GB2131496A - Apparatus for dispensing infusate to a mammal body - Google Patents

Apparatus for dispensing infusate to a mammal body Download PDF

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Publication number
GB2131496A
GB2131496A GB8330159A GB8330159A GB2131496A GB 2131496 A GB2131496 A GB 2131496A GB 8330159 A GB8330159 A GB 8330159A GB 8330159 A GB8330159 A GB 8330159A GB 2131496 A GB2131496 A GB 2131496A
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Prior art keywords
apparatus
pump
infusate
chamber
wall
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Granted
Application number
GB8330159A
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GB8330159D0 (en )
GB2131496B (en )
Inventor
Richard D Cummins
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Moog Inc
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Moog Inc
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Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F04POSITIVE DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS FOR LIQUIDS OR ELASTIC FLUIDS
    • F04BPOSITIVE DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS
    • F04B43/00Machines, pumps, or pumping installations having flexible working members
    • F04B43/08Machines, pumps, or pumping installations having flexible working members having tubular flexible members
    • F04B43/09Pumps having electric drive
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M5/00Devices for bringing media into the body in a subcutaneous, intra-vascular or intramuscular way; Accessories therefor, e.g. filling or cleaning devices, arm-rests
    • A61M5/14Infusion devices, e.g. infusing by gravity; Blood infusion; Accessories therefor
    • A61M5/142Pressure infusion, e.g. using pumps
    • A61M5/14244Pressure infusion, e.g. using pumps adapted to be carried by the patient, e.g. portable on the body
    • A61M5/14276Pressure infusion, e.g. using pumps adapted to be carried by the patient, e.g. portable on the body specially adapted for implantation
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M2205/00General characteristics of the apparatus
    • A61M2205/35Communication
    • A61M2205/3507Communication with implanted devices, e.g. external control

Abstract

An implantable infusate dispenser (10) includes a reservoir (12), a pump (13) an inlet valve arranged between the reservoir (12) and pump (13), an outlet valve arranged between the pump (13) and the body of the mammal, a battery (16), and an electrical circuit (18). The pump (13) and the two valves are selectively operable by solenoids in response to signals provided by the circuit (18). The pump (13) employs the return spring rate of an extended bellows to pressurize infusate for dispensation to the mammal body. <IMAGE>

Description

SPECIFICATION Apparatus for dispensing infusate to a mammal body The present invention relates generally to the field of infusion apparatus, and more particularly to improved apparatus which is adapted to be implanted in the body of a mammal for dispensing infusate thereto at controlled rates. The invention also relates to a pump assembly suitable for use in such apparatus.

The medical profession has for some time foreseen the advantage of administering medication on a low-dosage continuous basis, as opposed to by high dosage percutaneous injections. As reported, in an article entitled "Implantable Drug-Delivery Systems" by Perry J.

Blackshear, appearing in Scientific American Vol.

241, No. 6 (December 1979), early attempts began with the implantation of erodible pellets in 1937-1938. By 1964, others were working on ways to diffuse medication into a living body. By 1970, an implantable device having a collapsible bellows reservoir and adapted to be recharged by percutaneous injection through a self-sealing septum, had been developed. The stored infusate was pressurized by means of a propellant having a boiling point below body temperature, and which exerted a force on the exterior of the reservoir, urging it to collapse. See, for example, U.S.

Patent Specification No. 3,731,681 (Blackshear, et al.); Blackshear et al., "The Design and Initial Testing of an Implantable Infusion Pump", Surgery, Gynecology & Obstetrics (January, 1972); "A Lifetime Infusion Pump to Call His Own", Medical World News (October 16, 1970).

See also, U.S. Patent Specification No. 3,840,009 (Michaels et al.). Improvements on this general concept have also been developed. See, for example, U.S. Patent Specifications Nos.

4,221,219 (Tucker) and 4,193,397 (Tucker et al.).

U.S. Patent Specification No. 3,527,220 (Summers et al.) discloses an implantable device having a pump portion operated by an extracorporeal motor. See, also, Summers et al., "A New Miniature Pump for the Treatment of Hydrocephalus", Journal of the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (May/June 1967); U.S. Patent Specification No.

3,310,051 (Schulte); Matthews et al., "A Preliminary Report on the Biological Fluid Transfer System for the Treatment of Hydrocephalus", Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology (Vol. 9, 1967).

