GB2214417A - Mop wringer - Google Patents

Mop wringer Download PDF

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Publication number
GB2214417A
GB2214417A GB8801450A GB8801450A GB2214417A GB 2214417 A GB2214417 A GB 2214417A GB 8801450 A GB8801450 A GB 8801450A GB 8801450 A GB8801450 A GB 8801450A GB 2214417 A GB2214417 A GB 2214417A
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GB
United Kingdom
Prior art keywords
squeezing
wringer
mop
bucket
relative
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Granted
Application number
GB8801450A
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GB2214417B (en
GB8801450D0 (en
Inventor
John Patrick Mccormick
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
HOME HYGIENE Ltd
Original Assignee
HOME HYGIENE Ltd
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by HOME HYGIENE Ltd filed Critical HOME HYGIENE Ltd
Priority to GB8801450A priority Critical patent/GB2214417B/en
Publication of GB8801450D0 publication Critical patent/GB8801450D0/en
Publication of GB2214417A publication Critical patent/GB2214417A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of GB2214417B publication Critical patent/GB2214417B/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Fee Related legal-status Critical Current

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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L13/00Implements for cleaning floors, carpets, furniture, walls, or wall coverings
    • A47L13/10Scrubbing; Scouring; Cleaning; Polishing
    • A47L13/50Auxiliary implements
    • A47L13/58Wringers for scouring pads, mops, or the like, combined with buckets
    • A47L13/59Wringers for scouring pads, mops, or the like, combined with buckets with movable squeezing members

Abstract

A mop wringer comprises a squeezing member 25 mounted on springs 26 supported on flanges 23, 24 of walls 21, 22, and at least one squeezing member 32, 33 arranged for movement towards and away from squeezing member 25, for example, by a hand-operated mechanism. The resilient mounting of squeezing member 25 enables its attitude relative to the other squeezing member(s) to be varied during use. The mop wringer may be disposed in a bucket 10 provided with an array 14 of metal wire elements suspended from the rim of the bucket. A mop for use with the mop wringer comprises a head 50 with yarns 51, each yarn having a free end portion of a length less than the length and the breadth of the head. <IMAGE>

Description

Title: "Mop, mop wringer and bucket" Description of Invention The present invention relates to a mop and to a wringer suitable for squeezing liquid from the mop. A mop comprises a head and a number of pieces of yarn, each piece being anchored by one of its end portions to the head and the remainder of the piece hanging freely. The head is generally mounted releasably on a handle.

Several different forms of mop are known. One known form comprises a circular, fairly small head with end portions of the yarns packed tightly together at the head so that the profile of the mop, with the pieces of yarn hanging freely from the head, is similar to that of an inverted cup. Another known form of mop has a rectangular head with the length of the head being a plurality of times greater than the width of the head. The pieces of yarn in these known mops are quite long. Thus, the length of the free portion of each piece of yorn of a round mop is considerably greater than the diameter of the head. The length of the free portion of each piece of yarn in a rectangular mop is considerably greater than is the width of the head.

Mops are generally used in a wet condition for wiping floor surfaces.

Nevertheless, there is a requirement to reduce the amount of water remaining on the floor surface after mopping, in order that burnishing of the floor surface in a dry condition can be carried out without significant delay.

A variety of wringers are used to remove water from mops but the known wringers cannot be used easily to remove water to a degree such that the mop is left in a damp condition, rather than a wet condition.

According to a first aspect of the present invention, there is provided a mop wringer comprising first and second squeezing members, a mechanism for bringing about relative movement of the squeezing members towards each other to squeeze a mop between them and control means for controlling the attitude of one of the squeezing members relative to the other during squeezing, wherein the control means includes at least one resiliently deformable element which can yield to permit variation of the attitude of the anesqveezing member relative to the other.

According to a second aspect of the invention, there is provided a mop comprising an elongated head and a number of pieces of yarn extending from one face of the head with an end portion of each piece being fixed with respect to the head, wherein the length of the free portion of each piece of the yarn is not substantially greater than the length of that face of the head.

According to a further aspect of the invention, we provide a bucket having an array of elements supported inside the bucket, the array being spaced from both the top and the bottom of the bucket.

If a bucket in accordance with the invention is filled with water to a level above the array, the pieces of yarn will contact the array when a mop is introduced into the bucket and movement of a head of the mop relative to the array will promote flexing of the pieces of yarn and permit dirt to fall from the pieces of yarn through the array to the bottom of the bucket.

