GB2324098A - Solar control coated glass - Google Patents

Solar control coated glass Download PDF

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Publication number
GB2324098A
GB2324098A GB9707135A GB9707135A GB2324098A GB 2324098 A GB2324098 A GB 2324098A GB 9707135 A GB9707135 A GB 9707135A GB 9707135 A GB9707135 A GB 9707135A GB 2324098 A GB2324098 A GB 2324098A
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Prior art keywords
lt
gt
rti
refractive index
layer
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GB9707135A
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GB9707135D0 (en )
Inventor
Ronald D Goodman
Jose Manuel Gallego
John Martin Copeland
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Pilkington Group PLC
Pilkington North America Inc
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Pilkington Group PLC
Pilkington North America Inc
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G02OPTICS
    • G02BOPTICAL ELEMENTS, SYSTEMS, OR APPARATUS
    • G02B5/00Optical elements other than lenses
    • G02B5/20Filters
    • G02B5/28Interference filters
    • G02B5/281Interference filters designed for the infra-red light
    • G02B5/282Interference filters designed for the infra-red light reflecting for infra-red and transparent for visible light, e.g. heat reflectors, laser protection
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C03GLASS; MINERAL OR SLAG WOOL
    • C03CCHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF GLASSES, GLAZES, OR VITREOUS ENAMELS; SURFACE TREATMENT OF GLASS; SURFACE TREATMENT OF FIBRES OR FILAMENTS MADE FROM GLASS, MINERALS OR SLAGS; JOINING GLASS TO GLASS OR OTHER MATERIALS
    • C03C17/00Surface treatment of glass, not in the form of fibres or filaments, by coating
    • C03C17/34Surface treatment of glass, not in the form of fibres or filaments, by coating with at least two coatings having different compositions
    • C03C17/3411Surface treatment of glass, not in the form of fibres or filaments, by coating with at least two coatings having different compositions with at least two coatings of inorganic materials
    • C03C17/3417Surface treatment of glass, not in the form of fibres or filaments, by coating with at least two coatings having different compositions with at least two coatings of inorganic materials all coatings being oxide coatings

Abstract

A high performance solar control glass comprising a glass substrate 11 carrying a coating comprising a low emissivity layer 13 and, over said low emissivity layer, successive high refractive index 14, low refractive index 15 and high refractive index layers 16, each having an optical thickness corresponding to about n#/4 wherein in each case n is an odd integer and # is a wavelength in the near infrared region of the spectrum. The resulting coated glass article exhibits a desirable near neutral colour in reflection and transmission. The low emissivity layer may be tin doped indium oxide. The high refractory index layer may be titanium oxide, tin oxide or indium oxide whilst the low refractory index may be silicon oxide. The layers may be applied by sputtering or chemical vapour deposition.

Description

Improvements in or related to Coated Glass The invention relates to coated glass, and in particular to high performance solar control coated glass.

There is an increasing demand for solar control glasses, especially high performance solar control glasses that exhibit a neutral colour in both reflection and transmission. By "high performance" solar control glasses we mean glasses which transmit a significantly higher percentage of incident light than of total incident radiation energy (total solar heat). Body tinted glasses containing added iron are capable of providing high solar control performance, but the iron tends to tint the glass green, and a green tint is not always acceptable. Inclusion of further additives, for example, a combination of selenium and a metal oxide such as cobalt oxide, can convert the green tint to a more neutral colour, but at the cost of some loss of performance i.e. with an increase in the proportion of incident heat : incident light transmitted.

Coatings incorporating silver layers in combination with appropriate dieletric layers in multilayer stacks can provide high performance solar control products, close to neutral in both reflection and transmission, but have significant disadvantages. First, suitable silver layers are not susceptible to on-line deposition methods in which the coating is applied to the hot glass ribbon as it is produced i.e. before it is cut and removed from the production line, but are applied by off-line low pressure techniques such as magnetron sputtering. Second, the coatings produced in this way have limited physical durability requiring careful protection and handling during processing, and protection of the coated glass in the final product, for example, by glazing in a multiple glazing unit with the coating facing the airspace of the unit.

It would be desirable to have a coating which would provide a high performance solar control glazing without the disadvantages of the silver coatings referred to above, and which preferably would have a near neutral colour reflection and transmission, or at least provide an alternative to the green reflection and transmission colours characteristic of the high performance body tinted glasses referred to above.

