GB2165723A - Animal identification system - Google Patents

Animal identification system Download PDF

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Publication number
GB2165723A
GB2165723A GB08426150A GB8426150A GB2165723A GB 2165723 A GB2165723 A GB 2165723A GB 08426150 A GB08426150 A GB 08426150A GB 8426150 A GB8426150 A GB 8426150A GB 2165723 A GB2165723 A GB 2165723A
Authority
GB
United Kingdom
Prior art keywords
animal identification
identification device
animals
code
animal
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Withdrawn
Application number
GB08426150A
Other versions
GB8426150D0 (en
Inventor
Alexander Francis Nixon
Original Assignee
Alexander Francis Nixon
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Alexander Francis Nixon filed Critical Alexander Francis Nixon
Priority to GB08426150A priority Critical patent/GB2165723A/en
Publication of GB8426150D0 publication Critical patent/GB8426150D0/en
Publication of GB2165723A publication Critical patent/GB2165723A/en
Application status is Withdrawn legal-status Critical

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Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07CTIME OR ATTENDANCE REGISTERS; REGISTERING OR INDICATING THE WORKING OF MACHINES; GENERATING RANDOM NUMBERS; VOTING OR LOTTERY APPARATUS; ARRANGEMENTS, SYSTEMS OR APPARATUS FOR CHECKING NOT PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE
    • G07C9/00Individual entry or exit registers
    • G07C9/00126Access control not involving the use of a pass
    • G07C9/00134Access control not involving the use of a pass in combination with an identity-check
    • G07C9/00142Access control not involving the use of a pass in combination with an identity-check by means of a pass-word
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A01AGRICULTURE; FORESTRY; ANIMAL HUSBANDRY; HUNTING; TRAPPING; FISHING
    • A01KANIMAL HUSBANDRY; CARE OF BIRDS, FISHES, INSECTS; FISHING; REARING OR BREEDING ANIMALS, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; NEW BREEDS OF ANIMALS
    • A01K11/00Marking of animals
    • A01K11/006Automatic identification systems for animals, e.g. electronic devices, transponders for animals
    • A01K11/007Boluses
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07CTIME OR ATTENDANCE REGISTERS; REGISTERING OR INDICATING THE WORKING OF MACHINES; GENERATING RANDOM NUMBERS; VOTING OR LOTTERY APPARATUS; ARRANGEMENTS, SYSTEMS OR APPARATUS FOR CHECKING NOT PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE
    • G07C9/00Individual entry or exit registers
    • G07C9/00007Access-control involving the use of a pass
    • G07C9/00111Access-control involving the use of a pass the pass performing a presence indicating function, e.g. identification tag or transponder

Abstract

An animal identification device comprising a transponder in the form of a unique electronically coded bolus which fits inside the animals reticulum. A hand held interrogator allows the operator to identify the animals unique number, remotely. To do this, the operator uses his 'password' as verification to allow access followed by which he presses a button which allows him/her to activate the electronically coded bolus, and obtain the animals number. The transmitter system used in the bolus comprises an antenna, oscillator, timer, modulator/tripler and encoder. All the components of the transponder are encased in a cylindrical tube of hard, clear plastics material.

Description

SPECIFICATION Animal identification device The invention relates to an animal identification device which is unique, as the encode bolus is placed within the animal.

Amongst the key elements for a successful Britmix product, two particular items need careful consideration. The novelty of Britmix's idea is that the coded device is locatedwithin the animal, and isthereforea very secure system. Underthese conditions, therefore, the design must ensure that a readable, unique signal can be obtained after passage ofthe radio waves through the tissues ofthe animal. The lifetime ofthe device in this environment must also be lengthy, and the device must be intrinsically safe.

Both ofthese considerations have been met in comparable products. Radio pills are already in use, for example in tracking the movement of ingested products through the alimentary canal of humans.

These radio pills operate atthe frequencies required underthe regulatory requirements pertinenttothe Britmix product, very careful consideration will need to be given to the circuit'antennae design and power.

