0 ex BASF) and poly ethylene glycols (eg ex Hoechst), poly vinyl pyrrolidone (eg K50 ex ISP), Carbopol (ex 3V). Suitable levels of polymer inclusion are between 0. 1 to 10% more preferably between 0.2 and 2% most preferably between 0.3 and 1.2%.
    Water softeners Builders to remove water hardness may be included e.g. phosphates, zeolites, layered silicates, carbonates, amorphous silicates and polycaroxylates may be included.
    Oxidising agents Bleaches e.g. hydrogen peroxide compounds and Bleach activators may be included. The hydrogen peroxide compound may, for example, be an inorganic persalt, e.g. a perborate (in the monohydrate and/or tetra hydrate form), a percarbonate or a persulphate. The alkali metal salts of these compounds are preferred, particularly sodium and potassium salts. The bleach activator may be a compound incorporating aliphatic acyl groups preferably having two or three carbon atoms, the acetyl group being preferred. Examples of suitable bleach activators are tetraacetylethylene diamine (TAED) and acetylated polyols such as acetylated sugars (e.g. penta acetyl glucose, fructose etc.) and acetylated sugar derivatives (e.g. acetylated sorbitol and acetylated mannitol). All of these specific bleach activators are capable of reacting with hydrogen peroxide to generate peracetic acid as an active bleaching species.
    Chlorine bleaches may be included, for example hypohalites are also suitable for use a bleaching compounds.
    The detergent of the invention has a viscosity of between 1 and 1000 mPa. s, more preferably between 1 and 50OmPa.s even more preferably between 1 and 10OmPa.s, most preferably between 1 and 20mpa.s at 20"C and 21s-1 shear rate.
    Enzymes Enzymes are optionally included and are advantageously incorporated in such compositions due to the substantial absence of aerosol formation.
    The enzyme may, for example, be a protease, amylase, lipase or cellulase (or mixtures thereof) such as commonly used in detergent formulations. Examples of suitable enzymes are available under the names Opticlean, Savinase, Esperase; Termamyi, Maxamayl, Lipomax, Lipolase; Celluzyme and Carezyme. The amount of enzyme incorporated in the formulation will depend on activity but will typically be 0.1 to 3%. This level is particularly suitable for Savinase 6.0T, Termarnyl 60T, Celluzyme 0.7T and Lipomax.
    Further components that may be included include; Soil suspension agents (e.g. carboxy methyl cellulose) Anti-corrosion agent (e.g. disilicate) Sources of alkalinity (e.g. sodium carbonate, silicates) Crystal growth inhibitors (e.g. a phosphonate) Anti-tarnishing agents (e.g. benzatriazole).
    Bleach scavengers (e.g. ammonium sulphate, sodium, potassium or ammonium glutamate or sodium or potassium bisulfite) Water, air and fillers (eg sodium chloride, sodium sulphate.) Hydrotrope which may be used in an amount up to 7%, e.g. 0.3% of the formulation. A particular preferred hydrotrope is sodium xylene sulphonate.
    The formulation may contain the usual minor addition such as preservatives, dyes, perfumes, pearlising agent and antibacterial agents.
    Such components will be formulated or not by the person skilled in the art to provide 11 compositions suitable for textile washing, dish washing, hard surface cleaning, bleach additives etc. to form a product suitable for use as the detergent component in the invention.
    Alkalinity Compositions of high and low pH are optionally included and are advantageously incorporated in such compositions due to the substantial absence of aerosol formation which limits respiratory contact with these more aggressive compositions.
    Suitable pH's of products range from pH 1 to 14 but three preferred regions are present, from pH 1 to 5 for acidic cleaners, eg for use in bathrooms and hard surfaces particularly ceramics, from pH 5 to 8 for surfaces and applications likely to come in direct contact with the skin, pH 8 to 13 for high performance surface cleaning applications.
    Physical characteristics of the detergent The detergent according to the invention is provided as a liquid at ambient temperatures. Such a liquid has an associated viscosity, measured at 21 s -' Characteristics of the spraying device The spray device is any device which is capable of emitting a liquid from an orifice such that the resultant liquid exists in discrete droplets predominantly free from entrained (as opposed to dissolved) gas of a size between 1 and 1 000pm, more preferably between, 10 and 700pm. Even more preferably between 50 and 500pm and most preferably between 100 and 300pm.
    In addition such a spray to be effective for the invention must substantially exit the orifice at a velocity of from 0. 1 to 1 00ms-1, more preferably from 0. 1 to 10 ms-1, even more preferably from 0.5 to 5 ms-1, most preferably from 0.8 to 1.2ms-1.