An example of a bucket having a wringer embodying the first aspect of the invention and an example of a mop embodying the second aspect of the invention will now be described, with reference to the accompanying drawings, wherein: FIGURE I shows a perspective view of the bucket and wringer supported on a trolley, FIGURE 2 shows a diagrammatic representation of a partial crosssection through the bucket and wringer in a vertical plane passing through the centre of the bucket; FIGURE 3 shows a diagrammatic representation of a further partial cross-section in a plane parallel to the plane of the cross-section of Figure 2 but passing through an end portion of the wringer; and FIGURE 4 is a perspective view of the mop.

The bucket 10 shown in Figure I is generally rectangular, as viewed in plan and is mounted on a trolley II. The trolley includes an upstanding support 12 which is near to a rear of the trolley and which extends upwardly from a platform of the trolley for a distance which is somewhat greater than the height of the bucket. A wringer 13 is mounted on the support 12 and depends into the bucket, the majority of the wringer lying forwards of the support and forwards of a rear wall of the bucket.

The bucket 10 contains an array 14 of elongated elements, for example metal wires. The array is generally flat, is parallel to the bottom of the bucket and is spaced upwardly from the bottom of the bucket. The array lies, however, below the top of the bucket and below the wringer 13. Typically, the array is somewhat nearer to the bottom of the bucket than to the top of the bucket. The array may extend beneath the wringer 13 or may occupy only that part of the bucket which is spaced forwardly from the wringer. The array is suspended by elements 15 which hook over the upper edge of the bucket wall.

The array 14 may have the form of a grid. Alternatively, at least the majority of the elements of the array may be parallel to one another.

Mutually adjacent elements are spaced apart by a distance which is typically within the range 20 millimetre to 50 millimetre.

The wringer 13 includes a body 16 having brackets 17 which engage over the support 12. The body further comprises a pair of hollow housings 18 and 19 which form opposite end portions of the body and which are spaced apart laterally of the trolley 11 by a cavity 20 which is sufficiently large to receive the mop shown in figure 4. The body 16 #further comprises front and rear walls 21 and 22 connecting the housings 18 and 19 to one another. At its lower margin, the front wall 21 has a rearwardly directed flange 23 and at the lower margin of the rear wall 22, there is a forwardly directed flange 24.

These flanges partly close the bottom of the cavity 20.

Above the flanges 23 and 24, there is disposed a first squeezing member 25 which is of generally plate-like form, is rectangular, as viewed in plan, and is received with small clearances between the front and rear walls 21 and 22 and the housings 18 and 19.

The first squeezing member 25 is arranged for limited movement relative to the body 16, whilst remaining within the cavity 20. For controlling the attitude of the member 25 relative to the body, there is provided a number of resiliently deformable elements which act between the member 25 and respective ones of the flanges 23 and 24. In the example illustrated, each of the elements 26 is a coiled compression spring having a lower end which rests on a respective one of the flanges and an upper end which engages the member 25 in a socket defined by that member. There is preferably a row of springs 26 along the flange 23 and a further row of springs 26 along the flange 24. Typically, there may be four springs in each row.

By deformation of some only of the springs 26, the attitude of the first squeezing memb#er 25 relative to the body 16 can vary. Movement of the member 25 relative to the body is limited by substantially inextensible tension elements 27 also arranged to act between the flanges 23 and 24 and the member 25. As shown in the drawing, each tension element may comprise a pin having one end portion fixed with respect to or formed integrally with the member 25, the pin extending through a hole formed in a respective one of the flanges 23 and 24 and having beneath that flange an enlarged head 28 which prevents the pin being withdrawn from its hole in the flange. Each of the springs 26 may be arranged to surround a corresponding one of the tension elements 27. Downward movement of the member 25 is limited by engagement of that member with the flanges 23 and 24.

Typically, the arrangement is such that the first squeezing member 25 can rock relative to the body 16 through an angle of not more than 100 about any axis which is perpendicular to the lengths of the pins 27. It will be noted that there is sufficient clearance between the flanges and these pins to avoid interference with rocking of the member 25. Normally, the member 25 is maintained in parallel relation with the flanges 23 and 24 by the action of the springs 26.

That face 29 of the first squeezing member 25 which faces towards the cavity 20 has a number of spaced protuberances 31 which are distributed evenly over the face of the member 25. Each protuberance may be round, as viewed in plan and the protuberances may be arranged in rows.