More recent attempts to improve such apparatus as shown and described in Webster, "Applications of Fluid Power Technology", Mechanical Engineering (June 1982).

The present invention provides apparatus adapted to be implanted in the body of a mammal for dispensing infusate thereto, comprising a reservoir adapted to contain a quantity of infusate; a pump having an enclosing wall defining a variable-volume chamber therewithin, having an inlet communicating with said reservoir and an outlet adapted to communicate with a region of said mammal body, a portion of said wall being movable between a retracted position, at which the volume of said chamber is a minimum, and an extended position, at which the volume of said chamber is a maximum, said enclosing wall having a spring rate which continuously urges said wall portion to move toward one of said positions, said pump also having an actuator selectively operable to cause said wall portion to move toward said other position;; an inlet valve arranged between said reservoir and pump inlet for permitting only undirectional flow of infusate from said reservoir to said pump; an outlet valve arranged between said pump outlet and mammal body region for permitting only undirectional flow of infusate from said pump to a region of said mammal body; a battery; and an electrical circuit associated with said battery and actuator and operative to selectively energize said actuator.

An embodiment of the invention will now be described, by way of example only, with reference to the accompanying diagrammatic drawings in which: Fig. 1 is a top plan view of an infusate dispensing apparatus.

Fig. 2 is a transverse vertical sectional view thereof, taken generally on line 2-2 of Fig.1; Fig. 3 is an enlarged detail view of the enclosure depending from the cover; Fig. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary horizontal sectional view of the pump assembly, taken generally on line 4-4 of Fig. 2; Fig. 5 shows the pump assembly with the inlet valve open and the outlet valve closed; Fig. 6 shows the pump assembly with the inlet valve closed and the outlet valve open; Apparatus 10, which is adapted to be implanted in the body of a mammal (not shown) for dispensing infusate selectively thereto is shown in Figure 1. The word "mammal" is intended in its broadest zoological sense, and specifically includes man (homo sapiens) as well as a large number of animal species.The word "infusate" is intended in this specification to mean a fluid, compound or substance which is infused or dispensed into the mammal body. While this word may not be found in all dictionaries, it is pointed out that others working in this field have also used "infusate" to describe generically that which is dispensed. (See, for example, U.S. Patent Specification Nos. 3,731,681 and 4,193,397).

Such an "infusate" is typically a fluid, and usually a liquid, and includes, but is not limited to, a wide variety of medications (e.g., insulin and chemotheraputic agents as well as other substances which may be dispensed to the body.

Referring now to the drawings, and more particularly to Figs. 1 and 2 thereof, the apparatus 10 is shown as broadly including a housing 11 , a reservoir 12, a pump assembly 13 having an inlet valve 14 (Fig. 4) and an outlet valve 15 (Fig. 4), a battery 16, and an electrical circuit 18 interposed between the battery and the pump assembly.

Housing 11 is an assembly which includes a cup-shaped lower part 19, and a cover 20. The lower part 19 has a planar horizontal circular bottom 21 from the peripheral margin of which an integrally-formed cylindrical side wall 22 rises vertically. Side wall 22 is provided with a plurality of circumferentially-spaced through holes, severally indicated at 23. The cover 20 has a central raised boss 24 provided with a vertical through opening 25, an annular horizontal planar portion 26 extending outwardly from this central boss, and an outermost down-turned annular flange 28 which is selectively engageable with the upper margin of the lower part side wall, to prevent their unintended separation. The purpose of raised boss 24 is to enable a person to feel the proximate location of the encircled opening 25 beneath the skin, through which opening the reservoir may be refilled.

As best shown in Fig. 3, a cylindrical wall 29 depends from the underside of cover 20 about opening 25 into the chamber formed within the assembled housing, and is closed by a circular horizontal bottom 30. Within the enclosure thus formed, the side wall has an upwardly-facing annular horizontal shoulder 31 spaced vertically above the enclosure bottom 30. A lower nipple 32, positioned vertically between bottom 30 and shoulder 31, extends radially outwardly from cylindrical wall 29, and is penetrated by a radial hole. An upper nipple 33, arranged diametrically opposite lower nipple 32 and positioned above shoulder 31, extends radially outwardly from cylindrical wall 29, and is penetrated by a radial hole. The through-holes penetrating nipples 32, 33 also penetrate cylindrical wall 29 and communicate with the chamber within the enclosure.

