GB2148676A - Ceramic heater having temperature sensor integrally formed thereon - Google Patents

Ceramic heater having temperature sensor integrally formed thereon Download PDF

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Publication number
GB2148676A
GB2148676A GB08405831A GB8405831A GB2148676A GB 2148676 A GB2148676 A GB 2148676A GB 08405831 A GB08405831 A GB 08405831A GB 8405831 A GB8405831 A GB 8405831A GB 2148676 A GB2148676 A GB 2148676A
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United Kingdom
Prior art keywords
ceramic
temperature sensor
sensor element
resistance heating
element
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GB08405831A
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GB8405831D0 (en
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William A Lawrence
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Eldon Ind Inc
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Eldon Ind Inc
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Application filed by Eldon Ind Inc filed Critical Eldon Ind Inc
Publication of GB8405831D0 publication Critical patent/GB8405831D0/en
Publication of GB2148676A publication Critical patent/GB2148676A/en
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05BELECTRIC HEATING; ELECTRIC LIGHTING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05B3/00Ohmic-resistance heating
    • H05B3/20Heating elements having extended surface area substantially in a two-dimensional plane, e.g. plate-heater
    • H05B3/22Heating elements having extended surface area substantially in a two-dimensional plane, e.g. plate-heater non-flexible
    • H05B3/28Heating elements having extended surface area substantially in a two-dimensional plane, e.g. plate-heater non-flexible heating conductor embedded in insulating material
    • H05B3/283Heating elements having extended surface area substantially in a two-dimensional plane, e.g. plate-heater non-flexible heating conductor embedded in insulating material the insulating material being an inorganic material, e.g. ceramic
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B23MACHINE TOOLS; METAL-WORKING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B23KSOLDERING OR UNSOLDERING; WELDING; CLADDING OR PLATING BY SOLDERING OR WELDING; CUTTING BY APPLYING HEAT LOCALLY, e.g. FLAME CUTTING; WORKING BY LASER BEAM
    • B23K3/00Tools, devices, or special appurtenances for soldering, e.g. brazing, or unsoldering, not specially adapted for particular methods
    • B23K3/02Soldering irons; Bits
    • B23K3/03Soldering irons; Bits electrically heated
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05BELECTRIC HEATING; ELECTRIC LIGHTING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05B2203/00Aspects relating to Ohmic resistive heating covered by group H05B3/00
    • H05B2203/002Heaters using a particular layout for the resistive material or resistive elements
    • H05B2203/003Heaters using a particular layout for the resistive material or resistive elements using serpentine layout

Abstract

A unified ceramic heater and heat sensor 10 has a burnt ceramic body 12 with a resistance heating element 14 located in and completely encased within the body. A pair of terminals 20, 22 connects to the resistance heating element to provide leads to power the resistance element. A temperature sensor element 26 is located upon and integrally attached to the burnt ceramic body. It is placed on the body in association with the heating element. The temperature sensing element is formed of an electrically conducting material such as platinum or copper, which exhibits a variable electrical resistance in response to variations of its temperature. A pair of sensor element terminals 32, 34 are connected to the sensor element for connecting the sensor element to an appropriate electrical appliance for measuring its resistance. <IMAGE>

Description

SPECIFICATION Ceramic heater having platinum temperature sensor integrally formed thereon This invention is directed to a ceramic heater having a temperature sensor integrallyformed as a part ofthe heater.

In soldering, for any particular soldering alloy, there exists an optimum temperature zoneforworking with that alloy. In utilizing a soldering iron having a tip temperature which is too lowforthe particular alloy, poorfluxing oftheworking surface, poor wetting of the soldering tip and poor alloying of the solderwith the worksurface can result. In addition aweak intermetallic layer will be created between the components being soldered together.If too high a temperature is utilized, a thick brittle alloy layer can be created, there is possibility of delaminating printed circuit boards and heat damage to the electronic compo nentscan occur. Further, theflux can bevaporized before it has a chance to perform its cleaning task and other detrimental effects, such as broken traces, lifted pads, "measles" can result.

To insure against the above effects of both a tip temperaturewhich is too low and a tip temperature which is too high, a temperature regulating device can be associated with the soldering iron to regulatethe tip temperature. For most electronic assembly, a tip temperature in a range of about600to 700 F. is considered as an optimum tip thermal working temperature zone. To maintain the soldering iron tip at such optimal temperatures heat sensors such as thermal couples, thermistors or positive temperature coefficient devices (PTC devices) have been utilized in the past.While all ofthese have certain utilitarian and desirable characteristics all of them also have certain undesirable characteristics when used in combination with soldering irons, especially soldering irons for electronic assembly and other work wherein the importance of maintaining optimum tip temperature is desirable.