    This as back calculated using Newtons the laws of motion from an average spray height (ie a decelerated velocity) when the spray is emitted vertically in the absence of any intervening obstacle. Air resistance specifically not being taken in to account to give clarity as to the scope of the invention. However, it is acknowledged that someone 12 skilled in such art could back calculate the effect of air resistance and adjust the claimed ranges accordingly. Such a calculation would be required should exit velocity be measured directly. This is not intended as the scope of the invention should be clear to the person skilled in the detergents field who is unlikely to access such sophisticated equipment.
    Liquid which may drip from the orifice or other malfunctioning is not considered to be part of the spray for calculating the exit velocity.
    The orifice for emission of the spray The orifice or orifices of the spraying device is between 10 and 1000pm, more preferably between, 50 and 800pm. Even more preferably between 100 and 700pm and most preferably between 300 and 500pm. If more than one orifice is provided they are arranged in such a manner as the sprays will not impinge upon one another before they impinge upon the obstacle as this will reduce their momentum and hence the energy available to the inventive combined foam forming mechanism.
    The obstacle upon which the spray impinges The obstacle can be any object which does not substantially impede the forward motion of the spray but causes sufficient of the droplets to interact that the low surface tension provided by the surfactant gives rise to the inclusion of air in particles as they interact with the obstacle and with one another.
    The obstacle is preferably in the form of a appetured barrier, most preferably as a mesh, gauze, screen, grill or similar. The appetured barrier will preferably cover between 1 and 50% of the pathway of the spray, more preferably from 5 to 20%, most preferably from 10 to 15% of the pathway of the spray.
    The obstacle is preferably arranged at between 1 and 1 Omm from the point of emission of the spray and impinged by the spray. More preferably between 2 and 8mm, most preferably between 3 and 5m..
    The spraying device Typically such a spraying device will be of the hand actuated pump variety, preferably engineered with a minimum force to overcome static resistance to spraying 13 such that the spray will be created with liquid at a lower pressure limit to avoid misuse. A variety of geometries are known for such devices as described in which sufficiently illustrate the intended principles for the person skilled in the art to identify suitable alternative spray generating devices.
    These include pressurised aerosols eg. as shown in GB 902,114, GB 1,008, 733, GB 2,136,057, 2,217,394 and GB 2, 234,555 including bag in can types, squeeze bottle types eg. as shown in EP 592 082 (Bab & Porat) and trigger spray pumps eg. as shown in EP 285 040 (Chemietechnik) EP 234 969 (Aerosol Inventions), US 5,341,967 (Dowbrands), DE 30 45 565 (Deutsche Prazisions), AU 33082/93 (Clean-a-matic).
    Aerosol propellants Suitable propellants for pressurised detergent aerosols include, air, nitrogen, argon and other noble gasses, carbon dioxide, butane, other volatile hydrocarbons, volatile fluorocarbons, volatile chlorocarbons, volatile chloroflurocarbons.
    An arrangement of rotatable/interchangeable barriers may be provided to provide a variety of selectable foam types for various purposes or compositions. The device may also preferably have the obstacle deselectable for use in cleaning applications where foam is not desired.
    14 A typical composition with ranges is given by illustration.
    Component Suitable Range Preferred range Dowanol DPM (ex Dow 1 to 10% 5 to 7% Chemical) Dimpropylene glycol monomethyl ether Alkyl dimethyl benzyl 0 to 5% 0.06 to 0. 12% ammonium chloride Empigen BB (ex Akzo) Coco 0.1 to 5% 1.0 to 1.6% imido propyl betain surfactant Synperonic A7 (ex ICI) 0 to 5% 1.0 to 6% C12-15 alcohol with 7 mole average ethylation C1 2-18 alkyl sulpahate (ex 0 to 5% 1 to 8% Henkel) Acrylate maleate copolymer or 0 to 2% 0.6 to 1.2% acrylate homopolymer MW 5,000 to 100,000.
    Dequest 2066 (ex Monsanto) 0 to 1% 0.3 to 0.7% alkyl penta phosphonate Sodium hydroxide 0 to 0.15% 0 to 0.15% Formalin 0.05 to 1 % 0.05 to 1 % Fragrance 0.1 to 3.6% 0.1 to 3.6% Water to 100% The invention is illustrated by the following non-limiting examples.
