GB2286609A - Internally insulated tank - Google Patents

Internally insulated tank Download PDF

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Publication number
GB2286609A
GB2286609A GB9503043A GB9503043A GB2286609A GB 2286609 A GB2286609 A GB 2286609A GB 9503043 A GB9503043 A GB 9503043A GB 9503043 A GB9503043 A GB 9503043A GB 2286609 A GB2286609 A GB 2286609A
Authority
GB
United Kingdom
Prior art keywords
insulating material
tank
cistern
insulated
interior surface
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Granted
Application number
GB9503043A
Other versions
GB9503043D0 (en
GB2286609B (en
Inventor
Thomas Craig
Original Assignee
Thomas Craig
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to GB9403194A priority Critical patent/GB9403194D0/en
Application filed by Thomas Craig filed Critical Thomas Craig
Publication of GB9503043D0 publication Critical patent/GB9503043D0/en
Publication of GB2286609A publication Critical patent/GB2286609A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of GB2286609B publication Critical patent/GB2286609B/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Application status is Expired - Fee Related legal-status Critical

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Classifications

    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E03WATER SUPPLY; SEWERAGE
    • E03DWATER-CLOSETS OR URINALS WITH FLUSHING DEVICES; FLUSHING VALVES THEREFOR
    • E03D1/00Water flushing devices with cisterns ; Setting up a range of flushing devices or water-closets; Combinations of several flushing devices
    • E03D1/006Realisations of and provisions for preventing "sweating" of cisterns
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D90/00Component parts, details or accessories for large containers
    • B65D90/02Wall construction
    • B65D90/06Coverings, e.g. for insulating purposes

Abstract

An internally insulated tank e.g. a toilet cistern, contains a layer of insulating material (such as polystyrene) on at least part of an internal surface of the tank. Preferably, however, substantially all of the interior surfaces of said tank are insulated in order to reduce or eliminate condensation. <IMAGE>

Description

"Insulated Tank" The present invention relates to the internal insulation of a tank, such as a toilet cistern to reduce condensation problems.

The external surfaces of a tank containing cold fluid (such as a toilet cistern) frequently become covered with a layer of condensation. The condensation forms because the external ambient air temperature is significantly warmer than the tank body, which is cooled by the volume of cold fluid contained therein.

A large volume of fluid within a tank will act as a heat sink, preventing the tank body warming to ambient temperature. In addition, the temperature of a cistern is prevented from warming up to the temperature of the surrounding air due to refilling of the cistern whenever the toilet is flushed.

The level of condensation upon a toilet cistern is increased by the relatively high humidity of air in domestic bathrooms. In addition many bathrooms have poor ventilation (for example, only small windows or extractor fans) and the poor circulation of air may also contribute to the problem of condensation.

Vitreous china, stone, and ceramic cisterns, being composed of conductive material, tend to be especially prone to condensation problems.

This problem of condensation, in addition to being unsightly, can cause serious problems with damp.

Droplets of condensation may fall onto the floor causing floor coverings to rot, or may be transferred to a wall. Condensation on the external surface of a tank can thus cause, or contribute to, rotting of floorboards, woodworm, discolouring or peeling of paint or wallcoverings, or growth of moulds or other fungi.

Such damp-induced problems necessitate expensive repairs or treatment.

Previous attempts to solve the problem of condensation on the external wall of toilet cisterns include the development of plastic cisterns, which tend to have less condensation due to the insulating nature of the plastics material forming the tank body. However, many people find plastic cisterns aesthetically unappealing, and even plastic cisterns have some external condensation formation. Textile coverings for cisterns are also available. However these do not prevent condensation formation, but merely reduce the amount of water being transferred to the floor, walls etc.

Moreover, where a cistern is attached to a bathroom wall such textile coverings cannot be fitted around the back of the cistern and protect the wall area to which the cistern is fastened.

The present invention solves the problem of condensation formation on tanks containing fluids of sub-ambient temperature.

The present invention provides an insulated tank, wherein insulating material is located on at least part of an interior surface of said tank.

