ES2355815T3 - High performance medical transducer with an ergonomic form and manufacturing method. - Google Patents

High performance medical transducer with an ergonomic form and manufacturing method. Download PDF

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Publication number
ES2355815T3
ES2355815T3 ES03747575T ES03747575T ES2355815T3 ES 2355815 T3 ES2355815 T3 ES 2355815T3 ES 03747575 T ES03747575 T ES 03747575T ES 03747575 T ES03747575 T ES 03747575T ES 2355815 T3 ES2355815 T3 ES 2355815T3
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Spain
Prior art keywords
threaded stud
transducer
characterized
assembly according
element
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ES03747575T
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Spanish (es)
Inventor
Alexander L. Darian
Scott Isola
Ronald R. Manna
Theodore A. D. Novak
Dan Voic
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Misonix Inc
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Misonix Inc
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Priority to US370364P priority
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Publication of ES2355815T3 publication Critical patent/ES2355815T3/en
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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61NELECTROTHERAPY; MAGNETOTHERAPY; RADIATION THERAPY; ULTRASOUND THERAPY
    • A61N7/00Ultrasound therapy
    • A61N7/02Localised ultrasound hyperthermia
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/32Surgical cutting instruments
    • A61B17/320068Surgical cutting instruments using mechanical vibrations, e.g. ultrasonic
    • A61B2017/32007Surgical cutting instruments using mechanical vibrations, e.g. ultrasonic with suction or vacuum means
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/32Surgical cutting instruments
    • A61B17/320068Surgical cutting instruments using mechanical vibrations, e.g. ultrasonic
    • A61B2017/320084Irrigation sleeves
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/32Surgical cutting instruments
    • A61B17/320068Surgical cutting instruments using mechanical vibrations, e.g. ultrasonic
    • A61B2017/320088Surgical cutting instruments using mechanical vibrations, e.g. ultrasonic with acoustic insulation, e.g. elements for damping vibrations between horn and surrounding sheath
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/32Surgical cutting instruments
    • A61B17/320068Surgical cutting instruments using mechanical vibrations, e.g. ultrasonic
    • A61B2017/320089Surgical cutting instruments using mechanical vibrations, e.g. ultrasonic node location

Abstract

A transducer assembly for an ultrasonic surgery instrument, comprising: a front exciter (14, 22) having an elongated shaft (16, 24) extending in one direction and a threaded stud (30, 32) extending in an opposite direction; an electromechanical transducer element (12, 20) disposed around said threaded stud (30, 32); a rear exciter (34, 36) disposed around said threaded stud (30, 32) on one side of said electromechanical transducer element (12, 20) facing said front exciter (14, 22), said electromechanical transducer element ( 12, 20) between said front exciter (14, 22) and said rear exciter (34, 36); and an inertial or damping mass (54, 56) connected to said threaded stud (30, 32) at a spaced point of said rear exciter (34, 36), characterized in that said inertial or damping mass (54, 56) is fixedly connected or rigidly with said threaded stud (30, 32) by fillets or by welding so that said threaded stud (30, 32) and said inertial or damping mass (54, 56) are effectively a single or unitary object to consequently eliminate vibrations and premature transducer failure.

Description

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to a high-performance medical-surgical transducer with an ergonomically improved shape. More particularly, this invention relates to a device that will transform electrical signals into mechanical vibrations to allow the ablation of tumors and other unwanted body tissues, while allowing a line of visual observation of the operating visor by the surgeon.

Over the past 30 years, several ultrasonic tools have been invented that can be used to remove or cut tissue in surgery. Such devices are disclosed by Wuchinich et al., In U.S. Patent No. 4,223,676, and Idemoto et al., In U.S. Patent No. 10 5,188,102.

