GB2060656A - Self-extinguishing polyphenylene oxide/plasticizer blends - Google Patents

Self-extinguishing polyphenylene oxide/plasticizer blends Download PDF

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GB2060656A
GB2060656A GB8032652A GB8032652A GB2060656A GB 2060656 A GB2060656 A GB 2060656A GB 8032652 A GB8032652 A GB 8032652A GB 8032652 A GB8032652 A GB 8032652A GB 2060656 A GB2060656 A GB 2060656A
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    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C08ORGANIC MACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS; THEIR PREPARATION OR CHEMICAL WORKING-UP; COMPOSITIONS BASED THEREON
    • C08LCOMPOSITIONS OF MACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS
    • C08L71/00Compositions of polyethers obtained by reactions forming an ether link in the main chain; Compositions of derivatives of such polymers
    • C08L71/08Polyethers derived from hydroxy compounds or from their metallic derivatives not used
    • C08L71/10Polyethers derived from hydroxy compounds or from their metallic derivatives not used from phenols not used
    • C08L71/12Polyphenylene oxides
    • C08L71/123Polyphenylene oxides not modified by chemical after-treatment

Abstract

Self-extinguishing thermoplastic molding compositions having high impact resistance, and improved surface appearance and processability comprise (a) a normally flammable composition comprising a polyphenylene ether resin and a hydrogenated A-B-A<1> block copolymer or radial teleblock copolymer, (b) an aromatic phosphate compound in an amount at least sufficient to render the normally flammable composition self- extinguishing and, after molding, impact resistant, and (c) a minor amount of a low molecular weight polystyrene.

Description

SPECIFICATION Improved polyphenylene oxide/plasticizer blends This invention relates to novel thermoplastic molding compositions which are self-extinguishing and are easily moldable to finished articles having good impact resistance and very high surface gloss.

More particularly, the invention is concerned with thermoplastic compositions of a polyphenylene ether resin, a polymer selected from hydrogenated A-B-A1 block copolymers and hydrogenated radial teleblock copolymers, an aromatic phosphate which is present in an amount sufficient to provide flame resistance, to the thermoplastic, and a minor amount of a low molecular weight polystyrene.

Polyphenylene ether resins are well known in the art as a class of thermoplastics which possess a number of outstanding physical properties. They can be prepared by oxidative and non-oxidative methods, such as are disclosed, for example, in Jay, U.S. Patent Nos. 3,306,874 and 3,306,875, and Stamatoff, U.S. Patent Nos. 3,257,357 and 3,257,358.

It has been found that many of the properties of polyphenylene ether resins, e.g., ease of processing, impact strength and solvent resistance, can be improved by combining these resins with other resins, such as, for example, polystyrene. Examples of polyphenylene ether resins-polystyrene compositions are disclosed in Cizek, U.S. Patent No. 3,383,435.

More recently, it has been found that polyphenylene ether resins can also be combined with block copolymers of the A-B-A1 type, e.g., polystyrene-polybutadiene-polystyrene, and with acrylic resin modified diene rubber containing resins, to provide compatible compositions characterized by a number of excellent physical properties in the resulting molded articles. These discoveries are described in Abolins et al., U.S. Patent Nos. 3,833,688 and 3,792,123 and in Haaf U.S. Patent Application Serial No.

935,099, filed August 21, 1978, which will issue as U.S. Patent No. 4,167,507 on September 11, 1979, and assigned to the same assignee as the present application.

It is known in the art that the polyphenylene ethers have excellent flame retardant properties and are classified self-extinguishing and non-dripping according to ASTM Test Method D635 and Underwriters Laboratories Bulletin No. 94. On the other hand, when polyphenylene ethers are combined with other polymers such as the above-mentioned A--BB-A' block copolymers and hydrogenated radial teleblock copolymers, many of the resulting compositions have poor flame retardancey and are not selfextinguishing, but rather burn slowly upon ignition. Consequently, many compositions composed of polyphenylene ether resin and A--BB-A' block copolymer or hydrogenated radial teleblock copolymer containing resins are unable to meet the minimum requirements established by various testing laboratories such as the Underwriters Laboratories.This restricts the use of such compositions for many commercial applications.