Tanks suitable for insulation according to the present invention include toilet cisterns and cold water storage tanks. However, any container liable to create condensation on its outside surfaces will be suitable.

However, the invention is particularly suited to domestic tanks.

Desirably the insulating material covers substantially all of the inside surface of the tank walls.

Additionally, internal walls within the tank may optionally be made of or covered with insulating material.

Conveniently the insulating material is pre-formed into sheets which may then be cut into the desired shape to cover the inside surface of a tank wall. Generally it is desirable for the insulating sheets for any particular tank to fit closely together, forming a snug fit within the tank. The sheets may be attached to the interior surface of the tank walls by any suitable means, but a fixant, especially a fixant which is water-resistant, is generally convenient.

Alternatively the insulating material may be applied to the inside surface of the tank walls in a fluid or semi-fluid state, and thus may be spread, poured or sprayed onto the appropriate surface. Application of the insulating material in the form of a foam (which subsequently dries or hardens) is also possible.

Alternatively a moulding member may be located inside the tank to be insulated, the moulding member being shaped and positioned so that a volume is described between the moulding member and an internal wall of the cistern. The volume of space described by the moulding member and internal tank walls may then be filled with an insulating material, which is desirably pourable or sprayable, for example an expanding foam, or small particles of insulating material which are then affixed together by heat or pressure or by use of a fixing material, for example a glue. By selection of an appropriate size and/or shape of moulding member, it is possible to produce a layer of insulating material of the desired shape and/or thickness. Once the insulating material has been properly positioned and, if required, dried the moulding member may be removed from the tank.

Advantageously, the insulating material may be applied to the tank as part of the tank manufacturing process and before installation of the tank into its operative position, thus avoiding the need to dry out and/or remove the tank to install the layer of insulating material.

In another aspect, the present invention provides a method of insulating tanks, said method comprising locating insulating material on at least part of an inside surface of a tank wall. By insulating a tank by this method the condensation produced on the outside of the tank will be reduced. In one embodiment the method comprises a pourable or sprayable insulating material being located into the volume described between the interior surface of said tank and a moulding member placed into said tank, said method further comprising removal of said moulding member after the insulating material has solidified.

In another aspect, the present invention also provides a kit to insulate a tank, said kit comprising insulating material (optionally pre-shaped to a form adapted to line the inside surface of a tank wall) and means to affix said material to an inside surface of a tank wall. Optionally said kit may include a template for producing sheets of insulating material of the size required to obtain a snug fit for a particular tank.

In a preferred embodiment, the kit further includes a moulding member adapted to be positioned within a tank, to describe a volume to be filled with said insulating material with the internal wall of said tank. The insulating material of such a kit should be pourable or sprayable.

The kit may be used to reduce condensation problems on the tank.

Any material having insulating properties may be used in the present invention. Desirably the insulating material should absorb as little water as possible.

Suitable insulating materials include, for example, polystyrene. Mention may be made of low water absorbing polystyrenes, for example high density polystyrene and Styrofoam.

The insulating material may be of any convenient thickness. Generally the insulating material should be thick enough to provide an adequate insulating effect, but an upper limit to the insulating material thickness is only imposed where a particular minimum capacity is required in the insulated tank. For example, for toilet cisterns there is a legal requirement (in the United Kingdom) to maintain a capacity of 7 to 9 litres and the thickness of insulating material used should take this requirement into account. Where high density polystyrene is used as the insulating material it has been found that a thickness of 5-lOmm, especially 6 to 8mm, is adequate. The exact thickness required will of course vary depending upon the insulating material selected.

To locate the insulating material in place it may be convenient to use a fixant, which should desirably be waterproof. Mention may be made of silicon glues (such as those used to seal windows), for example silicon rubber sealants, which also exhibit good adhesive properties. A preferred silicon rubber sealant is 7.9.7 of Dow Corning Hansl. Alternative sealants include (but are not limited to) wood glues and epoxy resins. For convenience the fixant may be applied using a glue gun.

After the insulating material has been located onto the internal surface(s) of the tank it may be desirable to seal any crevices or cracks using a sealant. Suitable sealants include the fixants described above.

