FR2658024A1 - Device for simulating a luminous effect of the flashing beacon type - Google Patents

Device for simulating a luminous effect of the flashing beacon type Download PDF

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Publication number
FR2658024A1
FR2658024A1 FR9001707A FR9001707A FR2658024A1 FR 2658024 A1 FR2658024 A1 FR 2658024A1 FR 9001707 A FR9001707 A FR 9001707A FR 9001707 A FR9001707 A FR 9001707A FR 2658024 A1 FR2658024 A1 FR 2658024A1
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Prior art keywords
light
activation
signals
diodes
emitting diodes
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Granted
Application number
FR9001707A
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French (fr)
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FR2658024B1 (en
Inventor
Reibel Jean-Michel
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INFORMATIQUE REALITE
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INFORMATIQUE REALITE
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Priority to FR9001707A priority Critical patent/FR2658024B1/en
Publication of FR2658024A1 publication Critical patent/FR2658024A1/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of FR2658024B1 publication Critical patent/FR2658024B1/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Application status is Expired - Fee Related legal-status Critical

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Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05BELECTRIC HEATING; ELECTRIC LIGHTING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05B33/00Electroluminescent light sources
    • H05B33/02Details
    • H05B33/08Circuit arrangements not adapted to a particular application
    • H05B33/0803Circuit arrangements not adapted to a particular application for light emitting diodes [LEDs] comprising only inorganic semiconductor materials
    • H05B33/0806Structural details of the circuit
    • H05B33/0809Structural details of the circuit in the conversion stage
    • H05B33/0815Structural details of the circuit in the conversion stage with a controlled switching regulator
    • H05B33/0818Structural details of the circuit in the conversion stage with a controlled switching regulator wherein HF AC or pulses are generated in the final stage
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60QARRANGEMENT OF SIGNALLING OR LIGHTING DEVICES, THE MOUNTING OR SUPPORTING THEREOF OR CIRCUITS THEREFOR, FOR VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60Q1/00Arrangements or adaptations of optical signalling or lighting devices
    • B60Q1/26Arrangements or adaptations of optical signalling or lighting devices the devices being primarily intended to indicate the vehicle, or parts thereof, or to give signals, to other traffic
    • B60Q1/2611Indicating devices mounted on the roof of the vehicle
    • GPHYSICS
    • G08SIGNALLING
    • G08BSIGNALLING OR CALLING SYSTEMS; ORDER TELEGRAPHS; ALARM SYSTEMS
    • G08B5/00Visible signalling systems, e.g. personal calling systems, remote indication of seats occupied
    • G08B5/22Visible signalling systems, e.g. personal calling systems, remote indication of seats occupied using electric transmission; using electromagnetic transmission
    • G08B5/36Visible signalling systems, e.g. personal calling systems, remote indication of seats occupied using electric transmission; using electromagnetic transmission using visible light sources
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05BELECTRIC HEATING; ELECTRIC LIGHTING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05B33/00Electroluminescent light sources
    • H05B33/02Details
    • H05B33/08Circuit arrangements not adapted to a particular application
    • H05B33/0803Circuit arrangements not adapted to a particular application for light emitting diodes [LEDs] comprising only inorganic semiconductor materials
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05BELECTRIC HEATING; ELECTRIC LIGHTING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05B33/00Electroluminescent light sources
    • H05B33/02Details
    • H05B33/08Circuit arrangements not adapted to a particular application
    • H05B33/0803Circuit arrangements not adapted to a particular application for light emitting diodes [LEDs] comprising only inorganic semiconductor materials
    • H05B33/0842Circuit arrangements not adapted to a particular application for light emitting diodes [LEDs] comprising only inorganic semiconductor materials with control
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05BELECTRIC HEATING; ELECTRIC LIGHTING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05B37/00Circuit arrangements for electric light sources in general
    • H05B37/02Controlling
    • H05B37/029Controlling a plurality of lamps following a preassigned sequence, e.g. theater lights, diapositive projector

Abstract

Device for simulating a rotary luminous effect, characterised in that it comprises at least three light-emitting diodes (1), arranged circularly and mounted in a star configuration (2), and an electronic control circuit (3) supplied with power and connected to the output of each of these light-emitting diodes (1), the rotary luminous effect being obtained by successive activations of the light-emitting diodes under the control of the electronic circuit according to a defined sequence. Application: miniature vehicles. <IMAGE>

Description

DEVICE FOR SIMULATING A TYPICAL ALUMINUM EFFECT
BEACON.