Forthe most part thermal couples are fragile and of a size largerthan that optimally desired for the use with a soldering iron tip and/or heater. The leads to the thermal couples must be provided with ceramic insulators in order to shield the same from the heat associated with the soldering tip or heater. In those soldering irons wherein it is desirable to be able to readily change from one tip to the other, in changing thetipthethermal couple is sometimes exposed to physical abuse resulting in breaking ofthethermal couple along the junction of the two metals comprising the same. Finally, pairs of metals which are utilized to form the thermal couple conjunction normally have only a limited temperature range wherein they exhibit generation of an accurate linearly variable electromo tive force.

Thermistors being solid state semiconductor devices are limited with regard to the amount of heat to which they can be exposed. Generally their maximum range is limited to approximately 500 to 600 F. When subjected to excess heat, the semiconductor material ofthethermistorcan lose its unique semiconducting properties and revert to a conducting material thus the destroying the properties of the thermistor.

The positive temperature coefficient devices in general use normally do not exhibit linear increase in resistance with increase in temperature. At times they can act as a thermal fuse or a circuit breaker because of exponential increases in resistance at high temperatures.

All oftheabovedevices,thermalcouples,thermis- tors, and PTC devices are further subjectto mechanical problems since they are located in the soldering iron as a separate mechanical entity subject to physical abuse and the like associated with changing of the soldering tip and/or heating element of a particular soldering iron as well as mechanical shock associated with rough handling ofthe soldering iron.

All of the above known devices are known to degrade with heat and are generally unreliable with temperatures in excess of 800 F.

In view of the above it is considered thatthere exists a need for new and improved temperature sensing devices for use in conjunction with heating elements for soldering irons and other devices which provide for good sensitivity over a broad temperature range, resistance against mechanical problems related to abuse, shock and the like and heat resistant character istics to temperatures far above those normally present within the internal environment of a soldering iron.More specifically it is considered that there exists a need for a temperature sensing device which can be integrallyformed as a part of a soldering iron ceramic heater such that at all times the temperature sensing device is intimately associated with the heating elements of the heater in a specific fixed physical relationship to insure accurate temperature sensing of the ceramic heater as well as eliminating the possibility of mechanical collision between the temperature sensing unit and the heater. It is further considered that there exists a need for heat sensing devices for utilization in combination with ceramic heaters that can easily and conveniently be manufactured as a part of that heater during manufacture ofthe same.

In view ofthe above it is a broad object of this invention to provideforthe needs outlined in the preceding paragraphs by providing a one piece, unified, ceramic heater and heat sensor. It is a further objectto providefora ceramic heater and heat sensor unitwhich because of its simplicity and engineering principles can be economically manufactured.These and other objects as will be evidentfrom the remainder of this specification are achieved in a unified ceramic heater and heatsensorwhich comprises: a monolithic burnt ceramic body; a resistance heating element located in and completely encased within said burnt ceramic body; a pair of resistance heating element terminals electrically connected to said resistance heating element and located on said ceramic body in positions allowing connection of an electric power supplyto said terminals so as to provide electrical power to said resistance heating element; atemperaturesensorelementlocated on and integrally attached to said burnt ceramic body, saidtemperaturesensorelementpositioned on said ceramic body in association with said resistance heating element; saidtemperaturesensorelement formed of an electrically conductive material which exhibits a variable electrical resis+:.'e in repsonse to variation of its temperature; a pair of sensor element terminals electrically connected to said temperature sensor element and located on said ceramic body in a position allowing electrical connection of said temperature sensor element to an electrical appliance capable of measuring the electrical resistance of said temperature sensor element Further, these and other objects are achieved in the formation of a unified ceramic heater and heat sensor when formed by a process wherein: said unified ceramic heater and heatsensorisformed by building up a composite intermediate structure including; locating a resistance heating element precursor material onto a ceramic base; overlaying said precursor material for said resistance heating element and said ceramic base with a green ceramic; locating one of a preformed temperature sensor element and a temperature sensor element precursor onto said green ceramic; heat treating said composite intermediate structure to unify said ceramic base, said resistance heating element precursor material, said green ceramic and said one of said preformed temperature sensor element and said temperature sensor element precursor into a single, unified structure and to form said ceramic base and said green ceramic into a monolithic burnt ceramic body with said resistance heating element encased therein and said temperature sensor element integrally attached thereto.