In the drawings Figure 1 represents a perspective view of an uninsulated toilet cistern.

Figure 2 shows the cistern of Figure 1 after insulation of the internal wall of the base of the cistern.

Figure 3 shows the cistern of Figure 1 after insulation of the front and rear internal walls of the cistern.

Figure 4 shows the cistern of Figure 1 after insulation of the internal walls of the gable ends of the cistern.

In more detail, Figure 1 shows a perspective view of a toilet cistern 1. The top of cistern 1 is not shown for clarity. Whilst a toilet cistern is illustrated in Figure 1, any other tank used to store fluid at subambient temperature may be used. Cistern 1 is shown without internal mechanisms. In base 5 of cistern 1 is located the inlet aperture 2 for water ingress, the outlet aperture 3 for water overflow and the main outlet aperture 4 which connects the cistern to the toilet basin. The size and shape of the cistern and the location of apertures 2, 3 and 4 may vary from that illustrated without detracting from the invention.

Figure 2 shows a cistern 1 as illustrated in Figure 1 having fitted thereto a layer of insulating material 6 on base 5 of the cistern 1. A suitable thickness of insulating material is 5 to loin, especially about 8mm.

If the insulating material is fitted in sheet form after location portions corresponding to apertures 2, 3 and 4 may be excised to permit operation of the cistern. Alternatively, the sheet of insulating material may be adapted to accommodate the apertures 2, 3 and 4 before location on the base 5 of cistern 1. In an alternative embodiment the insulating material 6 is sprayed or poured onto base 5. Apertures 2, 3 and 4 are covered to prevent escape of insulating material therethrough. The insulating material 6 may be prevented from covering the apertures 2, 3 and 4 or may be allowed to flow over them and suitable portions from the insulating material 1 excised after it has solidified.

To fit a layer of insulating material 6 in sheet form onto a cistern 1, the cistern should be clean and dry.

If a used cistern is to be insulated, it should first be carefully cleaned and thoroughly dried (for example using a hair drier). this is necessary to ensure full adhesion of the insulating layer 6. If holes corresponding to apertures 2, 3 and 4 are required these should desirably be cut out from the sheet before the sheet is fitted. Conveniently, a template may be prepared which gives the positions of the apertures and the shape required to achieve a snug fit in base 5 to aid accurate cutting out. The sheet of insulating material 6 may be affixed to base 5. One method to affix the sheet is by spotting glue in the corners of the sheet and then firmly holding the sheet in place until the glue dries. The glue should ideally be water-proof.

Figure 3 shows a cistern 1 as illustrated in Figure 1 having fitted thereto a layer of insulating material 6 on internal front wall 7 and internal back wall 8 of the cistern 1. The layer of insulating material is fitted as described above for base 5. The upper edge of the layer of insulating material 6 should be above the normal level of water held by the cistern, for example should be 1 to 5cm above the normal water level.

Figure 4 shows a cistern 1 as illustrated in Figure 1 having fitted thereto a layer of insulating material 6 on left and right gables 9 and 9' of the cistern 1.

The layer of insulating material is fitted as described above for base 5. The upper edge of the layer of insulating material 6 should be above the normal level of water held by the cistern, for example should be 1 to 5cm above the normal water level.

Where the cistern is to be insulated on base 5, internal walls 7, 8, 9 and 9' it may be advantageous to fit the insulating material 6 on the base last.

additionally it may be preferred to seal any crack or crevices (for example at the corners where the sheets meet) with a sealant which should desirably be waterproof. likewise it may be beneficial to seal the top edge of the insulating sheet with sealant.

Once the sealant and any fixant used have been dried, the internal mechanisms of the cistern 1 may be fitted and the cistern itself be installed for use. The insulated cistern 1 does not become condensed when in use.

