GB2057203A - Apparatus for insulating of a cable splice - Google Patents

Apparatus for insulating of a cable splice Download PDF

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Publication number
GB2057203A
GB2057203A GB8026313A GB8026313A GB2057203A GB 2057203 A GB2057203 A GB 2057203A GB 8026313 A GB8026313 A GB 8026313A GB 8026313 A GB8026313 A GB 8026313A GB 2057203 A GB2057203 A GB 2057203A
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GB
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Patent type
Prior art keywords
assembly
sleeve
member
outer member
fluid
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Granted
Application number
GB8026313A
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GB2057203B (en )
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Thomas and Betts Corp
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Thomas and Betts Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
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Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02GINSTALLATION OF ELECTRIC CABLES OR LINES, OR OF COMBINED OPTICAL AND ELECTRIC CABLES OR LINES
    • H02G15/00Cable fittings
    • H02G15/08Cable junctions
    • H02G15/18Cable junctions protected by sleeves, e.g. for communication cable
    • H02G15/182Cable junctions protected by sleeves, e.g. for communication cable held in expanded condition in radial direction prior to installation
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02GINSTALLATION OF ELECTRIC CABLES OR LINES, OR OF COMBINED OPTICAL AND ELECTRIC CABLES OR LINES
    • H02G1/00Methods or apparatus specially adapted for installing, maintaining, repairing or dismantling electric cables or lines
    • H02G1/14Methods or apparatus specially adapted for installing, maintaining, repairing or dismantling electric cables or lines for joining or terminating cables

Abstract

An outer relatively rigid shell (12) and an interior expandable insulating sleeve (14) define an enclosed air filled space (18). The space may be evacuated, by means of a valve (20), to expand the sleeve (14) and retain the sleeve in an expanded state (Figure 4). Subsequent opening of the valve (20) causes collapse of the expanded sleeve (14) onto a cable (46, 48) providing an electrically insulated, watertight and flexible covering. Methods for cable covering and apparatus for installing the covering are also set forth. <IMAGE>

Description

SPECIFICATION Electrical cable covering assembly Field of the invention: This invention relates generally to the provision of electrical insulation for cable splices and pertains more particularly to insulators of resilient character providing watertight seal and affording sufficient flexibility for reeling of the spliced cable.

Background of the invention: In such fields as underground mining, need arises for on-site splicing of sections of cables which have become separated by reason of mishandling or other abuse common to that environment. In these fields, several approaches have found acceptance, providing for a seamless electrical insulatorto extend over the crimped connection of the cables and onto the surfaces of the cable insulaton. In one of these approaches, use is made of a heatshrinkable insulator having a diameter exceeding that of the cable insulation and, accordingly, readily applied to the body of one of the cables to be joined and, likewise, easily movable into position over the crimped connection and onto the surfaces of the cables.When so positioned, heat is applied to the insulator, causing same to tightly grip all underlying surfaces and to provide a watertight covering for the splice. Additionally, this type of covering exhibits sufficient strength for cable reeling purposes and otherwise resembles quite closely the original cable insulation in shape and mechanical and electrical properties. The disadvantages attending use of the foregoing heat-shrinking insulators include the timeconsuming need for application of heat on-site and deterioration of insulating material by overheating.

Additionally, the available materials for heat-shrink application are of limited flexibility.

Another approach in present use involves a prestretched tubing type of insulator, inclusive of an additional element, arranged interiorly to the stretched tubing and sufficiently self-sustaining to retain the tubing in stretched condition. Typically, the interior member is in the form of a continuous strip arranged in hollow circular configuration. Once the assembly is placed over a splice to be insulated, the strip member is withdrawn, whereupon the tubing collapses to its original condition, snugly engaging the splice and associated cables. The disadvantage attending this second approach are several. Since the tubing is typically an elastomer, and since the interior member remains in continuous pressure relationship with the elastomer until the point of use, the elastomer frequently takes a set and fails to fully recover its original diameter after long stretching periods.In addition, prestretching of the tubing is required to be in excess of the range intended by reason of the presence of the interior member. The removal of the interior member on site gives rise to several difficulties, predominant among which is the consumption of substantial time in the course of removal of the interior member.

