GB2107571A - Gloves with integral optical fibres - Google Patents

Gloves with integral optical fibres Download PDF

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Publication number
GB2107571A
GB2107571A GB8131146A GB8131146A GB2107571A GB 2107571 A GB2107571 A GB 2107571A GB 8131146 A GB8131146 A GB 8131146A GB 8131146 A GB8131146 A GB 8131146A GB 2107571 A GB2107571 A GB 2107571A
Authority
GB
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
glove
light
fibres
gloves
light source
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Granted
Application number
GB8131146A
Other versions
GB2107571B (en )
Inventor
Edric Raymond Brooke
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
STC PLC
Original Assignee
STC PLC
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41DOUTERWEAR; PROTECTIVE GARMENTS; ACCESSORIES
    • A41D19/00Gloves
    • A41D19/015Protective gloves
    • A41D19/0157Protective gloves with luminous or reflective means

Abstract

A glove has optical fibres (1) woven into the fabric from which it is made, the fibres terminating at the finger/thumb ends (5). Light comes from a lamp or light-emitting diode (2), powered by a battery (3). Such gloves have wide applications, e.g. night reading or writing, or surgical use. <IMAGE>

Description

SPECIFICATION Gloves This invention relates to gloves, and especially to gloves with built-in light sources.

According to the invention there is provided a glove having optical fibres formed into the material of which the glove is made, wherein the fibres are fed with light from a light source when in use, and wherein the ends of the fibres terminate at or near the ends of the thumb and finger portions of the gloves.

Embodiments of the invention will now be described with reference to the accompanying drawing, in which Fig. 1 illustrates one embodiment of the invention, while Fig. 2 shows three ways to treat the fibres to allow of light emission.

As will be seen from Fig. 1, the fabric from which a glove is made has optical fibres woven into it, a fibre bundle thus woven in being shown at 1. The fibre bundles are supplied with light from a lamp or light emitting diode 2 powered by a battery 3 at the cuff end of the glove. With the small batteries now available, e.g. for pocket calculators the enclosure 4 for such a battery, light source and controlling switch is of light weight and compact.

The fibre bundles extend throughout the length of the gloves and their other or light emitting ends are clustered at the finger and thumb ends, as indicated at 5.

Such gloves have a wide range of application, such as map-reading, and reading/writing notes and instructions in the dark. An example of the latter is operating instruments at night, e.g. during military operations and manoeuvres. Other uses contemplated are use with surgical gloves, by astronauts in solar shadow, and underwater or underground.

Since the hands do not have to hold a lamp they can be used without hindrance. Cleaning is simple; the glove fingers are smooth and usable in the normal way.

Fig. 2 shows, in each case in sections, three ways to treat the fibres to allow light emission. Thus in Fig. 2(a), the fibre ends are cut as at 7 to provide "spot" sources of light.

In Fig. 2(b), the fibres have roughened regions, as at 8, along their lengths, while in Fig. 3 the fibres have doubled-back ends as shown at 9. Hence the sudden discontinuity due to the doubling-back causes light to escape.

Light can be fed to the fibres in various ways, the first of which is to take all the fibres together as a bundle which extends from the gloves to a remote light source, or taking the wires from the light source (in Fig. 1) to a remote voltage source. Another method is to use inductive techniques to provide alternating current to the light source, e.g. by a coil around the wrist part of the glove, which acts as the secondary winding for a remotelyplaced primary winding.

Methods using remote lamps or voltage supplies can also be used for signalling to the wearer of the glove by, for instance coded interruptions of the light output

CLAIMS 1. A glove having optical fibres formed into the material of which the glove is made, wherein the fibres are fed with light from a light source when in use, and wherein the ends of the fibres terminate at or near the ends of the thumb and finger portions of the gloves.

2. A glove as claimed in claim 1, and wherein the light is emitted substantially wholly from the fibre end, which is either cut or folded back.

3. A glove as claimed in claim 1 or 2, and wherein the surfaces of the fibres have roughened regions so as to emit light from those regions.

4. A glove as claimed in claim 1, 2 or 3, and wherein the light is derived from a light source such as a lamp or a light-emitting diode mounted at the wrist end of the glove.

5. A glove as claimed in claim 4, and wherein power for the light source is from a battery at the wrist end of the glove.

6. A glove as claimed in claim 4, and wherein power for the light source is obtained from a remote source wire-coupled to the glove.

7. A glove as claimed in claim 4, and wherein power for the light source is alternating current received inductively, there being a secondary winding on the cuff of the glove which when in use co-operates with a remote primary winding.