In practice, these surgical devices include a hollow blunt probe that vibrates at frequencies between 20 kHz and 100 kHz, with amplitudes of up to 300 μm or more. Such devices remove tissue either producing cavitation bubbles that implode and break cells, tissue compression and relaxation stresses (sometimes called the hammer drill effect), either by other forces such as microflow bubbles in the tissue matrix. The effect is that the tissue becomes liquefied and separated. Then it comes to emulsify with the irrigation solution. The resulting emulsion is then aspirated from the site. Mass excision of tissue is possible by applying energy around and under unwanted tumors to separate them from the surrounding structure. The surgeon can then remove the tissue using ordinary tools such as tweezers. twenty

The probe or tube is excited by a piezoelectric or magnetostrictive transducer, which transforms an alternating electrical signal within the frequencies indicated in a longitudinal or transverse vibration. When the probe is attached to the transducer, both become a single element with resonances in series and in parallel. The designer will try to adapt the mechanical and electrical characteristics of these elements to provide the convenient operating frequency. Almost always, the elements will have a longitudinal axis that is straight, as shown in Fig. 1. This is done for simplicity and economic considerations. In almost all applications, whether medical or industrial, such an embodiment is practical and useful.

However, in applications such as open brain surgery, such an embodiment is impractical, since the doctor uses a microscope while operating, to widen the view of the delicate structures of the brain. At this point, the length of the transducer / horn combination can be disadvantageous, since the proximal end of the transducer will come into contact with the microscope head and hinder the surgeon's ability to manipulate the tool for maximum effectiveness.

With equal relevance, the larger diameter of the transducer housing hinders the field of vision of the workplace surgeon.

In the past, various inventors have tried to solve the problem by layering or incurring the transducer or probe element to provide an angled handpiece. With this procedure, the surgeon manages the distal end of the combination normally, while the transducer extends along your hand, away from the microscope head, thereby increasing the ability to visualize the field of work . Fig. 2 shows an ultrasonic probe and transducer assembly with a bending or an incision in the front exciter of the transducer assembly.

Various factors have limited the benefit of a transducer or probe incurred. One is the fact that the incursion introduces a vector force that manifests itself as a transverse or flexural wave motion. This movement reduces the effectiveness of the tip action and increases the loss of energy in the transducer itself. As a result, the temperature of the transducer increases, causing the surface to become too hot to the touch. Likewise, transverse vibrations lead to stresses in the vibratory elements that, at higher amplitudes, cause metal fatigue and probe fracture. The transverse vector increases in direct proportion 50 to the angle of curvature. Due to these design problems, the designer will limit the angle of folding while reducing the maximum amplitude of the tip at which the device will be allowed to vibrate. As an example, a commercially available device provides a maximum amplitude for a straight combination of transducer and probe of 355 μm, while offering a transducer with an angle of 10 ° for the same effects at only 183 μm, or almost 50% less. Both remedies reduce the effectiveness of the working procedure in the sense that the removal and removal of harder, denser tumors require higher amplitudes and more power. Also, the small folding angle continues to allow, in practice, the proximal end of the transducer to come into contact with the microscopes.

The diameter of the transducer body is also a factor in the ergonomics of the device. The unit is much heavier and difficult to manipulate the larger its dimensions.

When surveyed, most surgeons demanded a device that was the size of a large writing pen. Since the electrical power required to remove tissue and overcome electromechanical losses in the handpiece is up to 70 watts, it is problematic to make a 5 finer handpiece, which does not get hot during use, due to the fact that the Crystal mass in a piezoelectric handpiece is reduced. The power density will then rise, increasing the loss of power and the generation of residual heat. Similar problems exist for magnetostrictive devices, although these can generally be finer for a given wattage output. However, since magnetostrictive devices cannot easily accommodate a central suction hole (one that is concentric with the longitudinal axis), tissue blockage can occur when tissue is aspirated. This is a fundamental disadvantage.

