GB2043899A - Ultrasonic Apparatus for Locating Interfaces in Media - Google Patents

Ultrasonic Apparatus for Locating Interfaces in Media Download PDF

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Publication number
GB2043899A
GB2043899A GB8005149A GB8005149A GB2043899A GB 2043899 A GB2043899 A GB 2043899A GB 8005149 A GB8005149 A GB 8005149A GB 8005149 A GB8005149 A GB 8005149A GB 2043899 A GB2043899 A GB 2043899A
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GB
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Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
ultrasonic energy
apparatus
frequency
modulation
inhomogeneity
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Granted
Application number
GB8005149A
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GB2043899B (en )
Original Assignee
Redding R J
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
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Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01SRADIO DIRECTION-FINDING; RADIO NAVIGATION; DETERMINING DISTANCE OR VELOCITY BY USE OF RADIO WAVES; LOCATING OR PRESENCE-DETECTING BY USE OF THE REFLECTION OR RERADIATION OF RADIO WAVES; ANALOGOUS ARRANGEMENTS USING OTHER WAVES
    • G01S15/00Systems using the reflection or reradiation of acoustic waves, e.g. sonar systems
    • G01S15/02Systems using the reflection or reradiation of acoustic waves, e.g. sonar systems using reflection of acoustic waves
    • G01S15/06Systems determining the position data of a target
    • G01S15/08Systems for measuring distance only
    • G01S15/32Systems for measuring distance only using transmission of continuous unmodulated waves, amplitude-, frequency-, or phase-modulated waves
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01NINVESTIGATING OR ANALYSING MATERIALS BY DETERMINING THEIR CHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL PROPERTIES
    • G01N29/00Investigating or analysing materials by the use of ultrasonic, sonic or infrasonic waves; Visualisation of the interior of objects by transmitting ultrasonic or sonic waves through the object
    • G01N29/04Analysing solids
    • G01N29/11Analysing solids by measuring attenuation of acoustic waves
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01NINVESTIGATING OR ANALYSING MATERIALS BY DETERMINING THEIR CHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL PROPERTIES
    • G01N29/00Investigating or analysing materials by the use of ultrasonic, sonic or infrasonic waves; Visualisation of the interior of objects by transmitting ultrasonic or sonic waves through the object
    • G01N29/34Generating the ultrasonic, sonic or infrasonic waves, e.g. electronic circuits specially adapted therefor
    • G01N29/348Generating the ultrasonic, sonic or infrasonic waves, e.g. electronic circuits specially adapted therefor with frequency characteristics, e.g. single frequency signals, chirp signals
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01NINVESTIGATING OR ANALYSING MATERIALS BY DETERMINING THEIR CHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL PROPERTIES
    • G01N2291/00Indexing codes associated with group G01N29/00
    • G01N2291/04Wave modes and trajectories
    • G01N2291/044Internal reflections (echoes), e.g. on walls or defects

Abstract

Apparatus to detect and/or locate an inhomogeneity in a medium comprises a transducer (1) to transmit frequency-modulated ultrasonic energy through the medium and a transducer (3) to receive reflected energy. The transducers are connected to a phase-locked loop (11, 12) which maintains a required relationship between the phase of the transmitted modulation and the phase of the received modulation by adjustment of the modulation frequency. The modulation frequency adjustment is kept within predetermined upper and lower frequency limits so that the loop can lock only on to received ultrasonic energy which has travelled a distance within a predetermined region in the medium. The energy may be scanned across the region to produce a profile of the inhomogeneity, such as tissue (40) at a certain depth within a limb (42). The invention may also be used to detect the level of water or sediment (37) at the bottom of an oil tank. <IMAGE>

Description

SPECIFICATION Apparatus for Locating Interfaces in Media This invention relates to apparatus for detecting interfaces occurring in systems of solid and/or fluid media.

By use of the invention, images representing differences in consistency of the media for use, for example, in the detection of flaws in workpieces and in medical diagnosis, may be obtained. In known medical diagnosis methods, such as tomography, a beam of x-rays or ultrasound is obscured or reflected by variations in the medium.