The uncoiling of the interior member further generally limits application to circular cross-section. Frequently, the uncoiled interior member engages a protrusion, for example, a corner of the ferrule of the splice, which prevents the interior member from further uncoiling and results in an incomplete operation.

Athird approach involves the use of an outer member of self-sustaining hollow configuration for retaining insulativetubing in stretched condition.

The tubing is stretched within the outer member and an adhesive is employed to bond the stretched tubing to the inner wall of the outer member. The outer member is frangible and is shattered when the expanded tubing is in position over a cable splice.

Thereupon, a solvent is introduced through the shattered outer member to release the bond thereof with the tubing. While this approach has advantage in not requiring excess pre-stretching of the tubing to accomodate an inner self-sustaining member and in not involving removal of such inner member, disadvantage remains in that the tubing is in prestretched state from the point of product manufacture to point of use. Also, the use of adhesive limits shelf life. Further, toxic solvents are needed for release, presenting difficulty in confined environments. There is also the matter of time consumption in directing solvent into the bonded areas of shattered outer member and relaxed tubing.

Summary ofthe invention: This invention has as its primary object the provision of an improved seamless electrical insulator for covering cable splices and the like.

In attaining the foregoing and other objects, the invention provides an electrical insulator assembly comprising an outer member of self-sustaining hollow tubular configuration, a sleeve member disposed interiorly of the outer member and being comprised of expandable material and fluid pressure valve means cooperative with the outer member of the assembly and capable of retaining the sleeve member in lengthwise contiguity with the outer member in the absence of fluid pressurization of the assembly. In use of the assembly, the sleeve is placed within the outer member and the sleeve ends are placed in fluid-tight relationship with the outer member, as by stretching the sleeve ends outwardly onto exterior surface of the outer member.The sleeve is then expanded to become contiguous with the outer member, the fluid pressure valve means permitting egress of air entrapped between the sleeve member and the outer member in the course of such expansion of the sleeve member. The valve means is uni-directional in flow character, whereby air is not permitted to re-enter the assembly once it has been expelled. The outer member and contiguous sleeve are now placed in circumscribing relation to one of the cables to be spliced together.

The splice is now made as between such cable and a second cable and the insulator assembly is now moved to encompass the entire splice. At this juncture, the unidirectional flow characteristic of the valve means is altered, for example, by removing the valve means from the assembly, whereupon the sleeve member collapses onto the splice. The outer member is preferably transparent and made of a frangible or cuttable material such that it may be readily removed from the completed splice as by simple fracture thereof.

In a particularly preferred embodiment of the insulator assembly, the outer member is made throughout of air-impermeable material and includes a passage or passages for the flow of air therethrough. In such embodiment, the unidirectional valve means comprises a tape in registry with each of such passages. Such tape is blown clear of the registering passage on expansion of the sleeve member into contiguity with the outer member and returns, under ambient pressure, to sealing relation with the passage through the outer member on completion of expansion of the sleeve member.

Once the assembly is in position over the cable splice, the tapes are torn from the outer member, giving rise to collapse of the sleeve member onto the splice.

The aspect of the invention whereby the sleeve member is expanded on site at the time of usage of the assembly has particular benefit in limiting the time duration of stretching of the sleeve member to a quite short period of time. Also, as there is no need to accommodate a removable member within the sleeve member, to be placed therewith on the cables and then removed, the invention assures that only essential stretching of the sleeve member to a diameter larger than that of the associated cables is involved.

The ensuing disclosure is further descriptive of method and apparatus facilitating use of the invention in providing insulative coverings for cable splices or for the termination of an individual cable or as boots for use with multiple cables.

The foregoing and other objects and features of the invention will be further evident from the following detailed description of preferred embodiments thereof and from the drawings wherein like reference numerals identify like parts throughout.

Description ofthe drawings: Figure 1 is a side elevational view of the insulator assembly of the invention, partly broken away to show interior detail.

Figure2 is a side elevation, again broken away in part to show interior detail, of apparatus for use in the installation of insulator assemblies according with the invention.

Figure 3 is a composite side elevation, showing the assembly of Figure 1 on sleeve-expanded condition by the apparatus of Figure 2.