Alternatively, each protuberance may have the form of an elongated rib. As shown in the drawing, the protuberances are smoothly curved and devoid of sharp corners.

The first squeezing member 25 has a number of drain holes 30 extending completely through the thickness of the member from the face 29 thereof.

Each drain hole lies between adjacent protuberances.

The wringer further comprises a second squeezing member 32 and a third squeezing member 33. The second and third squeezing members are arranged for movement within the cavity 20 towards and away from the first squeezing member 25. The second squeezing member includes a rectangular portion 34 having a length, that is the dimension extending between the housings 18 and 19, which is substantially equal to the corresponding dimension of the member 25. The breadth of the rectangular portion 34 is somewhat less than on half of that dimension of the member 25 which extends between the front and rear walls 21 and 22. That face of the member 32 which faces away from the cavity 20 includes an integral stiffening rib 35. At each end of the rectangular portion, there is an integral projection 36 projecting in a direction opposite to that in which the rib 35 projects.

Guide means is provided for guiding the second squeezing member 32 along a predetermined path relative to the body 16. The guide means further controls the attitude of the member 32 relative to the body. The guide means includes a track 37 in the housing 18 and corresponding track in the housing 19. The track includes a rectilinear portion 39 and a curved portion 40 at one end of the rectilinear portion. The rectilinear portion is nearer to the first squeezing member 25 and the curved portion is further from that member. The rectilinear portion is arranged with its length parallel to the front and rear walls 21 and 22. The curved portion curves away from the rear wall 22, that is away from the middle of the cavity 20. The guide means further comprises a pair of rollers 41 and 42 which are spaced apart along and run in the track 37.The rollers are mounted on the second squeezing member 32 for rotation relative thereto about respective axes which are mutually parallel, one of which intersects the rib 35 and the other of which intersects the projection 36. A line joining these axes is perpendicular to that face of the rectangular portion 34 which faces towards the member 25. Accordingly, when both of the rollers 41 and 42 are in the rectilinear portion 39 of the track, the second squeezing member 32 is maintained in the attitude relative to the body which is illustrated in figure 2. When the rollers move into the curved portion 40 of the track, the member 32 is tilted relative to the body so that a margin of the member 32 which is nearer to the member 33 is raised further away from the member 25 than is the opposite margin of the member 32.Furthermore, as the rollers 41 and 42 move from the rectilinear portion 39 of the track along the curved portion 40, the second squeezing member 32 is moved bodily away from the squeezing member 33. Accordingly, the gap between these members is increased substantially.

A further pair of rollers (not shown) are provided on the second squeezing members 32 to run in the track in the housing 19 which corresponds to the track 37. Thus, the member 32 is guided at both of its ends by the housing.

The third squeezing member 33 is identical with the member 32 and is provided with four rollers. The pair of rollers at one end of the member 33 run in a track 43 formed in the housing 18 and another pair of rollers run in a corresponding track in the housing 19. The track 43 has a rectilinear portion which is parallel to the portion 39 of the track 37 and has a curved portion which curves away from the curved portion 40 of the track 37. Thus, the third squeezing member 33 is guided for movement relative to the body 16 along a path which has a rectilinear portion nearer to the first squeezing member 25 and a curved portion further from the first squeezing member.

The attitude of the third squeezing member is controlled by the guide means at all positions of the member 32 along its path.

The wringer 30 further comprises driving means for moving the second and third squeezing members 32 and 33 along their respective paths towards and away from the first squeezing member 25. The driving means comprises a shaft 44 which extends between and into the housings 18 and 19. The shaft can be turned about its axis relative to the body 16 by means of a handle 45 which projects from the shaft at a position between the housings. On each end portion of the shaft, there is keyed a respective sprocket, one of which is shown at 46. The sprockets engage with respective racks, each rack being formed on a respective carrier, one of which is shown at 47. The carrier 47 is mounted in the housing 18 for reciprocation relative to the housing along a path parallel to the rectilinear track portion 39.The stroke of the carrier 47 is so limited that the sprocket 46 can turn only through an angle which is less than 1800. Accordingly, the sprocket 46 may be a sector only, rather than a complete sprocket.

The carrier 47 has a pair of elongated slots 48 and 49 in which respective ones of the rollers on the second and third squeezing members 32 and 33 engage. Accordingly, the squeezing members are caused to move upwardly and downwardly with the carrier. The slots 48 and 49 provide clearance for the rollers to move away from each other along the curved track parts. A further carrier (not shown) is arranged in a corresponding manner in the housing 19.