Other factors, which are desirable in a practical embodiment, would be a fluid passageway without seals inside the transducer housing to prevent a leak of liquid inside the transducer, which would cause the electrical components to fail. Also, the housing of the unit 15 should be isolated from the actual probe and transducer vibrations. If the wrap vibrated in line with the transducer, the surgeon or surgeon would feel the vibrations in his hand. This leads to less tactile feedback during operation, fatigue and, in fact, could lead to hand damage with prolonged exposure.

US Patent No. 5,371,429 discloses an electromechanical transducer device 20 according to the first part of claim 1, which includes means for acoustically decoupling the shell and the wavelength transmission member from each other.

US Patent No. 6,051,010 discloses a system for joining ultrasonic transmission components without using a separate torque limiting device.

US Patent No. 5,397,293 discloses an ultrasonic device provided with a sheath and cushioning of transverse motion.

US Patent No. 4,741,731 discloses a ventilated ultrasonic transducer for a surgical handpiece.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is defined in claim 1 and is intended to provide an improved ultrasonic surgery instrument that can be used in conjunction with microscopes.

The improved ultrasonic surgery instrument has a piezoelectric transducer that has an effective angle of curvature greater than 10 and a concentric central flow without passage joints for internal fluid, which may leak and cause failure. In this tool for improved ultrasonic surgery instrument, vibrations are isolated from the transducer envelope. 35

The handpiece can have a diameter of less than about 2.54 cm (one inch).

A transducer assembly for an ultrasonic surgery instrument comprises, according to the present invention, a front exciter having an elongated shaft that extends in one direction and a threaded stud that extends in an opposite direction. An electromechanical transducer element (for example, a plurality of piezoelectric crystal disks) is arranged around the threaded stud 40. The transducer assembly also comprises a rear exciter arranged around the threaded stud on one side of the electromechanical transducer element facing the front exciter, the electromechanical transducer element being secured between the front exciter and the rear exciter. An inertial or damping mass is fixedly connected to the threaded stud at a spaced point of the rear exciter.

In accordance with a preferred feature of the present invention, the inertial or damping mass is a terminal plug of a transducer shell. However, it is possible as an alternative that the inertial or buffer mass be located inside a wrapper, rather than being part of the wrapper. When the inertial or damping mass is a terminal plug, it can be connected to a substantially rigid wrap member in an elastic snap fit.

The fixed interconnection of the threaded stud and the inertial or damping mass can be carried out as a tightening adjustment of a terminal element with external thread of the threaded stud in a countersunk with internal thread in the inertial or damping mass. Preferably, a torque is applied to the inertial or damping mass on the threaded end member until an end thereof and a countersink end are married.

According to a particularly preferred embodiment of the present invention, the threaded stud protrudes a distance between 6.4 and 8.3 cm (2.50 and 3.25 inches) from a front face of the electromechanical transducer. More particularly, the threaded stud protrudes a distance between 6.9 and 7.6 cm (2.7 and 3.0 inches) from the front face of the electromechanical transducer. In addition to an exceptionally long length, the threaded stud is provided with an especially thin wall, for example, with a thickness between about 0.03 and 0.64 cm (0.010 and 0.25 inches). The thin wall and the length of the threaded stud allow the threaded stud to act as a flexible element to dampen vibrations of the electromechanical transducer.

When the elongated shaft of the front exciter is curved at the level of an incrimination region to form a first portion coaxial to the threaded stud and a second portion with an angle to the threaded stud, the transducer assembly further comprises a first shell member substantially rigid arranged around the electromechanical transducer element and the first portion of the elongate shaft, a second substantially rigid shell member disposed around the second portion of the elongated shaft and a flexible coupling member disposed around the elongated shaft at the level of the region of incursion. The flexible coupling member 15 connects on one side with the first substantially rigid wrap member and on the opposite side with the second substantially rigid wrap member.

According to a further preferred feature of the invention, disposed between the second substantially rigid wrap member and the second portion of the shaft is a grooved ring. When the second portion of the elongated shaft is provided with a thickened amplification mass, the striated ring is arranged to be crimped with the mass.