 The invention relates to an improved device capable of simulating the light effect generated by a beacon. It relates more specifically to a device capable of simulating this effect on miniature vehicles.

 Beacons are nowadays in common use, especially for safety and emergency vehicles.

They are typically composed of a permanently lit bulb around which a screen partly turns off the luminous flux generated by said bulb, activated in rotation by means of a motor, generally electric. Advantageously, the face of the screen facing the bulb is covered with a light reflecting material.

While certainly this type of device is quite suitable for the use of conventional vehicles, for which no problem of energy source arises, however, the adaptation of such a device on miniature vehicles presents some difficulties , given, on the one hand, the size of the engine, and on the other hand, its high energy consumption
Thus, this adaptation results in a high cost, increased cost given the repeated change of batteries or equivalents in order to activate the engine. Finally, this engine is noisy for miniature vehicles, making their use unthinkable.

 The invention overcomes these disadvantages. It proposes a device capable of simulating the light effect of a beacon, incorporating simple components, so low cost, small footprint, totally soundproof and easy to implement.

 This device is characterized in that it comprises at least three light-emitting diodes (generally called by the acronym LED), arranged in a circular manner and mounted in a star, and an electronic control circuit connected to the output of each of these light-emitting diodes, the light effect of the beacon being obtained by successive activations of the light emitting diodes on injunction of the electronic circuit according to a defined sequence.

 In other words, the invention consists in selectively activating a number of light-emitting diodes, arranged in such a way that the emitted light flux describes a complete rotation in a given plane.

 It has been found that in order to induce a realistic rotation simulation, a minimum number of three light-emitting diodes is required. Indeed, the breaking of the emitted light beam is too important and noticeable if only two diodes are used. However, it is quite possible to include more than three LEDs, when one wishes to improve the rendering of the device, without increasing the technicality of the electronic circuit.

Advantageously, in practice
the activation of the light-emitting diodes is sequenced so that a partial overlap of the LED activation times is provided at the end of the activation of each of them and at the beginning of the consecutive LED activation; Indeed, in order to obtain a more realistic and less haphazard simulation of the rotation effect, such an overlap proves judicious
during the overlapping phases of the activation times of the LEDs, the total light intensity of the two electroluminescent diodes activated simultaneously is equal to the light intensity of a light-emitting diode in isolated operation outside these overlapping phases; this is intended to further improve the rendering of the simulation, by canceling the overcurrent generated during the overlapping phases
the activation signals are modulated during the overlapping phases in order to materialize a progress that improves the visual simulation obtained
the electroluminescent diodes are activated from a triggering element connected to the electronic circuit.

According to the invention, the electronic circuit capable of activating the light-emitting diodes, comprises
an oscillator for generating logic signals of fixed fixed frequency;
a pre-divider, receiving said oscillator signals, and intended to adapt the frequency of the signals generated by the oscillator to the virtual rotation speed of the light signal generated by the LEDs, and actually perceived by the user; ;
a counter, intended to count the pulses emitted by the pre-divider, and therefore the different phases of switching on and off of the LEDs,
a logic control unit receiving the counter signals and capable of managing these signals, and consequently the switching on and off sequences of the LEDs, the latter being activated on an injunction of a tripping member, and in turn causing the activation of the oscillator, this activation being stopped when a predetermined number of phases corresponding to a virtual rotation has been reached, the signals coming from the counter being further decoded by means of a decoder, and transmitted to a read-only memory, containing an ignition sequence of each of the LEDs, each of the signals from the decoder selecting one of the addresses of the memory, causing in turn to turn on or off the LED considered.

 The way in which the invention can be realized and the advantages which result therefrom will emerge more clearly from the exemplary embodiment which follows, given by way of indication and not limitation, in support of the appended figures.

 Figure 1 is a simplified block diagram of the device according to the invention.

 Fig. 2 is a graph showing the activation of the light emitting diodes.

 FIG. 3 is a diagram of the same type as that of FIG. 2 in which the overlapping phases are represented.

 FIG. 4 is a representative graph of the modulation of the signals transmitted to the light-emitting diodes as a function of time.