Flame retardant additives for thermoplastics are known. In general, these are either blended physically with the thermoplastic or are used to unite chemically with the plastic and to modify it. For instance, self-extinguishing blends of a polyphenylene ether resin and a styrene resin using a combination of an aromatic phosphate and an aromatic halogen for flame retardancy are disclosed by Haaf in U.S. 3,639,506. Other self-extinguishing polyphenylene ether-polystyrene compositions are disclosed by Reinhard in U.S. 3,809,729, wherein aromatic halogens combined with antimony compounds are used as flame retardant additives. Still other flame retardant compositions of a polyphenylene ether resin and a styrene resin which include various phosphorus-containing and halogen-containing flame retardant agents, are described by Haaf et al in U.S.Serial No. 647,981,filed December 27, 1975, and assigned to the same assignee as the present application.

However, as is also well known, the inclusion of flame retarding compounds in thermoplastic materials not only affects burning characteristics, it frequently changes other physical properties as well, such as color, flexibility, tensile strength, electrical properties, softening point, and moldability characteristics. Thus, for example, aromatic phosphates such as triphenyl phosphate have been added to blends of polyphenylene ethers and styrene resins, with flame retardant properties being improved to the point where the compositions can be classified as self-extinguishing and nondripping according to the above-noted ASTM Test Method D635 and U.L. Bulletin No. 94.

It has also been found that molded compositions consisting of polyphenylene ether or various combinations of polyphenylene ether and certain polymeric modifiers, and aromatic phosphate compounds exhibit excellent self-extinguishing behavior, impact strength and acceptable surface gloss.

Such compositions are disclosed by Haaf et al. in copending application Serial No. 870,984, filed January 20, 1978, and assigned to the same assignee as the present invention.

While the aforementioned compositions achieve a combination of high heat distortion, good impact strength and good self-extinguishing properties, they encounter some difficulty in processing and yield a product which has surface gloss characteristics which, while good, can be improved upon via the utilization of compositions of the present invention.

It has now been surprisingly discovered that molding compositions consisting of polyphenylene ether or various combinations of polyphenylene ether and certain polymeric modifiers together with aromatic phosphate compounds in admixture with a minor amount of a low molecular weight polystyrene, yields a combined composition which exhibits excellent self-extinguishing behavior, high impact strength, improved processing characteristics and greatly improved surface gloss.

According to the present invention, there are provided flame retardant, self-extinguishing thermoplastic molding compositions which have excellent processing characteristics and, after molding, are impact resistant and have very high surface gloss, the compositions comprising an intimate admixture of: (a) a normally flammable composition comprising (i) a polyphenylene ether resin and (ii) a polymer selected from the group consisting of hyrogenated A-B-A1 block copolymers and hydrogenated radial teleblock copolymers, (b) an aromatic phosphate compound in an amount at least sufficient to render the normally flammable composition self-extinguishing and, (c) a minor amount of a low molecular weight polystyrene.

The polyphenylene ether resins of (a) are preferably of the type having the structural formula: <img class="EMIRef" id="026997593-00020001" />

wherein the oxygen ether atom of one unit is connected to the benzene nucleus of the next adjoining unit, n is a positive integer and is at least 50, and each Q is a monovalent substituent selected from the group consisting of hydrogen halogen, hydrocarbon radicals free of a tertiary alpha-carbon atom, halohydrocarbon radicals having at least two carbon atoms between the halogen atom and the phenyl nucleus, hydrocarbonoxy radicals and halohydrocarbonoxy radicals having at least two carbon atoms between the halogen atom and the phenyl nucleus.

An especially preferred class of polyphenylene ether resin for the compositions of this invention includes those of the above formula wherein each Q is alkyl, most preferably having from 1 to 4 carbon atoms. Illustratively, members of this class include poly(2,6-dimethyl-1 ,4-phenylene)ether; poly(2,6 diethyl- 1 ,4-phenylene)ether; poly(2-methyl-6-ethyl-1 ,4-phenylene)ether; poly(2-methyl-6-propyl-1 ,4- phenylene)ether; poly(2,6-dipropyl- 1 ,4-phenylene)ether; poly(2-ethyl-6-propyl-1 ,4-phenylene)ether; and the like. Most preferred is poly(2,6-dimethyl-1 ,4-phenylene)ether, preferably having an intrinsic viscosity of about 0.45 deciliters per gram (dl./g.) as measured in chloroform at 300C.

