GB2251391A - Smoke generation in steam models - Google Patents

Smoke generation in steam models Download PDF

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Publication number
GB2251391A
GB2251391A GB9026824A GB9026824A GB2251391A GB 2251391 A GB2251391 A GB 2251391A GB 9026824 A GB9026824 A GB 9026824A GB 9026824 A GB9026824 A GB 9026824A GB 2251391 A GB2251391 A GB 2251391A
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GB
United Kingdom
Prior art keywords
steam
duct
smoke
oil
heating
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Withdrawn
Application number
GB9026824A
Other versions
GB9026824D0 (en
Inventor
Thomas Vale Cooper
Colin Cooper
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Steamlines Models & Publicatio
Original Assignee
Steamlines Models & Publicatio
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Steamlines Models & Publicatio filed Critical Steamlines Models & Publicatio
Priority to GB9026824A priority Critical patent/GB2251391A/en
Publication of GB9026824D0 publication Critical patent/GB9026824D0/en
Publication of GB2251391A publication Critical patent/GB2251391A/en
Withdrawn legal-status Critical Current

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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63HTOYS, e.g. TOPS, DOLLS, HOOPS OR BUILDING BLOCKS
    • A63H19/00Model railways
    • A63H19/02Locomotives; Motor coaches
    • A63H19/14Arrangements for imitating locomotive features, e.g. whistling, signalling, puffing

Abstract

A smoky exhaust is caused to be emitted from a steam model by utilising pressurised steam to draw a potentially smoke-producing medium through a heating duct leading to a smoke outlet from the model. The medium becomes heated sufficiently within the duct to cause it to generate smoke which becomes exhausted with the steam through the smoke outlet. In a steam locomotive the blast from a steam motor 40 is directed into a heating duct 18 which extends through a boiler flue 14. Oil from a tank 26 is introduced into the blast, so as to be drawn through the duct, and becomes heated sufficiently in passage through the duct to produce a smoky exhaust. An outlet end of the duct bears a diffusion cap 20 within a chimney 16 which serves to collect condensate and unburnt oil. <IMAGE>

Description

SMOKE GENERATION IN STEAM MODELS Coal-fired steam boilers tend to produce a great deal of smoke exhaust, and smoke emission from steam-driven railway locomotives, traction engines, riverboats, stationary engines etc. is a very evident common characteristic amongst them.

Such steam-driven vehicles and engines are a popular subject for model makers, who strive to reproduce in working models the appearance of the original machines in operation as faithfully as possible.

The production of a realistic smoke emission from such steam models has long been a problem. Even if coal fired, the effects of scale mean generally that the amount of smoke emitted from the model's boiler will be less than it should be proportionately for accurate reproduction. Many steam models are not coal-fired at all but may, for example, have gas-fired boilers which produce by themselves virtually no visible smoke. Commonly waste steam may be exhausted through a chimney to give a smoke-like appearance, but the "smoke" quality produced is very dependent upon the ambient atmospheric conditions.

It is an object of the invention to enable a steam model to produce a more realistic smoke emission than has generally been provided hitherto.

In accordance with the invention in one of its aspects a method of causing a smoky exhaust to be emitted from a steam model comprises mixing oil with pressurised steam and heating the oil and steam mixture sufficiently to cause the oil to smoke, the smoke being exhausted from the model through a smoke outlet.

Such a technique can, of course, be employed whether or not the model is actually steam driven.

That is to say, models are sometimes powered electrically, or otherwise, but a steam boiler can be incorporated for the realistic provision of steam effects. Provided there is a pressurised steam supply available, the invention may be put into effect.

Any suitable oil may be used. Additives, for example potassium nitrate, may be included to increase the smoke output. The steam and oil mixture may be passed through a hot heating duct leading to the smoke outlet, the oil being introduced into the steam entering the duct. The steam may conveniently comprise the blast (ie the exhausted waste steam) from a steam motor which powers the model. The heating duct may pass through a heating chamber which contains a burner employed in a steam boiler, the duct so being heated (at least indirectly) by heat from the burner; the duct may extend through a flue passage which takes hot waste gases away from the burner.