    A detergent composition was made as follows:
    Test composition A Component Suitable Range Dowanol DPM (ex Dow 6% Chemical) Alkyl dimethyl benzyl 0.8% ammonium chloride Empigen BB (ex Akzo) Coco 1.3% imido propyl betain surfactant Sokalan CP-10 (ex BASF) 0.8% acrylate maleate copolymer Dequest 2066 (ex Monsanto) 0.5% alkyl penta phosphonate Sodium hydroxide 0.1% Formalin 0.075% Fragrance 0.5% Water to 100% This 500mi of this composition was filled in a bottle with a Guala 9C standard hand actuated trigger spray head (as currently widely used in the market place) with nominal volume per spray of 0.7mi. 5mm from the outlet of the spray a 200Pm plastic mesh with stands of thickness 1 00pm and 4mm diameter was secured using a 5mm internal diameter plastic tube perpendicular to the axis of the spray 5mm from the outlet.
    16 The detergent was then spray tested three times of two sprays of 0.7mi on to a vertical stainless steel surface with and without the mesh in place. The bottom edge of the sprayed area was noted and the time for the detergent to travel 30cm downward was noted.
    Sample Foaming trigger head Test 1 Test 2 Test 3 Leading Branded 21 24 24 product SM 3117 32 31 31 SM 3494 9 7 7 Sample Non foaming trigger head (with grille removed) Test 1 Test 2 Test 3 Leading Branded 8 14 13 product SM 3117 12 15 15 SM 3494 9 12 7 17 Test composition B Component % w/w Sodium Laury] Sulphate 9.6% Empicol L28 ex A&W Sodium Laury] ether 7.4% sulphate Empicol 0251 ex A&W Lutensol ON80 ex BASF 4.4% Alkyl ethoxylate Glucopon 600 CSUP ex 1.7% Henkel, Alkyl poly glucoside Sodium Xylene Sulphonate 2.5% Formalin 0.04% Dye, perfume <1% Water to 100% The base composition was diluted to 0.05% in demineralised water and 250ml placed in the trigger sprays as previously described, The rate of spraying was calibrated using a Mettler Toledo PB8001. The weight of water per sprayed was 0.7g. The orifice of the spray gun was 200pm. The force at which the standard spray action was carried out using a force of 2.5kg on the trigger mechanism for 0.5 seconds. The force/rate of the spray was conveniently measured by spraying the liquid vertically at a distance of 1cm on a damp cloth placed on the balance. The peak force reading on spraying the liquid was recorded. The foaming trigger head has a 1 00p m diameter plastic rectangular mesh with hole size of 400p rn placed 5mm in front of the orifice.
    Non-Foaming trigger head eak force 27mN Foaming trigger head cc ly 12mN 18 The graticule adsorbed 13mN, ie approximately 50% of the force The size of the spray droplets superimposed against a graticule is measured photographically on subsequently measured. The resulting average spray from the trigger heads has a larger average particle size which gives less aerosol components which give can give rise to respiratory discomfort in the user.
    Appearance of liquid sprayed five times on a horizontal stain less steel surface from a distance of 45cm.
    Non-Foaming trigger head Average size 31 pm Foaming trigger head cc 19 115pm Concentration Foam height in mm oftest Foaming trigger head Non-Foaming trigger head compostion B (ie with grille removed 0.01% fine visible foam None 0.05% 0.5mm None 0.1% 1IMM None 0.5% 2mm Occasional bubbles 1.0% 2.5mm Numbers of isolated bubbles 5.0% 3mrn 0.5mrn The presence of more foam is a consumer desirable attribute which also increases the effective volume and viscosity of the liquid, particularly on rough surfaces reducing runof. When the above experiment was performed with pure water no foam was obtained showing the necessity for surfactant. When the 1.0% experiment are repeated replacing all the surfactant in test composition A for a Cationic (coco trimethyl ammonium chloride) or a Nonionic surfactant (Synperonic A3 ex ICI) alone reduced foam levels were obtained with the foaming trigger head of 1.0 and 0.3mm respectively.
    19 The above experiments were conducted with a calculated initial spray velocity of 1 ms-1. Lower viscosities were compared using the 0.05% solution of test composition B along with the foaming trigger head as described above.
    Velocity Average droplet size Foam height in mm 0. 1 4ms-1 209pm Occasional bubbles 1.Oms-1 115pm 0.5mm of coarse foam 10.3ms-1 30pm 0.2mm of very fine foam The optimum outlet velocity for low misting and good foam lies in the range 0. 1 to 10 ms-1.
    Claims 1. A detergent composition comprising from 0.01 to 20% surfactant with a viscosity of between 1 than 1000 mPa used in combination with a spray characterised in that it is emitted at between 0. 1 and 1 Oms-' and impinged upon an obstacle or obstacles placed at a distance of between 1 and 1 Omm from the point of emission whilst at a velocity between the aforementioned velocities such that a substantial proportion of the resultant droplets contain entrained air and maintain a predominantly ongoing trajectory.
