FR3079628A1 - Cassette for optical fiber - Google Patents

Cassette for optical fiber Download PDF

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Publication number
FR3079628A1
FR3079628A1 FR1852812A FR1852812A FR3079628A1 FR 3079628 A1 FR3079628 A1 FR 3079628A1 FR 1852812 A FR1852812 A FR 1852812A FR 1852812 A FR1852812 A FR 1852812A FR 3079628 A1 FR3079628 A1 FR 3079628A1
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FR
France
Prior art keywords
fiber
cassette
cavity
plates
wall
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Pending
Application number
FR1852812A
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French (fr)
Inventor
Daniel Yves Lecoq
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Orange SA
Original Assignee
Orange SA
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Orange SA filed Critical Orange SA
Priority to FR1852812A priority Critical patent/FR3079628A1/en
Priority to FR1852812 priority
Publication of FR3079628A1 publication Critical patent/FR3079628A1/en
Pending legal-status Critical Current

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Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G02OPTICS
    • G02BOPTICAL ELEMENTS, SYSTEMS, OR APPARATUS
    • G02B6/00Light guides
    • G02B6/44Mechanical structures for providing tensile strength and external protection for fibres, e.g. optical transmission cables
    • G02B6/4401Optical cables
    • G02B6/4439Auxiliary devices
    • G02B6/444Systems and boxes with surplus length
    • G02B6/4441[Boxes]

Abstract

The invention relates to a cassette comprising a cavity for storing a segment of an optical fiber, the cavity being delimited on the underside by a lower plate, on the top by an upper plate, and on the sides by a wall connecting the plates between they, the inner surfaces of the plates and the wall being smooth, the cavity being free of obstacles and having an opening through which the fiber segment is intended to be inserted or extracted, by longitudinal sliding.

Description

Fiber optic cassette

1. Field of the invention

The invention request is in the field of fiber optic access network, and more particularly that of connecting a customer's fiber to a fiber of the access network, for example at a point service to several customers.

2. State of the prior art

As part of the deployment of optical fiber to the customer, the fiber optic access network is deployed to a point, called connection point, beyond which there is a cable comprising between one and four optical fibers for each customer, but the connection of this cable to the access network is generally made only at the customer's request.

Similarly, inside a dwelling or a room, optical sockets can be pre-installed, before the arrival of the access network in the building or house, or before the installation of the equipment final termination optics.

In order to allow a technician, at the time of the final connection, to perform the soldering between the two optical fibers with sufficient room for maneuver, each of the fibers is extended by an over-length. The connection point or the optical outlet being generally located in a difficult place of access, such as a landing cupboard, an underground room, or behind a piece of furniture, the extra lengths allow it to extract from the connection point the two ends of fiber to be welded to bring them to the optical welder, which is generally placed on the ground or on a workbench, in a stable and protected position.

When the welding is completed, the technician is therefore required to put the fiber extra lengths in cassettes provided for this purpose.

Such a cassette consists of a flat bottom, the edges of which are provided with tongues arranged in a circle or in an oval and forming a perimeter in which the fiber must be coiled manually over several turns. The free ends of the tabs are directed towards the center of the cassette to prevent the exit of a coiled fiber from the top of the cassette.

The propagation of light in the fiber must not be attenuated by excessive bending stress when the fiber is in its storage position in the cassette. In addition, the fiber structure must not be damaged during handling by excessive bending stress, even momentary.

Coiling a fiber in such a cassette is a long operation which requires a certain dexterity, because the fiber is fine and fragile, and the cassette is of reduced size so as not to clutter the connection point. In addition, the connection point can be in a cramped location that is difficult to access, or even exposed to the weather, such as a cavity under a sidewalk, a cabinet on the public highway or a box at the top of a pole.

When the technician cools the fiber in the cassette, he must take care not to skip any tabs at each of the coiling turns. In addition, to get out of the cassette the length of fiber it needs to connect a customer, it must sometimes take out several fibers coiled in the same cassette, often intermingled, connecting or intended to connect other customers. Once the connection is made, the reverse operation is of course necessary, that is to say the reinsertion of all the fibers into the cassette.