With regard to life cycle and safety, systems such as COTAG claim a ten year operating life and several battery suppliers offer standard products whose life underthe envisaged operating power requirements will exceed twelve months. By careful choice of power source and casing design, it should be readily possible to design an acceptable device for safe usage in a cow's reticulum.

Ofthe various concepts available we would propose a design based around the technology already being used in the compatible radio alarm application. By careful design and experimentation a system free from spurious operation caused by any other RF source (andforexamplefarmtractorslmachinery) should be achieved.

Thetransmitter(bolus)will, art a predetermined interval, or in response to an interrogator signal, transmit information in the form of a binary code. The transmitter generates a sequence of binary digits (bits). A complete binary number (word) will be transmitted repeatedly as long as the transmission is being made. These binary numbers will be impressed on the carrier signal by using a modulation method known as Frequency Shift Keying (FSK). In the FSK system, binary ones and zeros are represented by bursts of audio frequency tones with specific tones or combinations of tones allocated to each data bit. Data bits will need to be added to the word to tell the receiver where the word starts and finishes.Selection ofthe code bits can be readily performed either by a custom chip approach, or by the simple dil switches currently available. A small block often switches, for example, will allow 1,024 code combinations to be chosen. Generation of the data word is by an IC in the transmitter known as an Encoder (example AMI S2743). When the device is transmitting,the encoder will produce a continuous stream of data words which modulatethe carriersignal generated bythe RF section of the circuit. If a portion of the data word is designated as a receiver address, then only the intended receiver will be able to receive and decode the transmitted data word. Similar precautions can be made for the integrity of etransmitter data code.By using the FSK method we believethatwill be less susceptibleto noise or pulse interferencethat may be encountered in the environment of working farms.

On receipt ofthe transmitted signal a decoder integrated circuit measures the frequency at the 'start of the word' and locks onto it. The decoder then reads the data bits with those acceptable to it. Various safeguards are designed in to assure integrity. For example, the receiver will continually read the data word, and if fox r successive good words are received, then the word is accepted and an output (eg the animal's numberwill be displayed on an LED display) will be generated. This system would also allow significant data corruption to occurwithout loss of identity, thus noise and signal fading (ifthe animal turned or moved to the edge of its transmitter range) could be accommodated.

It is important to recognise that a sophisticated coding technique will be used to eliminate spurious output (wrong animal numbers). Also particular consideration should be given to the problem of 'blocking' by strong signals from other sources. By designing a high performance narrow band receiver with good rejection of out of band signals, then the limitations imposed by the regulatory authorities can be largely overcome.

The power output is also one ofthe constraints to the overall performance ofthe system. The operating range is principally limited by transmitted power, receiver sensitivity and operating (site) conditions.

With the added problems of limited antennae scope and the abortion of emissions bythe body ofthe animal, very careful attention will need to be paid to the trade off between transmitted power at source (inside the reticulum) and that obtained at the required operating distance.

The following comments are considered pertinent to transmitter design, since ititundoubtedlythe transmitterthatwill need the most careful attention due to the constraints imposed on it by such parameters as size, life expectancy, environment. Refer to fig. 3.

Thefollowing text referstofigure 3: Antenna-- it is likelythatthe antenna 1 will form part ofthe housing (bolus 2) or be wholly contained within it. It is unlikelythatthe health authorities would allow a trailing lead antenna. This being so, then optimum range is effected by several design and operational factors. Optimum range will be achieved if a vertically polarised transmission is received with a vertically polarised receiver antenna. It is clear, however,thatsuch an orientation alignment is most unlikely in the use to which Britmix seek to use this product. The resulting loss in efficiency will be further increased by subsequent absorption oftransmitted power by the animal's body tissues.An antenna design to overcome some ofthis loss will include the use of a ferrite rod, and although the resulting sensitivity will be largely directional, it should be possible to arrange for a sufficienttransmitted power level to be achieved.

Oscillator3-- will comprise a standard overtone circuit using a series inductance for oscillatortrimming.

Tjmer4-conventional with a time delay oftwenty to thirty seconds.

Modulator/tripler5the oscillator signal will be AC coupled to a pair of diodes which will act as a harmonic generator. Itwill be important to ensure good third harmonic generation at this stage. Careful control of modulation will be found to be necessary.

