GB2078805A - Fire and Weld Splash Resistant for Glass Fabric - Google Patents

Fire and Weld Splash Resistant for Glass Fabric Download PDF

Info

Publication number
GB2078805A
GB2078805A GB8021190A GB8021190A GB2078805A GB 2078805 A GB2078805 A GB 2078805A GB 8021190 A GB8021190 A GB 8021190A GB 8021190 A GB8021190 A GB 8021190A GB 2078805 A GB2078805 A GB 2078805A
Authority
GB
United Kingdom
Prior art keywords
polyol
fabric
method according
weight
dehydrating agent
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Withdrawn
Application number
GB8021190A
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Tba Industrial Products Ltd
Original Assignee
Tba Industrial Products Ltd
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Tba Industrial Products Ltd filed Critical Tba Industrial Products Ltd
Priority to GB8021190A priority Critical patent/GB2078805A/en
Priority claimed from GB8118357A external-priority patent/GB2079801B/en
Publication of GB2078805A publication Critical patent/GB2078805A/en
Application status is Withdrawn legal-status Critical

Links

Classifications

    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C03GLASS; MINERAL OR SLAG WOOL
    • C03CCHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF GLASSES, GLAZES, OR VITREOUS ENAMELS; SURFACE TREATMENT OF GLASS; SURFACE TREATMENT OF FIBRES OR FILAMENTS MADE FROM GLASS, MINERALS OR SLAGS; JOINING GLASS TO GLASS OR OTHER MATERIALS
    • C03C25/00Surface treatment of fibres or filaments made from glass, minerals or slags
    • C03C25/10Coating
    • C03C25/42Coatings containing inorganic materials
    • C03C25/44Carbon, e.g. graphite
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C03GLASS; MINERAL OR SLAG WOOL
    • C03CCHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF GLASSES, GLAZES, OR VITREOUS ENAMELS; SURFACE TREATMENT OF GLASS; SURFACE TREATMENT OF FIBRES OR FILAMENTS MADE FROM GLASS, MINERALS OR SLAGS; JOINING GLASS TO GLASS OR OTHER MATERIALS
    • C03C25/00Surface treatment of fibres or filaments made from glass, minerals or slags
    • C03C25/10Coating
    • C03C25/24Coatings containing organic materials
    • C03C25/25Non-macromolecular compounds
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C03GLASS; MINERAL OR SLAG WOOL
    • C03CCHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF GLASSES, GLAZES, OR VITREOUS ENAMELS; SURFACE TREATMENT OF GLASS; SURFACE TREATMENT OF FIBRES OR FILAMENTS MADE FROM GLASS, MINERALS OR SLAGS; JOINING GLASS TO GLASS OR OTHER MATERIALS
    • C03C25/00Surface treatment of fibres or filaments made from glass, minerals or slags
    • C03C25/10Coating
    • C03C25/24Coatings containing organic materials
    • C03C25/26Macromolecular compounds or prepolymers
    • C03C25/32Macromolecular compounds or prepolymers obtained otherwise than by reactions involving only carbon-to-carbon unsaturated bonds
    • C03C25/321Starch; Starch derivatives

Abstract

Glass fabrics are given enhanced weld splash resistance by treating them with a non-intumescent, i.e. non swelling, char-forming composition, for example a mixture of a dehydratable polyol and a dehydrating agent. The polyol may be a sugar, starch of polyhydric alcohol and the dehydrating agent an ammonium or amine phosphate, a phosphate ester or a borate.

Description

SPECIFICATION Improvements in and Relating to Glass Fabrics This invention relates to glass or mineral fibre fabrics, herein referred to as glass fabrics and is particularly concerned with a method of treating such fabrics to enhance their resistance to intense relatively localised heating, such as from drops of molten metal produced during welding operations or from naked flames. For convenience, this resistance will be termed "weld splash resistance" in this specification.

