FR3015174B1 - Electroluminescent diode lighting system with remote luminaire - Google Patents

Electroluminescent diode lighting system with remote luminaire Download PDF

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Publication number
FR3015174B1
FR3015174B1 FR1362778A FR1362778A FR3015174B1 FR 3015174 B1 FR3015174 B1 FR 3015174B1 FR 1362778 A FR1362778 A FR 1362778A FR 1362778 A FR1362778 A FR 1362778A FR 3015174 B1 FR3015174 B1 FR 3015174B1
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iii
power
wire
luminaire
control circuit
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FR3015174A1 (en
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Ghislain Baussan
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SECURLITE
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SECURLITE
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    • H05B47/185
    • H05B47/105

Abstract

The invention relates to a light-emitting diode lighting system (1000) comprising a presence detector (113) controlling at least two luminaires (100, 200), at least one of which is remote from the presence detector (113), powered by two power supply wires (I, II) and controlled by a control wire (III) connected to the presence detector (113). The luminaire (200) comprises a control circuit connected to the three wires (I, II, III) and provided with a power switch, and a power circuit arranged between the power switch and the light source. The control circuit is powered by the supply circuit so that the opening of the power switch interrupts the supply of power to the control circuit. The control circuit is able to draw energy on the control wire (III) on receiving a signal on this wire (III).

Description

The invention relates to lighting systems, and in particular those comprising remotely controlled luminaires.

In the field of building, the management of the ignition and extinction of a set of light sources depends on the number of light sources and the number of control organs. From single-switch mounting to touch-switch mounting through "back-and-forth" installations, all light sources that must be simultaneously turned on / off are connected to common electrical wires. As a result, the electrical intensity passing through these wires corresponds to the cumulative power consumption of all the light sources. It is then necessary to use a switch type control member supporting such power.

Patent Application EP 2 542 029 in the name of Toshiba Lighting & Technology Corporation, filed March 21, 2012 and EP Patent Application 2,536,253 in the name of Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. filed February 13, 2011, describe light emitting diode lighting. The use of low-energy light sources, such as light-emitting diodes, has also been promoted by the Applicant for more than five years.

The Applicant has furthermore identified the need for a lighting system having a low installation cost, and for which three cables are sufficient to power and control a large number of light sources and to allow a control member to control the ignition. light sources of which at least one is distant. The invention improves the situation.

The Applicant proposes a light-emitting diode lighting system comprising a presence detector capable of controlling the illumination and at least two luminaires controlled by the presence detector. At least one of the luminaires is distant from the presence detector. This luminaire is powered by two power supply wires and controlled by a control wire connected to the presence detector. The luminaire comprises a light-emitting diode light source, a control circuit connected to the two power supply wires and the control wire, and provided with a power switch. The control circuit is able to draw energy from the control wire, on reception of a signal on said control wire. The luminaire further comprises a power circuit provided between the power switch and the light source. The control circuit is powered by the output of the supply circuit so that the opening of the power switch interrupts the supply of power to the control circuit.

Such a system combines presence detector and light-emitting diode light source connected by an electrical network and allowing a large number of light sources. This results in ecological, hygienic, safety, energy efficiency and convenience benefits. In addition, the energy consumption is reduced.

The three electrical wires may consist of three pre-existing wires of an installation to be renovated or converted. The costs of connecting fixtures to an existing electrical network are well below the cost of installing a new wire network and fixtures. The cumulative power of a large number of luminaires becomes compatible with increased system reliability. The number of luminaires able to cooperate is high.

The system may furthermore have the following characteristics, whether combined or not: - The presence detector and one of the luminaires are installed in a common unit. The installation of the presence detector and the light source is performed in one operation instead of two. Mounting and replacement costs are low. - The power switch is a mechanically static component. Lafiability of such switches is high. Their operation is silent. - The power consumption of the control circuit provided by the control wire is less than 1.5 watts. Even during the transient ignition phase, the power passing through the control wire due to the consumption of the control circuit is kept at low levels. An electrical conductor with a small section can thus act as a control wire for a large number of luminaires. Descables which are otherwise too thin to be used as a power supply wire can here be reassigned to the transmission of a control signal, especially during a renovation. - At least one luminaire comprises a progressive extinction member adapted to gradually reduce the luminous flux provided by a light source. The gradual reduction of the luminous intensity serves as a visual indicator of the next extinction of the lights for the user while ensuring a sufficient lighting to anticipate the next darkness. The presence detector comprises an electromechanical relay provided with an output connected to the control wire for controlling said remote luminaire of the presence detector. - The presence detector comprises a static switch or electronic switch provided with an output connected to the control wire for controlling said remote light of the presence detector. The reliability of the system is improved.