Encoder 6- this is an area for careful thought. For small volume single farm management systems where quantities of cattle may be 1,000 and less, then standard chips and dil switches may be used. For a nationwide very high volume system then a purpose designed custom chip will undoubtediy be required.

Which ever route is taken, it is recommended that the frequency shift keying ofatrinary pulse train is used forthe complex data pattern generation.

All the transmitter's components are encased in a cylindrical tube of hard, clear, plastic material.

Claims (7)

1. Animal identification device comprising a cylindrical tube of hard, clear plastic material.
2. Animal identification device, as in claim 1 inside of which is a transmitterwith a unique code, particular to that animal.
3. Animal identification device as in claims 1 and 2 comprising of an antenna 1, oscilator 3, timer 4, modulatoritripler 5, encoder6 capable of giving the animals unique and unalterable number code.
4. Animal identification device comprising an interrogator which is hand held and with a LED display and keyboard.
5. Animal identification device as in claim 4 whereby the operator uses a keyboard to operate a 'pass word' to verify that he has access into the transmitter to verifythat he has access into the transmitter.
6. Animal identification device as in claims 4 and 5 which on receipt of the correct 'pass word' or entry code, energisesthetransmitterto release the animals true identity code or number.
7. Animal identification device as in claim 1,2 and 3 consisting ofthe animals unalterable code consis tentwith components in figure 3.
GB08426150A 1984-10-16 1984-10-16 Animal identification system Withdrawn GB2165723A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB08426150A GB2165723A (en) 1984-10-16 1984-10-16 Animal identification system

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB08426150A GB2165723A (en) 1984-10-16 1984-10-16 Animal identification system

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
GB8426150D0 GB8426150D0 (en) 1984-11-21
GB2165723A true GB2165723A (en) 1986-04-16

Family

ID=10568267

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
GB08426150A Withdrawn GB2165723A (en) 1984-10-16 1984-10-16 Animal identification system

Country Status (1)

Country Link
GB (1) GB2165723A (en)

Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO1989001722A1 (en) * 1987-08-08 1989-02-23 Enguvu Ag Device for transmitting data from an animal body
WO1990003070A1 (en) * 1988-09-16 1990-03-22 Universal Tracking Systems Ltd. A/S Identification system
WO1990009707A1 (en) * 1989-02-17 1990-08-23 Integrated Silicon Design Pty. Ltd. Transponder system
EP0404148A1 (en) * 1989-06-23 1990-12-27 Texas Instruments Deutschland Gmbh Method of transmitting messages with predetermined message duration from batteryless transponders to interrogation devices
DE8717887U1 (en) * 1986-07-23 1991-02-28 Wacom Co., Ltd., Saitama, Jp
DE4239271A1 (en) * 1991-11-21 1993-10-14 Thomson Brandt Gmbh Anti-theft system for vehicle using transmitted signals - has transmitter initiated by signal when object removed ,which provides identification data and also GPS location data
DE4317340A1 (en) * 1993-05-25 1994-12-01 Spieshofer Guenther Method of identifying ruminants, in particular cattle
US5482008A (en) * 1991-09-13 1996-01-09 Stafford; Rodney A. Electronic animal identification system
AU665713B2 (en) * 1993-05-12 1996-01-11 Delaval Holding Ab Animal identification capsule
WO1997016963A1 (en) 1995-11-03 1997-05-15 Alfa Laval Agri Ab Attachable transponder housing
US5697384A (en) * 1993-03-26 1997-12-16 Surge Miyawaki Co., Ltd. Internal identification apparatus for animals
US5984875A (en) * 1997-08-22 1999-11-16 Innotek Pet Products, Inc. Ingestible animal temperature sensor
US6145226A (en) * 1996-06-06 2000-11-14 Alfa Laval Agri Ab Ear tag assembly
US6202596B1 (en) * 1996-07-09 2001-03-20 The European Community Ruminal bolus for electronic identification of a ruminant

Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB1567750A (en) * 1975-09-19 1980-05-21 Seldown Electronics Ltd Transponders
GB2053622A (en) * 1979-07-13 1981-02-04 Emerald Electronics Ltd Radio transmitter and alarm system
WO1984000869A1 (en) * 1982-08-09 1984-03-01 Cornell Res Foundation Inc Remote passive identification system
WO1984001688A1 (en) * 1982-10-29 1984-05-10 Bi Inc Identification system
EP0108643A1 (en) * 1982-11-09 1984-05-16 Australian Meat and Live-Stock Corporation Improved animal identification system
GB2139856A (en) * 1983-04-25 1984-11-14 Sensormatic Electronics Corp A signal receptor-reradiator component for operation in a surveillance system

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB1567750A (en) * 1975-09-19 1980-05-21 Seldown Electronics Ltd Transponders
GB2053622A (en) * 1979-07-13 1981-02-04 Emerald Electronics Ltd Radio transmitter and alarm system
WO1984000869A1 (en) * 1982-08-09 1984-03-01 Cornell Res Foundation Inc Remote passive identification system
WO1984001688A1 (en) * 1982-10-29 1984-05-10 Bi Inc Identification system
EP0108643A1 (en) * 1982-11-09 1984-05-16 Australian Meat and Live-Stock Corporation Improved animal identification system
GB2139856A (en) * 1983-04-25 1984-11-14 Sensormatic Electronics Corp A signal receptor-reradiator component for operation in a surveillance system

Cited By (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE8717887U1 (en) * 1986-07-23 1991-02-28 Wacom Co., Ltd., Saitama, Jp
WO1989001722A1 (en) * 1987-08-08 1989-02-23 Enguvu Ag Device for transmitting data from an animal body
WO1990003070A1 (en) * 1988-09-16 1990-03-22 Universal Tracking Systems Ltd. A/S Identification system
WO1990009707A1 (en) * 1989-02-17 1990-08-23 Integrated Silicon Design Pty. Ltd. Transponder system
EP0404148A1 (en) * 1989-06-23 1990-12-27 Texas Instruments Deutschland Gmbh Method of transmitting messages with predetermined message duration from batteryless transponders to interrogation devices
AU620702B2 (en) * 1989-06-23 1992-02-20 Texas Instruments Deutschland Gmbh Sequential transmission method between an interrogator and transponder
US5482008A (en) * 1991-09-13 1996-01-09 Stafford; Rodney A. Electronic animal identification system
DE4239271A1 (en) * 1991-11-21 1993-10-14 Thomson Brandt Gmbh Anti-theft system for vehicle using transmitted signals - has transmitter initiated by signal when object removed ,which provides identification data and also GPS location data
US5697384A (en) * 1993-03-26 1997-12-16 Surge Miyawaki Co., Ltd. Internal identification apparatus for animals
AU665713B2 (en) * 1993-05-12 1996-01-11 Delaval Holding Ab Animal identification capsule
DE4317340A1 (en) * 1993-05-25 1994-12-01 Spieshofer Guenther Method of identifying ruminants, in particular cattle
WO1997016963A1 (en) 1995-11-03 1997-05-15 Alfa Laval Agri Ab Attachable transponder housing
US6145226A (en) * 1996-06-06 2000-11-14 Alfa Laval Agri Ab Ear tag assembly
US6474263B2 (en) * 1996-07-09 2002-11-05 The European Community Ruminal bolus for electronic identification of a ruminant
US6202596B1 (en) * 1996-07-09 2001-03-20 The European Community Ruminal bolus for electronic identification of a ruminant
US6059733A (en) * 1997-08-22 2000-05-09 Innotek, Inc. Method of determining a physiological state of a ruminant animal using an ingestible bolus
US6099482A (en) * 1997-08-22 2000-08-08 Innotek Pet Products, Inc. Ingestible animal temperature sensor
US6371927B1 (en) 1997-08-22 2002-04-16 Innotek Pet Products, Inc. Ingestible animal temperature sensor
US5984875A (en) * 1997-08-22 1999-11-16 Innotek Pet Products, Inc. Ingestible animal temperature sensor

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
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WAP Application withdrawn, taken to be withdrawn or refused ** after publication under section 16(1)