Some provision is most preferably made to capture unburnt oil from the heating duct and prevent its being discharged through the smoke outlet. This may comprise a suitable kind of diffuser and/or baffle arrangement at the outlet end of the heating duct. The captured oil may be collected for disposal.

In another of its aspects the invention provides a method of causing a smoky exhaust to be emitted from a steam model, the method comprising utilising steam under pressure to draw a smoke-producing medium through a hot heating duct leading to a smoke outlet from the model, the medium being heated sufficiently in the hot duct to dause the medium to generate smoke and the smoke being exhausted through the smoke outlet.

The smoke-producing medium could comprise, for example, potassium nitrate to generate the smoke.

There now follows a detailed description, to be read with reference to the accompanying drawings, of a model steam locomotive which in its construction and operation illustrates the invention by way of example.

In the accompanying drawings: Figure 1 is a cut-way drawing of a model steam locomotive; and Figure 2 is a flow chart illustrating the operation of a smoke generator of the locomotive.

A steam-powered model railway locomotive comprises a boiler 10, of a broadly conventional construction. A gas burner 12 is positioned within one end of a burner tube 14 which extends through the boiler to heat water in the boiler. The tube serves also to provide a flue to take waste gases away from the burner to an outlet (not shown) at the front end of the locomotive; the outlet is separate from a chimney 16, and the waste gases are not led to the chimney. Air can be supplied to the burner, and water in the boiler turned to steam, in a conventional manner of operation of the boiler.

Additionally within the burner tube 14 there is a heating duct 18 forming an expansion pipe of a smoke generator. The duct extends horizontally the full length of the tube 14, and beyond the boiler is directed vertically upwards into the chimney 16. An outlet from the duct 18, within the chimney 16, is fitted with a diffusion cap 20. The chimney forms a vertical cylindrical chamber housing the duct outlet to capture unburnt oil coming from the duct, as hereinafter referred to. The chamber is covered at its upper end by a perforate baffle 22 and closed at its bottom end. Oil drain pipes 24 lead from adjacent to the bottom end to drain away the captured oil to a collecting tank (not shown).

A bunker of the locomotive serves as an oil storage tank 26 from which oil can be fed steadily to an inlet 28 of the duct 18. Suitable feed lines provide for steam to be fed by way of a regulator 30 and a flow restrictor 32 into a bottom inlet 34 of the tank 26. Feed lines also provide for oil so displaced from a top outlet 36 of the tank 26 to be fed through an oil flow regulator 37 and a flow restrictor 38 to one of two available inlet arms of a tee- piece junction (not shown) fitted with its outlet arm to the duct inlet 28.

The locomotive is arranged to be driven by means of a steam motor 40. Steam from the boiler 10 is passed to the motor through a lubricator 42 in a conventional way. Further feed lines are provided to direct the blast (i.e. the waste steam) exhausted from the motor 40 into the other inlet arm of the tee-piece fitted to the duct inlet 28.

In operation of the locomotive, the gas burner 12 is operated to raise steam in the boiler 10. That steam is used to drive the motor 40 and so propel the locomotive. Some of the steam is directed through the restrictor 32 as a low flow supply to the inlet 34 at the bottom of the oil tank 26.

The tank 26 is initially almost filled with oil (optionally containing a certain amount of potassium nitrate) through a filler 44, but is topped up with a small amount of water which sinks to the bottom. The steam fed into the tank through the inlet 34 causes corresponding displacement of oil through the outlet 36 at the top of the tank. The displaced oil so becomes fed, by way of the regulator 37 and restrictor 38, to the tee-piece at the duct inlet 28. The regulator 37 is suitably adjusted.

