GB2317813A - Spiked shoes protector - Google Patents

Spiked shoes protector Download PDF

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Publication number
GB2317813A
GB2317813A GB9720956A GB9720956A GB2317813A GB 2317813 A GB2317813 A GB 2317813A GB 9720956 A GB9720956 A GB 9720956A GB 9720956 A GB9720956 A GB 9720956A GB 2317813 A GB2317813 A GB 2317813A
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GB
United Kingdom
Prior art keywords
pad
shoe
spikes
sole
over
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Withdrawn
Application number
GB9720956A
Other versions
GB9720956D0 (en
Inventor
Thomas Eccles
Original Assignee
Thomas Eccles
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to GBGB9620704.8A priority Critical patent/GB9620704D0/en
Priority to GBGB9624561.8A priority patent/GB9624561D0/en
Application filed by Thomas Eccles filed Critical Thomas Eccles
Publication of GB9720956D0 publication Critical patent/GB9720956D0/en
Publication of GB2317813A publication Critical patent/GB2317813A/en
Withdrawn legal-status Critical Current

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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B5/00Footwear for sporting purposes
    • A43B5/18Attachable overshoes for sporting purposes

Abstract

An under-sole pad which is so sized and shaped as to abut the spiked region of a spiked shoe, for example a running shoe, and whose sole-abutting face consists of a material which is sufficiently soft or is so recessed that the spikes will cause it to adhere to the sole or will be accommodated in the recesses; preferably with additional means associated with the pad to retain it temporarily on the shoe during such usage; the pad being sufficiently thick, or being so recessed, that the spikes do not go wholly through it and are thereby protected from the ground over which the shoe wearer is walking when the pad is in place. The pad may incorporate straps which over-fasten onto the shoe, in use, with VELCRO-style strips (Figs 2, 3) and two appropriately configured pads may fit together such that they form a readily separable container for drinks etc (Fig 6).