According to the present invention there is provided a high performance solar control glass comprising a glass substrate carrying a coating comprising a low emissivity layer and, over said low emissivity layer, successive high refractive index, low refractive index and high refractive index layers, each having an optical thickness corresponding to about <RTI>nD4</RTI> wherein in each case n is an odd integer and <RTI>k</RTI> is a wavelength in the near infra red region of the spectrum.

The invention is illustrated in (but not intended to be limited by) the accompanying diagrammatic drawings in which: Figure 1 shows a section through a coated glass in accordance with one embodiment of the invention.

Figure 2 shows a section through a double glazing unit incorporating a coated glass as illustrated in Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a plot of reflection and transmission against wavelength for a coated glass as shown in Figure 1 (discussed later in the specification with reference to the Example).

Figure 4 is a plot of reflection colour against angle of incidence for a coated glass as shown in Figure 1 (discussed later in the specification with reference to the Example).

Referring to Figure 1, a high performance solar control coated glass 1 comprises a glass substrate <RTI>11,</RTI> preferably of clear float glass, and a coating 12 comprising a low emissivity layer 13, high refractive index layers 14 and 16 and low refractive index layer 15.

Figure 2 illustrates the coated glass pane 1 of Figure 1 assembled in parallel spaced relationship with a second pane of glazing material 31, typically of clear float glass, the panes being spaced apart and sealed together by spacing and sealing system 32, to form double glazing unit 3 having airspace 33. The coating 12 faces the airspace 33 of the unit.

The low emissivity layer may be a layer of a metal compound, normally a metal oxide (as low emissivity metal nitrides and metal silicides tend to have lower light transmissions), which is a transparent semiconductor, for example, a doped indium, tin or zinc oxide. Preferred materials include tin doped indium oxide, fluorine doped tin oxide and zinc oxide doped with aluminium or indium. The low emissivity layer will normally have a thickness in the range 100 nm to 600 nm (as use of a thicker layer is likely to result in an unnecessary reduction in light transmission without sufficient reduction in emissivity to compensate), especially a thickness in the range 200 nm to 500 nm. The low emissivity layer may be such as to provide, in the absence of the overlying layers, an emissivity of less than 0.4 (the numerical values of emissivity referred to in this description and the accompanying claims are values of normal emissivity, measured in accordance with ISO <RTI>10292 : 1994,</RTI> Annex A), although it is preferred to use a low emissivity layer which, in the absence of overlying layers, would provide an emissivity of 0.2 or less.

Use of thin films, as in the present invention, may result in the appearance of interference colours and iridescence. To avoid or at least alleviate undesirable colour resulting from interference effects, a colour suppressing underlayer (which may itself be a combination of sub-layers) may be applied to the glass prior to deposition of the low emissivity layer. The composition and deposition of such iridescence suppressing underlayers is described in prior published patents including <RTI>GB</RTI> 2 031 756B, UK 2 115 315B and EPO 275 662B. Thus, according to a preferred aspect of the invention, an iridescence suppressing layer or layers (not shown in the drawings) is incorporated into the coating under the low emissivity layer.

The stack of successive high refractive index, low refractive index and high refractive index layers provided over the low emissivity layer serves to enhance the reflection of the coating in the near infra red region of the spectrum, each of said layers having an optical thickness corresponding to <RTI>nAi4</RTI> wherein in each case independently n is an odd integer and <RTI>X</RTI> is a wavelength in the near infra red region of the spectrum.

In order to maximise the light transmission of the coated product, n is, in each case, preferably 1. To maximise infra red reflection, <RTI>X</RTI> is a wavelength in the near infra red region of the spectrum, usually in the region from 900 nm to 1400 nm, and preferably in the region from 1000 nm to 1250 nm. Moreover, as the skilled man will appreciate, the terms "high refractive index" and "low refractive index", when used in connection with the layers of the infra red reflecting stack, are references to refractive index in the near infra red region of the spectrum. The skilled man will further appreciate that the layers need not have an optical thickness exactly equal to <RTI>nAJ4</RTI> (and the precise thickness of each layer may be tuned, for example, to control the reflection and/or transmission colour of the product). However, the thicknesses will normally be within <RTI>+</RTI> 25% of the <RTI>nAl4</RTI> values and, for optimum results, within + 10%. Examples of materials with high refractive indices in the near infra red, suitable for use in the practice of the present invention, are materials with a refractive index of over 1.8, preferably over 1.9, at a wavelength of <RTI>1100</RTI> nm, for example titanium oxide and non-conductive tin oxide and non-conductive indium oxide (the refractive indices of the corresponding conductive metal oxides fall off in the infra red, making them less suitable for use in this application). Examples of materials with a low refractive index in the near infra red, suitable for use in the practice of the invention, are materials with a refractive index of less than 1.7, preferably less than 1.6, at a wavelength of 1100 nm, for example silicon oxides containing a high proportion of oxygen, especially substantially stoichiometric SiO2.