Nucleonic sources are sometimes used in the known scanning systems.

It is an object of the present invention to detect interfaces occurring in a medium by use of a benign ultrasonic beam, comprising a carrier wave which is frequency modulated. By controlling the carrier frequency and the modulating frequency, data relating to interfaces occurring within a given depth or thickness of a medium can be obtained. Hence, the presence of a change in tissue consistency, such as occurs when a cancerous growth is present, can be diagnosed without the danger and expense of complicated scanning systems using x-rays or nucleonic sources.

Other types of inhomogeneity can also be detected, such as strata occurring within a given depth of a liquid, or the presence of a layer of foreign material within, or at the boundary of, a liquid.

According to the present invention, apparatus to detect the presence of sound-reflective inhomogeneity in a selected region within a medium comprises a transducer to transmit frequency-modulated ultrasonic energy through the medium; a transducer to receive reflected ultrasonic energy; and means to adjust the frequency of the modulation to a valve within a predetermined range, the frequency limits of which depend upon the distances of the near and far boundaries, respectively, of the selected region from the transducers, to obtain a required relationship between the modulation phase of the transmitted ultrasonic energy and the modulation phase of the received energy only for a reflection from within said region.

Embodiments of the invention will now be described, by way of example, with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which: Fig. 1 is a schematic circuit diagram of one form of apparatus according to the invention, Fig. 2 is a schematic circuit diagram of another form of apparatus according to the invention, Fig. 3 shows schematically a cross-section through an oil tank incorporating apparatus according to the invention, and Fig. 4 illustrates the use of apparatus according to the invention for indicating the profiles of layers of different tissue or of bone within a limb.

Referring to Fig. 1 of the drawing, apparatus to detect the presence of inhomogeneity in a medium comprises an ultrasonic transducer 1 which is disposed to transmit ultrasonic energy into the medium, for example a liquid 2, and a transducer 3 which is disposed to receive ultrasonic energy reflected from an inhomogeneity represented by an interface.4 with some other material. The transducer 1 is energised by an oscillator 5 which produces a carriersignal, the centre frequency of which is determined by a capacitor 6 and a variable resistor 7. The carrier signal is modulated by a frequency-modulation circuit 8, and the modulated carrier is fed to the transducer 1 via a power amplifier 9.

The receiving transducer 3 feeds the received frequency-modulated carrier signal to an amplifier-limiter and f.m. demodulator circuit 10.

The demodulated output, i.e. the received modulation, is fed to D-type flip-flop 11 (e.g. type 4013) which is connected in a phase-locked loop with a P.L.L. integrated circuit 12. The circuit 12 may comprise any suitable chip (such as the 4046 chip) incorporating a voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) and a phase comparator. A capacitor 1 3 and a resistor 14 are provided to determine the centre operating frequency of the VCO. The output of the flip-flop 11 is fed, via a filter comprising a resistor 1 5 and a capacitor 16, to a control voltage input 1 7 of the circuit 12.

The VCO output is fed via a line 18 to a "clock" input of the flip-flop 11, and is also fed via a line 19 of the frequency-modulation circuit 8 as the modulation frequency. A frequency-dependent display 20 is connected to the line 19.

In describing the operation of the circuit, it will firstly be assumed that the interface 4 occurs at a distance from the transducers 1 and 3 which is within predetermined operating limits for the phase-locked loop circuit 12. The beam from the transducer 1 is reflected at the interface 4, and at least part of the energy is received at the transducer 3. The modulation fed to the flip-flop 11, together with the clock pulses on the line 18, cause the flip-flop to set and reset continuously, and the phase comparator of the PLL 12 compares the phase of the flip-flop output with the phase of the clock pulses and adjusts the modulation frequency accordingly if the correct phase relationship does not exist.