Description

SPIKED SHOES PROTECTOR Background to the Invention The invention relates to ways of protecting for example spiked running shoes ("running spikes").
Running spikes come into competitive action for relatively short periods of time and in between these competitive usages the runner will usually continue to wear, and to walk around in, his or her spikes rather than be bothered to change into (for example) a pair of non-spiked trainers or similarly suitable alternative footwear.
It is awkward to walk around in spikes, but runners get used to this in much the same way as footballers get used to clattering around in studded boots off the football pitch and on the way to the changing rooms. Unlike studded boots, however, running spikes are relatively easily damaged and blunted by such offthe-track walking. Concrete, asphalt, and the like surfaces can damage the spikes very quickly indeed. Yet the practice of walking around in them in between races still persists.
The problem is well-recognised and the applicant knows of no widely accepted solution to it.
Summarv of the Invention In its broadest aspect the invention is embodied in an under-sole pad which is so sized and shaped as to abut the spiked region of a spiked shoe and whose soleabutting face consists of a material which is sufficiently soft or is so recessed that the spikes will cause it to adhere to the sole or will be accommodated in the recesses; preferably with additional means associated with the pad to retain it temporarily on the shoe during such usage; the pad being sufficiently thick, or being so recessed, that the spikes do not go wholly through it and are thereby protected from the ground over which the shoe wearer is walking when the pad is in place.
The additional means, where used, may take the form of front andlor rear straps which could be of the two-strap kind which over-fasten with (for example) VELCRO-style strips (VELCRO is currently a registered trade mark).
The rear strap, where present, could form a heel-embracing piece and optionally could be moulded integrally as part of the pad rather than being formed as a separately defined strap.
In any of these embodiments the pad may be longitudinally sufficiently so stretchable that a user of the pad could put it over his shoe by, first, engaging his heel with the pad (either by spiking it onto the heel region of the shoe sole or, if there is a heel strap or heel piece, fitting the shoe into it) and then stretching the pad towards and eventually over the toe of the shoe; or vice versa.
Where the pad is recessed to accommodate the spikes there may be a plurality of recesses each so sized and spaced as to accommodate, between them, a specific pattern of spikes; or there could be one large recess accommodating all the spikes.
The ground-contacting face of the pad could be overlaid with material which is relatively harder than the rest of the pad and which thus would tend to resist wear and/or slippage when the shoe wearer is walking over hard surfaces.
In the case just outlined, it would be relatively conventional to tread or dimple such a ground-contacting slippage-resisting surface. The invention proposes however yet another non-obvious optional feature in such a case and, according to this feature of the invention, the ground-contacting surface of the pad (whether or not it is overlaid with a relatively harder layer as previously set forth) is studded in the manner of a pair of football boots. Not only does this give excellent grip, it makes the shoe wearer feel more at home with the pad since the action produced by the studs is not dissimilar to that with which he is thoroughly familiar when walking around in his running spikes without the pad.
In the broadest aspect of the invention it is not necessary for the pads to be "shoeshaped" in plan view. They could be broadly rectangular. Runners and other athletes are not known for walking with their feet unduly close together, indeed quite the opposite, and this is one aspect of the invention that has been wholly overlooked by conventional shoe manufacturers to date.
In any embodiment of the invention, but particularly in the case just outlined where the pads are (say) generally rectangular in plan view, two such pads brought face-to-face could constitute a readily separable container for drinks, glucose bars, spare socks or whatever else the athlete might want to carry with him to the track side. When the pads are not required, i.e when competition is imminent, something has to be done with them; and this is a particularly imaginative way of putting them to an alternative use.
The invention naturally includes within its scope an under-sole pad substantially as described herein with reference to and as illustrated in any appropriate combination of the accompanying drawings.
Bnef Description of the Drawings Figures 1 to 4 each show, in perspective, under-sole pads of differing designs but all embodying the invention in its broadest aspect; Figure 5 is a sectioned side elevation of another pad embodying the invention; and Figures 6 and 7 are respectively sectioned side elevation and plan of a pair of pads embodying the invention.
Descnption of the illustrated embodiments In Figure 1 a simple pad of integral moulded relatively soft rubber is "shoeshaped" in plan and is thick enough, and soft enough, to be impaled on the underside of a spiked running shoe so that the spikes cause the pad to adhere to the shoe sole temporarily.
The pad is sufficiently thick that the spikes will not go right the way through it and will therefore be protected from contact with the ground over which the shoe wearer is walking.
Such a pad might only be good for a limited number of applications before it starts to shred and lose its gripability; but it embodies the invention in its broadest aspect.
The pad may be pre-shaped so as to conform to the curvature of the shoe sole or it might, in its simplest format, be sufficiently deformable that it starts off flat but can be pressed onto the sole and the spikes will, again temporarily, cause it to conform to the sole curvature whilst it is in use.
Figure 2 shows a more sophisticated version in which the pad exhibits front overfastening straps of the VELCRO-fastening kind and which resembles in many ways a "flip-flop" sandal of the kind with which the reader will be familiar. Again the pad is thick enough, soft enough and resilient enough that it is impaled by the spikes and can relatively easily be pulled off them afterwards.
In Figure 3 the pad of Figure 2 now exhibits a heel piece which, in this particular embodiment, is moulded integrally with the resilient rubber of the pad itself.
In Figure 4 the pad of Figure 3 exhibits two further features. Firstly, it has an integrally moulded front piece (or "bumper") which fits over the toe of the running shoe (not shown) in use. Secondly, it is deliberately made to be readily stretchable in the direction of the arrow shown.
The combined effect of these two features is to enable the user, firstly, to insert the heel piece on his shoe and, secondly, to pull the pad forward and then fit the front bumper 6f it over the toe of his shoe. Whether or not the spikes play any part in retaining the pad on the shoe subsequently, these features will clearly tend to retain the pad securely on the shoe whilst it is being used.
In Figure 5 the pad of Figure 4 is indeed provided with recessed areas, one for the sole spikes, another for the heel array of spikes, with a bridging section in between the two.
In Figure 6 two pads, each similar to that described and illustrated with reference to Figure 5, mate such that their recesses form effectively readily separable containers as previously outlined. As Figure 7 shows, these pads are generally rectangular in plan view. The shaping and the inherent resilience of the heel and toe sections of the pads enables them to be readily separable but, when carried in one hand and in the mating formation shown in Figures 6 and 7, to form an adequately secure container of a temporary nature for relatively small and lightweight objects such as socks, bandages, and glucose bars.

Claims (11)

CLAIMS:
1. An under-sole pad which is so sized and shaped as to abut the spiked region of a spiked shoe and whose sole-abutting face consists of a material which is sufficiently soft or is so recessed that the spikes will cause it to adhere to the sole or will be accommodated in the recesses; preferably with additional means associated with the pad to retain it temporarily on the shoe during such usage; the pad being sufficiently thick, or being so recessed, that the spikes do not go wholly through it and are thereby protected from the ground over which the shoe wearer is walking when the pad is in place.
2. A pad according to Claim 1 in which the said additional means are present and take the form of front and/or rear straps which over-fasten with VELCROstyle strips (VELCRO is currently a registered trade mark).
3. A pad according to Claim 2 and in which the rear strap, where present, forms a heel-embracing piece and is either moulded integrally as part of the pad or is formed as a separately defined strap.
4. A pad according to Claims 1, 2 or 3 in which the pad is longitudinally sufficiently so stretchable that a user of the pad can put it over his shoe by, first, engaging his heel with the pad (either by spiking it onto the heel region of the shoe sole or, if there is a heel strap or heel piece, fitting the shoe into it) and then stretching the pad towards and eventually over the toe of the shoe; or vice versa.
5. A pad according to any of the preceding Claims in which the pad is recessed to accommodate the spikes with either a plurality of recesses each so sized and spaced as to accommodate, between them, a specific pattern of spikes or one large recess accommodating all the spikes.
6. A pad according to any of the preceding Claims and in which the groundcontacting face of the pad is overlaid with material which is relatively harder than the rest of the pad to resist wear and/or slippage when the shoe wearer is walking over hard surfaces.
7. A pad according to Claim 6 and in which the ground-contacting surface of the pad is studded in the manner of a pair of football boots.
8. A pad according to any of the preceding Claims which is broadly rectangular in plan view.
9. A pad according to any of the preceding Claims so configured that when two such pads are brought face-to-face they constitute a readily separable container for drinks, glucose bars, spare socks or whatever else the athlete might want to carry with him to the track side.
10. An under-sole pad substantially as described herein with reference to and as illustrated in any appropriate combination of the accompanying drawings.
11. A shoe product incorporating a pad in accordance with any of the preceding Claims.
GB9720956A 1996-10-04 1997-10-03 Spiked shoes protector Withdrawn GB2317813A (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GBGB9620704.8A GB9620704D0 (en) 1996-10-04 1996-10-04 Running spikes protector
GBGB9624561.8A GB9624561D0 (en) 1996-10-04 1996-11-27 Spiked shoes protector