 FIG. 5 is a graphical representation of the variation of the luminous intensity of the LEDs over time, complementary to the graph of FIG. 4.

 Figure 6 is a schematic representation of the electronic control circuit according to the invention.

 According to the invention and as can be seen in FIG. 1, the device capable of simulating the light effects of a beacon consists of three star-shaped electroluminescent diodes (1) (2). However, to the extent that it is desired to complete the rotating light effect, it is quite possible without departing from the spirit of the invention to increase this number. These three light-emitting diodes are arranged in a circle precisely to simulate this rotating aspect of the beacon. They are fed successively in a sequence determined by an electronic circuit (3), the light-emitting diodes (1) and said circuit (3) being fed by a common energy source not shown.

 In an advantageous form of the invention, the device is started by means of a triggering device (4), advantageously constituted by a proximity detector, a pushbutton, a noise detector, a light detector, etc. . This detector is located in the miniature vehicle on which is mounted the device according to the invention.

 According to the invention, each of the electroluminescent diodes (1) is activated one after the other, this activation with respect to the other being offset by a phase shift expressed in corresponding time units in the case of one-third of the inverse of the number of revolutions per unit of time that one wishes to simulate. For example, if one wishes to simulate a rotation of three revolutions / second, the phase difference between each activation of light-emitting diodes is equal, at a ninth (1/9) of a second.

 FIG. 2 shows a diagram illustrating the activation of the three light-emitting diodes represented in FIG. 1, the respective output signals A, B and C being more particularly represented.

The triggering member causes, according to D, the activation of the first light-emitting diode by the electronic circuit (3), then the second, then the third, and so on without overlapping.

 However, for the sake of improving the visual effect, and in particular to reduce abrupt changes in the direction of the light beam, it seeks to materialize the continuity of the rotating light beam, causing an overlap of the activation of two light emitting diodes consecutive. More precisely, the end of the activation of one is made coincident with the beginning of activation of the immediately consecutive LED.

 This type of overlap has been shown in FIG. In addition, in an advantageous embodiment of the invention, and always with a view to improving the impression of continuity of the rotating beam, it is sought to obtain a continuity of the instantaneous luminous intensity. To do this, it is sought to obtain a total luminous intensity when there is overlap, therefore of two light-emitting diodes, equal to the light intensity of a single LED in operation isolated between two overlapping phases.

 To do this, a homogeneous modulation of the time signals sent to the light-emitting diodes is generated. But by adjusting the duty cycle of the signal at the time of ignition and extinction of the light emitting diodes, it is thus possible to obtain a progress sivity improving the visual effect.

 In an improved embodiment with respect to the previous embodiment, the modulation of the frequency of the signals is combined with a variation in the luminous intensity of the LEDs, by varying the modulation of the signals transmitted to the LEDs over time. This variation, represented in FIGS. 4 and 5, is increasing just before the lighting of the LED considered, then decreasing when it is extinguished. It is thus possible to obtain quasi-linear variations of the luminous intensity at the time of the lighting and extinction of the LEDs.

 it should be noted that to do this, the electronic control circuit (3) basically comprises an oscillator (5) for generating fixed frequency signals determined it is activated by a logic control unit (6), itself activated by a triggering device, for example a proximity detector, sounds, etc. The signals delivered by the oscillator (5) are divided by a predetermined factor, by means of a pre-divider (7), and this, in order to adapt their frequency to the virtual rotation speed of the "beacon" constituted The different phases are then counted at a counter (8) which, on the one hand, generates a signal in the direction of the logic control unit (6) in order to stop the activation of the signal. oscillator, when a number of rotation cycle have been counted, and on the other hand, sends to the address of a decoder (9), the addresses for a memory (10).

The decoder (7) converts the binary addresses so that they can be transmitted to the ROM (10). The latter contains the sequence of switching on and off of each of the LEDs. Each signal from the decoder (9) corresponds to a particular address, that is to say to a particular phase of said memory (10), causing in turn the switching on or off of a
LED considered.

 it is thus entirely possible to modulate at will the LED ignition sequences, in order to optimize the realistic rendering of the beacon, by modifying the sequence previously stored in said memory.

 The following two tables, I and II, respectively, show the contents of the memory, according to whether it is desired for the three LEDs shown in FIG. 1 to be fired in succession, and whose intensity is shown in FIG. or as it is desired a more progressive and continuous ignition of said LEDs.

