GB169548A - Improvements in electrical systems and apparatus for inducing chemical action - Google Patents

Improvements in electrical systems and apparatus for inducing chemical action

Info

Publication number
GB169548A
GB169548A GB1954920A GB1954920A GB169548A GB 169548 A GB169548 A GB 169548A GB 1954920 A GB1954920 A GB 1954920A GB 1954920 A GB1954920 A GB 1954920A GB 169548 A GB169548 A GB 169548A
Authority
GB
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
arc
electrode
chamber
solution
electrolyte
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired
Application number
GB1954920A
Original Assignee
William John Rickets
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01JCHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL PROCESSES, e.g. CATALYSIS OR COLLOID CHEMISTRY; THEIR RELEVANT APPARATUS
    • B01J19/00Chemical, physical or physico-chemical processes in general; Their relevant apparatus
    • B01J19/08Processes employing the direct application of electric or wave energy, or particle radiation; Apparatus therefor
    • B01J19/087Processes employing the direct application of electric or wave energy, or particle radiation; Apparatus therefor employing electric or magnetic energy
    • B01J19/088Processes employing the direct application of electric or wave energy, or particle radiation; Apparatus therefor employing electric or magnetic energy giving rise to electric discharges

Abstract

169,548. Rickets, W. J. July 8, 1920. Gases, treating with electric discharge ; electrode and electrolytic furnaces.-A direct-current electric arc is maintained between a solid electrode and an electrolytic solution, so that chemical reactions occur between the solid electrode, the gas or vapour in which the arc is formed. the electrolyte, or ionic or other constituents of some or all of these. The solid electrode 5 may be of carbon, and may contain metallic salts such as sodium or mercuric chloride; it may be hollow for the conveyance of gases, vapours, or volatilizable substances through the arc. Either the electrode 5 or the arc mav be rotated, a coil 13, which may be of chemically resistant bronze, being provided for the latter purpose. A screw 16 and hand-wheel 17 are shown for adjusting the electrode. Alternatively, combustion of the electrode may be compensated for by raising the level of the liquid. Gases may pass from the arc chamber 1 to separators 10 such as condensers or absorption towers, and returned by a pump 9 and flexible tube 8 through the electrode. The pressure within the chamber 1 may be controlled by escape or reducing valves or pumps. Within the chamber the gas and the electrolyte may be driven past the are by paddles, fans, or fluid jets. A porcelain or like disc 15 may be placed around the electrode 5 to guide the gas through the arc and in contact with the liquid surface. The electrolyte may also be circulated through separators such as a crystallizer 11 and filter 11<a> and back to the chamber, after regeneration if necessary. It may contain non-electrolytes in solution, and may be aqueous or alcoholic. The arc chamber may be heated or cooled by jackets, pipes, or resistances in the walls. Current is conveyed to the electrolyte by the wall of the chamber or by submerged electrodes 3, which may be situated behind impervious screens, not reaching to the bottom of the chamber, or behind partly-porous diaphragms 20, to separate any electrolytic products evolved at these electrodes. In series with the arc are connected a rheostat 18 and an inductance 7, exceeding one henry. Several electrodes, each with its own inductance and resistance, may arc on to a common body of liquid. Acetylene may be formed from carbon electrodes in hydrogen, and may immediately combine with cuprous salts in the solution. Cyanides may be produced by using carbon electrodes in nitrogen above a solution of sodium sulphate or mercuric chloride. Aqueous lead acetate solution and alcoholic cupric chloride may also be used as electrolytes. Specifications 7226/92 and 158,250 are referred to. According to the Provisional Specification, the liquid may consist of fused salts or the like.
GB1954920A 1920-07-08 1920-07-08 Improvements in electrical systems and apparatus for inducing chemical action Expired GB169548A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB1954920A GB169548A (en) 1920-07-08 1920-07-08 Improvements in electrical systems and apparatus for inducing chemical action

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB1954920A GB169548A (en) 1920-07-08 1920-07-08 Improvements in electrical systems and apparatus for inducing chemical action

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
GB169548A true true GB169548A (en) 1921-10-06

Family

ID=10131228

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
GB1954920A Expired GB169548A (en) 1920-07-08 1920-07-08 Improvements in electrical systems and apparatus for inducing chemical action

Country Status (1)

Country Link
GB (1) GB169548A (en)

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2458321A (en) * 1946-03-29 1949-01-04 Henry M Unschuld Flow tube
US5506095A (en) * 1993-06-17 1996-04-09 Nu-Logic Dental Mfg., Inc. Dental cast tray subassembly

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2458321A (en) * 1946-03-29 1949-01-04 Henry M Unschuld Flow tube
US5506095A (en) * 1993-06-17 1996-04-09 Nu-Logic Dental Mfg., Inc. Dental cast tray subassembly

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