Figure 4 illustrates the sleeve-expanded assembly of Figure 3 in position circumscribing a splice of two cables.

Figure 5 is a successive showing of the Figure 4 arrangement wherein the unidirectional valve is stripped from the insulator assembly and the sleeve collapses upon the splice.

Figure 6 shows the completed insulator-covered splice, the outer member having been removed and the sleeve member being shown in section for purposes of illustration.

Figure 7 is a side elevation of alternate apparatus for use in the installation of insulator assemblies.

Figure 8 is a plan view of the apparatus of Figure 7.

Figure 9 is a plan view of a protective end cap for use with installation apparatus.

Figure 70 is a sectional view taken along line X - X of Figure 9.

Figure 7 1 illustrates a further embodiment of the invention for use in insulating a single cable termination.

Figure 12 shows a completed insulator - covered multiple cable installation in accordance with the invention, partly broken away to show detail.

Figure 13 is a front elevation of the end cap of Figure 12 prior to insertion of cables therein.

Figure 14 is a side elevation of Figure 13.

Description ofpreferred embodiments and practices: Referring to Figure 1, electrical insulator assembly 10 includes an outer member in the form of hollow shell 12, preferably constituted by a hard shell plastic extrusion of transparent frangible material, for example, modified styrene. As such, shell 12 is a relatively rigid body of self-sustaining hollow configuration, typically circular in cross-section.

Assembly 10 further includes an inner member in the form of elastomeric sleeve 14, selected to have a lengthwise cross-sectional area less than that of cables with which assembly 10 is to be used, such cross-section to be expanded, as discussd below, to become essentially contiguous with the interior surface of shell 12, thereby capable of being freely applied to cables to be spliced. In reaching the assembly of Figure 1, end portion 14a of sleeve 14 is stretched radially outwardly to circumscribe and engage in fluid sealed relation the end surface 12a of shell 12.Open ends of shell 12 and sleeve 14 are accordingly placed in registry and assembly 10 defines a passage 16 extending leftwardly from the opening illustrated in Figure 1,such passage to either terminate within assembly 10 or continue therethrough to leftward registered openings of shell 12 and sleeve 14. The Figure 1 embodiment is for purposes of insulatively covering a splice of two electrical cables and, accordingly, assembly 10 has opposite open ends. Sleeve 14 may be notched, as shown at 14b, whereby the extent of the sleeve from portion 14b to portion 14a may be removed following completion of the insulative covering of the cable splice. The configuration of the sleeve is preferably such that notched portion 14b is necked-down from its diameter leftward thereof in Figure 1, thereby increasing hoop stress at the point of cable entry when assembled upon the cable and, on the other hand, permitting fully relaxed condition of neckeddown portions when the assembly is not expanded.

As indicated, the outer surface of portion 1 4b is tapered radially inwardly to the notch so as to provide a smooth transition surface when relaxed and separated from the tear-away extent 14a 14b.

The relaxed flare of the tear-away extent has advantage in facilitating application of the sleeve ends about the shell ends without undue stretching and has still further benefit as discussed below in connection with Figure 6.

With shell 12 and sleeve 14 arranged as in Figure 1, assembly 10 includes a confined volume 18 which is annular to passage 16 and bounded by radially interior surface of shell 12 and radially exterior surface of sleeve 14. Shell 12 includes a passage 20 communicating with volume 18. Flap valve 22 is supported by shell 12 in registry with passage 20 and provides fluid sealing thereof. Based on the fluid impermeable character of shell 12 and of sleeve 14 and of the fluid seals provided by valve 22 and shell surface 12a and sleeve portion 14a, volume 18 is entrapped within assembly 10. Valve 22 may be comprised of a pressure-sensitive tape, releasably secured at one end thereof to shell 12.