Hitherto asbestos fabrics have been used where there was a risk of molten metal splash damage, or of accidental short-term flame exposures. Asbestos is well-suited to such use because although severe heating causes embrittlement there is no immediate loss of integrity. By contrast, even thick, heavy glass fibre fabrics melt away from a localised intense heat source in a matter of seconds, if the temperature is above the softening point of the glass. Naked flames and molten metal splashes quickly penetrate ordinary glass fabrics by simply melting them at the point of contact.

Attempts to alleviate this problem have been made by treating glass fabrics with commercial intumescent paints. However, although these paints effect an improvement, they create other problems. The main problem is their stiffness when dry, this renders the treated fabric boardlike and it has to be countered by adding a substantial proportion of a plasticiser, typically 15% by weight of the paint solids. This creates a second problem, namely that the treated fabric when strongly heated, as in use, emits excessive smoke and fumes. In effect, the piasticised paint coating tends to burn and the combustion products are a hazard in their own right.

According to the present invention, the weld splash resistance of a glass fabric is improved by treating the fabric with a non-intumescent char-forming composition.

"Non-intumescent char-forming composition" means a composition which on exposure to relatively intense heat, e.g. above 250"C forms a carbonaceous coating on the fibres of the fabric, but substantially without any intumescence. Contrary to expectation, it has been found that intumescence is not necessary and that indeed weld splash resistance appears to be improved without it.

A preferred composition comprises at least one dehydrateable organic polyol such as sugars, starches, or other polyhydric alcohols, for example pentaerythritol, its dimer and/or trimer. The composition also includes a dehydrating agent such as an ammonium or amine phosphate or polyphosphate, a phosphate ester or a borate. Suitable dehydrating agents act as a kind of latent catalyst, breaking down on heating to give an acid which is effective to decompose the polyol to the carbonaceous char.

It has been found that the polyol should be applied at a rate of from 2 to 20% by weight of the fabric treated, the range 5 to 15% by weight being particularly preferred. The dehydrating agent should be present in the range 5 to 50% by weight of the polyol, with the range 10 to 40% being preferred.

A composition comprising starch and di-ammonium hydrogen phosphate has proved very effective in practice.

Optionally, the composition may also contain a plasticiser for the polyol. In the case of starch, about 10% by weight of the starch solids of polyethylene glycol has proved effective. Optionally also, a binder such as a flexible polymer latex can be added in a similar proportion to help retain the composition on the fabric during/after drying. An acrylic latex binder has proved effective and although other polymers will work, some experiments may be required in order to ensure compatibility of the latex dispersing system with the dehydrating agent chosen.

Single component, self-catalysing non-intumescent char-forming material can also be employed.

For example, melammonium pentate and polyol derivative containing "leaving" groups can be used.

The use of these is within the scope of the invention.

In order that the invention be better understood preferred embodiments of it will now be described by way of example.

Example 1 A 2000 gm/square metre will weave glass fabric woven from bulked continuous filament 'E' glass yarns was padded through a liquid composition comprising: parts by weight Farina starch 17.5 di-ammonium hydrogen phosphate 7.0 Acrylic polymer 1.8 Polyethylene glycol (400 grade) 1.8 Water to 100 The pick-up was adjusted to 40% by weight, giving 7% starch by weight of the fabric. After drying, the fabric was tested by clamping a portion of it against a metal ring about 100 mm in diameter. The fabric was pressed through the ring during clamping so as to generate a nearhemispherical depression. 500 gm of molten bronze at about 1 2000C was then poured into this depression and allowed to solidify. This was at ambient temperature and without any external cooling being applied.Although the softening temperature of the 'E' glass used was about 7000C, the fabric was not penetrated by the metal, which was subsequently removed as a solid ingot ciearly bearing on the hemispherical side the imprint of the twill weave. The fabric was obviously embrittled, but clearly not melted, despite the severity of the intense localised heating which had been applied to it.