One of the aims of the invention is to remedy these drawbacks of the state of the art.

3. Statement of the invention

The invention improves the situation using a cassette comprising a cavity for storing a segment of an optical fiber, the cavity being delimited on the underside by a lower plate, on the top by an upper plate, and on the sides by a wall connecting the plates together, the internal surfaces of the plates and of the wall being smooth, the cavity being free of obstacle and having an opening through which the fiber segment is intended to be inserted or extracted, by sliding longitudinal.

The cassette according to the invention can be formed in one piece or in several assembled pieces. To store a segment of fiber in this cassette, simply slide it inside the cassette by pushing it through the opening. The user begins by inserting one end of the fiber segment, if one of the two ends is free, or by inserting a loop formed in the segment, for example towards the middle of the segment, if neither of the two ends is free.

Then it is enough to push the rest of the segment towards the interior of the cavity. As the interior surface of the wall is smooth, the fiber slides along this surface. Under the effect of the push, it ends up automatically winding on itself inside the cavity.

Unlike the prior art, the fiber is no longer coiled, lap after lap, by the top of the cassette, along the tabs positioned in the bottom of the cassette. This avoids manual and delicate operations consisting of winding or unwinding the fiber following the tabs. This also avoids the need for a large opening on the top of the cassette to gain access to the tabs. The cassette according to the invention can thus be closed completely and permanently, which protects the fiber when it is stored inside.

Another advantage is that the user can move the cassette away from the fiber connection point, where the cassette storage position is, and bring it closer as he pushes the fiber into the cavity. of the cassette. This avoids the user having to work constantly inside a connection point which is cramped and difficult to access.

According to one aspect of the cassette, the dimensions of the cavity, in the plane of the plates, are such that a circle can be inscribed therein, this circle being of radius equal to or greater than a radius of curvature of the fiber below which an optical signal flowing in the fiber is degraded, called the attenuation radius.

The attenuation radius of a fiber is the radius of the smallest of the circles that this fiber can follow without the attenuation of the optical signal carried by this fiber becoming unacceptable.

Thanks to the above aspect, the fiber has enough space to wind up in the cassette and to take up a storage position in which an optical signal carried by the fiber is not degraded by its curvature.

In a preferred embodiment, the diameter of the inscribed circle is close to four times the attenuation radius. For an optical fiber of 250 microns, the attenuation radius is for example 15 mm. The circle inscribed in the cavity would therefore be 60 mm in diameter.

According to one aspect of the cassette, the distance from one plate to the other is between twice the diameter of the fiber and twice a radius of curvature of the fiber below which the fiber is damaged, called the breaking radius .

The breaking radius of a fiber is the radius of the smallest of the circles that this fiber can marry without being damaged. The elasticity of a fiber, that is to say the spring effect which causes it to resume a rectilinear shape when it is subjected to bending, is such that the fiber reaches this breaking radius only under the constraint. Therefore, between two possible paths presented to the fiber when it is pushed into the cavity, the fiber will automatically choose the path which constrains it the least.

Thus thanks to this aspect, when the fiber is pushed into the cavity, it does not take a random path on the surface of one of the plates, but it necessarily follows the wall, which constrains it less than the plates. In addition, for optimal occupancy of the volume of the cavity, it is important that the fiber remains as close as possible to the perimeter formed by the interior of the wall, which is also favored by this aspect.

In addition, limiting the distance between the plates has the advantage of ensuring a substantially flat shape for the cassette, which facilitates its storage and stacking with other cassettes of the same type.

In a preferred embodiment, the distance from one plate to another, that is to say the thickness of the cavity, is close to eight times the diameter of the fiber.

For an optical fiber 250 microns in diameter, the breaking radius is for example 5 mm. The thickness of the cavity must therefore be between 500 microns and 10 mm, and is ideally 2 mm.

According to one aspect of the cassette, the interior perimeter of the wall in the plane of the plates is generally convex in shape and has no radius of curvature less than the attenuation radius.