Suitable apparatus for on-site preparation of assembly 10 for splice-covering use, as by expansion of sleeve 14, is set forth in Figure 2. Positioning stub 24 has fixedly connected thereto a first end cap 26 and further supports end cap 28 for adjustable longitudinal positioning on stud threaded end portion 24a. Grommet 30, integral with end cap 28, provides fluid sealed support as between end cap 28 and stud 24 and end cap 28 is positionally adjustable on stud 24 by advancement of wing nut 31 on stud threaded portion 24a. A fluid passage 32 extends within the stud 24 leftwardly of end cap 26 and opens into end portion 24b of the stud. A radial port 34 extends off passage 32 and flap valve 36 is in registry with port 34, providing fluid sealing forthe port.As in the case of valve 22 above, valve 36 may be comprised of a pressure-sensitive tape affixed at one end to stud 24. Rightwardly of end cap 26 in Figure 2 is shown a fluid pressure pump 38 comprised of cylinder 40, piston 42 and shaft 44.

Figure 3 depicts the components above discussed in Figures 1 and 2 in assembled on-site condition with sleeve 14 expanded into contiguous relation with shell 12. Preparatory to sleeve expansion, wing nut 31 and end closure 28 are separated from stud end portion 24a and stud 24 is seated within passage 16 of assembly 10, sleeve 14 being in relaxed condition shown in Figure 1. Wing nut 31 and end closure 28 are now advanced on stud portion 24a so as to mutually position end closures 26 and 28 in fluid sealing relationship with assembly 10. Pump 38 is now secured to the rightward surface of end closure 26 in fluid sealed relation and the pump is operated to pressurize passage 16, flap valve 36 being displaced to open port 34 on leftward stroke of piston 42 and being returned to fluid sealing relation with port 34 on rightward stroke of piston 42.In the course of expansion of sleeve 14, valve 22 is operably responsive to fluid pressure change in confined volume 18 (Fig. 1) and to fluid pressure ambient to the assembly for controlled diminution of volume 18. Thus, on pressurization of volume 18 exceeding ambient, i.e., pressure exterior to assembly 10, valve 22 is displaced from fluid sealing relation with passage 20. Concomitantly, atmospheric pressure forces valve 22 into closing relationship with passage 20 in the absence of pressure change in volume 18, on rightward stroke of piston 42.

Upon completion of expansion of sleeve 14, the sleeve-expanded assembly 10 is removed from the apparatus of Figure 2 by withdrawal therefrom of wing nut 31 and end closure 28.

Upon separation of the expanded insulator assembly from the apparatus of Figure 3, it is to be appreciated that the assembly remains in sleeveexpanded condition in the absence of fluid pressurization of the assembly subsequent to such expansion of its sleeve into contiguous relation with the shell. Accordingly, assembly 10 may be freely advanced onto an electrical cable 46 (Fig. 4), and displaced far leftwardly of its illustrated position, to facilitate joinder of cable 46 to cable 48, as by the crimping of ferrule 50 on exposed conductors of the cables. Following such splicing of cables 46 and 48, cable assembly 10 is positioned symmetrically relative to ferrule 50, as in Fig. 4, and valve 22 is separated from assembly 10, as by tearing such flap tape from the exterior surface of shell 12.On this event, the retention of sleeve 14 in expanded condition by valve 22 is interrupted and sleeve 14 collapses upon the completed splice, as is shown in Fig. 5. By preselection of the relaxed cross-section of sleeve 14 (Fig. 1) to be less than the cross-section of the completed splice, sleeve 14 stretchingly circumscribes the competed splice in Fig. 5, not yet having reached its fully relaxed cross-section.

At this juncture, shell 12 is fractured, as may be accomplished by impacting the shell with shattering force. Thereupon, the shell is readily removed from sleeve 14 and the outward ends of the sleeve may be severed at notches 14b (Fig. 6). In the Fig. 6 showing, sleeve 14 is shown prior to severing of its rightward removable end portion. As alluded to above, benefit attends the flared configuration of such end portion in that one can readily roll the sleeve back upon itself to any extent desired, simply by engaging a flared end, which is in relaxed state, in contrast to the situation applying in the case of a shrunk sleeve rightly circumscribing the cable at sleeve ends. Need for rolling back the sleeve arises, for instance, when it is desired to apply treating compound interiorly of the sleeve or when cleaning of the cable is necessary.After roll back and cable treating, the sleeve is rolled forward and the end portion is severed.

Afurther embodiment of insulator assembly 110 is shown in Figure 11 for use in insulatively covering terminations of a cable or group of cables. In this situation, shell 112 is continuous about one end thereof and defines a single rightward opening.