Claims (12)

1. An insulated tank, wherein insulating material is located on at least part of an interior surface of a tank wall.
2. An insulated tank as claimed in Claim 1, which is a toilet cistern.
3. An insulated tank as claimed in either one of Claims 1 and 2 wherein substantially all of the interior surfaces of said tank walls are insulated.
4. An insulated tank as claimed in any one of Claims 1 to 3 wherein said insulating material is polystyrene.
5. An insulated tank as claimed in Claim 4 wherein said polystyrene is high density polystyrene.
6. An insulated tank as claimed in any one of Claims 1 to 5 wherein said insulating material is fixed onto said interior surface by a waterproof fixant.
7. A method of insulating a tank, said method comprising locating insulating material onto at least part of an interior surface of a tank wall.
8. A method as claimed in Claim 7 wherein said insulating material is polystyrene and is located on said interior surface by means of a waterproof fixant.
9. A method as claimed in Claim 7 wherein a pourable insulating material is used, said pourable or sprayable insulating material being located into the volume described between the interior surface of said tank and a moulding member placed into said tank, said method further comprising removal of said moulding member after the insulating material has solidified.
10. A method as claimed in any one of Claims 7 to 9, said method further including the step of sealing any cracks or crevices in said insulating material with a waterproof sealant.
11. A kit to insulate at least part of an interior surface of a tank wall, said kit comprising insulating material and a means to locate said material onto said surface.
12. A kit as claimed in Claim 12 further comprising a moulding member and wherein said insulating material is pourable.
GB9503043A 1994-02-18 1995-02-16 Insulated tank Expired - Fee Related GB2286609B (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB9403194A GB9403194D0 (en) 1994-02-18 1994-02-18 Cistern tank liner kit

Publications (3)

Publication Number Publication Date
GB9503043D0 GB9503043D0 (en) 1995-04-05
GB2286609A true GB2286609A (en) 1995-08-23
GB2286609B GB2286609B (en) 1998-02-04

Family

ID=10750603

Family Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
GB9403194A Pending GB9403194D0 (en) 1994-02-18 1994-02-18 Cistern tank liner kit
GB9503043A Expired - Fee Related GB2286609B (en) 1994-02-18 1995-02-16 Insulated tank

Family Applications Before (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
GB9403194A Pending GB9403194D0 (en) 1994-02-18 1994-02-18 Cistern tank liner kit

Country Status (1)

Country Link
GB (2) GB9403194D0 (en)

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB2304780A (en) * 1995-08-29 1997-03-26 Stephen Arthur Bannocks Water recirculation system and storage tank for use therein
DE19706965A1 (en) * 1997-02-20 1998-10-08 Vulf Dr Ing Etkin Lavatory installation
GB2325251A (en) * 1997-05-14 1998-11-18 Deborah Francis Cistern insulating sleeve

Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB898223A (en) * 1957-09-25 1962-06-06 Hubert Percival Schofield Improvements in or relating to water cisterns or the like liquid containers
US4536901A (en) * 1983-09-23 1985-08-27 Kohler Co. Insulating liner for a water closet tank
GB2259733A (en) * 1991-09-17 1993-03-24 Roy Hamer Improvements relating to water cisterns

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB898223A (en) * 1957-09-25 1962-06-06 Hubert Percival Schofield Improvements in or relating to water cisterns or the like liquid containers
US4536901A (en) * 1983-09-23 1985-08-27 Kohler Co. Insulating liner for a water closet tank
GB2259733A (en) * 1991-09-17 1993-03-24 Roy Hamer Improvements relating to water cisterns

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB2304780A (en) * 1995-08-29 1997-03-26 Stephen Arthur Bannocks Water recirculation system and storage tank for use therein
GB2304780B (en) * 1995-08-29 1997-09-17 Stephen Arthur Bannocks Water recirculation system
DE19706965A1 (en) * 1997-02-20 1998-10-08 Vulf Dr Ing Etkin Lavatory installation
GB2325251A (en) * 1997-05-14 1998-11-18 Deborah Francis Cistern insulating sleeve

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
GB2286609B (en) 1998-02-04
GB9403194D0 (en) 1994-04-06
GB9503043D0 (en) 1995-04-05

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Date Code Title Description
PCNP Patent ceased through non-payment of renewal fee

Effective date: 20050214

Effective date: 20050216