In another aspect, the Applicant proposes a kit for installing a lighting system. The kit comprises: - a first luminaire connected to a presence detector, and - at least one second luminaire including a light-emitting diode light source, a control circuit arranged to be connected to power supply wires and a light-emitting wire. control and provided with a power switch, the control circuit being able to draw energy on the control wire to receive a signal on said control wire, and a power circuit disposeantre the power switch and the light source, the control circuit being adapted to be powered by the output of the supply circuit so that the opening of the power switch interrupts the supply of energy to the control circuit.

Such an installation kit can either be used to install a new lighting system or to renovate an existing lighting system by reusing the existing wiring. Other features, details and advantages of the invention will appear on reading the detailed description below, and the appended drawings, in which: FIG. 1 is a schematic representation of part of an illumination system according to the invention, - Figure 2 is an electrical diagram of a luminaire according to the invention, - Figure 3 is an electrical diagram of another luminaire according to the invention, and - Figure 4 is an electrical diagram of another embodiment of the light of Figure 3.

The drawings and description below contain, for the most part, elements of a certain character. They can therefore not only serve to better understand the present invention, but also contribute to its definition, if any. For ease of understanding, the electrical connections are shown in solid lines and the functional links are shown in dashed line and arrowed.

The devices handled by the users are subject to significant wear and tear, especially in places with a lot of public such as staircases, corridors, halls, etc.

In most of these places, manual switches are sources of bacterial decontamination. Moreover, when a person is looking for a switch, the risk of accident in the dark is important.

Lighting systems whose extinction requires the voluntary action of users lead to significant electricity consumption.

Existing electrical installations are unsatisfactory.

In addition, the Applicant has identified numerous obstacles on renovation projects. Many existing power grids include two or three wires. In a context of renovation, the increase in the number of light sources may be desirable. However, the electrical installations to be renovated can not, as they are, support an increase in power consumption. The location of the control members may also be desirable. The electrical installations to be renovated can not, as they are, accommodate control units requiring a dedicated network. A complete replacement including rewiring of buildings is generally not desirable for technical and / or economic reasons. The costs of renovation interventions are generally higher than the cost of electrical appliances. The invention comes to overcome these difficulties.

The lighting system 1000 shown in Figure 1 comprises three sonic I, II and III. Wire means here any electrical conductor such a single wire, a bundle of several son in contact with each other or a cable. The three sonI, II and III are each surrounded by an insulating envelope, for example plastic material. Each wire I, II and III forms an electrical branch of an electrical network. The three son I, II and III extend along a common path, for example along a corridor of a building. The three electrical son I, II, and III are for example arranged together in a common sheath.

The lighting system 1000 comprises a plurality of luminaires of a first type 100 and a plurality of luminaires of a second type 200. Two luminaires of the first type 100 and three luminaires of the second type 200 are shown in FIG. first type 100 and the luminaires of the second type 200 present each three connectors respectively connected to each of the three son I, II and III. In the example described here, the luminaires of the first type 100 are each combined with a presence detector 113 forming a module 10 common. The second type of luminaires 200 form a module 10 without presence detector 113.

The distribution of the luminaires of the first type 100 and of the second type of luminaires 200 along the wires I, II and III is adapted to the specific configuration of each architectural unit in which the electrical installation is carried out. In particular, the lamps of the first type 100 which are combined with presence detectors 113 are distributed in such a way as to cover all the desirable detection zones, whereas all the luminaires 100, 200 which are provided with a source of light are separated from to cover all areas to be illuminated.

In a ready state, the first wire I and the second wire II are turned on by being each connected to one of the terminals of an electrical network, or sector. The detector, for example of the 230 Volts type, is not shown here. The third wire III extends along the first wire I and the second wire II independently of the sector and the earth. The first wire I and the second wire II form two power supply wires. The third wire III forms a control wire.

In addition to the three electrical wires I, II and III, the sheath can accommodate a ground wire. Lefil de terre is similar to the three electric wires I, II and III but acts as a conductive ground. To improve the readability of the figures, the ground wire is not represented.