Thus, the fiber can marry the inner perimeter of the wall, that is to say be in contact uninterruptedly over a length of the wall. This guarantees optimal use by the fiber of the space in the cavity, without the signal carried by the fiber being unacceptably attenuated.

As regards the section of the wall inside the cavity, different profiles are possible. The wall can form a right angle with the plates, provided that the assembly does not have any slot or micro slot in which the fiber could become trapped. Alternatively, the wall may also have the shape of a gutter, each edge of which is tangentially extended by one of the plates.

According to one aspect of the cassette, one of the dimensions of the opening is greater than or equal to twice the breaking radius.

If no end of the fiber is free, a loop of fiber must be inserted in the cassette. Thanks to this aspect, the size of the opening is sufficient to pass the fiber loop through without damaging the fiber structure.

If, on the other hand, it is an end of fiber which is inserted into the cassette, the opening may be much smaller.

Preferably, although greater in length than twice the breaking radius, the opening must however be short enough for the spring effect due to the elasticity of the fiber to be sufficient to prevent it from accidentally leaving the cassette.

For an optical fiber 250 microns in diameter with a breaking radius of 5 mm, the opening is for example a slot 11 mm long.

According to one aspect of the cassette, the opening is in the wall, and the wall is continuous on either side of the opening, in the plane of the plates.

Thanks to this aspect, the fiber emerges from the cassette through the edge of the cassette, that is to say in the extension of the plane formed by its plates. This reduces the thickness of the cassette, and therefore its size, because the fiber does not emerge from above or from below. The cassette can thus be stacked on another cassette without its fiber (s) interfering.

According to one aspect of the cassette, the wall on either side of the opening is flared towards the inside of the cavity, in the plane of the plates.

Thanks to this aspect, the opening through which the fiber emerges from the cassette does not have any roughness liable to hinder the sliding of the fiber through the opening, or to damage the fiber.

Preferably, the wall on either side of the opening is also flared outwards, if only very slightly and over a very slight distance.

According to one aspect of the cassette, the wall has since the opening a concave curve whose radius is greater than the attenuation radius, in the plane of the plates.

Thanks to this aspect, the fiber at the opening does not risk being bent below its attenuation radius.

We understand that in this embodiment the volume formed by the cavity has the shape of a racket, that is to say a flattened shape, the edges of which are convex in the main part where the fiber is housed, and whose the edges are concave in the part close to the opening.

In another embodiment of the opening of the cassette, the opening is in one of the plates, and the wall is continuous and uninterrupted.

In certain configurations it may be inconvenient for the fiber to emerge through the wall, that is to say on the sides of the cassette, for example due to a lack of space in the cassette storage. Thanks to this aspect, the fiber can emerge on top of the cassette.

We understand that in this embodiment the volume formed by the cavity has the shape of a disc, that is to say a flattened shape with a convex perimeter. The shape of the cassette can thus be simply that of a disc, circular or oval, without any protuberance for opening. The shape of the opening can be arbitrary, circular, oval, rectangular, or for example that of a slot in an arc of a circle or in a semicircle, as long as its largest dimension is greater than twice the breaking radius.

According to one aspect of the cassette, one of the plates is at least partially transparent.

Thanks to this aspect, it is possible to assess at a glance the length of fiber inside the cassette, as well as the number of fibers if they are of different colors. The transparency effect can be achieved by using a transparent material, such as a plastic sheet, or by perforations in the otherwise opaque plate. These perforations must then be of sufficiently small dimensions to prevent any involuntary exit of the fiber by one of the perforations.

The various aspects of the cassette which have just been described can be implemented independently of each other or in combination with each other.

The invention also relates to a method of inserting a segment of optical fiber into a cassette comprising a cavity, the cavity being delimited on the underside by a lower plate, on the top by an upper plate, and on the sides by a wall connecting the plates together, the interior surfaces of the plates and of the wall being smooth, the cavity being free of obstacle and comprising an opening through which the fiber segment is intended to be inserted or extracted, the method comprising:

• insertion by the opening of one end of the segment, or of a loop formed in the segment;

• pushing of the rest of the segment by longitudinal sliding towards the interior of the cavity.