This invention will be better understood when taken in conjuction with the drawing wherein: Fig. 1 is a top plan view of an embodimentofthe ceramic heater- heat sensor of the invention; Fig. 2 is a side elevational view of the ceramic heater -heatsensorofFig. 1 with certain internal components shown in phantom lines; Fig. 3 is a bottom plan view of the ceramic heater heatsensorofFig. 1 with the same components shown in phantom line in Fig. 2 also shown in phantom line in Fig. 3; Fig. 4 is an elevational view in section aboutthe line 4-4of Fig. 1; Fig. 5 is an elevational view in section aboutthe line 5-5 of Fig. 1;; Fig. 6 is a top plan view of a further embodiment of the invention showing certain of its internal components shown in phantom line; and Fig. 7 is an elevational view aboutthe lines 7-7 of Fig.

6.

The invention shown in the drawing attached hereto and described in the specification utilize certain principles and concepts as aresetforth in the claims appended hereto. Those skilled in the art to which this invention pertains will realizethatthese principles and/or concepts are capable of being utilized in a variety of embodiments differing from the embodiments depicted herein for illustrative purposes. For this reason this invention is not to be construed as being limited solely to the illustrative embodiments, but is only to be construed as being limited to the claims appended hereto.

United States patent 4,035,613 entitled Cylindrical Ceramic Heating Device describes certain heating devices and methods of preparation thereof. Forthe purposes of this specification the disclosed methods of preparation in US 4,035,613 aswell as the materials described therein for use in those methods are herein incorporated by reference. Generally, these methods can be summarized as utilizing a strip of either green or burnt ceramic as a baseorsubstratewitha resistance heating element being formed on the base utilizing a suitable paste. The heating element can be introduced onto the base by one of a number of methods such as slip trailing, screening, printing, or utilizing transfer members.All of these are generally considered to be known in the ceramic arts forthe application of substances to green or burnt ceramic cores, matrixes or other subtrates. After overlaying of the resistance heating material onto the green or burnt ceramic base a further coating of a green ceramic substance is overlaid onto the resistance heating material and the ceramic substrate so asto enclose the resistance heating material in a "sandwich" between theceramicsubstrate and the overlaying orcoating material.

Upon heat treatment of the above combined "sandwich" the ceramic material of both the substrate and the overlay is unified so as to hermetically seal the resistance heating element within the interior of the ceramicmaterial.Thisformsa heating element as is described in US 4,035,613.

While US 4,035,613 specifically describes the production of cylindrical type heaters, a flat blade type heater can also be produced utilizing the same materials in the same manner. Great Britain patent application 2,064,396 describes such a flat blade heating element. For the purposes ofthe description ofthatflat blade heating elementthe entire contents of Great Britain application 2,064,396 are also incorporated herein by reference.

The present application is directed to a ceramic heater which not only incorporates a hermetically sealed resistance heating element within a ceramic matrix, butfurther includes a heat sensing element integrallyformed as a part ofthe ceramic heater. The heat sensing elementofthis invention becomes a unified part of the ceramic heater afterthe final heating or calcining step utilized in the production of the heater. In this way the heat sensing element at all times is intimately associated with the resistance heating element of the ceramic heater so as to accurately reflect the temperature of the ceramic heater as well as mechanically being a partofthe ceramic heater.When so constructed the ceramic body ofthe heater provides for physical strength for the heat sensor preventing physical damage to the heatsensorthrough bending, torquing and the like.

Since the heat sensor is integrallyformed as part of the ceramic heater with the ceramic heater providing the mechanical strength for the heat sensor,the heat sensor can be sized and dimensioned in a manner not physicallypossiblefora heatsensorwhich must provide for its own mechanical integrity. As such the components of the heat sensor as hereinafter explained can be formed asverv thin films, foils, ribbons orthreads of physical dimensions not possible for independentfree-standing heat sensors.

Furthermore, since the heat sensor is integrally formed with the remainder of the ceramic heaterthe physical location ofthe heatsensorwith respect to the resistance heating element is constant allowing for extremelyfine calibration between the actual temperature of the resistance heating element and the heat sensor. This yields a better accuracy in control ling the heatoutputofthe resistance heating element.

In one embodiment of the invention described herein the heat sensor can also be hermetically sealed within the matrix of the ceramic heating element so as to allow the use of materialsforthe heatsensorwhich, if exposed to oxygen or other corrosive atmospheres at high temperature, would be degraded by oxidation or other corrosive chemical reaction. In another embodiment of the invention the heatsensorwould be formed of materials which would be both resistant to oxidation and certain chemical degradation at elevated temperatures and as such hermetically sealing of the same in the ceramic matrix ofthe heat sensor is not necessary.