Reference is now made to FIG. 2, in which an electrical diagram of a module 10 comprising a luminaire of the first type 100 and a detector of presence 113 is shown. The luminaire of the first type 100 combined with the preset detector 113 may be called a master luminaire, an active luminaire or a control luminaire.

The luminaire of the first type 100 comprises a light source 115, a control circuit 120 and a supply circuit 150. The presence detector 113 comprises a detection cell 111, a detection controller 112 and a controlled switch 114.

In the example described here, the module 10 of the luminaire of the first type 100 and the presence detector 113 comprises a housing 11. The housing 11 supports the detector deence 113 and the light source 115. The housing 11 houses the control circuit 120 andthe supply circuit 150. The housing 11 forms a common support for the presence detector 113 and the first type luminaire 100. Alternatively, the presence detector 113 and the first type luminaire 100 can form two separate and electrically connected assemblies. Alternatively, a luminaire of the first type 100 is devoid of light source 115. In this case, the luminaire of the first type 100 provides a detection function in combination with the presence detector 113 and not a lighting function.

The control circuit 120 and the supply circuit 150 each take the form of an electronic card formed of a printed circuit on which electronic components are implanted. Alternatively, the control circuit 120 and the power circuit 150 may comprise a common electronic card and / or comprise a set of components connected by electrical wires rather than by printed circuit boards.

The presence detector 113 here takes the form of an electronemodular card 12 removably plugged into a corresponding socket of the control circuit 120. The detection cell 111 here comprises a high-frequency type (HF) type of motion sensor, here the Gigahertz order. Such a sensor may be housed in the housing 11 without a specific window or opening being provided in a wall of the housing 11. The detection remains effective through the walls of a housing 11, for example made of polycarbonate. As a variant, the detection cell 111 may comprise an infrared (IR) type presence sensor, an inductive, capacitive, or RADAR type motion sensor, or any other sensor or combination of sensors adapted to the desired type of detection.

In the examples shown, the detection cell 111 protrudes from the housing 11 while the detection controller 112 and the controlled switch 114 are housed inside the housing 11. A portion of the presence detector 113 protrudes from the housing 11. Alternatively, the entire presence detector 113 is integrated in the housing 11 or the entire presence detector 113 is offset outside the housing 11, for example fixed on an outer surface. The housing 11 is, here, similar to the antivandalism housing described in the patent application FR 2,815,153 filed by the applicant on October 22, 1999 to which the reader is invited to refer.

In operation, when the detection cell 111 is activated by a presence, a signal is transmitted to the detection controller 112. The detection controller 112 comprises, here, a processor. The detection controller 112 interprets the signal transmitted from the detection cell 111 and sends a control signal to the controlled switch 114 generating its closure.

A first terminal of the controlled switch 114 is connected to the second wire II.A second terminal of the controlled switch 114 is connected to the third wire III. The closing of the controlled switch 114 puts the third wire III at the potential of the second wire II. The second terminal of the controlled switch 114 can be viewed as an output of the control circuit 120 connected to the third wire III. The presence detector 113 ensures a control function. The presence detector 113 and the controlled switch 114 give the luminaire of the first type 100 its active or master device function. When the third wire III is put to the potential of the second wire II, the rest of the 1000 system enters an ignition phase.

The disconnection of the presence detector 113 from the luminaire of the first type 100 makes it possible to obtain a luminaire of the second type 200 and vice versa. The freedom of the presence detector 113 with respect to a module 10 comprising a luminaire of the first type 100 facilitates the standardization of the modules 10 of the luminaires of the first type 100 and of the luminaires of the second type 200. This property isoptional. The presence detector 113 and the control circuit 120 of the first type 100 luminaire can be permanently connected, or even be carried by a common electronic card.

The light source 115 is supported by the housing 11 of the module 10 so that a luminous flux is directed towards the outside of the housing 11. The light source 115 comprises at least one light emitting diode.

The control circuit 120 includes a power switch 121, a controller 123, a start diode 125, a power supply diode 127 and a control reducer 129. The control circuit 120 has two inputs formed bytwo connectors respectively connected to each of the first electrical wire I and the second electrical wire II and an input / output formed by a connector connected to the third wire III. The control circuit 120 furthermore has two outputs IV and V and two inputs VI and VII formed by four links with the supply circuit 150. The connector of the control circuit 120 connected to the first wire I is connected to the second output V. In alternatively, the connection between the first wire I and the power supply circuit 150 is performed without passing through the control circuit 120. The second output V is then overflowing.