The hydrogenated A-B-A1 block copolymers of component (a)(ii) are well known. In general, these are block copolymers of the A-B-A1 type in which terminal blocks A and A1 are the same or different and, prior to hydrogenation, comprise homopolymers or copolymers derived from vinyl aromatic hydrocarbons and, especially, vinyl aromatics wherein the aromatic moiety can be either monocyclic or polycyclic. Examples of the monomers are styrene, alpha methyl styrene, vinyl xylene, ethyl vinyl xylene, vinyl naphthalene, and the like. Center block B will always be derived from a conjugated diene, e.g., butadiene, isoprene, 1,3-pentadiene, and the like. Preferably, ceter block B will be comprised of polybutadiene or polyisoprene.

It is preferred to form terminal blocks A and A1 having average molecular weights of 4,000 to 11 5,000 and center block B having average molecular weights of 20,000 to 450,000. Still more preferably, the terminal blocks will have average molecular weights of 8,000 to 60,000 while the center block has an average molecular weight between about 50,000 and-300,000. The terminal blocks will preferably comprise from 2 to 33% by weight, and more preferably, 5 to 30% by weight of the total block copolymer. Especially preferred are A-B-A1 type block copolymers having a polybutadiene center block wherein 35 to 55%, or more preferably, 40 to 50% of the carbon atoms present in the butadiene polymer block are in the form of dependent vinyl side chains.

The A-B-A1 block copolymers will have an unsaturation in the center block B reduced to less than 10% and more preferably, less than 5% of its original value.

The hydrogenated block copolymers are formed by techniques which are well known to those skilled in the art. For instance, the preparation of these materials is described in detail in Jones, U.S.

3,431,323, the disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reference.

A particular preferred hydrogenated block copolymer is Kraton G 1651, a hydrogenated styrenebutadiene-styrene block copolymer, which is commercially available from the Shell Chemical Company.

Hydrogenation can be carried out with a variety of hydrogenation catalysts, such as nickel on Kieselguhr, Raney nickel, copper chromate, molybdenum sulfide and finely divided platinum or other noble metals on a low surface area catalyst.

Hydrogenation can be conducted at any desired temperature or pressure, e.g., from atomospheric to 3,000 p.s.i.g., the usual range being between 100 and 1,000 p.s.i.g., and at temperatures from about 75 to 6000F., for times between 0.1 and 24 hours, preferably 0.2 to 8 hours.

The hydrogenated radial teleblock copolymers useful in the present invention are branched polymers having segments, or blocks, which are comprised of a saturated rubber, blocks of a vinyl aromatic polymer, and a coupling agent. More particularly, in the copolymer structure, several chains of the rubber, usually three or more, extend from a coupling agent, with each chain terminating at its other end with a block of the vinyl aromatic polymer. It is generally believed that incompatibility of the block segments in the radial teleblock copolymer promotes the formation of a two-phase system with blocks of the vinyl aromatic polymer coalescing to form discrete regions, or "domains".These domains simulate the effect of cross-links between the chains of elastomer, and a branched elastomeric network is thus formed comprising blocks of a saturated rubber, blocks of vinyl aromatic polymer, and a coupling agent.

Radial teleblock copolymers are known int he art. For instance, detailed descriptions of these materials are given by Marrs et al. in Adhesives Age, December, 1971, pp. 15-20 and by Haws et al. in Rubber World, January,1973, pp. 27-32, the disclosures of which are incorporated herein by reference.

Radial teleblock copolymers are available commercially or can be prepared by following the teachings of the prior art. As an illustration, they can be made by polymerizing conjugated dienes, e.g., butadiene, and vinyl aromatic compounds, e.g., styrene in the presence of an organometallic initiator, e.g., n-butyllithium, to produce copolymers which contain an active metal atom, such as lithium, on one end of each of the polymer chains. These metal atom-terminated polymers are then reacted with a coupling agent which has at least three active sites capable of reacting with the carbon-metal atom bonds on the polymer chains and replacing the metal atoms on the chains. This results in polymers which have relatively long branches which radiate from a nucleus formed by the poly-functional coupling agent. Such a method of preparation is described in detail in Zelinski et al., U.S. Patent No.

3,281,383, which is incorporated herein by reference.