8. A glove as claimed in claims 1, 2 or 3, and wherein the light is supplied to the glove from a light source remote from the glove and coupled thereto via optical fibre.

9. A glove as claimed in claim 4, 6, 7 or 8, and wherein means is provided to remotely interrupt the power supply so that signalling may be effected to the wearer of the glove.

10. A glove substantially as described with reference to the accompanying drawings.

**WARNING** end of DESC field may overlap start of CLMS **.

Claims (10)

**WARNING** start of CLMS field may overlap end of DESC **. SPECIFICATION Gloves This invention relates to gloves, and especially to gloves with built-in light sources. According to the invention there is provided a glove having optical fibres formed into the material of which the glove is made, wherein the fibres are fed with light from a light source when in use, and wherein the ends of the fibres terminate at or near the ends of the thumb and finger portions of the gloves. Embodiments of the invention will now be described with reference to the accompanying drawing, in which Fig. 1 illustrates one embodiment of the invention, while Fig. 2 shows three ways to treat the fibres to allow of light emission. As will be seen from Fig. 1, the fabric from which a glove is made has optical fibres woven into it, a fibre bundle thus woven in being shown at 1. The fibre bundles are supplied with light from a lamp or light emitting diode 2 powered by a battery 3 at the cuff end of the glove. With the small batteries now available, e.g. for pocket calculators the enclosure 4 for such a battery, light source and controlling switch is of light weight and compact. The fibre bundles extend throughout the length of the gloves and their other or light emitting ends are clustered at the finger and thumb ends, as indicated at 5. Such gloves have a wide range of application, such as map-reading, and reading/writing notes and instructions in the dark. An example of the latter is operating instruments at night, e.g. during military operations and manoeuvres. Other uses contemplated are use with surgical gloves, by astronauts in solar shadow, and underwater or underground. Since the hands do not have to hold a lamp they can be used without hindrance. Cleaning is simple; the glove fingers are smooth and usable in the normal way. Fig. 2 shows, in each case in sections, three ways to treat the fibres to allow light emission. Thus in Fig. 2(a), the fibre ends are cut as at 7 to provide "spot" sources of light. In Fig. 2(b), the fibres have roughened regions, as at 8, along their lengths, while in Fig. 3 the fibres have doubled-back ends as shown at 9. Hence the sudden discontinuity due to the doubling-back causes light to escape. Light can be fed to the fibres in various ways, the first of which is to take all the fibres together as a bundle which extends from the gloves to a remote light source, or taking the wires from the light source (in Fig. 1) to a remote voltage source. Another method is to use inductive techniques to provide alternating current to the light source, e.g. by a coil around the wrist part of the glove, which acts as the secondary winding for a remotelyplaced primary winding. Methods using remote lamps or voltage supplies can also be used for signalling to the wearer of the glove by, for instance coded interruptions of the light output CLAIMS
1. A glove having optical fibres formed into the material of which the glove is made, wherein the fibres are fed with light from a light source when in use, and wherein the ends of the fibres terminate at or near the ends of the thumb and finger portions of the gloves.
2. A glove as claimed in claim 1, and wherein the light is emitted substantially wholly from the fibre end, which is either cut or folded back.
3. A glove as claimed in claim 1 or 2, and wherein the surfaces of the fibres have roughened regions so as to emit light from those regions.
4. A glove as claimed in claim 1, 2 or 3, and wherein the light is derived from a light source such as a lamp or a light-emitting diode mounted at the wrist end of the glove.
5. A glove as claimed in claim 4, and wherein power for the light source is from a battery at the wrist end of the glove.
6. A glove as claimed in claim 4, and wherein power for the light source is obtained from a remote source wire-coupled to the glove.
7. A glove as claimed in claim 4, and wherein power for the light source is alternating current received inductively, there being a secondary winding on the cuff of the glove which when in use co-operates with a remote primary winding.
8. A glove as claimed in claims 1, 2 or 3, and wherein the light is supplied to the glove from a light source remote from the glove and coupled thereto via optical fibre.
9. A glove as claimed in claim 4, 6, 7 or 8, and wherein means is provided to remotely interrupt the power supply so that signalling may be effected to the wearer of the glove.
10. A glove substantially as described with reference to the accompanying drawings.
GB8131146A 1981-10-15 1981-10-15 Gloves with integral optical fibres Expired GB2107571B (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB8131146A GB2107571B (en) 1981-10-15 1981-10-15 Gloves with integral optical fibres

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB8131146A GB2107571B (en) 1981-10-15 1981-10-15 Gloves with integral optical fibres

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
GB2107571A true true GB2107571A (en) 1983-05-05
GB2107571B GB2107571B (en) 1985-03-13