The relationship will be correct only if the path length travelled by the ultrasonic energy corresponds to an integral number of half-wave lengths of the modulation frequency. Hence, the modulation frequency gives a measure of the distance from the transducer 1 to the inhomogeneity 4. The display 20 therefore indicates that distance, either digitally or graphically.

If an inhomogeneity 4' now appears, energy from the beam will be reflected therefrom, and the phase-locked loop can adjust the modulation frequency to take into account the shorter distance travelled by the ultrasonic energy. The apparatus will, therefore, constantly monitor the existence of significant homogeneities, provided that the required modulation frequency falls within the working range of the phase-locked loop.

If the modulation frequency is forced to sweep over a wide range by sweeping the centre frequency of the phase-locked loop, each time the frequency corresponds to the position of an inhomogeneity the loop will try to lock. Hence, the positions of all in homogeneities within a given distance can be monitored.

Alternatively, if the loop operating frequency range is made narrow, only those inhomogeneities occurring within a given stratum of the medium will be taken into account. Hence, considering the inhomogeneities 4 and 4' in Fig.

1, the operating frequency range may be set so that the inhomogeneity 4 (for example the surface of a liquid) is ignored, but a dense layer or foreign body 4' present beneath the surface is located.

Conversely a layer 4' may be ignored and the layer 4 located by suitably setting the operating frequency range.

Various types of phase-locked loop circuits are known, and a particular type will be selected depending upon the required mode of operation.

The circuit 12 in Fig. 1 is of the pulse-counting edge-controlled memory phase comparator type, and can be made very sensitive due to working on the leading edges of the modulation signal.

For higher stability, an exclusive-OR type of phase comparator may be used, which type considers only whole cycles of the modulation. A circuit including such a comparator and also including automatic power control will now be described, with reference to Fig. 2 of the drawings, in which components having the same functions as in the Fig. 1 circuit have the same reference numerals as in that Figure. In this case, the output of the transducer 3 is fed to limiteramplifier 21, and the received frequencymodulated carrier is then demodulated by a pulse-counting demodulator 22. The resultant modulation is fed via a constant-phase low-pass filter 23, for example of the Butterworth type, to a phase-locked loop (P.L.L.) integrated circuit 24, which may be a type 4046 chip as in the Fig. 1 embodiment, but using an exclusive-OR P. L. L.

configuration 25 provided therein instead of the type of comparator circuit used in Fig. 1. One input to the circuit 25 comprises the received modulation, and the other input is provided by a voltage-controlled oscillator (V.C.O.) 26. The V.C.O. output provides the modulating signal, as previously described, and is fed to the display 20 and to the frequency-modulation circuit 8.

The loop gain of the Figs. 1 and 2 circuits has no effect on the accuracy of the measurements over wide limits, but it can be controlled automatically to give a substantially constant received modulation signal, irrespective of changes in the attenuation of the path along which the ultrasonic energy is transmitted and received. This can be achieved, as shown in Fig. 2, by controlling the input power fed to the power amplifier 9 using a signal fed back from the amplifier 21 such as to ensure that the power is kept at a level for which the amplifier 21 just limits. The input power to the amplifier 9 is controlled by a transistor 27, and the feed back signal is derived by feeding the modulation output from the filter 23 through an integrator circuit 28 and thence to the base electrode of the transistor 27.The feedback signal provides a measure of the attenuation of the path via which the ultrasonic energy passes between the transducers 1 and 3, and this can be fed to an indicator or display 29.

Changes in the displayed attenuation value could, for example, indicate the presence of bubbles or solid particles in a normally liquid medium.

Referring now to Fig. 3 of the drawings, a tan 30 contains oil up to a level 31. A transmitting transducer 32 located in the oil is connected to a circuit (not shown) such as described above and transmits frequencymodulated ultrasonic energy upwards through the oil. Energy reflected from the surface 31 is received by an upward-pointing receiving transducer 33 and, via a different path, by a second upward-pointing receiving transducer 34 a vertical distance Y above the transmitting transducer 32. A third receiving transducer 35 points downwards to receive energy reflected firstly by the surface 31 and then by the base 36 of the tank, or, as will be explained later, by the surface 37 of a layer of water or sediment 38. The transducers 32, 33 and 35 are all located at a fixed distance Z above the base 36. The level 31 is at a variable distance X above the transducers 32, 33 and 35.

