GB2242396A - Airline luggage or cargo security label - Google Patents

Airline luggage or cargo security label Download PDF

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Publication number
GB2242396A
GB2242396A GB9106336A GB9106336A GB2242396A GB 2242396 A GB2242396 A GB 2242396A GB 9106336 A GB9106336 A GB 9106336A GB 9106336 A GB9106336 A GB 9106336A GB 2242396 A GB2242396 A GB 2242396A
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GB
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Patent type
Prior art keywords
security
label
code
adhesive
labels
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Granted
Application number
GB9106336A
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GB9106336D0 (en )
GB2242396B (en )
Inventor
Yolande Fiona Anthony
Micheal John Anthony
Original Assignee
Yolande Fiona Anthony
Micheal John Anthony
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

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Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G09EDUCATION; CRYPTOGRAPHY; DISPLAY; ADVERTISING; SEALS
    • G09FDISPLAYING; ADVERTISING; SIGNS; LABELS OR NAME-PLATES; SEALS
    • G09F3/00Labels, tag tickets, or similar identification or indication means; Seals; Postage or like stamps
    • G09F3/02Forms or constructions
    • G09F3/0297Forms or constructions including a machine-readable marking, e.g. a bar code
    • GPHYSICS
    • G09EDUCATION; CRYPTOGRAPHY; DISPLAY; ADVERTISING; SEALS
    • G09FDISPLAYING; ADVERTISING; SIGNS; LABELS OR NAME-PLATES; SEALS
    • G09F3/00Labels, tag tickets, or similar identification or indication means; Seals; Postage or like stamps
    • G09F3/02Forms or constructions
    • G09F3/0291Labels or tickets undergoing a change under particular conditions, e.g. heat, radiation, passage of time
    • G09F3/0292Labels or tickets undergoing a change under particular conditions, e.g. heat, radiation, passage of time tamper indicating labels

Abstract

A tamper evident security label for airline baggage or cargo utilises a unique series of randomly generated identifier codes, which after printing on to paper or fabric seals/labels (20), are affixed over apertures or fastenings, or may be positioned within or applied directly to objects, as unique identifiers. Codes may take the form of a series of monochrome or multi-coloured bar codes (21-23) to which specific numeric values are assigned. The security of the system relies upon the sequence of coded markings being destroyed if any attempt is made to remove or break the seal. <IMAGE>

Description

TAMPER EVIDENT SECURITY <RTI>SYSTEMS</RTI> The present invention relates to a tamper evident security system which utilises a unique series of randomly generated identifier codes, to be printed on to a paper or fabric seal, which is then affixed over an aperture or fastening, or located within an item as a specific means of identification.

In certain instances, it is envisaged that the identifier code may be applied directly to the object of concern. The invention has particular, but not exclusive, application to security systems for airlines, but may be used in any situation where clear demonstration of tampering is required.

Throughout history, security seals, often in the form of wax and metal markers bearing unique insignia, have been used as a means of ensuring that important documents and cargo were not tampered with during their transport. In recent years, the unfortunate and remorseless rise of security risks associated with air travel in particular, have provided a new impetus for assurances of tamper evidency. Immediate areas for concern include the following: i) the terrorist threat of planting bombs in luggage or freight; ii) the smuggling of a wide range of narcotics; iii) the persistently high level of pilferage at international airports.

Whilst both airlines and airport administrators continue to channel increasingly large resources into security procedures such as the installing of X-ray machinery and the manual inspection of luggage and cargo, very little has been done in the production of effective tamper evident seals, to be applied to security cleared items.A typical example of the best security procedure currently in force is the X-raying of passengers' hold luggage on arrival at the airport, with the application of sticky tape over the item as a means of indicating that it has been "security <RTI>checked.</RTI> Such a system fails to provide effective evidence of subsequent tampering owing to the fact that the sticky tape can easily be removed and replaced without showing evidence of removal, and in the event of the tape requiring replacement as a result of damage during removal, the generally simplistic nature of the tape would not prevent its replacement by an identical copy. Furthermore, the verification procedures to ensure that all luggage bears evidence of security clearance, do not seem to be systematically enforced.

There is, therefore, a need for a convenient but highly secure system of tamper evident seals. Ideally, such a system would provide an unique identifier for each flight which is capable of rapid identification. This requirement gave rise to the concept of utilising a different combination of codes on a paper/fabric seal to be affixed to the security cleared item. Such a coding system would be capable of rapid verification either visually, or by automated means.

The security label would be secured by an adhesive powerful enough to ensure that it would be damaged if any attempt was made to remove it. The label itself would be overprinted in a series of specific markings arranged in a random order.