Comparative Examples An untreated sample of the same fabric having only about 3% of a starch-based weaving size on it was subjected to exactly the same test. The molten metal penetrated the fabric almost instantly. Its weld splash resistance was nil, for all practical purposes. The relative merits of the above treated and untreated fabric were also evaluated by a weld splash test as follows:- Treated and untreated fabric samples (as in Example 1) were stretched over a horizontal steel ring 75 mm in diameter and molten steel dripped onto them from a height of 125 mm. The steel drips were made by heating the end of a 6 mm steel rod with a welding torch, to simulate an actual welding operation. After 3 drops of molten steel weighing about 6 or 7 gm in total had fallen on the untreated fabric, penetration occurred.The treated fabric was essentially unaffected in that it retained its integrity and was unpenetrated by a similar quantity of molten steel.

An 1300 gm/square metre fabric made from the same yarns as in Example 1 was exposed to a laboratory oxygen/gas blow-torch adjusted to give a roaring flame and an inner blue cone about 40 mm long. The fabric (untreated, loomstate) was penetrated in roughly 7 seconds.

Example 2 A second sample of the same 1300 gm/square metre fabric was padded through a composition comprising: parts by weight Farina starch 20 di-ammonium hydrogen phosphate 4 Acrylic polymer 2 Polyethylene glyco (400 grade) 2 Water to 100 The pick-up was adjusted to 50% corresponding to 10% by weight of starch on the dry fabric. On repeating the flame test described above, there was still no penetration after 1 minute when the test was stopped.

Example 3 The glass fabric used for Example 1 was treated as in Example 2 above. The product was tested for integrity under fire by a method based on British Standard 476 (part 8). The fabric was exposed to a progressive rise in temperature from ambient to 1 0500C over a period of 1 hour whilst subjecting it to an air pressure of 5 mm of water on the opposite side to the one to which the heat was applied. The fabric performance was excellent and despite embrittlernent, it appeared entirely suitable for use as a replacement for an asbestos cloth fire curtain.

This was in addition to the previously-noted excellent weld splash resistance and it demonstrated that glass fabrics treated according to the invention can be used at temperatures well above the softening point of the glass, provided that some embrittlement is acceptable.

Claims (12)

Claims
1. A method of improving the weld splash resistance of a glass fibre fabric comprising treating the fabric with a non-intumescent char-forming composition, as hereinbefore defined.
2. A method according to claim 1, wherein the composition comprises at least one dehydratable organic polyol, and a dehydrating agent for the polyol.
3. A method according to claim 2 or wherein the polyol is a sugar, starch or a polyhydric alcohol.
4. A method according to claim 3 or wherein the dehydrating agent is an ammonium or amine phosphate, or a phosphate ester, or a borate.
5. A method according to any of claims 2 to 4, wherein the polyol is applied at the rate of from 2 to 20% by weight of the fabric.
6. A method according to any one of claims 2 to 4, wherein the composition includes a dehydrating agent at the rate of 5 to 50% by weight of the polyol.
7. A method according to any of claims 2 to 4, wherein the polyol is applied at the rate of from 5 to 1 5% by weight of the fabric.
8. A method according to any one of claims 2 to 4, wherein the composition includes a dehydrating agent at a rate of from 10 to 40% by weight of the polyol.
9. A method according to claim 1, wherein the composition comprises a single component, selfcatalysing non-intumescent char-forming material.
10. A method according to any preceding claim, wherein the composition includes a plasticiser and/or a polymeric binder.
11. A method of improving the weld splash resistance of a glass fibre fabric substantially as hereinbefore described with reference to and as illustrated by Example 1, 2 or 3.
12. Glass fibre fabric of improved weld splash resistance made by the method of any preceding claim.
GB8021190A 1980-06-27 1980-06-27 Fire and Weld Splash Resistant for Glass Fabric Withdrawn GB2078805A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB8021190A GB2078805A (en) 1980-06-27 1980-06-27 Fire and Weld Splash Resistant for Glass Fabric