Similarly, sleeve 114 is stretched to engage only such open end of shell 112, sleeve 114 defining passage 116 which has one closed end. Combined volume 118 is now continuous radially across the leftwardendofshell 112. Passage 120 and valve 122 are included as in the foregoing embodiment and function likewise on expansion of sleeve 114. Shell 112 may be an injection molded part in its Figure 11 configuration, wherein its closed end is integrally formed. Alternatively, the shell may be formed in part as an extruded cylinder with open ends, one of which may be fluid sealed by an end cap joinable therewith. End caps may desirably be provided as parts of a field kit, the shell having at least one open end, in any event. With the shell and sleeve assembled as in Figure 1 and end caps applied to ends thereof, dust protection and protection for any material applied to the sleeve are afforded. Where such end caps provide fluid sealing, and are applied after sleeve stretching, fluid sealed relation of sleeve and shell may be maintained for a longer time perod than would otherwise apply. The end caps are removed on site at the time of use of the assemblies.

For purposes of expanding sleeve 114, and as substitute apparatus to that shown in Figure 2 for expanding a sleeve having opposite ends open, use may be made of an expandable air bag disposed in passage 16 or passage 116. Use of an air bag permits use of fluid medium for sleeve expansion which may be a contaminant to the splice or termination, e.g., an electrically conductive liquid, based on isolation of the fluid medium from the sleeve by the air bag.

As insulator assemblies of type disclosed herein are of type deriving sleeve support from an interior removable element, they may be provided in any cross-sectional configuration to conform with the member to be covered. Further, the member to be covered may be coated with an adhesive or other filler which will not be disturbed since no removable member is interior to the sleeve on completion of covering. While it is preferable to avoid shelf storage of sleeves in expanded condition, assemblies of type disclosed herein may have their sleeves expanded and stored in such condition.

The assemblies may include design detail for lessening the possibility that shell passage, or passages 20 of Figure 1 become interiorly by sleeve 14 and thwarted from fully evacuating volume 18. By way of example, a network of grooves may be formed on the interior surface of shell 12 in communication with the shell passages, with the passage valves being located radially outwardly of intersections of the grooves. Another such practice is to taper sleeve wall thickness such that sleeve thickness in registry with the shell passages is greater than sleeve thickness at locations remote from the shell passages. In this instance, it need be observed that the mechanical and electrical strengths of the installed sleeve will be minimum at the thinnest sleeve sections.A further practice looks to providing longitudinal protrusions or spaced dimples on the sleeve to assure full evacuation of confined volume 18.

In summary of the foregoing embodiments of the invention, assemblies herein have an outer member of self-sustaining, i.e., relatively rigid, configuration, having at least one open end. An expandable sleeve member is disposed interiorly of the outer member and will have an open end in registry with each open end of the outer member. The sleeve member and outer member are placed in fluid sealed relation, for example, by stretching the sleeve upon other surface of the outer member, whereby the assembly includes combined volume intervening the outer member and the sleeve member and bounded enclosingly thereby.The sleeve member has relaxed cross-section less than that of both the outer member and a cable or cables to be covered by the sleeve and the sleeve member may be expanded, by positive interior pressurization or otherwise, to a cross-section greater than that of the cable, preferably to become contiguous over sleeve length with the outer member. The assembly valve may be considered in several independent and separate aspects. In one aspect, the valve selectively retains the sleeve member, once expanded, in lengthwise contiguity with the outer member in the absence of fluid pressurization of the assembly, i.e., there is no need for connection of the assembly to a source of positive or negative pressure to retain the sleeve member in expanded state. In another aspect, the valve is operably responsive to fluid pressure, i.e.

that of air or other fluid medium. Thus, the valve is responsive to fluid pressure change in such confined volume on sleeve member expansion and to fluid pressure ambient to the assembly for retentive diminution of such confined volume. In a further aspect, where the sleeve member is in retained stretched state, the valve accommodates interruption of the fluid sealed relation of the sleeve member and the outer member to provide for relaxation of the sleeve member from such stretched condition, as by valve opening or removal of the valve from the assembly. In a still further aspect, the valve may be responsive to differential pressure thereacross to accommodate sleeve member expansion and retention of such expansion.