A screen assembly is first placed in the enclosure. This screen assembly includes vertically-spaced upper and lower filter screens 34, 35, respectively, mounted on a short cylindrical tube 36. Each screen is positioned axially inwardly from the proximate annular end face of the tube. Thus, upper screen 34 is positioned below the upper end face of the tube, and lower screen 35 is positioned above the lower end face of the tube. The screen assembly is placed within the enclosure with the lower end face of tube 36 abutting shoulder 31. A radial hole 38 penetrates tube 36 between the two screens, and communicates with the hole provided through upper nipple 33. The hole provided through lower nipple 32 communicates with that part of the enclosure which is below lower screen 35.

A needle stop 39 is next placed into the enclosure. This needle stop is a flat circular disclike element having a plurality of downwardly and inwardly convergent through holes circularly spaced from one another. Needle stop 39 provides an abutment surface to limit further penetration of the needle of a syringe, and yet allows infusate to pass therethrough. The inclination of several needle stop holes is opposite to the foreseeable inclination of an inserted syringe needle, so as to prevent the syringe needle from unintentionally passing therethrough. The needle stop is arranged to abut the upper end face of filter assembly tube 36, and may be suitably retained in this position if desired.

A self-sealing septum 40 is sandwiched between upper and lower retainers 41,42, and the subassembly thus formed is positioned within the enclosure immediately beneath cover opening 25. The lower retainer 42 is in the form of a horizontal flat washer provided with a central opening, and has an outer peripheral edge embedded in a cooperative recess provided in cylindrical wall 29. This lower retainer is also spaced vertically above needle stop 39. The upper retainer 41 also somewhat resembles a flat washer, albeit vertically thickened. However, its central through-hole is bounded by an upwardly and inwardly facing frusto-conical surface, which acts to guide insertion of a hypodermic needle.

The septum itself is a disc-like elastomeric element, which may be provided with a central bulbous portion. The septum is preferably compressed between the upper and lower retainers. The upper surface of the upper retainer bears against the proximate underside surface of cover 20, and is complementarily configured thereto for this purpose. As previously noted, the septum is self-sealing and heals a penetrant hole upon withdrawal of a hypodermic needle.

Adverting to Fig. 2, the housing is further shown as including a separating plate having a horizontal upper and lower portions 43, 44, and an upturned peripheral flange 45 secured to side wall 22. Upper portion 43 is provided with a through opening 46.

The reservoir 12 is an elastomeric bag, inert to both the serviced infusate and body fluids, arranged in the chamber beneath the separating plate. Reservoir 12 also has a neck portion 48 which passes through plate opening 46, and has a distal end portion engaging nipple 33. Thus, the variable-volume chamber within the flexible bag is in continuous communication with the space between the two filter screens. The exterior surface of the reservoir bag is exposed to body fluids, via housing openings 23, at normal body pressures. Thus, the reservoir will collapse as infusate is withdrawn therefrom, and will expand when refilled.

A flexible conduit 49 has one marginal end portion mounted on nipple 32, and has its other marginal end portion mounted on another nipple communicating with the pump. Conduit 49 provides a partial infusate flow path leading from the reservoir to the pump. Another flexible conduit 50 communicates the pump outlet with a distal portion of the mammal body, to which infusate is to be dispensed.

As best shown in Fig. 4, the pump assembly has inlet valve 14, pump 13 and outlet valve 1 5 mounted in a common body, generally indicated at 51. Body 51 has three specially-configured faces, arranged transverse to nominal equi-distant centerline angles of 120 degrees, to accommodate the pump and the two valves. Each face is bounded by an outwardly-facing annular mounting flange, severally indicated at 52, which is provided with two or more tapped holes 53.

The pump face of body 51 (arranged in the three o'clock position in Fig. 4) has an annular ring 54 extending outwardly from the associated flange 52, and outwardly-facing annular shoulder 55, and a unique recess extending inwardly into body 51. This recess is bounded by a cylindrical surface 56 extending into the body from shoulder 55 so as to be normal to the associated mounting flange, an annular bottom 58 normal to surface 56, and an upstanding axial post extending outwardly from bottom 58 and bounded by a coaxial cylindrical surface 59, an inwardly-facing annular shoulder 60, a cylindrical surface 61 continuing outwardly therefrom, and an outwardly-facing planar end face 62. Cylindrical surfaces 56, 59 and 61 are severally coaxial.