Referring nowto the figures, Figs. 1 through 5 depict afirstembodimentoftheinventionwhereinthe heat sensor is integrally formed with the remainder of the ceramic heater but is exposed on the top surface thereof. In Figs. 6 and 7 a fu rther embodiment is depicted wherein the heat sensor is encased within the ceramic matrix ofthe ceramic heater so asto be shielded from exposure to the environment outside of the ceramic matrix of the heater.

Referring now to the embodiment of Figs. 1 through 5, a ceramic heater 10 of this invention is shown. The heater 10 includes a ceramic matrix 12 which is in the form of a unified structure afterfinal calcining ofthe green precursors thereof. Hermetically sealed within the ceramic matrix 12 is a resistance heating element 14. This heating element would be formed of a suitable conductor having a high resistance which would be appropriately adjusted to the needs of the particular ceramic heater 10. Afterthe final calcining of the ceramic heater 10 the resistance heating element 14 originally extruded as a paste orthe like on a green ceramic would be fused into a continuous electrially conducting body having a particular geometric pattern reproducing that of the precursor paste from which it is formed.For the purposes of illustration herein, as can be seen in Fig. 3 in phantom line, the resistance heating element 14 is formed as a "squished up' serpentine-like pattern having a series of long parallel regions joined by short "U" shaped, connecting regions. Other patterns could be appropriatelyformed depending upon the pattern of the precursor resistance heating element paste prior to the final heat treating step.

Appropriate leads 16 and 18 lead from the resistance heating element 14 to two external terminal pins 20and22.The leads 16and 18would beformedasan integral part ofthe resistance heating element 14 of the same materials as the resistance heating element 14. Further, as with the resistance heating element 14 the leads 16 and 18 would be hermetically sealed within the ceramic matrix 12.

Thetwoterminal pins 20 and 22 would be electrical lyconnected to the leads 16 and 18 respectively so as to provide electrical contacts for supplying currentto the resistance heating element 14. Preferredlythe terminals 20 and 22 would be formed of nickel or a nickel based alloy whose electrical resistance compared to that of the resistance heating element 14 is suchthatpassageofacurrentfromoneterminal pin through the resistance heating element to the other terminal pin would not result in heating oftheterminal pins 20 and 22 relative to the heating of the resistance heatingelementl4.Preferredlytheterminal pins20 and 22 are appropriately brazed or otherwise connected to the ends of the leads 16 and 18 afterthe final heattreatmentofthe heater 10.

Integrallyformed on the top surface 24 of the ceramic matrix 12 is the heat sensor 26. The heat sensor 26 would be overlaid onto this top surface 24 during manufacutre ofthe ceramic heater 10 in a pattern such that it overlaid the pattern of the resistance heating element 14. As shown in the drawing the pattern of the heat sensor 26 is the same ofthe resistance heat element 1 4with the pattern of the heat sensor 26 extending over approximately the same physical dimensions as the pattern of the resistance heating element 14.

Heat sensor leads 28 and 30 lead from the heat sensor 26 in a direction away from the heat sensor 26.

The heat sensor leads 28 and 30 would be formed of the same material asisthe heatsensor 26 and would be electrically continuous with the heat sensor 26.

Two heat sensorterminal pins 32 and 34are electrically joined to the heat sensor leads 28 and 30 also by brazing orthe like afterthe heat treatment ofthe heater 10. As with the terminal pins 20 and 22 the terminal pins 32 and 34 would be preferredlyformed of a nickel or nickel alloy. A small ceramic bridge 36 can be positioned in association with the junction of the heatsensorterminal pins 32 and 34 with the heat sensor leads 28 and 30. The bridge 36 would be integrallyformed with the remainder of the ceramic matrix 12.

In forming the ceramic heater 10 a suitable green substrate or base would be appropriately overlaid with a pastetoformthepatternforthe resistance heating element 14 as well as its leads 16 and 18. This would then be covered with a further amount of green ceramic either as a preformed blanket or by other techniques such as spraying, dipping orthe like in an appropriate slurry or slip of the green ceramic. This is then followed by application of the heat sensor and the heat sensor leads 28 and 30 onto the top surface of the green ceramic.

The heat sensor 26 and its leads 28 and 30 could be applied as a paste by suitable screening, printing or transfertechniques. Alternately preformed pattern of appropriate materials as hereinafter described could be overlaid ontothetop surface ofthe green ceramic either by direct physical overlyaing of such preformed patterns or by suitable transfer techniques. Such as transfer"decals" or the like. Suitable preformed patterns can be cut, punched or otherwise formed from thin foils or ribbons. Further, threads, thin strips or the like could also be used. The foils, ribbons, threads orthe like could also be applied by utilizing a heat "expendable" backing strip orthe like which would burn off during the heat treatment step.