The coupling agents for radial teleblock copolymers can be chosen from among polyepoxides, polyisocyanates, polyimines, polyaldehydes, polyketones, polyanhydrides, polyesters, polyhalides, and the like. These materials can contain two or more types of functional groups, such as the combination of epoxy and aldehyde groups or isocyanate and halide groups. The coupling agents are described in detail in the above-mentioned U.S. Patent No. 3,281,383.

The conjugated dienes of radial teleblock copolymers include compounds such as 1,3-butadiene, isoprene, 2,3-dimethyl-1 ,3-butadiene, 1 ,3-pentadiene, 3-butyl-1 3-octadiene, and the like.

The vinyl aromatic polymers may be prepared from vinyl aromatic compounds of Formula II. They include styrene, l.-vinylnaphthalene, 2-vinylnaphthalene, and the alkyl, cycloalkyl, aryl, alkaryl, and alkyl derivatives thereof. Examples include 3-methylstyrene, 4-n-propylstyrene, 4-cyclohexylstyrene, 4-dodecylstyrene, 2-ethyl-4-benzylstyrene, 4-p-tolylstyrene, 4-(4-phenyl-n-butyl) styrene, and the like.

Hydrogenation of radial teleblock copolymers to form a hydrogenated radial teleblock copolymer is known in the art and can be carried out by any of several known procedures. See by way of illustration, De Vault, U.S. Patent No. 3,696,088, the teachings of which are incorporated herein by reference.

In preferred compositions, the hydrogenated radial teleblock copolymer will be a radial teleblock copolymer of sytrene and a saturated rubber, with terminal blocks derived from stytene, and a coupling agent selected from eopxidized polybutadiene, SiCI4, polyisocyanates, polyaldehydes, polyhalogen substituted hydrocarbons such as 1 ,3,5-tri(bromoethyl)benzene or 2,5,6,9-tetrachloro-3.7-decadiene, or mixtures thereof. Especially preferred epoxidized polybutadiene coupling agents are available commercially under the tradenames Oxiron 2000 and Oxiron 2001 from Food Machinery Corporation.

Coupling agents are discussed in U.S. Patent No. 3,281,383, the teachings of which are incorporated herein by reference.

The molecular weight of the hydrogenated radial teleblock copolymer and the ratios of the comonomers thereof can vary broadly. In preferred embodiments the molecular weight of the hydrogenated radial teleblock copolymer will be from about 75,000 to about 350,000, and will comprise from 1 to 45 parts by weight of the vinyl aromatic compound and from 99 to 55 parts by weight of the saturated rubber, based on the weight of the radial teleblock copolymer. The amount of coupling agent in the copolymer will depend on the particular agent and the amount of organo-metallic initiator used. Generally, relatively small amounts of coupling agent, e.g., from 0.02 to 1 part by weight per 100 parts of resin are employed.

Preferred hydrogfenated radial teleblock copolymers include Solprene 502 and 512 (containing about 70 parts by weight of hydrogenated butadiene units and about 30 parts by weight of styrene units), which are available commercially from Philips Petroleum Co., Stowe, Ohio. These materials also include a relatively minor amount of a coupling agent, e.g., less than 1 part by weight of coupling agent per 100 parts by weight of copolymer.

The aromatic phosphate compound of the compositions of the invention is a compound of the formula: <img class="EMIRef" id="026997593-00030001" />

wherein R', R2 and R3 can be the same or different and are alkyl, cycloalkyl, aryl, alkyl substituted aryl, halogen substituted aryl, aryl substituted alkyl, halogen, hydrogen and combinations of any of the foregoing, provided that at least one of R', R2 and R3 is aryl.

Typical examples include phenylbisdodecyl phosphate, phenylbisneopentyl phosphate, phenylethylene hydrogen phosphate, phenyl-bis(3,5,5'-trimethylhexyl phosphate), ethyldiphenyl phosphate, 2-ethyl-hexyldi(P-tolyl) phosphate, di-phenyl hydrogen phosphate, bis (2-ethylhexyl) ptolylphosphate, tritolyl phosphate, bis (2-ethylhexyl)phenyl phosphate, tri-(nonyl-phenyl) phosphate, phenylmethyl hydrogen phosphate, di(dodecyl) p-tolyl phosphate, tricresyl phosphate, triphenyl phosphate, dibutylphenyl phosphate, 2-chloroethyidiphenyl phosphate, p-tolyl bis (2,5,5'trimethylhexyl) phosphate, 2-ethylhexyldiphenyl phosphate, diphenyl hydrogen phosphate, and the like.