An additional layer may be incorporated over the coating, for example as an antireflection layer, but the use of such overlayers tends to lead to a further loss of the low emissivity properties which result from the use of the low emissivity layer i.e. an increase in emssivity, and is thus usually avoided.

The coating layers of the present invention may be deposited by known techniques, for example low pressure techniques such as sputtering, including reactive sputtering, and pyrolytic techniques, including chemical vapour deposition, more suitable for application to a continuous ribbon of hot glass from the glass production process. Indeed, it is an important advantage of the invention that both the above layers are susceptible to deposition by chemical vapour deposition techniques providing for the possibility of applying the coating to the hot ribbon of glass during the glass production process.

Methods of depositing metal oxide on a hot glass ribbon by chemical vapour deposition are described, for example, in <RTI>GB</RTI> 2 026 454B and EP 0 365 239B. while methods of depositing silicon oxide on a hot glass ribbon are known from WO 96/11802.

When a semiconductor metal oxide is to be produced, for example a doped tin oxide or indium oxide, an appropriate dopant is included in the source materials and, when a pyrolytic deposition technique is used, a high deposition temperature, for example above 5000C, is normally chosen. When a non-conductive indium or tin oxide is required, the dopant may be omitted and a lower deposition temperature employed.

The invention is illustrated but not limited by the following Examples. In the Examples, as in the remainder of the description and claims, the visible light transmissions (and the colours of transmitted and reflected light) stated are measured using Illuminant C. The total solar heat transmissions stated are the sums of the direct solar heat transmission and the absorbed solar heat which enters the room; the direct solar heat transmission is determined in accordance with ISO 9050 as the integrated total transmittance of radiation of wavelength in the range 350 nm to 2100 nm having a distribution corresponding to the Parry Moon Air Mass 2 distribution. The emissivities are <RTI>"nonnal"</RTI> emissivities determined in accordance with ISO <RTI>10292:1994</RTI> Annex A.

EXAMPLE 1 A pane of 3 mm clear float glass, coated with a low emissivity layer of fluorine doped tin oxide about 300 <RTI>nm</RTI> thick over a colour suppressing layer of a silicon oxide containing carbon ("silicon oxycarbide", refractive index about 1.7), commercially available as Pilkington K Glass (trade mark) from Pilkington United Kingdom Ltd, was overcoated on its coated side with successive high refractive index, low refractive index and high refractive index layers. The base coated glass, before overcoating, had an emissivity of about 0.16, and a visible light transmission of 82%.

The additional layers were applied by conventional magnetron sputtering. A first high refractive index layer of TiO2 (refractive index in near infra red approx 2.17) was reactively sputtered using a titanium target and an argon/oxygen sputtering gas to a thickness of approximately 112 nm. A low refractive index layer of SiO2 (refractive index or near infra red approx 1.45) was sputtered on to the titanium oxide using a silicon target in an oxygen atmosphere as sputtering gas to a thickness of approximately 180 <RTI>nm,</RTI> and a second high refractive index layer of titanium oxide (refractive index in the near infra red approx 2.17) was reactively sputtered over the SiO2 layer to a thickness of approximately 107 <RTI>nm</RTI> using an argon/oxygen sputtering gas atmosphere.

The reflection (dotted line) and transmission (solid line) spectra of the resulting coated product are shown in Figure 3. It will be seen that the high transmission in the visible is accompanied by a broad reflection peak in the near infra red (say from 750 nm to 1400 nm). The optical characteristics of the coated pane, when irradiated from the uncoated side, are: Visible light transmission 70% Visible light reflection 14% Emissivity 0.20 Direct solar heat transmission 56% Transmission colour (a*,b*) -1.7,1.1 Reflection colour (a*,b*) <RTI>-2.1,0.9</RTI> Thus providing a high performance product (visible light transmission much greater than direct solar heat transmission) with a high level of light transmission and a substantially neutral colour in both transmission and reflection. Moreover, with its outer coating of titanium oxide, the coated product has a high degree of physical and chemical durability.