In accordance with yet another preferred embodiment of the present invention, the first substantially rigid wrap member is provided with a spike or access element and a vent. The vent is spaced in a proximal direction of the spike or access element and is located on the same side of the first substantially rigid wrapping member as the spike or access element.

A manufacturing process is also described in which a transducer intended for an ultrasonic medical device uses a front exciter with a threaded stud in rearward extension having a free end with an external thread. A threaded countersink is formed in a damping mass so that the inner fillets of the countersink end at a predetermined distance 30 from a countersink bottom. The damping mass is screwed onto the threaded free end of the threaded stud to the bottom of the threaded stud fillets. The damping mass is then subjected to a supplementary tightening torque until the free end of the threaded stud and a countersink end are married.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS 35

Fig. 1 is partially an elevational view from one side and partially a cross-sectional view of a transducer according to the present invention, showing a horn or ultrasonic probe attached.

Fig. 2 is partially an elevational view from one side and partially a cross-sectional view of another transducer according to the present invention, showing a horn or probe attached.

Fig. 3 is an elevation view from one side of the transducer and probe of Fig. 2 and a cross-sectional view of a cover and sheath assembly in accordance with the present invention.

Fig. 4 is a cross-sectional view, on an enlarged scale, of an inertial ground end plug 45 with couplings shown in Figs. 2 and 3, in accordance with the present invention.

Fig. 5 is a cross-sectional view, on the scale of Fig. 4, of an alternative end cap according to the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS 50

This document discloses a piezoelectric transducer that incorporates a plurality of characteristics that, together, manifest desirable characteristics in the execution of delicate medical operations. Also, the various features may have utility in and of themselves in different applications.

The terminology used to examine the transducer, a set of associated instruments and a manufacturing procedure will be generally admitted in the ultrasonic engineering technique. The term "fixedly connected", provided it is used herein to

describing the coupling of a threaded stud with an inertial or damping mass, refers to a connection that is such that the threaded stud and the inertial or damping mass have been manufactured as a single or unitary object. In this way, the connection is rigid and essentially irreversible.

Fig. 1 shows a piezoelectric transducer 8 in a straight or straightened form, while Fig. 2 shows another transducer 10 in an angular or incurred form. The transducer of Fig. 1 includes a stack of piezoelectric crystals 12 having a front exciter 14 consisting partly of a rod 16 and a transformer mass 18 to amplify the longitudinal movement generated by the piezoelectric crystals 12. The transducer of Fig. 2 also comprises a stack of piezoelectric crystals 20 and a front exciter 22 that includes a rod or shaft 24 and 10 a mass of motion amplification 26. The rod or shaft 24 is provided with an incursion 28.

The front exciters 14 and 22 are constructed of materials with great acoustic efficiency such as titanium, although other materials could be contemplated. Each exciter 14 and 22 is hollow in the sense that it has a full length of a drill (not shown) that will become the suction path when the unit is fully assembled. The crystals 12 and 20 are of artificial materials 15 such as lead zirconate titanate compounds (PZT) formed in a ring configuration.

The crystals 12 surround a hollow threaded stud 30 protruding backward, that is, in a proximal direction, of the front exciter 14, while the crystals 20 surround a hollow threaded stud 32 protruding in a posterior or proximal direction of the forward exciter 22. The 20 transducers 8 and 10 further include respective rear exciters 34 and 36, each of which is a two-piece structure of tungsten and titanium. Each transducer device 8 and 10 is configured as a Langevin sandwich transducer in which crystals 12 or 20 with electrodes 38 or 40 are compressed by squeezing the rear exciter 34 or 36 through inner fillets with the threaded stud 30 or 32 of the front exciter 14 or 22 at a predetermined torque or 25 preload level. By connecting electrodes 38 or 40 electrically in parallel, transducer 8 or 10 can be adjusted to vibrate when an alternating signal is applied to the positive and negative connections. These characteristics are well known in the art.