Whilst the transmitting transducer 32 is permanently connected to the modulation and P.L.L. circuitry, the receiving transducers 33, 34 and 35 may be switched into circuit sequentially by electronic switching means (not shown) which also causes any necessary change in the modulation centre frequency and the frequency range as each transducer is connected.

The frequency (F1) for the transmission from the transducer 32 to the transducer 33 could be used to determine 2X, and hence the height of the surface 31 above the base 36 could be obtained.

However, by taking another frequency setting (F2) using the transducers 32 and 34, an indication of 2X-Y is obtained. Y is a known value, and the value of X can be obtained from Y F1 x=-.

2 F1-F2 This will take into account changes in the density of oil which may occur near the surface 31, and/or the production of vapour.

If a modulation frequency F3 is produced for ultrasonic energy received by the transducer 35, it can readily be checked whether this frequency truly corresponds to the distance 2X+2Z i.e. that reflection of the energy has taken place at the surface 31 and at the base 36. For this frequency to be correct, F3-F1 should represent 2Z. If it is found that F3 is not correct, it follows that there must be some inhomogeneity elsewhere, such as at the surface 37 of a layer 38 of water or sediment at the bottom of the tank. The value F3-F1 will give an indication of the location of the layer.

The weight of oil in the tank may be computed from the measured height of the level 31 and the temperature of the oil. If the speed of sound in the liquid at a given temperature is known, the average temperature of the liquid in the path followed by the ultrasonic energy can be computed from the resultant modulation frequency.

It will be seen that if the height of the oil level is known from use of some other measuring system, the ultrasonic apparatus can be used to give warning of the presence of an inhomogeneity beneath the surface. In this case, the operating frequency range is selected so that the apparatus will not take into account reflections from the surface.

In a tank containing liquid petroleum gas, such an inhomogeneity could be an unusually dense layer adjacent the surface, produced by local cooling following the drawing-off of some of the gas. Such a layer can be potentially highly dangerous, because it may suddenly sink to the bottom of the tank following a path round the periphery of the tank, accompanied by a general swirling of the contents of the tank. The forces produced may be large enough to overturn the tank, so it is extremely advantageous to be forewarned that a dense layer is beginning to form.

Referring now to Fig. 4 of the drawings, the apparatus can be used for investigating the profiles of various layers of tissue 39 and 40 and bone 41 within a limb 42. Transmitting and receiving transducers 43 and 44, respectively, are located adjacent the limb and are connected to a frequency modulation and P.L.L. circuit as described above.

By selection of the operating modulation frequency range, reflections from an interface in a particular stratum of the limb can be obtained and the location of the interface indicated in the manner described above. The transducers may be made to scan across the limb, so that the profile of the interface can be displayed on the unit 20.

For example, the stratum contained between dotted lines 45 in Fig. 4 may be investigated, and reflections will be obtained from the tissue 40.

The profile of this tissue will be plotted as the transducers 43 and 44 scan the limb.

Due to the limited modulation frequency range, reflections from the tissue 39 will be ignored, as will those from the bone 41. If it is desired to investigate the tissue 39 or the bone 41, the frequency range must be adjusted accordingly.

The apparatus can be used for scanning articies such as metal castings. The presence of any inhomogeneity which will cause a change in the speed of sound in the article, and hence will cause reflection of the ultrasonic beam, can be detected. The position of impurities, cracks or blowholes can be determined from the resultant modulation frequency when the PLL has locked.

The apparatus may be used with gases, liquids or solids and will show the interface when a change of phase occurs. When dealing with a solid or animate material it may be advantageous to reduce the interface losses between the transducers and the object under test by means of a coupling fluid, as is well known in nondestructive testing practice. Alternatively, the object and the transducers can be immersed in a fluid, for example water, so that the energy is concentrated at the area of interest.