Referring to Figures 7 and 8, apparatus is shown which is more readily usable than the apparatus of Figure 2 in the installaton of a variety of different length insulations and which accommodates also the Figure 11 assembly. An outer frame 52 receives an innerframe 54 and interlocks therewith in manner permitting the varying of the spacing between end caps 56 and 58 to position same in engagementwith an insulator assembly. Side arms 60 and 62 of outer frame 52 have apertures 64 along the lengths thereof for receiving lugs 66 which project outwardly of side arms 68 and 70 of inner frame 54. Clips 72 and 74 are slidable respectively on side arms 60 and 62 into locking relation relative to lugs 66 and apertures 64.

In adjusting the apparatus for receiving a given length insulator assembly, clips 72 and 74 are moved clear of the rightward ends of side arms 68 and 70, freeing the same for inward flexing and accompanying release of lugs 66 from apertures 64. The inner frame is now repositioned in flexed condition relative to the outer frame to accommodate the insulator assembly and the side arms are then released such that lugs 66 re-engage apertures 64. Clips 72 and 74 are then moved into registry with the lugs.

End cap 58 is fixedly secured to end part 76 of inner frame 54 by frictional interfitting of valve stem 78 with cap 58 and end part 76. End cap 56 is secured to plate 80, which has side portions seated in slots 82 and 84 of outer frame 52. Threaded member 86 is journaled in plate 80 and extends through support 88 outboard of end part 90 of outer frame 52. As member 86 is rotated, end cap 56 is moved relative to outer frame 52, thereby providing vernier adjustment of spacing between the end caps to accommodate fluid sealing of the insulator assembly. On such adjustment, the insulator assembly may be positively pressurized, for example, by applying a pressurized capsule to valve stem 78. In this apparatus embodiment, the valve of the pressurizing apparatus is exterior to the end caps, in contract to the Figure 2 apparatus.As will be appreciated, pressurization medium may comprise a carbon dioxide cylinder, factory pressurized air and the like.

Figures 9 and 10 depict protective end cap structure for installation apparatus. In this embodiment, a pressure release in introduced in end cap 92 by staking to neck 94 thereof, as at locations 96,98, 100 and 102, a washer 104. The end cap defines tapered passage 106 for receipt of ball valve 108. With the washer located by guides 109 and 111 adjacent neck 94, and then staked as noted above, the washer defines a cantilevered leaf spring portion 104a atop ball valve 108. By selection of washer material and thickness, ball valve displacement from passage 106 may be predetermined to prevent pressurization of an insulator assembly in excess of that required for sleeve expansion.

Figures 12 - 14 indicate a further usage of insulator assemblies hereof, namely, in providing a boot for multiple conductor cables. Cables 130 and 132 are insulated conductors of a multiconductor cable having outer insulation (not shown) circumscribing the cables. At junction locations, it is desirable to extend the cables, as indicated in Figure 12, with the outer insulation removed and yet to prevent moisture interiorly of the outside insulation. A rangetaking end cap 134 having tapered passages 136 and 138 is employed, providing fluid sealing of cables 130 and 132 at their rightward points of exit from passages 136 and 138.Then, sleeve 140 is assembled with a shell and is expanded, as above discussed and the assembly is disposed with its rightward notched portion 140a rightwardly beyond radially extended portion 134a of end cap 134 and with its leftward notched portion leftwardly beyond the multiconductor cable outer insulation (not shown).

The sleeve is now released from its expanded state and engages the outer insulation and end cap 134, this condition having been reached in Figure 12.

As stated above, shell material is preferably transparent. This characteristic enables one to visually observe sleeve expansion of the assembled shell and sleeve. While the shells are conveniently comprised of frangible material, such as modified styrene, they may be constituted of material otherwise readily removable from the sleeve on release thereof. Thus, one may cut longitudinally through the shell and open the cut shell to remove it from a cable.

Various modifications to the above-discussed insulator assemblies and changes to components thereof will not be evident to those skilled in the art.