4. Presentation of the figures

Other advantages and characteristics of the invention will appear more clearly on reading the following description of a particular embodiment of the invention, given by way of simple illustrative and nonlimiting example, and of the appended drawings, among which :

- Figure 1 shows a first view of the cassette according to a particular embodiment of the invention;

- Figure 2 shows a second view of the cassette according to a particular embodiment of the invention;

- Figure 3 shows a third view of the cassette according to a particular embodiment of the invention.

5. Detailed description of at least one embodiment of the invention

In the following description, an example of an embodiment of the invention is presented, based on a type of optical fiber whose diameter is 250 microns, the attenuation radius (RA) is 15 mm and the radius break point (RC) is 5 mm. Other embodiments are possible from the description of the invention for other types of optical fiber, depending on their diameter, their attenuation radius and their break radius.

For a fiber of type G657A2 according to ITU-T standards (International Telecommunication Union - telecommunications standardization sector), used on the FTTH network, which is 250 microns in diameter including the cladding, the following table indicates the attenuation observed on a complete revolution for 2 different wavelengths and 2 different radii of curvature, as well as the maximum attenuation recommended by the UlT-T.

wave length attenuation for 1 turn, R = 10 mm attenuation for 1 turn, R = 7.5 mm maximum attenuation according to ITU-T standard 1550 nm 0.03 dB 0.10 to O.15dB 0.5 dB 1625 nm 0.07 dB 0.20 to 0.25 dB 1.0 dB

The maximum attenuations set by the standards for fiber optic manufacturers are considered excessive by fiber optic network operators. Much lower attenuations are sought by operators, especially since the attenuations add up for each fiber revolution, and that they are inversely proportional to the radius of curvature taken by the fiber. The design of a cassette to house a fiber segment therefore poses a compromise problem between the need to miniaturize the cassette to optimize the organization of the connection point, both functional and structural, and the search for a radius of curvature of the fiber which is large enough to avoid any attenuation of the optical signal capable of degrading a service dependent on the efficiency of the transmission of the data through the fiber.

Figure 1 shows a first view of the cassette, according to a particular embodiment of the invention.

This first view illustrates the cassette 1, without its upper plate 3 (not shown) in order to better reveal the interior of the cassette. The cassette 1 has a general shape of a racket or drop, with an opening 5 which widens towards the inside of the cassette. The wall 4, which is smooth and uninterrupted from one edge of the opening 5 to the other, defines the lateral limits of a cavity in which a fiber is intended to be housed. Plate 2 defines the lower limit of this cavity, and plate 3 (not shown) defines the upper limit.

In order not to hinder the sliding of a fiber along the wall, and not to constrain the fiber in bending below a radius of attenuation RA, the interior perimeter of the wall presents curves whose radius of curvature is greater than this attenuation radius. The radii R1 and R2 are greater than RA. For the same reason, a circle with a radius greater than RA must be able to fit into the interior perimeter of the wall. In other words, the distance between the closest wall edges in the cavity, except near the opening, that is to say the distance L1 in FIG. 1, is greater than twice RA. In this embodiment, RA = 15 mm and L1 = 60 mm.

Once a fiber is housed in the cassette, it is undesirable for it to inadvertently come out, that is to say for example without manual assistance coming from a technician pulling on a piece of fiber. emerging from the opening. In order to prevent unattended exit, the opening is sufficiently narrow for the spring effect to push the loop (s) of fiber housed in the cassette towards the interior of the cavity, and wide enough to be able to insert or exit a loop without damaging it. This is why the width L2 of the opening in the plane of the plates is greater than RA. In this embodiment, RC = 5 mm and L2 = 11 mm.

The width L2 of the opening 5 can without disadvantage be less than the attenuation radius RA, that is to say 15 mm in this embodiment, because a fiber loop will not be forced to adopt this curvature attenuating the signal optics only during the short time during which the loop in question is inserted or extracted by the opening. In addition, this moment most often corresponds to the installation or repair phase of the optical fiber at a customer, which is a moment during which no data transmission by the fiber takes place, or at least a moment during which optical signal attenuation does not matter.