Applications Claiming Priority (12)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB8021190A GB2078805A (en) 1980-06-27 1980-06-27 Fire and Weld Splash Resistant for Glass Fabric
GB8118357A GB2079801B (en) 1980-06-27 1981-06-15 Weld splash resistant glass fibre fabrics
EP81302645A EP0044614A3 (en) 1980-06-27 1981-06-15 Improvements in and relating to glass fabrics
IN388/DEL/81A IN156461B (en) 1980-06-27 1981-06-16 A method of treating the glass fibre fabric and fabric produced by the above method
ZA814076A ZA8104076B (en) 1980-06-27 1981-06-17 Glass fabrics
AU72179/81A AU538484B2 (en) 1980-06-27 1981-06-25 Glass fabric
FI812015A FI67885C (en) 1980-06-27 1981-06-26 Foerfarande Foer Treatment of glasfibrer
JP56098472A JPS5742557A (en) 1980-06-27 1981-06-26 Improvement of weld splash resistance for glass fiber textile
NZ197540A NZ197540A (en) 1980-06-27 1981-06-26 Treatment of glass or mineral fibre fabrics with a non-intumescent char-forming substance
ES503415A ES8305290A1 (en) 1980-06-27 1981-06-26 A method of improving the resistance to spatter sol-welds using a woven fiberglass
DK284181A DK284181A (en) 1980-06-27 1981-06-26 Method for improving glasfibervaevs resistance to svejsesproejt
NO812193A NO812193L (en) 1980-06-27 1981-06-26 A method of improving glassfibertekstilers spatter resistance.

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
GB2078805A true GB2078805A (en) 1982-01-13

Family

ID=10514388

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
GB8021190A Withdrawn GB2078805A (en) 1980-06-27 1980-06-27 Fire and Weld Splash Resistant for Glass Fabric

Country Status (3)

Country Link
JP (1) JPS5742557A (en)
GB (1) GB2078805A (en)
ZA (1) ZA8104076B (en)

Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB2117807A (en) * 1982-03-31 1983-10-19 Rolls Royce Refractory material
WO1991016403A1 (en) * 1990-04-26 1991-10-31 Interfame Holding S.A. Fireproofing agent and its use
WO2007014236A2 (en) * 2005-07-26 2007-02-01 Knauf Insulation Gmbh Binders and materials made therewith
EP2223940A1 (en) * 2009-02-27 2010-09-01 Rohm and Haas Company Polymer modified carbohydrate curable binder composition
EP2223941A1 (en) * 2009-02-27 2010-09-01 Rohm and Haas Company Rapid cure carbohydrate composition
US7842382B2 (en) 2004-03-11 2010-11-30 Knauf Insulation Gmbh Binder compositions and associated methods
US7854980B2 (en) 2007-01-25 2010-12-21 Knauf Insulation Limited Formaldehyde-free mineral fibre insulation product
US8114210B2 (en) 2007-08-03 2012-02-14 Carl Hampson Binders
US8501838B2 (en) 2007-01-25 2013-08-06 Knauf Insulation Sprl Composite wood board
US8552140B2 (en) 2007-04-13 2013-10-08 Knauf Insulation Gmbh Composite maillard-resole binders
US8603631B2 (en) 2004-10-13 2013-12-10 Knauf Insulation Gmbh Polyester binding compositions
US8747953B2 (en) 2010-11-30 2014-06-10 Rohm And Haas Company Stable reactive thermosetting formulations of reducing sugars and amines
US8791198B2 (en) 2012-04-30 2014-07-29 H.B. Fuller Company Curable aqueous composition
US8883886B2 (en) 2010-04-22 2014-11-11 Rohm And Haas Company Durable thermoset binder compositions from 5-carbon reducing sugars and use as wood binders
US8900495B2 (en) 2009-08-07 2014-12-02 Knauf Insulation Molasses binder
US9416294B2 (en) 2012-04-30 2016-08-16 H.B. Fuller Company Curable epoxide containing formaldehyde-free compositions, articles including the same, and methods of using the same
US9493603B2 (en) 2010-05-07 2016-11-15 Knauf Insulation Sprl Carbohydrate binders and materials made therewith
US9492943B2 (en) 2012-08-17 2016-11-15 Knauf Insulation Sprl Wood board and process for its production
US9505883B2 (en) 2010-05-07 2016-11-29 Knauf Insulation Sprl Carbohydrate polyamine binders and materials made therewith
US9828287B2 (en) 2007-01-25 2017-11-28 Knauf Insulation, Inc. Binders and materials made therewith
US9879138B2 (en) 2010-04-22 2018-01-30 Dow Global Technologies Llc Durable thermosets from reducing sugars and primary polyamines