In any event, after an intermediate structure including the green ceramic, the precursor of the resistance heating element 14 and the precursor of orthe heat sensor 26 and the appropriate leads therefor is assembled, thetotality of the inte -.adiate structure is heattreated bycalcining orthe like to unify all of the ceramic components into a monolithicburntceramic matrix or body 12, to appropriately form any precursor paste or pastes orthe like into the resistance heating element 14 and heatsensor26 if a precursor paste for the heatsensor26 is used and to appropriately seal and unifythe heatsensor26 to the top surface 24 ofthe body 12 such that it becomes an integral part of the finished ceramic heater 10. After the heating steps the terminals 20,22,32 and 34 are then attached to the leads 16,18,28 and 30 respectively to form the finished ceramic heater 10.

In the embodiment of Figs. 6 and 7 a ceramic heater 38 is shown which includes all the component parts of the ceramic heater 10 and as such identical numbers are utilized to identify identical parts. The ceramic heater 38, however, differs from the ceramic heater 10 in that priorto the final heat treating step a final layer of green ceramic is overlaid on the top of heat sensor 26 of any precu rser forthe heat sensor 26 such that afterthefinalfiring both the heat sensor 26 and the resistance heating element 14 are hermetically sealed within the ceramic matrix ofthe ceramic heater 38.

The geometrical location ofthe heat sensor 26 with respect to the resistance heating element 14 would be identical between the ceramic heaters 10 and the ceramic heater 38. Further, the structural properties imparted to the heat sensor 26 by the remainder of the ceramic heater 38 would be equivalentto the structural properties imparted to the heat sensor 26 of the ceramic heater 10 with the addition of further structural integrity and protection of the heat sensor 26 in the ceramic heater 38 by virtue of embeding the heat sensor 26 ofthe ceramic heater 38 directly within the ceramic matrix 12.

Whileforthe purposes of illustration herein the ceramic heaters 10 and 38 have been shown to be flat blade type heaters. The same principles embodied in the ceramic heaters 10 and 38 could also be utilized in other geometric shapes such as cylindrical heaters and the like. In such a cylindrical heater both the resistance heating element and the heatsensorwould be appropriately located within the ceramic matrix of a cylindrical heater or the like. The heat sensor could be located in one portion of the cylindrical surface with the resistance heating element located in a different portion, orthesetwo components could be radially displaced with respect to one another from the axis of the cylindrical heaterorthe like.In any event, because the heatsensorwould be in a fixed physical rela tionship with the ceramic heating element a very accurate couple of the resistance heating element and heatsensorwould be achieved.

In actual use as with otherceramic heaters such as those described in US4,035,6l3theterminal pins 20 and 22 of the resistance heating element 14 are attached to an appropriate electrical powersource for supplying powertheretoto cause the resistive heating ofthe resistance heating element 14.

Theterminal pins 32 and 34 ofthe heat sensor 26 would be appropriately connected to an arm of an electrical bridge circuitfor measurement of the electrical resistance of the heat sensor 26. The heat sensor 26 would be formed of an appropriate material whose electrical resistance would vary depending on temperature and as such measuring ofthis resistance would indicate the temperature of the immediate environment of the heat sensor, i.e. the temperature of the ceramic heater 10 or 38.

Materialsforformation of the sensor 26 would be materials having reproducabletemperature coefficients of resistance. Thus as the temperature of the environment of the heat sensor 26 increased or decreased, the resistance of this element 26 would appropriately change in response to the changes in temperature.

By definition, the temperature coefficient of resistance is the change in resistance of a given conductor resulting from a one degree change in temperature about a reference temperature divided bythe conductive resistance at that temperature. Temperature coefficients of resistance are known for various materials including the preferred materials forthe heat sensor 26.

Preferred for the heat sensor 26 would be those materials having an essentially lineartemperature coefficient of resistance. Thesewould include suitable metals or alloys.

The most preferred materials for the heat sensor 26 are platinum and copper in that both of these elements have a nearly lineartemperature coefficient of resistance. Other materials such as nickel or nickel iron have greater linearity derivations. These other materials thus might be suitableforthose instances where widertemperature variations might be acceptable.

Ofthetwo preferred materials, platinum and copper, platinum has certain characteristics which allow its use in preference to copper. These include the chemical stability of platinum when heated to the working temperatures ofthe ceramic heaters 10our38 or other suitable heaters in oxidation or corrosive environments, i.e. air or other closed environments such as in the presence of acid core fluxes and the like.