FIG. 2 presents a second view of the cassette, according to a particular embodiment of the invention.

This second view is an exploded view of the cassette 1, where the upper plate 3 is detached from the cassette, in order to better illustrate how it can be assembled with the wall 4 and the lower plate 2 to form the cassette. The upper plate 3 is, in this embodiment, made of a transparent material, which allows a technician to visually assess the fiber filling state of the cassette.

If, as in this embodiment, the upper plate 3 is of a first transparent material, and if the lower plate 2 and the wall 4 form a single piece of a second non-transparent material, the two pieces can easily be glued to constitute the cassette 1. In other embodiments, the cassette can be molded in one piece, or assembled from 3 pieces (2 plates and 1 wall). The transparency effect can also be obtained with a non-transparent material, for example by means of perforations in one of the plates, of the mesh or porthole type, provided that none of the perforations is large enough to allow accidental exit. a loop of fiber from the cassette. Perforations also have the advantage of reducing the weight and quantity of material in the cassette.

The interior surface of the cavity, and particularly that of the interior perimeter of the wall over which the fiber slides, must be smooth. In order to facilitate the sliding of the fiber inside the cavity during its insertion or extraction, the material used for the manufacture of the parts of the cassette surrounding the cavity, in particular the wall, must have a coefficient of friction reduced. Common plastics (ABS, PET, PVC, etc.) are suitable.

FIG. 3 presents a third view of the cassette, according to a particular embodiment of the invention.

In this third view, the cassette 1 is complete. It is easy to see the flat shape of the cavity between the plates 2, 3 and the wall 4, with the opening 5 made between the plates, at the level of the wall. The reduced thickness of the materials gives the same external shape to the cassette, that is to say a flat shape whose thickness is equal to the sum of the thicknesses of the plates and the height of the wall between the plates.

The edge of the cavity along the wall may have different profiles. If the wall 4 is at right angles to the plates 2 and 3, the profile is rectangular. In order to reduce the risk of the fiber getting stuck against the wall in a corner against one of the plates, it is advantageous for the wall to have a gutter shape, each edge of which touches one of the plates. The profile of the edge of the cavity is then rounded, which eliminates the risk that the fiber is trapped against the wall.

The distance H1 between the plates 2 and 3 determines the height of the cavity. In this embodiment, it is also the height of the opening 5, but this may not be the case in other embodiments. The height of the cavity, like the height of the opening, must be greater than the diameter of the fiber so that it is not trapped in the cavity or at the opening.

However, the height of the cavity, like the height of the opening, must not exceed a certain value, so that the fiber loops housed in the cavity are well superimposed in one plane, that formed by the plates, and not tangled all over the place. In addition, this combined with the elasticity of the fiber contributes to the fact that it is housed as much as possible along the interior perimeter of the wall, which optimizes the space occupied in the cassette. Preferably and in this embodiment, H1 = 2 mm, or 8 times the diameter of the fiber.

Such a cassette according to the invention is reduced in size compared to the prior art. It may be possible to reserve a cassette for each customer connected or to be connected. The technician can therefore connect a new customer without touching the fiber or fibers of other customers already connected. In the case of a single fiber per customer, once the welding has been carried out between the fiber serving the customer's room and the fiber coming from the central office, two fiber over-length loops can be inserted and housed in the cassette, this which results in 4 fibers emerging from the cassette. In the case of 4 fibers per customer, it is 8 loops to be inserted, therefore 16 fibers emerging from the cassette.

In all cases, handling by the technician is simple and quick. One or more loops at a time can be inserted through the opening. The excess fiber lengths are then pushed through the opening towards the inside of the cavity, manually or using a roller mechanism. Thanks to the particular shape of the cassette according to the invention, its cavity and its opening, the fiber loops are coiled automatically one on the other, while keeping a radius of curvature greater than the radius of attenuation. The simplicity of the maneuver, as well as the lightness and small size of the cassette allow the technician to move it according to his needs, and in particular to bring it closer to its storage position as the over-lengths of fiber fit into the cassette. Once all the extra lengths are housed in the cassette, it can be stowed in its storage position in the connection box containing all the cassettes, using a removable fixing (not shown), for example.