Preparatory to squeezing of a mop, the handle 45 is moved, if necessary, to raise the carrier 47 as far as possible away from the bottom of the bucket. This moves the second and third squeezing members 32 and 33 away from each other so that the mop can be introduced through the gap between those squeezing members into the cavity 20. The mop then rests on the face 25 of the first squeezing member and is confined laterally by the housings 18 and 19 and by the front and rear walls 21 and 22. The handle 45 is then moved to turn the sprocket 46 and drive the carriers downwardly towards the bottom of the bucket. The second and third squeezing members are thus moved together towards the first squeezing member and, once all of the rollers have reached the rectilinear portions of their tracks, the second and third squeezing members are maintained in the attitudes illustrated in figure 2.In these attitudes, the flat faces of these squeezing members which face towards the first squeezing member are co-planar.

The mop is squeezed between the second and third squeezing members, on the one hand, and the first squeezing member, on the other hand. It is likely to be the case that a greater proportion of the yarns of the mop lie between one of the second and third squeezing members and the first squeezing member than lies between the other of the second and third squeezing members and the first squeezing member. If the squeezing members are maintained in the respective attitudes illustrated in figure 2, this would result in a higher pressure being exerted on the yarns by one of the second and third squeezing members than is exerted by the other of these squeezing members. Thus, squeezing would not be equally effective throughout all of the yarns of the mop. Some of the yarns would remain wet.

The first squeezing member 35 is able to move relative to the body 16 if some of the springs 26 yield. Thus, the attitude of the first squeezing member 25 can change to accommodate a greater bulk of yarns in one part of the cavity 20 than is present in another part of that cavity. In this way, variations in the effectiveness with which the yarns are squeezed can be minimised ao that substantially all of the yarns can be reduced to a damp condition, rather than a wet condition.

The wringer may be modified by omitting the third squeezing member 33 and increasing the size of the second squeezing member 32 so that it overlaps substantially all of the face 29 of the first squeezing member. The wringer may be further modified by substituting for the springs 26 a single resiliently deformable element, for example a leaf-spring or an elastomeric pad.

Water squeezed from the mop can escape from the cavity 20 through openings in the front and rear walls 21 and 22 and through the drain holes 31 in the first squeezing member 35. It will be understood that water will drain rapidly from the protuberances 31, so that there will be no accumulations of water on these protuberances. The mop is pressed by the second and third squeezing members primarily against the protuberances and water squeezed from the yarns will drain away from the mop.

The mop shown in figure 3 has a relatively rigid head 50 of plate-like form which is rectangular. From one face of the head, there depends a number of pieces of yarn 51. Each piece of yarn is anchored by one of its end portions in the head 50. The length of the free portion of each piece of yarn is somewhat less than the length and also somewhat less than the breadth of the head 50. For example, the length of the free portion of each piece of yarn may be 250 millimetre, the head having a length in excess of 300 millimetre and a breadth of 300 millimetre.

On the face of the head 50 which is opposite from the pieces of yarn 51, there is provided a bracket 52 for mounting a handle. The bracket may include a universal joint.

We have found that the mop illustrated in figure 3 can be squeezed more effectively than can a known mop and that the cleaning action of the mop on the floor is more effective than is the action of known mops.

The features disclosed in the foregoing description, or the accompanying drawings, expressed in their specific forms or in terms of a means for performing the disclosed function, or a method or process for attaining the disclosed result, as appropriate, may, separately or in any combination of such features, be utilised for realising the invention in diverse forms thereof.

Claims (12)