Surfaces 55, 58, 60 and 62 are arranged in parallel planes, and are severally perpendicular to the axis of cylindrical surfaces 56, 59 and 62.

Surfaces 55, 58 and 62 face outwardly of the body; surface 60 faces inwardly of the body.

The inlet valve face of body 51 (arranged at the eleven o'clock position in Fig. 4) has an annular ring 63 extending outwardly from the associated flange 52, an outwardly-facing annular shoulder 64, and a recess extending inwardly into the body.

The inlet valve recess is bounded by a cylindrical surface 65 extending into the body so as to be normal to the associated mounting flange, an outwardly-facing annular shoulder 66, a cylindrical surface 68 continuing inwardly therefrom, an inwardly convergent frusto-conical surface 69, and a traverse planar bottom surface 70 provided with an outwardly-extending axial nipple 71. Cylindrical surfaces 65 and 68 are coaxial with nipple 71. Surfaces 64,66 and 70 are arranged in parallel planes, and are severally perpendicular to the axis of cylindrical surfaces 65 and 68.

The outlet valve face of body 51 (arranged at the seven o'clock position in Fig. 4) is similar to that of the inlet valve face, just described. Hence, the same reference numerals have been used on the accompanying drawings to indicate the corresponding elements and surfaces.

Body 51 is also provided with a network of isolated internal passageways which establish communication between various body surfaces. A first passageway 72 includes a hole extending between pump recess bottom surface 58 and inlet recess frusto-conical surface 69 a second passageway 73 penetrates inlet recess nipple 71 and opens onto one side of the pump recess post; a third passageway 74 communicates with outlet recess frusto-conical surface 69 and open onto pump post surface 59 diametrically opposite passageway 73; and a fourth passageway 75 (not fully shown) penetrates outlet recess nipple 71 and communicates with conduit 50 (Fig. 2), leading to the particular area or region of the mammal body to which the infusate is to be dispensed.

Each of the inlet valve, pump and outlet valve, is operated by a solenoid. Since the structure of each solenoid, severally indicated at 76, is the same, only one will be explicitly described. The pump solenoid has a somewhat cup-shaped housing including a planar vertical base 78, a horizontal cylindrical side wall 79, and an annular vertical inner face 80. An annular mounting flange 81 extends radially outwardly from side wall 79 outwardly of inner face 80. This flange is provided with a plurality of horizontal through-holes, severally indicated at 82, to accommodate passage of a plurality of headed fasteners 83 having their threaded shank positions matingiy received in tapped body holes 53. These fasteners may be selectively rotated to draw the solenoid 76 toward body 51.Arranged within the solenoid housing is a coil 84 surrounding a core 85 and insulated therefrom by an intermediate spoolshaped insulator 86. A diaphragm seal 88 closes each body recess, and is suitably held in this position, preferably by a peripheral weidment. A resilient O-Ring like member 89 sealingly engages the diaphragm, the solenoid housing flange, and the solenoid housing side wall. This diaphragm 88 is a continuous metal barrier wall, preferably welded in place, and functions to separate the "dry" electrical section on one side thereof, from the "wet" infusate section on the other side thereof.

The pump itself includes a metal bellows 90, having a folded, somewhat sinusoidal side wall.

The open lower end of this bellows is sealingly secured, as by a peripheral weldment, to pump recess bottom surface 58 so as to encompass the openings of body passageway 73, 74. The open upper end of bellows 90 is sealingly secured to, and closed by, a circular plate-like clapper 91.

Clapper 91 is movable between two extreme positions: a fully-retracted position (Fig. 5) at which the clapper abuts pump recess post surface 62; and a fully-extended position (Fig. 6) at which the clapper engages the underside of the diaphragm seal. The bellows itself has a normal, unbiased position at or inwardly of the fullyretracted position. When the clapper is moved from the retracted position to the extended position, the spring rate (k) of the bellows exerts a return force (F) proportional to the displacement (x) of the clapper from the retracted position. In other words, the pump solenoid is an actuator which may be selectively energized to draw the clapper, thereby stretching the bellows from its retracted position to its extended position.

However, in doing so, the attractive force exerted by the solenoid on the clapper exceeds the opposite return force (F = kx) of the now-extended bellows. When the solenoid is subsequently deenergized, this return force continuously urges the clapper to return to its fully-retracted position.