Labels would be issued to security staff in batches of identical combination codes where each batch would be used for a specific flight. Thus, Control labels would be issued to the security staff responsible for vetting the luggage and cargo, immediately prior to loading on to the aircraft. The power of the system arises from a random and unpredictable sequence of codes, which effectively prevents forgery or substitution.

STATEMENTS OF INVENTION 1) A method of generating a security label comprising the following steps: randomly generating a code; applying the code in the form of detectable indicia to an adhesive label.

2) An adhesive security label to which is applied a code in the form of detectable indicia.

3) A security method comprising: randomly generating a code; applying the code in the form of detectable indicia to an adhesive label; and securing the adhesive label to an item in a manner such that the item cannot be tampered with without breaking the adhesive label.

4) An airport security method comprising: randomly generating a code; applying the code in the form of detectable indicia to an adhesive label; and securing the adhesive label to a luggage item in a manner such that the luggage item cannot be opened without breaking the adhesive label.

Algorithms and computer programs may be used to generate unique and random numeric codes which are then utilised to drive the label printing machinery.

Specialised machinery employing inkjet technology may be used to economically print small batches of labels bearing identical, randomly generated codes.

Specialised self-adhesive paper/fabric labels may be used.

Hand-held scanning devices may, in some circumstances, be required to verify the codes printed on individual labels.

Two different types of devices may be used; one is a variation of the conventional monochrome bar code scanner; the other requires the application of advanced spectrophotometric technology, where colours are employed to represent the code.

Specific embodiments of the invention will now be described by way of examples which refer to accompanying drawings summarised below.

Figure 1: An example of a security label where the unique security code has been printed in the form of a monochrome bar coding; Figure 2: An example of a security label where the unique security code has been printed in a series of different colours; Figure 3: This illustrates the application of such a security label to a typical piece of airline baggage.

Figure 1 depicts a typical example of a security label, 10, where its unique code has been depicted in the form of black or monochrome stripes or bars, 11, 12, 13, 14. In this example, the monochrome stripes are of varying widths. Each width has its own numeric value, thus enabling the sequence of printing to represent the desired random code. For example, if 11 has a value of 1, 12 has a value of 2, 13 has a value of 3 and 14 has a value of 4, then the numeric code represented in figure 1 would be "323113141".

The white outer band, 15, allows the overprinting of the manufacturer's and/or client's specific logo or name, to further enhance the specificity of the label and act as a deterrent against forgery. It is envisaged that each label will be dispensed from a continous roll of material located within a sealed cassette. To ensure that the code sequence is read correctly, each label will be separated by a shaped perforation to distinguish the direction in which the code should be read when scanned.

Figure 2 depicts an alternative type of security label, 20, where stripes of colour, 21, 22, 23, have been employed. The stripes are of equal width, as the coding only relies on each colour denoting a different numeric value. For example, if 21, representing red, has a value of 1, 22, representing blue , has a value of 2, and 23, representing green, has a value of 3, the numeric code represented in figure 2 would be "121232". The white outer band, 15, plays an identical role to that described in figure 1 above.

Although it is not intended to make direct comparisons between the examples depicted in figures 1 and 2, it is believed that the use of colour will lead to a more effective system, where visual recognition is mainly relied upon for code verification. The monochrome system is more appropriate where well established, automated scanning systems are used for verification. Ultimately, it is believed that the utilisation of spectrophotometric technology will provide effective, automated, colour scanning systems for code verification. Differing values may be applied to a wide variety of specific colours, shades and/or hues, thus enabling security codes which are also capable of precise verification against specific standards, to be tailored for individual users.

Figure 3 illustrates the application of two labels, 31, across the aperture, 33, and between the catches, 32, of a typical piece of baggage, 30. If an attempt is made to open the bag or remove the labels, the location of the labels across the aperture, as well as the strong adhesive employed, will ensure that the printed surface of the label is significantly damaged to invalidate the pattern of stripes.

Claims (7)

1. A method of generating a security label comprising the following steps: (i) randomly generating a code; and (ii) applying the code in the form of detectable indicia to an adhesive label.
2. A method according to claim 1, wherein said code is applied by printing said detectable indicia on said adhesive label.
3. A method according to claim 1 or 2, wherein said detectable indicia comprise a series of coloured bars, said sequence of colours representing said code.
4. An airport security method comprising the following steps: (i) generating a plurality of security labels in accordance with the method of any one of claims 1 to 3, each of said security labels having the same code applied thereto; (ii) securing, at a first location, one of said security labels to an item of luggage; and (iii) checking said luggage at a second location to confirm that said security label bears the code applied at said first location.
5. A security method according to claim 4, wherein said security label is secured to the luggage item in a manner such that the item cannot be tampered with without breaking the adhesive label.
6. A security method comprising: (i) randomly generating a code; (ii) applying the code in the form of detectable indicia to an adhesive label; and (iii) securing the adhesive label to an item in a manner such that the contents of the item cannot be tampered with without breaking the adhesive label.
7. An airport security method substantially as hereinbefore described, with reference to the accompanying drawings.
GB9106336A 1990-03-30 1991-03-25 Tamper evident security systems Expired - Fee Related GB2242396B (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB9007257A GB9007257D0 (en) 1990-03-30 1990-03-30 Tamper evident security system