The preferred phosphates are those where each R is aryl. Especially preferred is triphenyl phosphate.

The respective amounts of the major components in the present compositions can vary broadly, e.g., from 60 to 99 parts by weight of polyphenylene ether resin to 40 to 1 parts by weight of A-B-A1 block copolymer or radial teleblock copolymer. With respect to the compostions containing A-B-A1 block copolymers, the most preferred such compositions contain no less than about 65% by weight of polyphenylene ether, based on the total weight of the resinous components in the composition. With respect to the aromatic phosphate flame retarding agent, amounts of from 1 to 40 parts by weight of the total composition can be employed to impart flame retardancy.With respect to the low molecular weight polystyrene component, amounts from 1 to about 10 parts by weight of the total composition can be employed with amounts from about 1 to about 5 parts by weight of the total composition preferred. Particular amounts will, of course, vary depending on the needs of the specific composition.

The compositions of the invention can also further include glass fibers as a reinforcing filler, especially preferably, fibrous glass filaments comprised of lime-aluminum borosilicate glass which is relatively soda free, known as "E" glass. However, other glasses are useful where electrical properties are not so important, e.g., the low soda glass known as "C" glass. The filaments are made by standard processes, e.g., by steam or air blowing, flame blowing and mechanical pulling. The preferred filaments for plastics reinforcement are made by mechanical pulling.The filament diameters range from about 0.0001 12 to 0.00075 inch, but this is not critical to the present invention In general, best properties will be obtained if the sized filamentous glass reinforcement comprise from about 1 to about 80% by weight based on the combined weight of glass and polymers and preferably, from about 10 to about 50% by weight. Especially preferably, the glass will comprise from about 10 to about 40% by weight based on the combined weight of glass and resin. Generally, for direct molding use, up to about 50% of glass can be present without causing flow problems. However, it is useful also to prepare the compositions containing substantially greater quantities, e.g., up to 70 to 80% by weight of glass. These concentrates can then be custom blended with blends of resins that are not glass reinforced to provide any desired glass content of a lower value.

Other ingredients, such as stabilizers, pigments, platicizers, antioxidants, and the like, can be added for their conventionally employed purposes.

The compositions of this invention can be prepared conventionally by tumbling the components to form a preblend, extruding the blend into a continuous strand, cutting the strand into pellets or granules, and molding the pellets or granules into the desired shape. These techniques are well known to those skilled in the art and further elaboration herein is not necessary.

The following examples illustrate compositions according to the invention. They are set forth for illustrative purposes only, and are not to be construed as limiting.

EXAMPLES I-V The compositions shown in Table I, were prepared by preblending the components extruding the blend and molding the extrudate into test pieces. All amounts are in parts by weight. The values for Izod impact strength are in units of ft.lbs./in.n., and the values for Gardner impact strength are in units of in. libs. Tensile yield, tensile break, flexural yield and flexural modulus values are each in units of p.s.i. x 103. The gloss values are 450 surface gloss expressed as relative dimensionless units. Composition* Tens. Yld. Tens. Str. Elong. Izod Gard. HDT UL-94 F.C.Gloss Example &num; Polystyrene (amt) (psi) (psi) (%) (ft. lb/in.) (in.-lb) (1/16 avg.) (inches) at 45 I Control 10,630 8.830 37 2.4 210 310 2.3/5.0 12 1/2 32.0 V-0 II LOME (2) 11,000 9,270 53 2.6 190 304 1.0/4.3 13 1/2 44.5 V-0 III LOME (4) 10,900 9,270 55 3.2 220 289 2.0/4.0 - 53.5 V-0 IV KTPL (2) 10,800 8,825 31 3.0 200 310 1.0/8.7 13 40.0 V-1 V KTPL (4) 11,000 9.870 68 3.4 220 298 5.7/5.3 - 48.5 * All blends contain PPO/TPP/Kraton G 1651/ZnS/Zno - 92/8/8/0.15/0.15 (parts by weigt).

LOME = Low MW PS (Mn = 2000) commercially avaible from Foster Grant.

KTPL - Low MW PS (Mn = 50,000) commercially available from Arco.