Family

ID=10525186

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
GB8131146A Expired GB2107571B (en) 1981-10-15 1981-10-15 Gloves with integral optical fibres

Country Status (1)

Country Link
GB (1) GB2107571B (en)

Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB2132463A (en) * 1982-12-01 1984-07-11 Eric Wood Electrically illuminated harness
GB2221025A (en) * 1988-07-19 1990-01-24 Graham Fitzpatrick Safety device
EP0654134A1 (en) * 1992-08-05 1995-05-24 Peter Koenen Myers H. Surgical-type glove and illuminator assembly
GB2310788A (en) * 1996-03-08 1997-09-10 Jong Edward Aldert Christopher Glove with lighting unit
US5816676A (en) * 1992-08-05 1998-10-06 Koenen Myers; Howard P. Work glove and illuminator assembly
WO2000020797A2 (en) * 1998-10-05 2000-04-13 Myers H Peter Koenen Glove assembly
DE19941589A1 (en) * 1999-02-20 2000-08-24 Juergen Schulze Light cushion, for use in e.g. padding garments, has padding layers with light generating elements
FR2810722A1 (en) * 2000-06-26 2001-12-28 Jeremy Kleinberg Equipment for producing animated luminous effects, comprises glove with battery to supply luminescent diodes at the finger tips controlled by a switch mounted on thumb and operated by first finger
GB2376520A (en) * 2001-06-13 2002-12-18 Norman Francis Say Light source for illuminating surgical operations
EP1437056A1 (en) * 2003-01-13 2004-07-14 Csaba Gyori Night-time glove
WO2004062406A1 (en) * 2003-01-03 2004-07-29 Anza Sport Group, Inc. Glove with integrated light
US7274844B2 (en) * 2005-05-11 2007-09-25 University Of Zurich Empa Light-emitting textile structure, in particular for medical purposes, and use thereof
GB2452480A (en) * 2007-08-31 2009-03-11 Sentient Medical Ltd Surgical device having illuminating and imaging means

Cited By (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB2132463A (en) * 1982-12-01 1984-07-11 Eric Wood Electrically illuminated harness
GB2221025A (en) * 1988-07-19 1990-01-24 Graham Fitzpatrick Safety device
EP0654134A1 (en) * 1992-08-05 1995-05-24 Peter Koenen Myers H. Surgical-type glove and illuminator assembly
EP0654134A4 (en) * 1992-08-05 1995-08-23 Howard P Koenen Surgical-type glove and illuminator assembly.
US5535105A (en) * 1992-08-05 1996-07-09 Koenen; H. Peter Work glove and illuminator assembly
US5816676A (en) * 1992-08-05 1998-10-06 Koenen Myers; Howard P. Work glove and illuminator assembly
GB2310788A (en) * 1996-03-08 1997-09-10 Jong Edward Aldert Christopher Glove with lighting unit
GB2310788B (en) * 1996-03-08 1999-06-16 Jong Edward Aldert Christopher A glove
WO2000020797A2 (en) * 1998-10-05 2000-04-13 Myers H Peter Koenen Glove assembly
WO2000020797A3 (en) * 1998-10-05 2000-07-06 H Peter Koenen Myers Glove assembly
DE19941589A1 (en) * 1999-02-20 2000-08-24 Juergen Schulze Light cushion, for use in e.g. padding garments, has padding layers with light generating elements
DE19941589C2 (en) * 1999-02-20 2002-07-18 Juergen Schulze light padding
FR2810722A1 (en) * 2000-06-26 2001-12-28 Jeremy Kleinberg Equipment for producing animated luminous effects, comprises glove with battery to supply luminescent diodes at the finger tips controlled by a switch mounted on thumb and operated by first finger
GB2376520A (en) * 2001-06-13 2002-12-18 Norman Francis Say Light source for illuminating surgical operations
WO2004062406A1 (en) * 2003-01-03 2004-07-29 Anza Sport Group, Inc. Glove with integrated light
US6892397B2 (en) 2003-01-03 2005-05-17 Anza Sport Group, Inc. Glove with integrated light
EP1437056A1 (en) * 2003-01-13 2004-07-14 Csaba Gyori Night-time glove
US7274844B2 (en) * 2005-05-11 2007-09-25 University Of Zurich Empa Light-emitting textile structure, in particular for medical purposes, and use thereof
GB2452480A (en) * 2007-08-31 2009-03-11 Sentient Medical Ltd Surgical device having illuminating and imaging means

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
GB2107571B (en) 1985-03-13 grant

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PCNP Patent ceased through non-payment of renewal fee