Claims (8)

Claims
1. Apparatus to detect the presence of a sound-reflective inhomogeneity in a selected region within a medium, comprising a transducer to transmit frequency-modulated ultrasonic energy through the medium; a transducer to receive reflected ultrasonic energy; and means to adjust the frequency of the modulation to a value within a predetermined range, the frequency limits of which depend upon the distances of the near and far boundaries, respectively, of the selected region from the transducers, to obtain a required relationship between the modulation phase of the transmitted ultrasonic energy and the modulation phase of the received energy only for a reflection from within said region,
2. Apparatus as claimed in claim 1, wherein the means to adjust the modulation frequency comprises a phase-locked loop.
3. Apparatus as claimed in claim 1 or claim 2, arranged to detect the presence of an inhomogeneity beneath the surface of a liquid, wherein the transducers are positioned within the liquid and face towards the surface.
4. Apparatus as claimed in claim 1 or claim 2, arranged to detect the presence of an inhomogeneity at the bottom of a liquid in a container, wherein the transducers are positioned within the liquid and face towards the surface of the liquid, and wherein there are provided a third transducer facing the bottom of the container and operative to receive the ultrasonic energy after successive reflections from the surface and from the inhomogeneity, and means responsive to the receipt of reflected energy by the receiving transducer and by the third transducer to compute the height of the surface of the liquid and the position of the inhomogeneity.
5. Apparatus as claimed in claim 1 or claim 2, including means to cause scanning of the frequency-modulated ultrasonic energy across the region to detect the profile of a said inhomogeneity present in the selected region.
6. Apparatus as claimed in claim 5, including display means, responsive to successive modulation frequency values determined as the ultrasonic energy is scanned across the region, to display said profile.
7. Apparatus as claimed in any preceding claim, including a feedback loop to provide a signal for controlling the power level of the transmitted ultrasonic energy to maintain a substantially constant received ultrasonic energy level despite changes in attenuation due to the medium through which the ultrasonic energy passes between the transducers, the feedback loop signal then providing a measure of the attenuation.
8. Apparatus as claimed in claim 1, and substantially as hereinbefore described with reference to the accompanying drawings.
GB8005149A 1979-02-15 1980-02-15 Ultrasonic apparatus for locating interfaces in media Expired GB2043899B (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB7905302 1979-02-15
GB8005149A GB2043899B (en) 1979-02-15 1980-02-15 Ultrasonic apparatus for locating interfaces in media

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB8005149A GB2043899B (en) 1979-02-15 1980-02-15 Ultrasonic apparatus for locating interfaces in media
US06195404 US4364273A (en) 1980-02-15 1980-10-09 Apparatus for locating interfaces in media

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GB2043899B GB2043899B (en) 1983-03-09

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Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4364273A (en) * 1980-02-15 1982-12-21 Redding Robert J Apparatus for locating interfaces in media
US4395912A (en) * 1979-12-12 1983-08-02 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Apparatus for ultrasonic scanning
US4557437A (en) * 1981-08-05 1985-12-10 Rheinmetall Gmbh Process for flight-attitude-adjustment of a flying body and/or activation of live load carried by the flying body and arrangement for carrying out the process
US4570487A (en) * 1980-04-21 1986-02-18 Southwest Research Institute Multibeam satellite-pulse observation technique for characterizing cracks in bimetallic coarse-grained component
GB2188420A (en) * 1986-03-25 1987-09-30 Atomic Energy Authority Uk Ultrasonic range finding
GB2193317A (en) * 1986-07-31 1988-02-03 Gec Avionics Monitoring sludge formation in liquid-containing vessels
WO1988009939A1 (en) * 1987-06-11 1988-12-15 Commonwealth Of Australia Ultrasonic beam compensation
EP0381653A2 (en) * 1989-02-01 1990-08-08 Ab Bofors Method and device for determining the degree of adherence between an explosive and the delimiting surface of a projectile
DE19856876B4 (en) * 1997-12-10 2005-02-10 Delphi Automotive Systems Deutschland Gmbh Ultrasonic sensor device and method for a contactless detection of objects
US7852318B2 (en) 2004-05-17 2010-12-14 Epos Development Ltd. Acoustic robust synchronization signaling for acoustic positioning system
US9181555B2 (en) 2007-07-23 2015-11-10 Ramot At Tel-Aviv University Ltd. Photocatalytic hydrogen production and polypeptides capable of same
US9195325B2 (en) 2002-04-15 2015-11-24 Qualcomm Incorporated Method and system for obtaining positioning data
US9632627B2 (en) 2005-03-23 2017-04-25 Qualcomm Incorporated Method and system for digital pen assembly