PPO - (Polyphenylene oxide) TPP - (Triphenyl phosphate) Kraton G 1651 - (A hydrogenated styrene-butadiene block copolymer, commercially available from the Shell Chemical Company).

Although the above examples illustrate various midifications of the present invention, other variations will suggest themselves to those skilled in the art in the light of the above disclosure. It is to be understood, therefore, that changes may be made in the particular embodiments described above which are within the full intended scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

Claims (14)

CLAIMS:
1. A self-extinguishing thermoplastic molded composition which comprises an intimate mixture of: (a) a normally flammable composition comprising (i) a polyphenylene ether resin, and (ii) a hydrogenated A--BB-A' block copolymer or hydrogenated radial teleblock copolymer, (b) an aromatic phosphate compound in an amount at least sufficient to render said normally flammable composition (a) self-extinguishing and, (c) a minor amount of a low molecular weight polystyrene.
2. A composition as claimed in Claim 1 wherein the polyphenylene ether resin (a)(i) has the formula: <img class="EMIRef" id="026997594-00060001" />
wherein the oxygen ether atom of one unit is connected to the benzene nucleus of the next adjoining unit, n is at least 50, and each Q is hydrogen, halogen, a hydrocarbon radical free of a tertiary alphacarbon atom, a halohydrocarbon radical having at least two carbon atoms between the halogen atom and the phenyl nucieus, a hydrocarbonoxy radical or a halohydrocarbonoxy radical having at least two carbon atoms between the halogen atom and the phenyl nucleus.
3. A composition as claimed in Claim 2 wherein each Q is alkyl having from 1 to 4 carbon atoms.
4. A composition as claimed in Claim 3 wherein each Q is methyl.
5. A composition as claimed in any preceding Claim wherein component (a)(ii) is an A-B-A1 block copolymer in which: (1) each A is a polymerized mono alkenyl aromatic hydrocarbon block having an average molecular weight of 4,000 to 115,000; (2) B is a polymerized butadiene hydrocarbon block having an average molecular weight of 20,000 to 450,000; (3) the blocks A constitute 2 to 33 weight percent of the copolymer; (4) 35 to 55% of the butadiene carbon atoms in block B are vinyl side chains; and (5) the unsaturation of block B has been reduced by hydrogenation to less than 10% of the original unsaturation.
6. A composition as claimed in Claim 5 wherein: (1) each A is a polymerized styrene block having an average molecular weight of 8,000 to 60,000; (2) B is a polymerized butadiene block having an average molecular weight of 50,000 to 300,000; 40 to 50% of the butadiene carbon atoms in the block being vinyl side-chains; and (3) the blocks A comprise 5 to 30% by weight of the copolymer; the unsaturation of block B having been reduced by hydrogenation to less than 10% of its original value.
7. A composition as claimed in any of Claims 1 to 4 wherein component (a)(ii) is a hydrogenated radial teleblock copolymer comprising from 1 to 45 parts by weight of a vinyl aromatic compound and from 99 to 55 parts by weight of a saturated rubber, with a relatively small amount of a coupling agent, based on the total weight of the hydrogenated radial teleblock copolymer.
8. A composition as claimed in Claim 7 wherein the coupling agent is a polyepoxide, polyisocyanate, polyimine, polyaldehyde, polyketone, polyanhydride, polyester, or polyhalide polymer.
9. A composition as claimed in Claim 7 wherein the vinyl aromatic compound is styrene, the saturated rubber has terminal blocks derived from styrene, and the coupling agent is epoxidized polybutadiene, SiCI4, or a mixture thereof.
10. A composition as claimed in any preceeding Claim wherein the aromatic phosphate flame retarding agent (b) has the formula: <img class="EMIRef" id="026997594-00060002" />
wherein R1, R2 and R3 can be the same or different and are alkyl, cycloalkyl, aryl, alkyl substituted aryl, halogen substituted aryl, aryl substituted alkyl, halogen, hydrogen and combinations of any of the foregoing, provided that at least one of R1, R2 and R3 is aryl.
1 A composition as claimed in Claim 10 wherein the aromatic phosphate is triphenyl phosphate.
12. A composition as claimed in any preceding Claim wherein the low molecular weight polystyrene (c) is present in an amount from 1 to 10 parts by weight of the total composition.
13. A composition as claimed in Claim 12 wherein the amount of low molecular weight polystyrene (c) is from 1 to 5 parts by weight of the total composition.
14. A composition as claimed in any preceding Claim which includes a reinforcing amount of a fibrous glass reinforcing filler.
1 5. A composition as claimed in Claim 1 and substantially as hereinbefore described with reference to any of Examples II to V.
GB8032652A 1979-10-15 1980-10-09 Self-extinguishing polyphenylene oxide/plasticizer blends Withdrawn GB2060656A (en)