Of course, if fluid is entrapped within the bellows, the magnitude of the return force will pressurize such fluid. If the entrapped fluid is incompressible (e.g., a liquid), the clapper, on its return stroke, may be held at some position intermediate its limits of movement, at which a force balance is achieved. It should also be noted that variablevolume chambers 92, 93 within and without the bellows, vary reciprocally. Thus, when the clapper moves from its retracted position to its extended position, the volume of the chamber 92 within the bellows will increase at the expense of the volume of chamber 93 without the bellows. Conversely, when the clapper moves from its extended position back to its retracted position, the volume of chamber 92 decreases by the amount by which the volume of chamber 93 increases. Thus, the volumes of chambers 92, 93 are supplemental.

The structure of the inlet and outlet valves elements are also identical, and only one will be explicitly described. The movable portion of outlet valve 1 5 is a subassembly which includes a clapper 94, a spacer block 95 and a valve head 96 provided with a an elastomeric seal 98. These elements are suitably connected together and move as a unit. A support spring 99, somewhat resembling a Belleville washer but provided with openings (not shown) through which fluid may pass, engages the peripheral margin at valve head 96 and body recess wall. This spring may be a spoked element, and continuously biases the valve head to sealingly engage the annular valve seat provided by the free end of nipple 71. Thus, the outlet valve is pressure balanced, but is normally closed.The outlet valve solenoid may be selectively energized to draw the clapper against the diaphragm, thereby moving the valve head away from its seat and opening the valve (Fig. 6).

However, the support spring continuously urges the clapper-spacer block-valve head subassembly to move to the normally-closed position. Hence, when the solenoid is deenergized, the outlet valve will again be closed (Fig. 5). Both the inlet valve and the outlet valve are of the normally-closed, energize-to-open type.

Adverting now to Fig. 2, the battery 16 and electrical circuit 18 are mounted on a plate 100 connected to the underside of cover 20. The battery is preferably of the lithium type. The electrical circuit, schematically indicated at 18, is interposed between the battery and the various solenoids, and is capable of providing signals to the various solenoids to perform an operational sequence described infra. Individual electrical conductors have been omitted for clarity of understanding, but are necessarily implied.

The assembled device is implanted in the mammal body, with the cover boss preferably located immediately beneath the skin. Once implanted, body fluid(s) exert a pressure on the exterior surface of the reservoir, thereby urging it to collapse and causing infusate therewithin to be pressurized to the level of such body fluid(s).

Infusate within the reservoir is supplied to the pump assembly via lower filter screen 35, nipple 32 and conduit 49. Filter screen 35 functions to separate any solid contaminants too large to pass therethrough.

Assume that all three solenoids are initially deenergized. The inlet and outlet valves will both be closed, and the bellows will be in its fullyretracted position abutting post surface 62.

Assume also that the various passageways, conduits and chambers are completely filled with infusate.

The operational sequence of the inlet valvepump-outlet valve assembly is as follows: (1) the inlet valve solenoid is energized to open the inlet valve; (2) the pump solenoid is energized to move the pump clapper to its extended position, thereby allowing infusate to flow from the reservoir through the open inlet valve into expanding pump chamber 92; (3) the inlet valve solenoid is deenergized, thereby allowing the inlet valve to close; (4) the outlet valve solenoid is energized to open the outlet valve; (5) the pump solenoid is deenergized, to allow the spring rate of the extended bellows to force infusate from collapsing pump chamber 92 through the outlet valve and conduit 50 to the area or region to be treated; and (6) the outlet valve solenoid is deenergized to allow the outlet valve to close. Subsequent operational sequences are repetitive.If desired the steps (4) and (5) of the above sequence may be reversed, that is, the pump solenoid may be deenergized before the outlet valve is opened. This would afford the additional capability of being able to more finely meter the dispensed infusate through selective opening and closing of the outlet valve as the bellows return to its retracted position, if desired.

The electrical circuit may supply energizing pulses to the respective solenoids. The duration of each pulse, and/or the interval between successive pulses, may be established as a function of time, as a function of a sensed body parameter, or as a function of some other variable.

The device may incorporate an override mechanism (not shown) by which the various pulse durations, or the interval therebetween, may be changed or varied. Preferably this override mechanism would include an extracorporeal device magnetically couplable to the electrical circuit. Of course, the reservoir may be selectively refilled with infusate by percutaneous injection penetrating the septum. In this regard, it should be noted that such refilled infusate must pass through upper screen 34 on its way to the reservoir, and through lower screen 35 enroute to the pump. These two filters screen out solid particulate contaminants, and provide a high margin of safety. Needless to say, the concentration of refilled infusate may vary from previous charges to vary the dispensed dosage without requiring an alteration of the operation of the electrical circuit.