An improvement over the prior art is that the threaded studs 30 and 32 of the front exciter 14 and 22 are each elongated, for example, in a length of 7.34 cm ± 0.25 cm 30 (2,888 inches ± 0,100 inches), starting from a distal face of the crystals 42, 44 and ending at the level of the proximal end in a respective threaded element 46, 48 having a thread of the same size as that of the respective rear exciter 34, 36, to allow the assembly of the section of crystals. The threaded studs 30 and 32 have stems 50 and 52 of reduced wall thickness to provide decoupling of vibrations from the respective stacking of crystals 12 and 20 to a rear element, for example a cover end cap. By reducing the wall thickness of the threaded stud stems 50, 52 to a point that allows the unit to flex with compression and traction, the vibration of the respective rear exciter 34, 36 from the balance of the assembly will be isolated. In order to provide the decoupling, the threaded studs 30, 32 are screwed and sealed in a respective rear damping mass 54, 56 which, because of the materials used (stainless steel, 40 titanium, tungsten) and the expected volume, has a relatively significant inertia that dampens all vibration resulting from transducer 8, 10 and prevents transmission to the envelope and the liquid passageway. The threaded element 46, 48 at the level of the proximal end of the threaded stud 30, 32 must match the female thread of the inertial or damping mass 54, 56 in a forced, tight fit. In practice, it has been discovered that the damping mass 54, 56 must be countersunk to admit the inner fillets 45. The inner fillets have to end at a certain distance, for example approximately 0.16 cm (0.062 inches) from the bottom of the countersink, depending on the size and power of the transducer, as well as the characteristic working frequency. The damping mass 54, 56 is screwed onto the threaded element 46, 48 to the bottom of the threaded stud steaks. Then, the damping mass 54, 56 is subjected to a supplementary tightening torque until the end of the threaded stud and countersink is married. In this way, a liquid passageway is formed and the metal parts act as a single piece. Any other means such as a lower tightening torque or sealing materials will not provide the coupling required to eliminate transverse vibrations and premature transducer failure.

Each front exciter 14, 22 is connected at the level of a distal side of the respective motion amplification mass 55 or gain stage 18, 26 with a horn or probe 58, 60. The total length of the transducer assembly 8, 10 and probe 58, 60 corresponds to a full wavelength of the desired working frequency, although integer multiples of the average wavelength greater than or equal to two (a full wave) could be contemplated. The probe 58, 60 is connected to the transducer 8, 10 and to the amplification mass of the particular movement 18, 26 through a nut 62, 64 and a washer 60 66, 68 at the level of a frequency nodal point, such as the Current state of the art for ultrasonic neuro vacuum cleaners of this type. It can be contemplated that, with the remodeling of the probe

58, 60, the connection could also be made at the level of an antinode. In addition to the amplification of the movement provided by the mass or gain stage 18, 26, the probe 58, 60 provides a gain such that the amplitudes of the distal tip approach 400 µm.

The incursion 28 of the transducer 10 is 6.25 cm (2.46 inches) from the distal face of the glass stack 44. This dimension depends on the gain ratio of the front exciter 22 5 and may vary for different diameters and frequencies. The radius of curvature of the rod 24 at the level of the incursion 28 is 1.27 cm (1/2 "), which, once again, has proven to be truly sensitive. If the folding radius is, for example, of 1.54 cm (1 inch), there would be the presence of significant transverse vibrations at the level of the rear mass. Radios of smaller dimensions have requested the metal to the point of tearing or fracture. When it has been constructed in this way, 10 transducer 10 has provided an angle of curvature of 20 °.