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WO2006035444A3 (en) 2004-09-29 2006-06-22 Ervices Ltd Tel Hashomer Medic Composition for improving efficiency of drug delivery
US7367944B2 (en) 2004-12-13 2008-05-06 Tel Hashomer Medical Research Infrastructure And Services Ltd. Method and system for monitoring ablation of tissues
CN101690262B (en) 2007-03-14 2014-11-26 高通股份有限公司 MEMS microphone

Cited By (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4395912A (en) * 1979-12-12 1983-08-02 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Apparatus for ultrasonic scanning
US4364273A (en) * 1980-02-15 1982-12-21 Redding Robert J Apparatus for locating interfaces in media
US4570487A (en) * 1980-04-21 1986-02-18 Southwest Research Institute Multibeam satellite-pulse observation technique for characterizing cracks in bimetallic coarse-grained component
US4557437A (en) * 1981-08-05 1985-12-10 Rheinmetall Gmbh Process for flight-attitude-adjustment of a flying body and/or activation of live load carried by the flying body and arrangement for carrying out the process
GB2188420A (en) * 1986-03-25 1987-09-30 Atomic Energy Authority Uk Ultrasonic range finding
GB2188420B (en) * 1986-03-25 1990-03-07 Atomic Energy Authority Uk Ultrasonic range finding
GB2193317A (en) * 1986-07-31 1988-02-03 Gec Avionics Monitoring sludge formation in liquid-containing vessels
GB2193317B (en) * 1986-07-31 1990-07-04 Gec Avionics Improvements in or relating to the measurement or monitoring of baseplate deformation in liquid containing vessels such as oil storage tanks
GB2213264A (en) * 1987-06-11 1989-08-09 Commw Of Australia Ultrasonic beam compensation
WO1988009939A1 (en) * 1987-06-11 1988-12-15 Commonwealth Of Australia Ultrasonic beam compensation
GB2213264B (en) * 1987-06-11 1991-06-26 Commw Of Australia Ultrasonic beam compensation
EP0381653A2 (en) * 1989-02-01 1990-08-08 Ab Bofors Method and device for determining the degree of adherence between an explosive and the delimiting surface of a projectile
EP0381653A3 (en) * 1989-02-01 1992-05-06 Ab Bofors Method and device for determining the degree of adherence between an explosive and the delimiting surface of a projectile
DE19856876B4 (en) * 1997-12-10 2005-02-10 Delphi Automotive Systems Deutschland Gmbh Ultrasonic sensor device and method for a contactless detection of objects
US9195325B2 (en) 2002-04-15 2015-11-24 Qualcomm Incorporated Method and system for obtaining positioning data
US9446520B2 (en) 2002-04-15 2016-09-20 Qualcomm Incorporated Method and system for robotic positioning
US7852318B2 (en) 2004-05-17 2010-12-14 Epos Development Ltd. Acoustic robust synchronization signaling for acoustic positioning system
US9632627B2 (en) 2005-03-23 2017-04-25 Qualcomm Incorporated Method and system for digital pen assembly
US9181555B2 (en) 2007-07-23 2015-11-10 Ramot At Tel-Aviv University Ltd. Photocatalytic hydrogen production and polypeptides capable of same

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