The controller 123 of the control circuit 120 is arranged to control the opening and closing of the power switch 121. The controller 123 is connected to the first wire I and the third wire III via the rectifier 129 and the starter diode 125 of the control circuit 120. The rectifier 129, for example a diode bridge, is arranged to transform the alternating current received from the first wire I and third wire III into direct current. The start-up diode 125 is interposed between the controller 129 and the controller 123. The start-up diode 125 is oriented to allow current to flow in a single direction from the rectifier 129 to the controller 123. The controller 123 can thus be supplied with power. by the first filI and the third wire III. The controller 123 is connected to the rectifier 129 so as to detect whether the first wire I and the third wire III are equipotential, that is to say if all the controlled switches 114 of the lighting system 1000 are in the open state. It suffices that a controlled switch 114 of the same module 10 or another module 10 of the lighting system 1000 is closed to equipotential the second wire II and the third wire III and show a voltage between the first wire I and the third wire III.

In operation, when a presence detector 113 is activated and the corresponding controlled switch 114 closes (in the module 10 of FIG. 2 or in another module 10 on the network), the controller 123 is powered by the first wire I and the third wire III, here via the starting diode 125 and the recess 129. The controller 123 then leaves a mode "sleepy" ("Hybernation mode" in English). The term "asleep" is used here because, before closing a controlled switch 114, the controller 123 is not powered and does not consume energy, as it does not leak. The leakage current is less than 100 milliwatts. This mode distinguishes from a "sleep mode" ("sleep mode" or "suspend mode" in English) during which an electronic component remains powered and energy consuming. The controller 123 powered by the first wire I and the third wire III, triggers the closing of the power switch 121.

A first terminal of the power switch 121 is connected to the second filII. A second terminal of the power switch 121 is connected to the first output IV of the control circuit 120 and to the supply circuit 150. In the open state of the power switch 121, the two terminals are electrically isolated. the other. Closing the power switch 121 sets the second wire II and the first output IV of the control circuit 120 to equipotential.

In the example described here, the power switch 121 is a mechanically static component, for example an electronic switch or static contactor such as a thyristor, a triac or a transistor. In the absence of movement, wear is limited, reliability is improved and operation is quiet. Alternatively, the power switch 121 may be of electromechanical type.

The power supply circuit 150 comprises a power rectifier 151, for example a diode bridge, a regulator 153, a filtering capacitor 155 and a switching element 157. The two inputs of the power rectifier 151 also form the two inputs of the power supply circuit. Power supply 150 and are respectively connected to the first output IV and the second output V of the control circuit 120. The two outputs power equalizer 151 are connected to the two inputs of the switching member 157.

The filtering capacitor 155 is connected between the two outputs of the power rectifier 151. The filtering capacitor 155 is arranged so as to smooth the ensuing voltage of the power rectifier 151. In a variant, the power rectifier 151 may be provided with a corrector power factor, or PFC for "Power FactorCorrector" in English, to decrease reactive power consumption. The chopper member 157 is adapted to transmit the received power of the power rectifier 151 by adapting the voltage and / or the current. The regulator 153is able to control a switch of the switching member 157 to adapt the voltage and / or the current. The outputs of the switching member 157 also form outlets of the supply circuit 150. The outputs of the supply circuit 150 are respectively connected to each of the two terminals of the light source 115.

The outputs of the supply circuit 150 are also connected respectively to two inputs VI and VII of the control circuit 120. The two inputs VI and VII of the control circuit 120 are connected to the controller 123 of the control circuit 120. The switching element 157 of the supply circuit 150 is able to supply continuous current to the controller 123 of the control circuit 120.

The power diode 127 of the control circuit 120 is disposed between the switching member 157 and the controller 123, here on the first input VI, so as to supply the controller 123 through the power supply circuit 150 in this direction only.

When the power switch 121 is closed, the power rectifier 151 converts the alternating current, received by the power supply circuit 150 from the first wire I and the second wire II through the control circuit 120, in a continuous circuit. The direct current supplies the light source 115 and the controller 123 via the switching element 157. The power supply of the controller 123 is provided at startup by means of the starting diode 125. Once the power switch 121 closed and the power supply circuit 150 supplied, the controller 123 is further supplied via the supply diode 127. In the following steady state, the controller 123 is powered by both the starter diode 125 and by the supply diode 127 balanced according to the respective voltages. Powered by the power supply circuit 150, the controller 123 continues to keep the power switch 121 closed. The light source 115 continues to be powered by the power supply circuit 150.