It has been found that the diameter of the front exciter shaft or shaft 24 is optimal between a maximum of 0.58 cm (0.230 inches) and a minimum of 0.52 cm (0.205 inches), so that the tree provides insulation for both longitudinal and transverse vibrations to the back wrap. When the rear inertial mass 56 is formed to act as a back cover for a transducer casing 70 (Fig. 3), a plastic material housing member 72 of the transducer casing can be placed above the distal end of the transducer 10 until its proximal end marries with a positioning protrusion 74 (Figs. 2 to 4) of the inertial mass 56. By sealing the interface with known means such as o-rings 76 or sealing material, a gas-tight seal is sealed. to liquids that allows the unit to be sterilized in the autoclave. A front nodal ring 78 of the transducer 10 is similarly sealed by an O-ring 79. The envelope 70 thus formed can be grasped and manipulated by a surgeon to project the tip of the probe 60 against unwanted tissue at a surgical site of a patient. Since the envelope 70 only touches the rear inertial mass 56 and the front nodal ring 78 of the transducer 10, vibrations are not coupled to the envelope itself, satisfying one of the important design elements. 25

A modification that provides ease of assembly as well as reduction of the number of parts, since no fixing elements are needed, is a snap fit assembly. In this invention, the rear inertial mass 54, 56 includes a ramp flange 80, as illustrated in Figs. 5 and 6. An inner surface of a plastic or polymeric wrapping member 82 has a corresponding internal projection 84. When the wrapping member 82 is slid over the rear inertial mass 30 56, the wrapping projection 84 contacts with the ramp or inclined side of flange 80 (not marked separately). As more force is applied, the plastic material wrap member 82 expands slightly to allow the projection 84 to engage on the ramp flange 80. Since the proximal side of the flange 80 (not marked separately) is perpendicular to the protuberance 74, the wrapping member 82 is effectively imprisoned. If sealing material or O-rings are provided, the assembly is essentially finished without the need for sealing rings, screws or other fixing means.

To construct the embodiment, other noteworthy inventions have been developed to complete the assembly.

In all surgical aspirators of this type, liquid has to be supplied to the site of operation. This liquid is generally sterile saline, although this is not critical to the invention. The liquid serves to cool the probe, provide irrigation and cooling of the tissues and provides a liquid in which the tissue can be broken, emulsified and subsequently aspirated. In several prior art designs, the necessary fluid path is provided by a sleeve made of silicone or other elastomer, which surrounds the probe and provides a coaxial path for the fluid. Four. Five

As shown in Fig. 3, the envelope 70 of the present surgical instrument assembly includes a housing member 72 and another hard polymeric wrapping member 73. The housing member 72 and the wrapping member 73 are rigidly connected to each other. and can be considered as a single rigid wrap member. As further illustrated in Fig. 3, the casing 70 additionally includes an extender or sheath of hard plastic material 86 that marries the 50 transducer casing member 73, 82 through a flexible connector or coupling 88. This allows The hard plastic sheath 86 is placed on top of the probe 60 (after coupling it to the transducer 10 through a threaded joint) and crimped on the wrapping members 70, 82, providing a liquid tight seal. This is an improvement over the prior art, which required a wrap of whole plastic banana-shaped material that was a bivalve configuration and was difficult to seal and provide robustness against damage from handling or falls. Flexible coupling 88 and sheath 86 thus provide remarkable benefits.

A silicon conduit 90 is then placed on top of the probe 60 and hooked onto the distal end of the plastic material extender 86 in a standard manner. The whole set constitutes an improvement over the prior art in the sense that, in the past, a long 60 silicone case has been used. When the surgeon grabbed the flexible sheath, ultrasonic energy could be attached to the hand,

inducing discomfort

A fluid spike or access element 92 (Fig. 3) is located within the transducer shell members 70, 82, near its distal end. The spike 92 communicates with the inside of the wrapping members 70, 82. When a flexible tube for liquid (not shown) is placed on the spike 92, liquid can be pumped into the cavity formed by the wrapping members 70, 82 5 and the nodal ring of the front exciter 78. The liquid will then be forced to distally travel the annular passageway formed by the front exciter of the transducer 22, the envelope members of the transducer 70, 82, the probe 60 and the conduit silicon 90. The only outlet is then the proximal end of the duct 90, which borders the distal end of the probe. The liquid will then flood the area around the probe and provide the advantages described in this document. 10