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
GB9720956D0 GB9720956D0 (en) 1997-12-03
GB2317813A true GB2317813A (en) 1998-04-08

Family

ID=26310162

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
GB9720956A Withdrawn GB2317813A (en) 1996-10-04 1997-10-03 Spiked shoes protector

Country Status (1)

Country Link
GB (1) GB2317813A (en)

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB2322786A (en) * 1997-03-04 1998-09-09 Douglas Speirs Protective overshoe for golf shoe spikes

Citations (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3283424A (en) * 1964-02-13 1966-11-08 Bernard J Struntz Baseball spike guard
US3313047A (en) * 1965-11-17 1967-04-11 Jens A Svien Spiked shoe cover
US3566488A (en) * 1969-05-05 1971-03-02 Anthony J Pilarski Cleat guard
US3812603A (en) * 1973-10-09 1974-05-28 M Goodman Detachable spiked shoe protective cover
US3821858A (en) * 1973-09-12 1974-07-02 T Haselden Protector for athletic shoes
US3913243A (en) * 1975-02-20 1975-10-21 Lawrence Peska Ass Inc Golf sandal
US4258483A (en) * 1979-03-26 1981-03-31 Hogue Amos F Protective device for spiked athletic shoes
US4484398A (en) * 1983-07-21 1984-11-27 Goodwin Boyd G Spiked shoe protector
GB2140273A (en) * 1983-05-26 1984-11-28 Masao Shimada Protective footwear for a spike shoe
US5367794A (en) * 1993-04-01 1994-11-29 Adelstein; Stephen Cleated shoe protector
WO1995017108A1 (en) * 1993-12-23 1995-06-29 Owen Craig Pollard Spiked shoe protector
GB2300345A (en) * 1995-05-05 1996-11-06 Ericson Verschueren Doris Shoe spike protector.
WO1996034542A1 (en) * 1995-05-05 1996-11-07 Allan Graeme Miners Detachable spike cover for sports shoe

Patent Citations (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3283424A (en) * 1964-02-13 1966-11-08 Bernard J Struntz Baseball spike guard
US3313047A (en) * 1965-11-17 1967-04-11 Jens A Svien Spiked shoe cover
US3566488A (en) * 1969-05-05 1971-03-02 Anthony J Pilarski Cleat guard
US3821858A (en) * 1973-09-12 1974-07-02 T Haselden Protector for athletic shoes
US3812603A (en) * 1973-10-09 1974-05-28 M Goodman Detachable spiked shoe protective cover
US3913243A (en) * 1975-02-20 1975-10-21 Lawrence Peska Ass Inc Golf sandal
US4258483A (en) * 1979-03-26 1981-03-31 Hogue Amos F Protective device for spiked athletic shoes
GB2140273A (en) * 1983-05-26 1984-11-28 Masao Shimada Protective footwear for a spike shoe
US4484398A (en) * 1983-07-21 1984-11-27 Goodwin Boyd G Spiked shoe protector
US5367794A (en) * 1993-04-01 1994-11-29 Adelstein; Stephen Cleated shoe protector
WO1995017108A1 (en) * 1993-12-23 1995-06-29 Owen Craig Pollard Spiked shoe protector
GB2300345A (en) * 1995-05-05 1996-11-06 Ericson Verschueren Doris Shoe spike protector.
WO1996034542A1 (en) * 1995-05-05 1996-11-07 Allan Graeme Miners Detachable spike cover for sports shoe

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB2322786A (en) * 1997-03-04 1998-09-09 Douglas Speirs Protective overshoe for golf shoe spikes

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
GB9720956D0 (en) 1997-12-03

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