When the presence detector 113 stops detecting a presence, the controlled switch 114 opens. The opening of the controlled switch 114 causes the voltage to be switched between the first wire I and the third wire III. In a system 1000 comprising several luminaires of the first type 100, the opening of the last of the controlled switches 114 causes the voltage drop. Thus, a presence detection is sufficient to maintain the permanent phase during which the light sources 115 are turned on.

Preferably, the detection controller 112 of the presence detector 113 comprises a timer arranged to delay the opening of the controlled switch 114. After a predetermined duration of the timer has elapsed, the opening of the controlled switch 114 is caused. .

In response to the detection of the voltage drop of the third wire III, the controller 123 triggers the opening of the power switch 121. To detect the voltage path, the controller 123 is arranged to measure the voltage between the first wire I and the third wire III through the rectifier 129, at least during the permanent phase where the light source 115 is turned on. Alternatively, the controller 123 is arranged to measure the voltage between the second wire II and the third wire III. A control input 123 of the controller is connected for this purpose between the rectifier 129 and the starter diode 125. The opening of the power switch 121 interrupts the supply of energy to the supply circuit 150. When the light source 115 n is more energy-fed, it goes out. When the controller 123 is no longer supplied with energy by the power supply circuit 150, the controller 123 goes into sleep mode. The controller 123 then has a virtually zero consumption, leak currents close. The luminaire of the first type 100 is ready for a new ignition sequence.

In the embodiment described here, the power supply circuit is provided with a filtering capacitance 155. In this case, the light source 115 and the controller 123cause to be supplied with energy only after the filtering capacitor 155 has been discharged. The supply circuit 150 described here is particularly suitable for implementing the embodiment of the FIG. 4 comprising a progressive extinguishing function. The supply circuit 150 may have otherconfigurations, especially in the absence of the option of extinction. The controlled switch 114 of the presence detector 113 of the module 10represented in FIG. 2 can equipotential the second wire II and the third wire III of the system 1000. The appearance of a potential in the third wire III can be detected by the other devices connected to it. This is particularly the case of chaqueluminaire of the first type 100, including that of the module 10 of Figure 2 combined presence detector 113 at the origin of a detection. The luminaires of the second type 200 are also able to detect the appearance of a potential in the third wire III.

Referring now to FIG. 3, a luminaire of the second type 200 is shown. In the example described here, the luminaire of the second type 200 is identical to the light of the first type 100, except that the presence detector 113 connected to the light of the first type 100 is missing in the module 10 of Figure 3. From an electric point, it can be considered that the controlled switch 114 disposed between the second branch II and the third branch III of the luminaire of the first type 100 of Figure 2 is replaced by an open circuit in the luminaire of the second type 200 of Figure 3. As described above, the disconnection of the presence detector 113 from a first type of light 100 provides a second type of luminaire 200 and viceversa. In FIG. 3, the components similar to the luminaire of the first type 100 carry the same reference incremented by one hundred. The activation and operation of the second type luminaire 200 depends on the signal received by the third wire III or control wire. The module 10 comprising the light of the second type 200 differs from the module 10 comprising the luminaire of the first type 100 by its inability to control the power on or off of the third wire III. The luminaire of the second type 200 is then passive, or slave. The light of the first type 100 may alternatively be active when the associated detector 113 is activated and passive when a presence detector 113 of another luminaire of the first type 100 is activated and generates a control signal on the third wire III.

In the luminaire of the second type 200, when the controller 223 is turned on via the third wire III, it triggers the closing of the power switch 221. The operation of the ignition then the extinction of the light source 215 is then similar to that of the light source 115 of the first type 100 luminaire.

The system 1000 may comprise a single or a plurality of luminaires of the first type 100. In the asleep state, that is to say when no presence has been detected by at least one of the presence detectors 113 of the system 1000, each controlled switch 114 is open. The second wire II is isolated from the third wire III. The power switches 121 and 221 are open. The light sources 115 and 215 are extinguished. The voltage between the first wire I and the third wire III is substantially zero. The presence detectors 113 remain energized via the first wire I and the second wire II. The consumption of the presence detector 113 is here about 1 watt.