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR2888255B1 (en) * 2005-07-06 2007-11-16 Saint Gobain Vetrotex Son reinforcement and composites with improved fire resistance

Cited By (58)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB2117807A (en) * 1982-03-31 1983-10-19 Rolls Royce Refractory material
WO1991016403A1 (en) * 1990-04-26 1991-10-31 Interfame Holding S.A. Fireproofing agent and its use
US8691934B2 (en) 2004-03-11 2014-04-08 Knauf Insulation Gmbh Binder compositions and associated methods
US7842382B2 (en) 2004-03-11 2010-11-30 Knauf Insulation Gmbh Binder compositions and associated methods
US8603631B2 (en) 2004-10-13 2013-12-10 Knauf Insulation Gmbh Polyester binding compositions
EA019802B1 (en) * 2005-07-26 2014-06-30 Кнауф Инзулацьон Гмбх Formaldehyde-free uncured binder, composition comprising same and method for preparing fibers bound by a binder
KR101844169B1 (en) 2005-07-26 2018-03-30 크나우프 인설레이션, 인크. Binders and materials made therewith
US7772347B2 (en) 2005-07-26 2010-08-10 Knauf Insulation Gmbh Binder and fiber glass product from maillard reactants
US9926464B2 (en) 2005-07-26 2018-03-27 Knauf Insulation, Inc. Binders and materials made therewith
US7807771B2 (en) 2005-07-26 2010-10-05 Knauf Insulation Gmbh Binder and fiber glass product from maillard reactants
KR101963076B1 (en) 2005-07-26 2019-03-27 크나우프 인설레이션, 인크. Binders and materials made therewith
US7655711B2 (en) 2005-07-26 2010-02-02 Knauf Insulation Gmbh Binder and wood board product from maillard reactants
KR101779677B1 (en) 2005-07-26 2017-09-18 크나우프 인설레이션, 인크. Binders and materials made therewith
US7947765B2 (en) 2005-07-26 2011-05-24 Knauf Insulation Gmbh Binder and wood board product from maillard reactants
US9745489B2 (en) 2005-07-26 2017-08-29 Knauf Insulation, Inc. Binders and materials made therewith
US9434854B2 (en) 2005-07-26 2016-09-06 Knauf Insulation, Inc. Binders and materials made therewith
EP2433983A1 (en) * 2005-07-26 2012-03-28 Knauf Insulation GmbH Binders and materials made therewith
US8182648B2 (en) 2005-07-26 2012-05-22 Knauf Insulation Gmbh Binders and materials made therewith
US9260627B2 (en) 2005-07-26 2016-02-16 Knauf Insulation, Inc. Binders and materials made therewith
CN101287788B (en) 2005-07-26 2012-09-19 可耐福保温材料有限公司 Binders and materials made therewith
US9040652B2 (en) 2005-07-26 2015-05-26 Knauf Insulation, Llc Binders and materials made therewith
AU2006272595B2 (en) * 2005-07-26 2011-10-20 Knauf Insulation Gmbh Binders and materials made therewith
CN105176461A (en) * 2005-07-26 2015-12-23 可耐福保温材料有限公司 Binders and materials made therewith
WO2007014236A3 (en) * 2005-07-26 2007-04-12 Knauf Insulation Gmbh Binders and materials made therewith
WO2007014236A2 (en) * 2005-07-26 2007-02-01 Knauf Insulation Gmbh Binders and materials made therewith
AU2006272595C1 (en) * 2005-07-26 2014-08-28 Knauf Insulation Gmbh Binders and materials made therewith
US9464207B2 (en) 2005-07-26 2016-10-11 Knauf Insulation, Inc. Binders and materials made therewith