The reflection colour stated is, in conventional manner, the reflection colour for an angle of incidence/reflection of 00. There is an unfortunate tendency, with thin multilayer coatings, for the reflection colour to vary strongly with angle of incidence, and Figure 4 is a plot showing the reflection colours of the present coated product at angles of incidence from 00 to <RTI>450.</RTI> The squares represent the reflection colours at angles of incidence, varying in increments of <RTI>50,</RTI> from 00 to 450, with the first four squares (for angles of incidence of <RTI>0 ,</RTI> <RTI>50,</RTI> <RTI>10 </RTI> and <RTI>15 </RTI> respectively) overlapping. Thus, it will be seen that, at low angles of incidence, the reflection colour is virtually independent of angle of incidence. As the angle of incidence increases above <RTI>20 ,</RTI> the reflection colour does begin to change more rapidly although with limited change on the b axis.

The coated product described will normally be glazed with the coating inwards, so that the low emissivity property assists the solar control performance by reducing the proportion of heat absorbed by the glazing which is radiated inwardly. When used in a double glazed window, for example in the form of a double glazing unit, the coated pane will normally be used as the outer pane so that the coating is protected within the unit while facing inwards towards the interior of the building.

Table 1 below shows the optical properties (when irradiated from the outside) of double glazing units formed with the coated pane, produced as described above, as the outer pane with a variety of different inner panes. In each case, the double glazing unit <RTI>had an air space of 12 mrn.</RTI>

Inner pane 3 mm clear float 2 mm grey tint' 2 mm glass with low emissivity coating2 Visible light transmission 72% <RTI>61%</RTI> 66% Visible light reflection 19% 15% 20% Total solar heat transmission 50% 47% 40% Transmission colour (a*,b*) -1.6, -0.9 -3.8, -2.3 -2.1, -2.3 Reflection colour (a*,b*) -2.3, -0.7 -2.5, -1.0 -2.6, -0.7 '2mm <RTI>AUTOGREY1M</RTI> glass available in commerce from Libbey-Owens-Ford Co of Toledo, Ohio, USA.

2 2mm ENERGY <RTI>ADVANTAGE</RTI> glass available in commerce from Libbey-Owens Ford Co of Toledo, Ohio, USA.

It will be seen that a high performance may be achieved with the total solar heat transmission being, in all three cases, less than 80% of the visible light transmittance, and with a neutral colour in both reflection <img class="EMIRef" id="026534733-00090001" />

always < 3) and transmission <img class="EMIRef" id="026534733-00090002" />

always < 5).

Computer simulations confirm that a similar effect, without quite such a good performance but with even more neutral colours, may be achieved using non-conducting tin doped indium oxide, tin oxide or zinc oxide as the high refractive index layer (each of these non-conducting metal oxides having a similar refractive index, lower than the titanium oxide, in the near infra red).

For an optimised structure, comprising successive layers of non-conductive tin oxide (124 nm thick), silica (193 nm thick) and non-conductive tin oxide (118 nm thick) applied over the coated side of 3 mm Pilkington K Glass (as used in the above Example), the computer simulation indicates; Visible light transmission 76% Visible light reflection 13% Emissivity 0.18 Direct solar heat transmission 60% Transmission colour (a*, b*) -1.6,1.0 Reflection colour (a*, b*) -1.7, -0.8 when the coated pane is irradicated from the uncoated side.

In general, when titanium oxide is used for the high refractive index layers and silica for the low refractive index layer, the titanium oxide layers will preferably each have thicknesses in the range 70 to 140 nm, especially 80 to 120 nm, with thicknesses of about 100 nm being particularly preferred, and the silica layer will preferably have a thickness in the range 120 to 220 nm, especially 130 to 200 nm, with thickness of about 180 <RTI>rim</RTI> being particularly preferred. When one of the non-conductive metal oxides discussed above is used for the high refractive index layers and silica for the low refractive index layer, the metal oxide layers will preferably each have thicknesses in the range 80 to 150 nm, especially 90 to 140 <RTI>nm,</RTI> with thicknesses of about 120 nm being particularly preferred, and the silica layer will preferably have a thickness in the range 140 to 240 nm, especially 160 to 220 nm, with thicknesses of about 200 nm being particularly preferred.