Publications (3)

Publication Number Publication Date
GB9106336D0 GB9106336D0 (en) 1991-05-08
GB2242396A true true GB2242396A (en) 1991-10-02
GB2242396B GB2242396B (en) 1993-09-08

Family

ID=10673620

Family Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
GB9007257A Pending GB9007257D0 (en) 1990-03-30 1990-03-30 Tamper evident security system
GB9106336A Expired - Fee Related GB2242396B (en) 1990-03-30 1991-03-25 Tamper evident security systems

Family Applications Before (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
GB9007257A Pending GB9007257D0 (en) 1990-03-30 1990-03-30 Tamper evident security system

Country Status (1)

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GB (2) GB9007257D0 (en)

Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB2309685A (en) * 1996-01-31 1997-08-06 Portals Security packaging
EP0844497A2 (en) * 1996-11-25 1998-05-27 AGFA-GEVAERT naamloze vennootschap A label for certifying an inspection by penetrating radiation
WO1998045826A1 (en) * 1997-04-09 1998-10-15 Friarsgate Herne Limited Identification label and method of labelling an object
FR2771906A1 (en) * 1997-12-09 1999-06-11 Gavril Bredean Security casing for transport of unaccompanied baggage
US5990485A (en) * 1996-11-25 1999-11-23 Agfa-Gevaert, N.V. Label for certifying an inspection by penetrating radiation
GB2340931A (en) * 1998-08-21 2000-03-01 Celestica Ltd Object colour validation
WO2005040001A1 (en) * 2003-10-28 2005-05-06 Copthorne Trading Ltd. Storage unit with identifying markings__
CN102034399A (en) * 2011-01-12 2011-04-27 四川省宜宾五粮液集团有限公司 Anti-counterfeiting label

Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4268983A (en) * 1978-12-26 1981-05-26 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Security label
US4711994A (en) * 1986-01-17 1987-12-08 Princeton Synergetics, Inc. Security system for correlating passengers and their baggage

Family Cites Families (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4065343A (en) * 1975-11-14 1977-12-27 Rexnord Inc. Label system for package and baggage handling

Patent Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4268983A (en) * 1978-12-26 1981-05-26 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Security label
US4711994A (en) * 1986-01-17 1987-12-08 Princeton Synergetics, Inc. Security system for correlating passengers and their baggage

Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB2309685A (en) * 1996-01-31 1997-08-06 Portals Security packaging
US6085903A (en) * 1996-01-31 2000-07-11 Portals (Bathford) Limited Security packaging
GB2309685B (en) * 1996-01-31 1999-10-27 Portals Security packaging
EP0844497A3 (en) * 1996-11-25 2001-12-19 AGFA-GEVAERT naamloze vennootschap A label for certifying an inspection by penetrating radiation
US5990485A (en) * 1996-11-25 1999-11-23 Agfa-Gevaert, N.V. Label for certifying an inspection by penetrating radiation
EP0844497A2 (en) * 1996-11-25 1998-05-27 AGFA-GEVAERT naamloze vennootschap A label for certifying an inspection by penetrating radiation
WO1998045826A1 (en) * 1997-04-09 1998-10-15 Friarsgate Herne Limited Identification label and method of labelling an object
FR2771906A1 (en) * 1997-12-09 1999-06-11 Gavril Bredean Security casing for transport of unaccompanied baggage
GB2340931A (en) * 1998-08-21 2000-03-01 Celestica Ltd Object colour validation
WO2005040001A1 (en) * 2003-10-28 2005-05-06 Copthorne Trading Ltd. Storage unit with identifying markings__
CN102034399A (en) * 2011-01-12 2011-04-27 四川省宜宾五粮液集团有限公司 Anti-counterfeiting label

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
GB9007257D0 (en) 1990-05-30 grant
GB9106336D0 (en) 1991-05-08 grant
GB2242396B (en) 1993-09-08 grant

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Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
746 Register noted 'licences of right' (sect. 46/1977)

Effective date: 19950322

PCNP Patent ceased through non-payment of renewal fee

Effective date: 19980325