In a lighting system 1000 as shown in FIG. 1, the light sources 115 of the luminaires of the first type 100 and the light sources 215 of the lamps of the second type 200 are controlled by the presence detectors 113 connected to the luminaires of the first type 100. The intensity of the current passing through the at least one controlled switch 114 closed is virtually zero during the permanent phases because the third wire III does not act as a feed wire. The presence of a nonnull intensity in the controlled switches 114 is limited to a transient phase of triggering the closing of the power switch (s) 121, 221 of the lamps of the first type 100 and of the luminaires of the second type 200. During this transient phase, current is taken from the third wire III to supply the controllers 123, 223 so that the latter trigger the closing of the power switch 121, 221 corresponding. The power consumed by the control circuits 120, 220 supplied by the third wire III is, for example, less than 1.5 watts per control circuit 120, 220. On closing the power switch 121, 221, each power supply circuit 150 of each luminaire of the first type 100 or the second type 200 is energized and in turn supplies the corresponding controller 123, 223.

The logic function "OR", formed here by the start diode 125 and the supply diode 127, allows the energy from the supply circuit 150 to substitute at least in part for that taken at the third wire III for to power the controller 123, 223. The steady state of the lit state of the 115.215 light sources is reached.

The number of luminaires of the first type 100 or of the second type 200 that can be connected to the electrical network formed by the three wires I, II and III is then high. The power passing through the controlled switches 114 is very small. The controlled switches 114 do not represent the factor limiting the admissible power in a lighting system 1000, and thus limiting the number of luminairesadmissible in a lighting system 1000. For comparison, the remote switches of the state of the art generally constitute this limiting factor because of their fragility and the impossibility of resisting the passage of too high currents.

In a context of renovation and / or extension of an existing lighting system, an existing system comprising three son electrically insulated from each other can serve as a basis for forming a system 1000 as described so far. It suffices to connect the luminaires of the first type 100 and the luminaires of the second type 200 to the existing wires.

The three son I, II and III then consist of pre-existing son. The number of light sources can be increased over the existing one without the need for replacement of pre-existing wiring. The conservation of the number of electrical branches, here in number of three (earth line not included), reduces the risk of mounting error. On the other hand, even if a light power connector (II) as heretofore described was erroneously connected to the third wire III, the third wire III would not suffer irreversible damage. By way of comparison, a connection error in an electrical system comprising both power wires (calibrated for 230 V) and control wires (calibrated for 1 to 10 V) may result in overloads that are incompatible with the safety of the equipment. and people.

Controllers generating signals on control wires independent of the three wires I, II and III can be envisaged. A network of dedicated cables must be available to connect all these control devices. Such a network is usually not available. Installing them has an additional cost and increases the risks identified in the previous paragraph.

In the example described here, the luminaires of the first type 100 comprise a light source 115. Alternatively, the light source 115 may be absent. A telluminaire acts as a control member of the lighting system 1000 without providing light. The control circuits 120, 220, the power supply circuits 150, 250 and the light sources 115, 215 can take the form of modular modular assemblies of the luminaire of the first type 100, respectively of the second type of luminaire 200. In the event of a malfunction of one of the removable modular assemblies, a replacement of the incriminated modular assembly is possible without it being necessary to replace all the luminaire.

Reference is now made to FIG. 4 showing a second second type 300 luminaire. In FIG. 4, the components similar to the first type 200 second luminaire bear the same incremented reference of 100. In the example described here, the second luminaire of the second type 300 is identical to the first, except that two additional links are provided between the controller 323 of the control circuit 320 and the regulator 353 of the power supply circuit 350. The controller 323 is additionally to transmit to the regulator 353 a progressive extinction signal.

In operation, when the last controlled switch 114 of the system 1000 is opened, the third wire III sees its potential return substantially to zero. The controller 323 detects this change and sends the progressive extinction signal to the regulator 353. On receipt of the progressive extinction signal, the regulator 353 drives a progressive reduction of the output power of the switching unit 357, causing the progressive extinction the light source 315. The regulator 353 then forms a progressive extinction member capable of gradually decreasing the flux flux provided by the light source 315.

The optional progressive extinction characteristics can be transferred to the luminaires of the first type 100 and / or to the first luminaires of the second type 200.