As previously referred to, the blast from the motor 40 is also supplied to the tee-piece and the pressurised steam and oil become thoroughly mixed as they enter the duct inlet together. The oil and steam mixture then passes through the hot duct 18 within the burner tube 14 and so becomes heated. The system is arranged so that the degree of heating is sufficient for the oil to be caused to smoke strongly. At the diffusion cap 20, at the outlet from the heating duct within the chimney 16, liquids are so far as possible separated from the gases and a smoky exhaust leaves the chimney 16 through the smoke outlet at the baffle 22.

The baffle serves both to stop particles of hot oil escaping into the atmosphere (which could be a safety hazard) and to diffuse the smoke. The liquids (oil and condensed steam) captured within the chimney are drained off though the drain pipes 24 for collection.

Claims (11)

1. A method of causing a smoky exhaust to be emitted from a steam model, the method comprising utilising pressurised steam to draw a potentially smoke-producing medium through a heating duct leading to a smoke outlet from the model, the medium being heated sufficiently within the heating duct to cause it to generate smoke which becomes exhausted with the steam through the smoke outlet.
2. A method according to claim 1 in which the blast from a steam motor is utilised to draw the smoke-producing medium through the heating duct.
3. A method according to either of claims 1 and 2 in which the smoke-producing medium comprises oil.
4. A steam model comprising a heating duct leading to a smoke outlet, means for heating the duct, means for introducing a flow of steam from a pressurised source into the duct, and means for introducing a potentially smoke-producing medium into the steam flow so that the medium becomes drawn through the duct, the arrangement being such that in operation of the model the medium can be heated sufficiently in the heating duct to cause it to generate smoke which becomes exhausted with the steam through the smoke outlet.
5. A steam model according to claim 4 in which the heating duct extends through a boiler flue in order to be heated by boiler-heating means.
6. A steam model according to either of claims 4 and 5 comprising a steam motor, blast from the motor being directed into the heating duct to provide the steam flow through the duct.
7. A steam model according to any one of claims 4, 5 and 6 comprising a reservoir for oil and means for introducing steam into the reservoir to cause oil to be displaced and discharged into the steam flow through the heating duct.
8. A steam model according to any one of claims 4 to 7 in which an outlet end of the heating duct is enclosed within a collection chamber arranged to collect any condensate and unburnt medium leaving the duct.
9. A method of causing a smoky exhaust to be emitted from a steam model substantially as hereinbefore described.
10. A steam model adapted to operate substantially as hereinbefore described.
11. A steam locomotive constructed, arranged and adapted to operate substantially as hereinbefore described with reference to the accompanying drawings.
GB9026824A 1990-12-11 1990-12-11 Smoke generation in steam models Withdrawn GB2251391A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB9026824A GB2251391A (en) 1990-12-11 1990-12-11 Smoke generation in steam models

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB9026824A GB2251391A (en) 1990-12-11 1990-12-11 Smoke generation in steam models

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
GB9026824D0 GB9026824D0 (en) 1991-01-30
GB2251391A true GB2251391A (en) 1992-07-08

Family

ID=10686778

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
GB9026824A Withdrawn GB2251391A (en) 1990-12-11 1990-12-11 Smoke generation in steam models

Country Status (1)

Country Link
GB (1) GB2251391A (en)

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6280278B1 (en) * 1999-07-16 2001-08-28 M.T.H. Electric Trains Smoke generation system for model toy applications
WO2001087445A1 (en) * 2000-05-18 2001-11-22 Franz Schmeisser Steam generator for steam-operated machines and models

Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP0042876A1 (en) * 1979-05-11 1982-01-06 TAMURA, Muneo Method of producing fumes in model apparatus

Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP0042876A1 (en) * 1979-05-11 1982-01-06 TAMURA, Muneo Method of producing fumes in model apparatus

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6280278B1 (en) * 1999-07-16 2001-08-28 M.T.H. Electric Trains Smoke generation system for model toy applications
WO2001087445A1 (en) * 2000-05-18 2001-11-22 Franz Schmeisser Steam generator for steam-operated machines and models

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
GB9026824D0 (en) 1991-01-30

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Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
WAP Application withdrawn, taken to be withdrawn or refused ** after publication under section 16(1)