TABLE I

Figure img00080001

<tb> 1 <SEP> 0 <SEP> 1 <SEP>
<tb> 0 <SEP> 1 <SEP> 0 <SEP>
<tb> O <SEP> O <SEP> 1 <SEP>
<Tb>
TABLE II

Figure img00080002

<tb> 0 <SEP> t <SEP> t <SEP>
<tb> 0 <SEP> 0 <SEP> t <SEP>
<tb> t <SEP> 0 <SEP> t <SEP>
<Tb>
These two tables thus make it possible to materialize the sequential ignition of each of the LEDs, each column corresponding to a particular LED.

 Thus, the device according to the invention makes it possible to perform a simulation of the rotary effect of a real beacon, which can also be chosen at the origin of the speed of rotation.

 This device is therefore adapted to miniature vehicles to which it is particularly intended.

However, it goes without saying that it can receive any other application, for example animation, on light panels, and other toys

Claims (7)

 1 / Apparatus for simulating a rotating light effect characterized in that it comprises at least three light-emitting diodes (1), arranged in a circular manner and mounted in a star (2), and an electronic control circuit (3) supplied with energy and connected to the output of each of these light-emitting diodes (1), the rotary light effect being obtained by successive activations of the light-emitting diodes on injunction of the electronic circuit according to a defined sequence.
 2 / Apparatus according to claim 1, characterized in that the activation of the light-emitting diodes (1) is sequenced so that a partial overlap of the activation times of the electroluminescent diodes (1) is provided at the end of the activation of each of them and at the beginning of the activation of the immediately consecutive electroluminescent diodes.
 3 / Apparatus according to claim 2, characterized in that during the overlapping phases of the activation times of the electro-luminescent diodes (1), the total light intensity of the two electroluminescent diodes activated simultaneously is equal to the luminous intensity of an electroluminescent diode in isolated operation out of these overlapping phases.
 4 / Apparatus according to one of claims 2 and 3, characterized in that the activation signals of the electro-luminescent diodes (1) are homogeneously modulated in time during the overlapping phases in order to materialize a variation of the the luminous intensity of the diodes (1) during these overlapping phases.
 5 / Apparatus according to one of claims 1 to 3, characterized in that the activation signals of the electro-luminescent diodes (1) are linearly modulated in time during the overlapping phases to materialize a linear variation of the light intensity of the diodes (1) during these overlapping phases.
 6 / Apparatus according to one of claims 1 to 5, characterized in that the activation of the light emitting diodes (1) is effected by the electronic circuit (3) on the injunction of a trigger member (4) connected to the circuit electronic (3)
 7 / Apparatus according to one of claims 1 to 6, characterized in that the electronic control circuit (3) comprises
 an oscillator (5) intended to generate logic signals of determined fixed frequency
 a pre-divider (7), receiving said oscillator signals (5), and adapted to adapt the frequency of the signals generated by the latter to the virtual rotation speed of the light signal generated by the electroluminescent diodes; (3), and actually perceived by the user;
 a counter (8), intended to count the pulses emitted by the pre-divider (7), and therefore the different phases of switching on and off of the LEDs (3),
 a control logic unit (6), receiving the signals from the counter (8), and capable of managing these signals, and consequently the switching on and off sequences of the LEDs (3), the latter being activated at the request of a tripping member (4), and in turn causing the oscillator (5) to be activated or stopped, this activation being stopped when a predetermined number of phases corresponding to a virtual rotation has counter (8), the signals from the counter (8) are further decoded by means of a decoder (9), and transmitted to a read-only memory (10), containing an ignition sequence of each of the LEDs (3), each of the signals from the decoder (9) selecting one of the addresses of the memory (10), causing in turn the switching on or off of the
LED considered.
FR9001707A 1990-02-08 1990-02-08 A simulation of a light beacon type effect. Expired - Fee Related FR2658024B1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
FR9001707A FR2658024B1 (en) 1990-02-08 1990-02-08 A simulation of a light beacon type effect.

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Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
FR9001707A FR2658024B1 (en) 1990-02-08 1990-02-08 A simulation of a light beacon type effect.