While, in the Example described above, the product is produced by applying the infra red reflecting stack of high refractive index, low refractive index and high refractive index layers by sputtering, the skilled man will appreciate that the layer materials used are suitable for application to the glass by pyrolytic methods, for example chemical vapour deposition, on-line during the production process, so that all the coatings (and not just the low emissivity layer and any colour suppressing underlayer) may be applied on line. This is an important advantage of the invention.

Further advantages lie in the high performance achievable, with DSHT <RTI> < 0.9</RTI> LT, especially <RTI> < 0.8</RTI> LT where DSHT = direct solar heat transmission and LT = visible light reflection being readily available, in both monolithic and double glazed applications. The neutral colours, with <img class="EMIRef" id="026534733-00110001" />

<RTI>S 5</RTI> available in reflection (normal incidence) and transmission, are a further advantage, as is the possibility of achieving reflection colours substantially independent of angle of incidence at low angles of incidence.

Still further improvements in performance may be achieved by combining two coated panes in accordance with the invention in a double glazed window; in this case, the coatings would normally be used on surfaces two and three, i.e. the surfaces turned towards the internal air/gas space of the window, so that the coatings are protected within the window. However, other orientations are possible, so that, for example, the coatings may be present on surfaces two and four, provided the materials selected for the coating on surface four are sufficiently durable to withstand use on an exposed surface.

Claims (16)

Claims
1. A high performance solar control glass comprising a glass substrate carrying a coating comprising a low emissivity layer and, over said low emissivity layer, successive high refractive index, low refractive index and high refractive index layers, each having an optical thickness corresponding to about <RTI>ni4</RTI> wherein in each case n is an odd integer and <RTI>k</RTI> is a wavelength in the near infra red region of the spectrum.
2. A coated glass as claimed in claim 1 wherein the low emissivity layer is a layer of semi-conductor metal oxide.
3. A coated glass as claimed in claim 2 wherein the semi-conductor metal oxide is doped tin oxide.
4. A coated glass as claimed in claim 4 wherein the semi-conductor metal oxide is tin doped indium oxide.
5. A coated glass as claimed in any of the preceding claims including a colour suppression layer or layers between the low emissivity layer and the glass.
<RTI>
6.</RTI> A coated glass as claimed in claim 5 including, as a colour suppressing layer, a layer having an optical thickness of about <RTI>L4</RTI> wherein <RTI>X</RTI> is a wavelength of about <RTI> 500 nm.</RTI>
7. A coated glass as claimed in claim 5 including, as colour suppressing layers, a first layer, towards the glass, of relatively high refractive index material and a second layer, towards the low emissivity coating, of relatively low refractive index material, the total optical thickness of said two layers being about 1/6 of a 500 nm design wavelength.
8. A coated glass as claimed in any of the preceding claims wherein, for each of the high refractive index, low refractive index and high refractive index layers, the value <RTI>ofn</RTI> is 1.
9. A coated glass as claimed in any of the preceding claims wherein, for each of the high refractive index, low refractive index and high refractive index layers, <RTI>X</RTI> is a wavelength in the range from 900 nm to 1400 nm.
10. A coated glass as claimed in claim 9 wherein <RTI>x</RTI> is a wavelength in the range from 1000 nm to 1250 nm.
11. A coated glass as claimed in any of the preceding claims wherein at least one of the said high refractive index layers is of titanium oxide.
12. A coated glass as claimed in any of the preceding claims wherein at least one of said high refractive index layers is of <RTI>non-conductive</RTI> tin oxide or indium oxide.
13. A coated glass as claimed in any of the preceding claims wherein said one low refractive index layer is of silicon oxide.
14. A high performance double glazing unit comprising an outer pane and an inner pane, at least the outer pane being a pane of high performance solar control glass as claimed in any of the preceding claims.
15. A high performance double glazing unit as claimed in claim 14 wherein the inner pane also carries a low emissivity coating.
16. A high performance double glazing unit wherein each of the inner and outer panes is a pane of high performance glass according to any of claims 1 to 13.
GB9707135A 1997-04-08 1997-04-08 Improvements in or related to coated glass Withdrawn GB9707135D0 (en)