In a lighting system 1000, first luminaires of the second type 200 and second luminaires of the second type 300 may coexist and be connected to a set of three common wires I, II, and III. In this case, the first luminaires of the second type 200 are suddenly extinguished while the second luminaires of the second type 300 are gradually extinguished. The invention also proposes an installation kit comprising at least one of the first type, or master luminaire, and a luminaire of the second type, or a slave luminaire. The composition of said kit may include one or more fixtures of each of the two types. The kit may include additional modular sets of presence detectors and / or modular sets of additional light sources. The additional modular assemblies are intended to be added to luminaires of the second type. This makes it possible to transform and adapt the luminaires of both types. The composition of the kit can be adapted to the card according to the desired lighting system 1000. The invention is not limited to the examples of systems and kits described above, only as examples, but encompasses all variants that may be considered by those skilled in the art within the scope of the claims below.

Claims (8)

  1. claims
    1. Light-emitting diode lighting system (1000), characterized in that it comprises a presence detector (113) capable of controlling the illumination and at least two luminaires (100, 200, 300) controlled by the presence detector (H3), at least one of the luminaires (200; 300) being remote from the presence detector (113), powered by two power supply wires (I, II) and controlled by a control wire (III) connected to the detector presence detector (113), said luminaire (200; 300) comprising: - a light-emitting diode (215; 315) light source; - a control circuit (220; 320) connected to the power supply wires (I, II) and the control wire (III) and provided with a power switch (221; 321), the control circuit (220; 320) being able to draw energy on the control wire (III) on receipt of a signal on said control wire (III), and - a supply circuit (250; 350) disposed between the switch r power (221; 321) and the light source (215; 315), the control circuit (220; 320) being supplied by the output (VI; VII) of the supply circuit (250; 350) so that the opening of the power switch (221; 321) interrupts the supplies power to the control circuit (220; 320).
  2. 2. System according to claim 1, wherein the presence detector (113) and luminaires (100) are installed in a set (11) common.
  3. 3. System according to one of claims 1 and 2, wherein the power switch (221; 321) is a mechanically static component.
  4. 4. System according to one of the preceding claims, wherein the consumed power of the control circuit (220; 320) provided by the control wire (III) is less than 1.5 watt.
  5. 5. System according to one of the preceding claims, wherein at least one light (300) comprises a progressive extinguishing member (353) capable of gradually decreasing the luminous flux provided by a light source (315).
  6. 6. System according to one of the preceding claims, whereinpresence detector (113) comprises an electromechanical relay (114) provided with a control wire output (III) for controlling said luminaire (200; 300) remote from the detector of presence (113).
  7. 7. System according to one of claims 1 to 5, wherein the presence detector (113) comprises an electronic switch (114) provided with an output connected to the control wire (III) for controlling said luminaire (200; 300) remote from the presence detector (113).
  8. 8. Installation kit of a system (1000) according to one of the preceding claimscomprenant: - a first luminaire (100) - a presence detector (113) adapted to be connected to the first luminaire (100), and - to at least one second luminaire (200; 300) including a light-emitting diode (215; 315) light source; a control circuit (220; 320) arranged to be connected to power supply wires (I, II) and to a control wire (III) and provided with a power switch (221; 321), the control circuit (220; 320) being adapted to draw power on the control wire (III) upon receipt of a signal on said control wire (III), and a supply circuit (250; 350) disposed between the power switch (221; 321) and the light source (215; 315), the control circuit (220; 320 ) being adapted to be supplied by the output (VI; VII) of the power supply circuit (250; 350) so that the opening of the power switch this (221; 321) interrupts the power supply to the control circuit (220; 320).
FR1362778A 2013-12-17 2013-12-17 Electroluminescent diode lighting system with remote luminaire Active FR3015174B1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

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FR1362778 2013-12-17
FR1362778A FR3015174B1 (en) 2013-12-17 2013-12-17 Electroluminescent diode lighting system with remote luminaire

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Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
FR1362778A FR3015174B1 (en) 2013-12-17 2013-12-17 Electroluminescent diode lighting system with remote luminaire

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FR3015174A1 FR3015174A1 (en) 2015-06-19
FR3015174B1 true FR3015174B1 (en) 2019-08-09

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
ES2307609T3 (en) * 2000-04-12 2008-12-01 Marko Cencur Compact electric switch without contact.
US9736911B2 (en) * 2012-01-17 2017-08-15 Lutron Electronics Co. Inc. Digital load control system providing power and communication via existing power wiring

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