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FR2658024A1 true FR2658024A1 (en) 1991-08-09
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WO2000074975A1 (en) * 1999-06-08 2000-12-14 911 Emergency Products, Inc. Strip led light assembly for motor vehicle
US6472996B1 (en) 1997-10-21 2002-10-29 911 Emergency Products, Inc. Led warning signal light and light support
US9655189B2 (en) 2013-03-13 2017-05-16 Federal Law Enforcement Development Services, Inc. LED light control and management system
US9654163B2 (en) 2009-04-01 2017-05-16 Federal Law Enforcement Development Services, Inc. Visible light transceiver glasses
US9660726B2 (en) 2007-05-24 2017-05-23 Federal Law Enforcement Development Services, Inc. LED light broad band over power line communication system
US10051714B2 (en) 2007-05-24 2018-08-14 Federal Law Enforcement Development Services, Inc. LED light control assembly and system
US10205530B2 (en) 2013-05-06 2019-02-12 Federal Law Enforcement Development Services, Inc. Network security and variable pulse wave form with continuous communication

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US6590502B1 (en) 1992-10-12 2003-07-08 911Ep, Inc. Led warning signal light and movable support
US6614359B2 (en) 1999-04-06 2003-09-02 911 Emergency Products, Inc. Replacement led lamp assembly and modulated power intensity for light source
US6462669B1 (en) 1999-04-06 2002-10-08 E. P . Survivors Llc Replaceable LED modules
US6380865B1 (en) 1999-04-06 2002-04-30 911 Emergency Products, Inc. Replacement led lamp assembly and modulated power intensity for light source
US6705745B1 (en) 1999-06-08 2004-03-16 911Ep, Inc. Rotational led reflector
US6700502B1 (en) 1999-06-08 2004-03-02 911Ep, Inc. Strip LED light assembly for motor vehicle
US6623151B2 (en) 1999-08-04 2003-09-23 911Ep, Inc. LED double light bar and warning light signal
US6367949B1 (en) 1999-08-04 2002-04-09 911 Emergency Products, Inc. Par 36 LED utility lamp
US6590343B2 (en) 2000-06-06 2003-07-08 911Ep, Inc. LED compensation circuit
US6547410B1 (en) 2000-07-28 2003-04-15 911 Emergency Products, Inc. LED alley/take-down light
US8188878B2 (en) 2000-11-15 2012-05-29 Federal Law Enforcement Development Services, Inc. LED light communication system
US7439847B2 (en) 2002-08-23 2008-10-21 John C. Pederson Intelligent observation and identification database system
US9294198B2 (en) 2007-05-24 2016-03-22 Federal Law Enforcement Development Services, Inc. Pulsed light communication key
US9258864B2 (en) 2007-05-24 2016-02-09 Federal Law Enforcement Development Services, Inc. LED light control and management system
US9100124B2 (en) 2007-05-24 2015-08-04 Federal Law Enforcement Development Services, Inc. LED Light Fixture
CA2824756C (en) 2011-01-14 2014-12-23 Federal Law Enforcement Development Services, Inc. Method of providing lumens and tracking of lumen consumption

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US6472996B1 (en) 1997-10-21 2002-10-29 911 Emergency Products, Inc. Led warning signal light and light support
WO2000074975A1 (en) * 1999-06-08 2000-12-14 911 Emergency Products, Inc. Strip led light assembly for motor vehicle
US10050705B2 (en) 2007-05-24 2018-08-14 Federal Law Enforcement Development Services, Inc. LED light interior room and building communication system
US9660726B2 (en) 2007-05-24 2017-05-23 Federal Law Enforcement Development Services, Inc. LED light broad band over power line communication system
US9755743B2 (en) 2007-05-24 2017-09-05 Federal Law Enforcement Development Services, Inc. LED light global positioning and routing communication system
US9967030B2 (en) 2007-05-24 2018-05-08 Federal Law Enforcement Development Services, Inc. Building illumination apparatus with integrated communications, security and energy management
US10051714B2 (en) 2007-05-24 2018-08-14 Federal Law Enforcement Development Services, Inc. LED light control assembly and system
US9654163B2 (en) 2009-04-01 2017-05-16 Federal Law Enforcement Development Services, Inc. Visible light transceiver glasses
US9655189B2 (en) 2013-03-13 2017-05-16 Federal Law Enforcement Development Services, Inc. LED light control and management system
US10205530B2 (en) 2013-05-06 2019-02-12 Federal Law Enforcement Development Services, Inc. Network security and variable pulse wave form with continuous communication

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