US9447281B2 (en) 2007-01-25 2016-09-20 Knauf Insulation Sprl Composite wood board
US10000639B2 (en) 2007-01-25 2018-06-19 Knauf Insulation Sprl Composite wood board
US8501838B2 (en) 2007-01-25 2013-08-06 Knauf Insulation Sprl Composite wood board
US7854980B2 (en) 2007-01-25 2010-12-21 Knauf Insulation Limited Formaldehyde-free mineral fibre insulation product
US8901208B2 (en) 2007-01-25 2014-12-02 Knauf Insulation Sprl Composite wood board
US9828287B2 (en) 2007-01-25 2017-11-28 Knauf Insulation, Inc. Binders and materials made therewith
US9309436B2 (en) 2007-04-13 2016-04-12 Knauf Insulation, Inc. Composite maillard-resole binders
US8552140B2 (en) 2007-04-13 2013-10-08 Knauf Insulation Gmbh Composite maillard-resole binders
US9039827B2 (en) 2007-08-03 2015-05-26 Knauf Insulation, Llc Binders
US8979994B2 (en) 2007-08-03 2015-03-17 Knauf Insulation Sprl Binders
US8940089B2 (en) 2007-08-03 2015-01-27 Knauf Insulation Sprl Binders
US9469747B2 (en) 2007-08-03 2016-10-18 Knauf Insulation Sprl Mineral wool insulation
US8114210B2 (en) 2007-08-03 2012-02-14 Carl Hampson Binders
CN101864091A (en) * 2009-02-27 2010-10-20 罗门哈斯公司 Rapid cure carbohydrate composition
EP2223941A1 (en) * 2009-02-27 2010-09-01 Rohm and Haas Company Rapid cure carbohydrate composition
US20100222463A1 (en) * 2009-02-27 2010-09-02 Jean Marie Brady Rapid cure carbohydrate composition
US8232334B2 (en) 2009-02-27 2012-07-31 Rohm And Haas Company Polymer modified carbohydrate curable binder composition
US8299174B2 (en) 2009-02-27 2012-10-30 Rohm And Haas Company Rapid cure carbohydrate composition
EP2223940A1 (en) * 2009-02-27 2010-09-01 Rohm and Haas Company Polymer modified carbohydrate curable binder composition
US10053558B2 (en) 2009-08-07 2018-08-21 Knauf Insulation, Inc. Molasses binder
US8900495B2 (en) 2009-08-07 2014-12-02 Knauf Insulation Molasses binder
US9416248B2 (en) 2009-08-07 2016-08-16 Knauf Insulation, Inc. Molasses binder
US8883886B2 (en) 2010-04-22 2014-11-11 Rohm And Haas Company Durable thermoset binder compositions from 5-carbon reducing sugars and use as wood binders
US9879138B2 (en) 2010-04-22 2018-01-30 Dow Global Technologies Llc Durable thermosets from reducing sugars and primary polyamines
US9505883B2 (en) 2010-05-07 2016-11-29 Knauf Insulation Sprl Carbohydrate polyamine binders and materials made therewith
US9493603B2 (en) 2010-05-07 2016-11-15 Knauf Insulation Sprl Carbohydrate binders and materials made therewith
US8747953B2 (en) 2010-11-30 2014-06-10 Rohm And Haas Company Stable reactive thermosetting formulations of reducing sugars and amines
US8791198B2 (en) 2012-04-30 2014-07-29 H.B. Fuller Company Curable aqueous composition
US9416294B2 (en) 2012-04-30 2016-08-16 H.B. Fuller Company Curable epoxide containing formaldehyde-free compositions, articles including the same, and methods of using the same
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Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
ZA8104076B (en) 1982-06-30
JPS5742557A (en) 1982-03-10

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