  2. 2. The combination as described in claim 1 wherein a single jet of atomised liquid impinges upon the obstacle.
    3) The combination as described in claim 1 wherein the obstacle is a appetured barrier.
    4) The combination as described ib claim 1 wherein the surfactant level is between 0.2 and 10%.
    5) The combination as described ib claim 1 wherein the surfactant is a combination of an amphoteric and a cationic surfactant.
    6) The combination as described ib claim 1 wherein the surfactant is a combination of an anionic surfactant and a nonionic surfactant.
    7) The combination as described in claim 1 wherein the obstacle obstructs between 5 and 20% of the path of the impinging spray.
    8) A combination as described in claims 2, 3, 4 and 7 with a composition as described in either of claims 5 or 6.
    9) A combination as described in claims 8 with a composition as described in either of claims 5 or 6.
    10) a device as described in any proceeding claim in which the obstacle is readily reversibly removed from the path of the spray.
    21
GB9919352A 1999-08-17 1999-08-17 A detergent composition and delivery method Withdrawn GB2353287A (en)

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EP2758482A4 (en) * 2011-09-21 2015-08-19 Ecolab Usa Inc Development of extensional viscosity for reduced atomization for diluated concentrate sprayer applications
US9206381B2 (en) 2011-09-21 2015-12-08 Ecolab Usa Inc. Reduced misting alkaline cleaners using elongational viscosity modifiers
EP3415590A1 (en) * 2017-06-13 2018-12-19 The Procter & Gamble Company Consumer product
EP3415603A1 (en) * 2017-06-13 2018-12-19 The Procter & Gamble Company Consumer product
WO2018231751A1 (en) * 2017-06-13 2018-12-20 The Procter & Gamble Company Consumer product
EP3536773A1 (en) * 2014-04-28 2019-09-11 Ecolab USA Inc. Method of minimizing enzyme based aerosol mist using a pressure spray system
US10640903B2 (en) 2017-06-13 2020-05-05 The Procter & Gamble Company Process for treating at least one garment

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GB1099701A (en) * 1964-01-07 1968-01-17 Howard Duncan Goulding Improvements in or relating to cleaning
GB1481520A (en) * 1974-11-18 1977-08-03 Grundy Ltd Liquid sprayer for cleansing and/or sterilising tanks
GB2002262A (en) * 1977-08-12 1979-02-21 Kaercher Gmbh & Co Alfred Nozzle for spraying a medium under pressure
GB2155554A (en) * 1983-08-26 1985-09-25 Dainippon Jochugiku Kk Method of and apparatus for application
GB2325871A (en) * 1997-06-02 1998-12-09 Canyon Europ Ltd Nozzle insert to promote foaming

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* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB1099701A (en) * 1964-01-07 1968-01-17 Howard Duncan Goulding Improvements in or relating to cleaning
GB1481520A (en) * 1974-11-18 1977-08-03 Grundy Ltd Liquid sprayer for cleansing and/or sterilising tanks
GB2002262A (en) * 1977-08-12 1979-02-21 Kaercher Gmbh & Co Alfred Nozzle for spraying a medium under pressure
GB2155554A (en) * 1983-08-26 1985-09-25 Dainippon Jochugiku Kk Method of and apparatus for application
GB2325871A (en) * 1997-06-02 1998-12-09 Canyon Europ Ltd Nozzle insert to promote foaming

Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP2758482A4 (en) * 2011-09-21 2015-08-19 Ecolab Usa Inc Development of extensional viscosity for reduced atomization for diluated concentrate sprayer applications
US9206381B2 (en) 2011-09-21 2015-12-08 Ecolab Usa Inc. Reduced misting alkaline cleaners using elongational viscosity modifiers
EP3536773A1 (en) * 2014-04-28 2019-09-11 Ecolab USA Inc. Method of minimizing enzyme based aerosol mist using a pressure spray system
US10683472B2 (en) 2014-04-28 2020-06-16 Ecolab Usa Inc. Method of minimizing enzyme based aerosol mist using a pressure spray system
EP3415590A1 (en) * 2017-06-13 2018-12-19 The Procter & Gamble Company Consumer product
EP3415603A1 (en) * 2017-06-13 2018-12-19 The Procter & Gamble Company Consumer product
WO2018231751A1 (en) * 2017-06-13 2018-12-20 The Procter & Gamble Company Consumer product
US10640903B2 (en) 2017-06-13 2020-05-05 The Procter & Gamble Company Process for treating at least one garment

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