The various component parts of the improved apparatus should be formed of a material which is inert to both the serviced infusate and to body fluids. If desired, the electrical circuit and/or the battery may be protectively encapsulated to avoid contact with body fluids or with infusate. The provision of two normally-closed valves, mechanically in series, between the reservoir and the mammal body further increases the margin of safety. While the inlet valve-pump-outlet valve assembly is shown as having its three major components mounted on a common body at nominal interval angles of 120 degrees, this particular arrangement is not deemed critical, and may be readily varied.

If desired, the operation of the bellows may be reserved. In other words, the bellows may be forcibly contracted by suitable operation of the associated solenoid, to forcibly pump fluid from the bellows, and allowed to expand back to its normal shape to draw fluid into the bellows.

Claims (19)

1. Apparatus adapted to be implanted in the body of a mammal for dispensing infusate thereto, comprising a reservoir adapted to contain a quantity of infusate; a pump having an enclosing wall defining a variable-volume chamber therewithin, having an inlet communicating with said reservoir and an outlet adapted to communicate with a region of said -mammal body, a portion of said wall being movable between a retracted position, at which the volume of said chamber is a minimum, and an extended position, at which the volume of said chamber is a maximum, said enclosing wall having a spring rate which continuously urges said wall portion to move toward one of said positions, said pump also having an actuator selectively operable to cause said wall portion to move toward said other position;; an inlet valve arranged between said reservoir and pump inlet for permitting only unidirectional flow of infusate from said reservoir to said pump; an outlet valve arranged between said pump outlet and mammal body region for permitting only unidirectional flow of infusate from said pump to a region of said mammal body; a battery; and an electrical circuit associated with said battery and actuator and operative to selectively energize said actuator.
2. Apparatus as claimed in claim 1, wherein the spring rate of the wall urges the wall portion into its retracted position and the actuator is operable to move the wall portion to its extended position, the spring rate of the wall pressurising the infusate in said chamber when the actuator is deenergized.
3. Apparatus as claimed in claim 1, or 2, wherein said reservoir is a flexible wall bag having its external surface exposed to ambient body pressure.
4. Apparatus as claimed in claim 1,2 or 3, wherein said enclosing wall is a bellows.
5. Apparatus as claimed in any one of the preceding claims, wherein said actuator is a solenoid.
6. Apparatus as claimed in claim 5, further comprising a ferrous clapper mounted on said movable wall portion.
7. Apparatus as claimed in any one of the preceding claims, wherein said inlet valve has a member movable between a normally-closed flow-preventing position and an open flow permitting position.
8. Apparatus as claimed in claim 7, wherein movement of said inlet valve member is controlled by said electrical circuit.
9. Apparatus as claimed in any one of the preceding claims, wherein said outlet valve has a member movable between a normally-closed flow-preventing portion and an open flow permitting position.
10. Apparatus as claimed in claim 9, wherein movement of said outlet valve member is controlled by said electrical circuit.
11. Apparatus as claimed in any one of the preceding claims, wherein said electrical circuit energizes said motor with a sequence of pulses.
12. Apparatus as claimed in claim 11, wherein the frequency of said pulse sequence is a function of time.
13. Apparatus as claimed in claim 11, wherein the frequency of said pulse sequence is a function of a sensed condition of said mammal body.
14. A pump assembly adapted to be associated with a source of fluid, comprising an enclosing wall defining a variable-volume chamber therewithin, having an inlet communicating with said source and having an outlet; a portion of said wall being movable between a retracted position at which the volume of said chamber is a minimum, and an extended position at which the volume of said chamber is a maximum, said enclosing wall having a spring rate which continuously urges said wall portion into one of said positions; an actuator selectively operable to cause said wall portion to move toward said other position; an inlet valve arranged between said source and the chamber inlet and operative to prevent flow from said chamber toward said source; and an outlet valve arranged between the exterior and the chamber outlet and operative to prevent flow from the exterior toward said chamber.
15. A pump assembly as claimed in claim 14, wherein said actuator is physically separate from said movable wall portion.
16. A pump assembly as claimed in claim 14 or 15, wherein said actuator is a solenoid.
17. A pump assembly as claimed in claim 16, further comprising a ferrous clapper mounted on said movable wall portion.
18. A pump assembly substantially as herein described with reference to Figures 4 to 6 of the accompanying drawings.
19. Apparatus adapted to be implanted in the body of a mammal for dispensing infusate thereto substantially as herein described with reference to the accompanying drawings.
GB8330159A 1982-12-08 1983-11-11 Apparatus for dispensing infusate to a mammal body Expired GB2131496B (en)