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Cited By (9)

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2000027771A1 (en) * 1998-11-09 2000-05-18 Ppg Industries Ohio, Inc. Solar control coatings and coated articles
WO2001038246A2 (en) * 1999-11-26 2001-05-31 Commissariat A L'energie Atomique Heat-absorbing filter and method for making same
WO2002008136A1 (en) * 2000-07-26 2002-01-31 Pilkington North America, Inc. Glass article with anti-reflective coating
US6680135B2 (en) 1995-09-15 2004-01-20 Saint-Gobain Glass France Substrate with a photocatalytic coating
US6722159B2 (en) 1997-03-14 2004-04-20 Ppg Industries Ohio, Inc. Photocatalytically-activated self-cleaning article and method of making same
US7749621B2 (en) 1997-03-14 2010-07-06 Ppg Industries Ohio, Inc. Visible-light-responsive photoactive coating, coated article, and method of making same
WO2011025757A1 (en) * 2009-08-24 2011-03-03 Certainteed Corporation Thin films with high near-infrared reflectivity deposited on building materials
US8158262B2 (en) 2006-06-05 2012-04-17 Pilkington Group Limited Glass article having a zinc oxide coating and method for making same
WO2013036112A1 (en) * 2011-09-05 2013-03-14 Wallvision B.V. Outside wall cladding element and an outside wall provided with such an outside wall cladding element

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Cited By (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6680135B2 (en) 1995-09-15 2004-01-20 Saint-Gobain Glass France Substrate with a photocatalytic coating
US7597930B2 (en) 1995-09-15 2009-10-06 Saint-Gobain Glass France Substrate with a photocatalytic coating
US6846556B2 (en) 1995-09-15 2005-01-25 Saint-Gobain Glass France Substrate with a photocatalytic coating
US7749621B2 (en) 1997-03-14 2010-07-06 Ppg Industries Ohio, Inc. Visible-light-responsive photoactive coating, coated article, and method of making same
US6722159B2 (en) 1997-03-14 2004-04-20 Ppg Industries Ohio, Inc. Photocatalytically-activated self-cleaning article and method of making same
WO2000027771A1 (en) * 1998-11-09 2000-05-18 Ppg Industries Ohio, Inc. Solar control coatings and coated articles
US6844976B1 (en) 1999-11-26 2005-01-18 Commissariat A L'energie Atomique Heat-absorbing filter and method for making same
WO2001038246A3 (en) * 1999-11-26 2002-01-10 Commissariat Energie Atomique Heat-absorbing filter and method for making same
FR2801684A1 (en) * 1999-11-26 2001-06-01 Commissariat Energie Atomique Heat absorbing filter operating in the visible and infrared ranges for use in surgical and therapy applications, and manufacture
WO2001038246A2 (en) * 1999-11-26 2001-05-31 Commissariat A L'energie Atomique Heat-absorbing filter and method for making same
WO2002008136A1 (en) * 2000-07-26 2002-01-31 Pilkington North America, Inc. Glass article with anti-reflective coating
US6838178B1 (en) 2000-07-26 2005-01-04 Libbey-Owens-Ford Co. Glass article with anti-reflective coating
US9909316B2 (en) 2005-10-05 2018-03-06 Certainteed Corporation Thin films with high near-infrared reflectivity deposited on building materials
US8551619B2 (en) 2005-10-05 2013-10-08 Certainteed Corporation Thin films with high near-infrared reflectivity deposited on building materials
US8277943B2 (en) 2005-10-05 2012-10-02 Certainteed Corporation Thin films with high near-infrared reflectivity deposited on building materials
US8158262B2 (en) 2006-06-05 2012-04-17 Pilkington Group Limited Glass article having a zinc oxide coating and method for making same
WO2011025757A1 (en) * 2009-08-24 2011-03-03 Certainteed Corporation Thin films with high near-infrared reflectivity deposited on building materials
WO2013036112A1 (en) * 2011-09-05 2013-03-14 Wallvision B.V. Outside wall cladding element and an outside wall provided with such an outside wall cladding element
US9331630B2 (en) 2011-09-05 2016-05-03 Wallvision B.V. Outside wall cladding element and an outside wall provided with such an outside wall cladding element

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