  1. CLAIMS:
    I. A mop wringer comprising first and second squeezing members, a mechanism for bringing about relative movement of the squeezing members towards each other to squeeze a mop between them and control means for controlling the attitude of one of the squeezing members relative to the other during squeezing, wherein the control means includes at least one resiliently deformable element which can yield to permit variation of the attitude of the one squeezing member relative to the other.
  2. 2. A wringer according to Claim I comprising a third squeezing member, wherein the first squeezing member has a face which is partly overlapped by the second squeezing member and is partly overlapped by the third squeezing member, wherein said mechanism is arranged for moving the second and third squeezing members relative to each other and relative to the first squeezing member and wherein the control means is arranged for guiding the second and third squeezing members along respective paths which are mutually divergent in a direction away from the first squeezing member.
  3. 3. A wringer according to Claim 2 wherein the resiliently deformable element or elements is or are arranged to act on the first squeezing member and, by yielding, to permit variation of the attitude of the first squeezing member relative to the second and third squeezing members.
  4. 4. A wringer according to any preceding Claim wherein at least one of the squeezing members has drain holes and an uneven surface which engages the mop under pressure, the drain holes being between crests of that surface.
  5. 5. A wringer according to any preceding Claim wherein the control means further comprises a wall extending around the periphery of the first squeezing member and extending from the first squeezing member generally in a direction towards the second squeezing member to surround the mop, when the mop is being squeezed.
  6. 6. A wringer according to Claim 5 wherein the attitude of the first member to the wall can vary.
  7. 7. A wringer according to Claim 5 or Claim 6 wherein the wall has a pair of spaced flanges which underlie the first member and the or each resiliently deformable element is or are interposed between the first member and the flanges or a respective one of the flanges.
  8. 8. A mop comprising an elongated head and a number of pieces of yarn extending from one face of the head with an end portion of each piece being fixed with respect to the head, wherein the length of the free portion of each piece of yarn is not substantially greater than the length of that face.
  9. 9. A bucket having an array of elements supported inside the bucket, the array being spoced from both the top and the bottom of the bucket.
  10. 10. A bucket according to Claim 9 having a wringer according to any one of Claims I to 7 mounted adjacent to a side wall of the bucket to lie partly inside the bucket.
  11. II. A wringer substantially as herein described with reference to and as illustrated in the accompanying drawing.
  12. 12. Any novel feature or novel combination of features disclosed herein or in the accompanying drawing.
GB8801450A 1988-01-22 1988-01-22 Mop wringer and bucket Expired - Fee Related GB2214417B (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB8801450A GB2214417B (en) 1988-01-22 1988-01-22 Mop wringer and bucket

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB8801450A GB2214417B (en) 1988-01-22 1988-01-22 Mop wringer and bucket

Publications (3)

Publication Number Publication Date
GB8801450D0 GB8801450D0 (en) 1988-02-24
GB2214417A true GB2214417A (en) 1989-09-06
GB2214417B GB2214417B (en) 1991-06-26

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Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
GB8801450A Expired - Fee Related GB2214417B (en) 1988-01-22 1988-01-22 Mop wringer and bucket

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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB2276077A (en) * 1993-03-17 1994-09-21 Scot Young Research Mop wringers
DE4318792A1 (en) * 1993-06-05 1994-12-08 Freudenberg Carl Fa Surface-wiping implement
EP0734681A1 (en) * 1995-03-03 1996-10-02 Yugengaisha Access Mop thread-squeezing apparatus
WO2011089415A3 (en) * 2010-01-22 2011-09-22 Young Ronald Alexander Scot Combination of a mop head and wringing device

Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB2276077A (en) * 1993-03-17 1994-09-21 Scot Young Research Mop wringers
GB2276077B (en) * 1993-03-17 1996-07-17 Scot Young Research Improvements in or relating to mop wringers
DE4318792A1 (en) * 1993-06-05 1994-12-08 Freudenberg Carl Fa Surface-wiping implement
EP0734681A1 (en) * 1995-03-03 1996-10-02 Yugengaisha Access Mop thread-squeezing apparatus
US5720073A (en) * 1995-03-03 1998-02-24 Yugengaisha Access Mop thread-squeezing apparatus
WO2011089415A3 (en) * 2010-01-22 2011-09-22 Young Ronald Alexander Scot Combination of a mop head and wringing device
CN102711578A (en) * 2010-01-22 2012-10-03 罗纳德·亚历山大(斯科特)·杨 Combination of a mop head and wringing device
US8813304B2 (en) 2010-01-22 2014-08-26 Ronald Alexander Young Combination of a mop head and wringing device
AU2011208529B2 (en) * 2010-01-22 2014-10-16 Scot Young Research Limited Combination of a mop head and wringing device
AU2011208529A8 (en) * 2010-01-22 2014-10-16 Scot Young Research Limited Combination of a mop head and wringing device
CN102711578B (en) * 2010-01-22 2016-01-20 罗纳德·亚历山大(斯科特)·杨 The combination unit of mophead and wringer

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
GB2214417B (en) 1991-06-26
GB8801450D0 (en) 1988-02-24

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Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
732 Registration of transactions, instruments or events in the register (sect. 32/1977)
PCNP Patent ceased through non-payment of renewal fee

Effective date: 19940122

728Y Application for restoration allowed (sect. 28/1977)
PCNP Patent ceased through non-payment of renewal fee

Effective date: 19990122