A fiber optic cassette according to the invention, because of its smaller size and its ease of handling, makes it possible to envisage an optimization of the functional and structural organization of a connection point between a central office and customers.

Claims (11)

1. Cassette comprising a cavity for storing a segment of an optical fiber, the cavity being delimited on the underside by a lower plate, on the top by an upper plate, and on the sides by a wall connecting the plates together, the the internal surfaces of the plates and of the wall being smooth, the cavity being free of obstacle and comprising an opening through which the segment of fiber is intended to be inserted or extracted, by longitudinal sliding.
2. Cassette according to the preceding claim, wherein the dimensions of the cavity, in the plane of the plates, are such that a circle can be inscribed therein, this circle being of radius equal to or greater than a radius of curvature of the fiber in below which an optical signal circulating in the fiber is degraded, called the attenuation radius.
3. Cassette according to the preceding claim, wherein the distance from one plate to another is between twice the diameter of the fiber and twice a radius of curvature of the fiber below which the fiber is damaged, called radius break.
4. Cassette according to one of the preceding claims, wherein the inner perimeter of the wall in the plane of the plates is generally convex in shape and has no radius of curvature less than the attenuation radius.
5. Cassette according to one of the preceding claims, where one of the dimensions of the opening is greater than or equal to twice the breaking radius.
6. Cassette according to one of the preceding claims, where the opening is in the wall, and where the wall is continuous on either side of the opening, in the plane of the plates.
7. Cassette according to the preceding claim, wherein the wall on either side of the opening is flared towards the inside of the cavity, in the plane of the plates.
8. Cassette according to the preceding claim, wherein the wall has since the opening a concave curve whose radius is greater than the attenuation radius, in the plane of the plates.
9. Cassette according to one of claims 1 to 5, where the opening is in one of the plates, and where the wall is continuous and uninterrupted.
10. Cassette according to one of the preceding claims, wherein one of the plates is at least partially transparent.
11. A method of inserting a segment of optical fiber into a cassette comprising a cavity, the cavity being delimited on the underside by a lower plate, on the top by an upper plate, and on the sides by a wall connecting the plates between them, the interior surfaces of the plates and of the wall being smooth, the cavity being free of obstacle and comprising an opening through which the fiber segment is intended to be inserted or extracted, the method comprising:
• insertion by the opening of one end of the segment, or of a loop formed in the segment;
• pushing of the rest of the segment by longitudinal sliding towards the interior of the cavity.
FR1852812A 2018-03-30 2018-03-30 Cassette for optical fiber Pending FR3079628A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
FR1852812A FR3079628A1 (en) 2018-03-30 2018-03-30 Cassette for optical fiber
FR1852812 2018-03-30

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
FR1852812A FR3079628A1 (en) 2018-03-30 2018-03-30 Cassette for optical fiber

Publications (1)

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FR3079628A1 true FR3079628A1 (en) 2019-10-04

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Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
FR1852812A Pending FR3079628A1 (en) 2018-03-30 2018-03-30 Cassette for optical fiber

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FR (1) FR3079628A1 (en)

Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB2074544A (en) * 1980-04-30 1981-11-04 Gen Electric Co Ltd Storing Optical Fibre
EP0253728A1 (en) * 1986-07-15 1988-01-20 SAT Société Anonyme de Télécommunications Storage device for optical fibres
EP0531921A2 (en) * 1991-09-09 1993-03-17 Sumitomo Electric Industries, Limited Redundant length treatment mechanism for optical fiber at terminal of optical cable

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB2074544A (en) * 1980-04-30 1981-11-04 Gen Electric Co Ltd Storing Optical Fibre
EP0253728A1 (en) * 1986-07-15 1988-01-20 SAT Société Anonyme de Télécommunications Storage device for optical fibres
EP0531921A2 (en) * 1991-09-09 1993-03-17 Sumitomo Electric Industries, Limited Redundant length treatment mechanism for optical fiber at terminal of optical cable

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