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Cited By (8)

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EP0078032A1 (en) * 1981-10-28 1983-05-04 General Electric Company Compositions of a polyphenylene ether resin, low molecular weight polystyrene and a block copolymer
EP0085850A1 (en) * 1982-01-28 1983-08-17 General Electric Company PPE composition containing impact modifier and melt viscosity reducer
EP0124916A1 (en) * 1983-05-04 1984-11-14 General Electric Company Flame retardant polyphenylene ether composition
US5059645A (en) * 1987-05-02 1991-10-22 Basf Aktiengesellschaft Thermoplastic molding materials based on polyphenylene ethers
US6172148B1 (en) 1996-10-15 2001-01-09 Basf Aktiengesellschaft Nonflammable mouldable material based on polyphenylene esters and vinyl aromatic polymers
US6194496B1 (en) 1996-05-09 2001-02-27 Basf Aktiengesellschaft Flame-resistant thermoplastic moulding materials with improved processing behavior
US6197869B1 (en) 1996-05-30 2001-03-06 Basf Aktiengesellschaft Non-flammable, thermoplastic moulded materials with improved anti-drip properties
US6204315B1 (en) 1996-05-30 2001-03-20 Basf Aktiengesellschaft Non-flammable, thermoplastic molded materials based on polyphenylene ethers

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US4544703A (en) * 1981-10-02 1985-10-01 General Electric Company High impact thermoplastic compositions containing diblock impact modifier
DE3219048A1 (en) * 1982-05-21 1983-11-24 Basf Ag The thermoplastic molding compounds
DE3226427A1 (en) * 1982-07-15 1984-01-19 Basf Ag The thermoplastic molding compounds
JPH0686566B2 (en) * 1984-12-17 1994-11-02 三菱瓦斯化学株式会社 Polyphenylene ether-based resin composition
JPH0578582B2 (en) * 1985-08-28 1993-10-29 Asahi Chemical Ind
US5237006A (en) * 1990-09-28 1993-08-17 General Electric Company Thermoplastic resin compositions containing polyphenylene ethers and polyesters
US7919013B2 (en) 2006-07-26 2011-04-05 Basf Se Thermoplastic moulding compositions with high stiffness

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US4203931A (en) * 1976-03-29 1980-05-20 General Electric Company Flame retardant thermoplastic polyphenylene ether resin compositions
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Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP0078032A1 (en) * 1981-10-28 1983-05-04 General Electric Company Compositions of a polyphenylene ether resin, low molecular weight polystyrene and a block copolymer
EP0085850A1 (en) * 1982-01-28 1983-08-17 General Electric Company PPE composition containing impact modifier and melt viscosity reducer
EP0124916A1 (en) * 1983-05-04 1984-11-14 General Electric Company Flame retardant polyphenylene ether composition
US5059645A (en) * 1987-05-02 1991-10-22 Basf Aktiengesellschaft Thermoplastic molding materials based on polyphenylene ethers
US6194496B1 (en) 1996-05-09 2001-02-27 Basf Aktiengesellschaft Flame-resistant thermoplastic moulding materials with improved processing behavior
US6197869B1 (en) 1996-05-30 2001-03-06 Basf Aktiengesellschaft Non-flammable, thermoplastic moulded materials with improved anti-drip properties
US6204315B1 (en) 1996-05-30 2001-03-20 Basf Aktiengesellschaft Non-flammable, thermoplastic molded materials based on polyphenylene ethers
US6172148B1 (en) 1996-10-15 2001-01-09 Basf Aktiengesellschaft Nonflammable mouldable material based on polyphenylene esters and vinyl aromatic polymers

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DE3038551A1 (en) 1981-04-23 application
NL8005597A (en) 1981-04-21 application
FR2467228A1 (en) 1981-04-17 application
JPS5679151A (en) 1981-06-29 application

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