Because of its chemical stability at an elevated temperature, platinum would be the material of choice forthe ceramic sensor 26 oftheceramic heater 10.

While platinum would be preferred over copper for the ceramic heater 10, in the ceramic heater 38 wherein the heat sensor 26 is hermetically sealed within a ceramic matrix, copper could be utilized as well as platinum. In the ceramic heater38the heat sensor 26 would be protected from oxidative or other corrosive environments in a heated state. As such the chemical degradation of copper in a heated state by environmental elementswould be inhibited.

Since the melting points of both platinum and copper are well above the optimum soldering temperature range of common solders, both elements would be suitable for use as heat sensors 26 in these instances. Further, since both of the elements copper and platinum, display essentially lineartemperature coefficients of resistance, each ofthem could be appropriately connected to a bridge circuit for measurementoftheir resistance and the change of their resistance in response to change in temperature.

With the use of a ceramic heater of this invention such as ceramic heaters 10 and 38, in an appropriate appliance such as a soldering iron orthe like, the resistance heating element could be accurately regulated by known appropriate control devices based upon the incorporation of the heat sensor 26 into an appropriate control circuitwherein the resistance of the heat sensor 26 is determined and then used as an input signal to regulate the power supplied to the resistance heating element 14.

Claims (25)

1. A unified ceramic heater and heatsensorwhich comprises: a monolithic burnt ceramic body; a resistance heating element located in and completely encased within said burnt ceramic body; a pair of resistance heating elementterminals electrically connected to said resistance heating element and located on said ceramic body in positions allowing connection of an electric power supply to said terminals so asto provide electrical power to said resistance heating element; a temperature sensor element located on and integrally attached to said burnt ceramic body, said temperature sensor element positioned on said ceramic body in association with said resistance heating element;; said temperature sensor elementformed of an electrically conductive material which exhibits a variable electrical resistance in response to variation of its temperature; a pairofsensorelementterminalselectrically connected to said temperature sensor element and located on said ceramic body in a position allowing electrical connection of said temperature sensor element to an electrical appliance capable of measuring the electrical resistance of said temperature sensor element.
2. The unified ceramic heaterand heatsensorof claim 1 wherein: said temperature sensor element is formed of a material having an essentially lineartemperature coefficient of resistance.
3. The unified ceramic heater and heatsensorof claim 2wherein: said material is chosen from the group consisting of platinum and copper.
4. The unified ceramic heater and heat sensor of claim 3wherein: said material is platinum.
5. The product of claim 1 when prepared by the process wherein: said unified ceramic heater and heat sensor is formed by building up a composite intermediate structure including; locating a resistance heating element precursor material onto a ceramic base; overlaying said precursor material for said resistance heating element and said ceramic base with a green ceramic; locating one of a preformed temperature sensor element and a temperature sensor element precursor onto said green ceramic;; heat treating said composite intermediate structure to unify said ceramic base, said resistance heating element precursor material, said green ceramic and said one of said preformedtemperaturesensor element and said temperature sensor element precursoy into a single, unified structure and to form said ceramic base and said green ceramic into a monolithic burnt ceramic body with said resistance heating element encased therein and said temperature sensor element integrally attached thereto.
6. The product of claim 5 when prepared bythe processfurtherincluding: attaching terminal pins to said resistance heating element and said temperature sensor element after said heat treatment.
7. The product of claim Swhen prepared bythe processfurtherincluding: forming said ceramic base from a green ceramic.
8. The product of claim 5 when prepared bythe process further including: overlaying said temperature sensor element precur sorwithfurthergreen ceramicpriortosaid heat treatment so asto encase said temperature sensor element in said burnt ceramic body aftersaid heat treatment.
9. The product of claim 8 when prepared bythe process further including: attaching terminal pins to said resistance heating element and said temperature sensor element after said heat treatment.
10. The product of claim 9 when prepared bythe processfurtherincluding: locating said preformed temperature sensor element onto said green ceramic.
11. The product of claim 5 when prepared by the process further including: locating said temperature sensor element precursor onto said green ceramic.
12. The product of claim Swhen prepared bythe process further including: selectingsaidtemperaturesensorelementfrom a material such that said temperature sensor element has an essentially lineartemperature coefficient of resistance.
13. Theproductofclaim 12when prepared bythe process further including: said material from the group consisting of platinum and copper.
14. The product of claim 13 when prepared by the process wherein: said material is platinum.
15. The product of claim 13 when prepared bythe processfurtherincluding: attaching terminal pins to said resistance heating element and said temperature sensor element after said heat treatment.
16. The product of claim 13 when prepared by the processfurtherincluding: overlaying said one of said preformed temperature sensor elements and said temperature sensor element precursor with further green ceramic prior to said heat treatment so as to encase said temperature sensor element in said burntceramicbodyaftersaid heat treatment.
17. The product of claim 14when prepared bythe process further including: attaching terminal pins to said resistance heating element and said temperature sensor element after said heat treatment.
18. The unified ceramic heater and heat sensor of claim 16wherein: said temperature sensor element is encased with said burnt ceramic body.
19. The unified ceramic heater and heat sensor of claim 18 wherein: said temperature sensor element is formed of a material having an essentially lineartemperature coefficient of resistance.
20. The unified ceramic heater and heat sensor of claim 19 wherein: said material is chosen from the group consisting of platinum and copper.
21. The unified ceramic heater and heat sensor of claim 20 wherein: said material is platinum.
22. The unified ceramic heater and heat sensor of claim 20 wherein: said material is copper.
23. The unified ceramic heater and heat sensor of claim 2 wherein: said resistance heating element is encased within a portion of said burnt ceramic body and is shaped in a pattern within said portion of said ceramic body.
24. The unified ceramic heater and heat sensor of claim 23 wherein: said temperature sensor element is positioned in association with said portion of said ceramic body.
25. The unified ceramic heater and heat sensor of claim 24wherein: said temperature sensor element is shaped in a pattern overlaying said pattern of said resistance heating element.
GB08405831A 1983-10-17 1984-03-06 Ceramic heater having temperature sensor integrally formed thereon Withdrawn GB2148676A (en)