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GB2131496A true true GB2131496A (en) 1984-06-20
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DE (1) DE3343708A1 (en)
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EP0142866A2 (en) * 1983-11-22 1985-05-29 Consolidated Controls Corporation Compact implantable medication infusion unit and method of filling and sealing the pressure stabilizing chamber thereof
GB2192135A (en) * 1986-06-26 1988-01-06 Bristol Myers Co Infusion erectile system
US5011472A (en) * 1988-09-06 1991-04-30 Brown University Research Foundation Implantable delivery system for biological factors
US5137529A (en) * 1990-02-20 1992-08-11 Pudenz-Schulte Medical Research Corporation Injection port
WO1995003078A1 (en) * 1992-07-13 1995-02-02 Elan Medical Technologies Limited Liquid material dispenser and valve
WO1996040357A1 (en) * 1995-06-07 1996-12-19 Strato/Infusaid Inc. Implantable access device
US5704520A (en) * 1993-07-19 1998-01-06 Elan Medical Technologies, Limited Liquid material dispenser and valve
US5707361A (en) * 1994-03-10 1998-01-13 Siemens Aktiengesellscahaft Implantable infusion system with a neutral pressure medication container
US5997501A (en) * 1993-11-18 1999-12-07 Elan Corporation, Plc Intradermal drug delivery device

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US4650469A (en) * 1984-10-19 1987-03-17 Deltec Systems, Inc. Drug delivery system
EP0182502B1 (en) * 1984-10-19 1991-02-06 Pharmacia Deltec, Inc. Drug delivery system
JP4494172B2 (en) * 2004-11-19 2010-06-30 シーケーディ株式会社 Discharge, air-vent integrated valve
EP2589807A1 (en) 2011-11-07 2013-05-08 hofer mechatronik GmbH Folding bellows pump
DE202012100944U1 (en) 2012-03-16 2013-06-17 Hofer Mechatronik Gmbh bellows pump

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Cited By (12)

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP0142866A2 (en) * 1983-11-22 1985-05-29 Consolidated Controls Corporation Compact implantable medication infusion unit and method of filling and sealing the pressure stabilizing chamber thereof
EP0142866A3 (en) * 1983-11-22 1986-12-10 Consolidated Controls Corporation Compact implantable medication infusion unit and method of filling and sealing the pressure stabilizing chamber thereof
GB2192135A (en) * 1986-06-26 1988-01-06 Bristol Myers Co Infusion erectile system
GB2192135B (en) * 1986-06-26 1990-10-24 Bristol Myers Co Infusion erectile system
US5011472A (en) * 1988-09-06 1991-04-30 Brown University Research Foundation Implantable delivery system for biological factors
US5137529A (en) * 1990-02-20 1992-08-11 Pudenz-Schulte Medical Research Corporation Injection port
WO1995003078A1 (en) * 1992-07-13 1995-02-02 Elan Medical Technologies Limited Liquid material dispenser and valve
US5704520A (en) * 1993-07-19 1998-01-06 Elan Medical Technologies, Limited Liquid material dispenser and valve
US5997501A (en) * 1993-11-18 1999-12-07 Elan Corporation, Plc Intradermal drug delivery device
US5707361A (en) * 1994-03-10 1998-01-13 Siemens Aktiengesellscahaft Implantable infusion system with a neutral pressure medication container
WO1996040357A1 (en) * 1995-06-07 1996-12-19 Strato/Infusaid Inc. Implantable access device
US5695490A (en) * 1995-06-07 1997-12-09 Strato/Infusaid, Inc. Implantable treatment material device

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
JPS59111764A (en) 1984-06-28 application
FR2537440A1 (en) 1984-06-15 application
GB8330159D0 (en) 1983-12-21 grant
GB2131496B (en) 1986-09-10 grant
DE3343708A1 (en) 1984-06-14 application

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Effective date: 19951111