Accordingly, the particularly disclosed and discussed embodiments are intended in an illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

Claims (12)

1. An electrical insulator assembly, comprising: an outer member of self-sustaining hollow configuration having at least one open end; an expandable sleeve member of electrically insulative material disposed in said outer member in fluid sealed relationship therewith and having an open end in registry with said outer member open end, said sleeve member being of unexpanded cross-section less than the cross-section of said outer member, whereby said assembly includes confined volume intervening said outer member and said sleeve member and bounded enclosingly thereby; and valve means operably responsive to fluid pressure change in said confined volume on such sleeve member expansion and to fluid pressure ambient to said assembly for retentive diminution of said confined volume.
2. The assembly claimed in claim 1 wherein said valve means provides in said assembly for fluid flow through said valve means exclusively during such expansion of said sleeve member.
3. The assembly claimed in claim 1 wherein said outer member defines a fluid flow passage therethrough opening into said confined volume said valve means being in registry with said passage and exterior to said outer member.
4. The assembly claimed in claim 3 wherein said valve means comprises a fluid-impermeable flap member overlying said opening of said outer member passage.
5. The assembly claimed in claim 4wherein said flap member is removably secured to said outer member to permit directionally unrestricted fluid flow through said passage of said outer member on such flap member removal from said assembly.
6. The assembly claimed in claim 1 wherein said sleeve member includes a radially outwardly flared tear-away portion adjacent said open end thereof.
7. The assembly claimed in claim 1 wherein said outer member is comprised of a transparent material.
8. The assembly claimed in claim 7 wherein said outer member is a plastic extrusion
9. The assembly claimed in claim 8 wherein said outer member is constituted of modified styrene.
10. The assembly claimed in claim 1 wherein said sleeve member is an elastomeric tube.
11. An electrical insulator assembly substantially as herein described with reference to Figure 1 of the accompanying drawings.
12. An electrical insulator assembly substantially as herein described with reference to Figure 11 of the accompanying drawings.
GB8026313A 1979-08-23 1980-08-13 Apparatus for insulation of a cable splice Expired GB2057203B (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US6922179 true 1979-08-23 1979-08-23

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GB2057203A true true GB2057203A (en) 1981-03-25
GB2057203B GB2057203B (en) 1983-07-06

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Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
GB8026313A Expired GB2057203B (en) 1979-08-23 1980-08-13 Apparatus for insulation of a cable splice

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CA (1) CA1156734A (en)
DE (2) DE3032015A1 (en)
FR (1) FR2463972A1 (en)
GB (1) GB2057203B (en)

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4868967A (en) * 1985-07-19 1989-09-26 Raychem Corporation Tubular article
GB2186431B (en) * 1986-02-07 1989-11-01 Sperry Sun Inc Assemblies for supporting electrical circuit boards within tubes
US5070597A (en) * 1985-07-19 1991-12-10 Raychem Corporation Tubular article

Family Cites Families (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3010194A (en) * 1958-11-06 1961-11-28 Rubberol Coverings Inc Apparatus for covering rolls with flexible tubing
FR1373001A (en) * 1959-04-08 1964-09-25 Mines De Fer De La Mouriere So A method of implementation of elastically deformable material coatings on substantially cylindrical or prismatic parts, apparatus for its implementation, its various applications, and products thus obtained
FR1321467A (en) * 1962-01-09 1963-03-22 Gustin Bacon Mfg Co Machine for laying elastic sheaths on parts such as conduits or pipes
FR1356115A (en) * 1962-05-04 1964-03-20 Enfield Standard Power Cables Method and device for covering pipes and other articles using organic plastic materials and products thus obtained
FR2423077B1 (en) * 1978-04-11 1981-12-31 Silec Liaisons Elec

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4868967A (en) * 1985-07-19 1989-09-26 Raychem Corporation Tubular article
US5070597A (en) * 1985-07-19 1991-12-10 Raychem Corporation Tubular article
GB2186431B (en) * 1986-02-07 1989-11-01 Sperry Sun Inc Assemblies for supporting electrical circuit boards within tubes

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
CA1156734A (en) 1983-11-08 grant
DE8022648U1 (en) 1981-04-09 grant
FR2463972A1 (en) 1981-02-27 application
GB2057203B (en) 1983-07-06 grant
CA1156734A1 (en) grant
DE3032015A1 (en) 1981-03-26 application

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