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US5666978A (en) * 1992-09-11 1997-09-16 Philip Morris Incorporated Electrical smoking system for delivering flavors and method for making same
US5666976A (en) * 1992-09-11 1997-09-16 Philip Morris Incorporated Cigarette and method of manufacturing cigarette for electrical smoking system
US5692525A (en) * 1992-09-11 1997-12-02 Philip Morris Incorporated Cigarette for electrical smoking system
US5837973A (en) * 1995-02-15 1998-11-17 Japan Bonkote Company Limited Assembly of thermocouple sensor fitted to iron tip
EP1493523A1 (en) * 2003-07-04 2005-01-05 Hakko Corporation Soldering device with a ceramic heater and method for producing the same
WO2005029021A1 (en) * 2003-09-09 2005-03-31 Braun Gmbh Heatable infrared sensor and infrared thermometer comprising such an infrared sensor
US7807949B2 (en) 2006-02-28 2010-10-05 Hakko Corporation Locking mechanism for soldering iron
US8402976B2 (en) 2008-04-17 2013-03-26 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Electrically heated smoking system
CN103874245A (en) * 2014-03-27 2014-06-18 福建闽航电子有限公司 Bonding pad structure of ceramic heating piece with temperature control
US8794231B2 (en) 2008-04-30 2014-08-05 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Electrically heated smoking system having a liquid storage portion
US8997753B2 (en) 2012-01-31 2015-04-07 Altria Client Services Inc. Electronic smoking article
US9084440B2 (en) 2009-11-27 2015-07-21 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Electrically heated smoking system with internal or external heater
US9420829B2 (en) 2009-10-27 2016-08-23 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Smoking system having a liquid storage portion
US9439454B2 (en) 2008-03-14 2016-09-13 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Electrically heated aerosol generating system and method
US9499332B2 (en) 2009-05-21 2016-11-22 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Electrically heated smoking system

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US5408574A (en) * 1989-12-01 1995-04-18 Philip Morris Incorporated Flat ceramic heater having discrete heating zones
US5060671A (en) * 1989-12-01 1991-10-29 Philip Morris Incorporated Flavor generating article
US5093894A (en) * 1989-12-01 1992-03-03 Philip Morris Incorporated Electrically-powered linear heating element
US5224498A (en) * 1989-12-01 1993-07-06 Philip Morris Incorporated Electrically-powered heating element
US5269327A (en) * 1989-12-01 1993-12-14 Philip Morris Incorporated Electrical smoking article
US5095921A (en) * 1990-11-19 1992-03-17 Philip Morris Incorporated Flavor generating article
US5179966A (en) * 1990-11-19 1993-01-19 Philip Morris Incorporated Flavor generating article
US5059769A (en) * 1991-02-22 1991-10-22 Fortune William S Replaceable soldering tip assembly
US5730158A (en) 1991-03-11 1998-03-24 Philip Morris Incorporated Heater element of an electrical smoking article and method for making same
US5388594A (en) * 1991-03-11 1995-02-14 Philip Morris Incorporated Electrical smoking system for delivering flavors and method for making same
US5249586A (en) * 1991-03-11 1993-10-05 Philip Morris Incorporated Electrical smoking
US5708258A (en) * 1991-03-11 1998-01-13 Philip Morris Incorporated Electrical smoking system
US5505214A (en) * 1991-03-11 1996-04-09 Philip Morris Incorporated Electrical smoking article and method for making same
US5573692A (en) * 1991-03-11 1996-11-12 Philip Morris Incorporated Platinum heater for electrical smoking article having ohmic contact
US5613504A (en) 1991-03-11 1997-03-25 Philip Morris Incorporated Flavor generating article and method for making same
US5865185A (en) * 1991-03-11 1999-02-02 Philip Morris Incorporated Flavor generating article
US5665262A (en) * 1991-03-11 1997-09-09 Philip Morris Incorporated Tubular heater for use in an electrical smoking article
US5750964A (en) * 1991-03-11 1998-05-12 Philip Morris Incorporated Electrical heater of an electrical smoking system
US5666976A (en) * 1992-09-11 1997-09-16 Philip Morris Incorporated Cigarette and method of manufacturing cigarette for electrical smoking system
US5692525A (en) * 1992-09-11 1997-12-02 Philip Morris Incorporated Cigarette for electrical smoking system
US5692291A (en) * 1992-09-11 1997-12-02 Philip Morris Incorporated Method of manufacturing an electrical heater
US5915387A (en) 1992-09-11 1999-06-29 Philip Morris Incorporated Cigarette for electrical smoking system
US6026820A (en) 1992-09-11 2000-02-22 Philip Morris Incorporated Cigarette for electrical smoking system
US5816263A (en) * 1992-09-11 1998-10-06 Counts; Mary Ellen Cigarette for electrical smoking system
US5666978A (en) * 1992-09-11 1997-09-16 Philip Morris Incorporated Electrical smoking system for delivering flavors and method for making same
US5468936A (en) * 1993-03-23 1995-11-21 Philip Morris Incorporated Heater having a multiple-layer ceramic substrate and method of fabrication
US5412178A (en) * 1993-07-23 1995-05-02 Japan Bonkote Company Limited Iron-tip temperature detector of electric soldering iron
US5837973A (en) * 1995-02-15 1998-11-17 Japan Bonkote Company Limited Assembly of thermocouple sensor fitted to iron tip
US5649554A (en) 1995-10-16 1997-07-22 Philip Morris Incorporated Electrical lighter with a rotatable tobacco supply
US7679032B2 (en) 2003-07-04 2010-03-16 Hakko Corporation Soldering or desoldering iron
EP1493523A1 (en) * 2003-07-04 2005-01-05 Hakko Corporation Soldering device with a ceramic heater and method for producing the same
WO2005029021A1 (en) * 2003-09-09 2005-03-31 Braun Gmbh Heatable infrared sensor and infrared thermometer comprising such an infrared sensor
US8115139B2 (en) 2003-09-09 2012-02-14 Kaz Usa, Inc. Heatable infrared sensor and infrared thermometer comprising such an infrared sensor
US7807949B2 (en) 2006-02-28 2010-10-05 Hakko Corporation Locking mechanism for soldering iron
US9439454B2 (en) 2008-03-14 2016-09-13 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Electrically heated aerosol generating system and method
US9848655B2 (en) 2008-03-14 2017-12-26 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Electrically heated aerosol generating system and method
US8851081B2 (en) 2008-04-17 2014-10-07 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Electrically heated smoking system
US8402976B2 (en) 2008-04-17 2013-03-26 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Electrically heated smoking system
US8794231B2 (en) 2008-04-30 2014-08-05 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Electrically heated smoking system having a liquid storage portion
US9499332B2 (en) 2009-05-21 2016-11-22 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Electrically heated smoking system
US9775380B2 (en) 2009-05-21 2017-10-03 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Electrically heated smoking system
US9420829B2 (en) 2009-10-27 2016-08-23 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Smoking system having a liquid storage portion
US9084440B2 (en) 2009-11-27 2015-07-21 Philip Morris Usa Inc. Electrically heated smoking system with internal or external heater
US8997753B2 (en) 2012-01-31 2015-04-07 Altria Client Services Inc. Electronic smoking article
CN103874245A (en) * 2014-03-27 2014-06-18 福建闽航电子有限公司 Bonding pad structure of ceramic heating piece with temperature control

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