A further improvement is the inclusion of a vent 94 proximally spaced from the fluid spike 92. This vent 94 allows air to flow into the interior space of the wrapping member 70, 82. It has been discovered that, when this vent is not provided, retains fluid in the cavity when the pump stops working, due to a vacuum that develops above the level of the liquid, similar to that of a gravity type water cooler. With the planned drain hole, the vacuum is relieved and the liquid flows due to gravity. The advantage is that the liquid does not stagnate in the area around the nodal ring which, if left there, increases the load on the system and, as a consequence, reduces the effectiveness of the device. This also leads to premature failure of the product since cavitation erosion caused by ultrasonic energy in such a fluid wears out the metal. For the reasons given, the vent should be located at the top of the transducer, as shown in Fig. 3. 20

As illustrated in Fig. 3, a grooved ring 96 is provided which serves to locate the hard shell 86 concentrically around the front exciter 22. This ring 96 is made from a hard elastomer or polytetrafluoroethylene which is pressed into the sheath 86 or, on the contrary, fixedly located within it by known means. Ring 96 not only keeps the sheath 86 concentric with the front exciter 22, as it has been found to suppress transverse vibrations throughout the assembly. Stretch marks 98 of ring 96 allow the passage of liquid to the distal end. In practice, the inner diameter of the ring 96 is a sliding fit against the front exciter 22.

In an example of a transducer 10 (Fig. 3) described herein, the damping mass 56 is 13 grams (0.46 ounces), the stem 52 of the threaded stud 34 has a wall thickness of 0.04 cm (0.017 inches) and inside and outside diameters of 0.20 cm (0.078 inches) and 0.28 cm (0.125 inches) respectively, the rod or shaft 24 has a diameter of 0.55 cm (0.215 inches) and the frequency of Regime work is approximately 23 kHz. This transducer has proven to be an effective tool when used to remove unwanted tissue from inside the body. The efficiency of the transducer is very high in the sense that it can provide more than 70 watts of power for prolonged periods without a noticeable temperature rise, while providing 400 µm or more at the level of the distal end of the tip. The outer diameter is 2.0 cm (0.800 "). In short, it actually provides all the desired characteristics for such a device. For example, as an indication of how the design suppresses transverse vibrations, the power supply of liquid is not necessary to reduce vibrations The instrument can be started without liquid until the heat generated in the joint between the front exciter 22 and the probe 60 requires the liquid 40 for cooling purposes.

The reference designation 99 in Figs. 3 to 6 represents an electric cable. The individual cable conductors (not shown) are connected to electrodes 40.

Although the invention has been described according to particular embodiments and applications, one skilled in the art, in the light of this teaching, can generate embodiments and additional modifications without departing from the scope of the claimed invention. It is noted, for example, that the inertial mass to which the threaded stud is connected in proximal extension does not need to be a terminal plug of the transducer housing.

Rather, the inertial mass may be a separate element located distally from the proximal end cap of the envelope. Likewise, the coupling of the proximal ends of the threaded stud 50, 32, 32 with the inertial or damping mass 54, 56 can be achieved by other means such as welding, which ensures that the threaded studs and the damping mass work together as an integral part. or unitary. Accordingly, it should be understood that the drawings and descriptions of this document are provided by way of example to facilitate the understanding of the invention and should not be construed as limiting the scope thereof. 55

Claims (14)

1. A transducer assembly for an ultrasonic surgery instrument, comprising:
a front exciter (14, 22) having an elongated shaft (16, 24) extending in one direction and a threaded stud (30, 32) extending in an opposite direction;
an electromechanical transducer element (12, 20) disposed around said threaded stud (30, 32);
a rear exciter (34, 36) disposed around said threaded stud (30, 32) on one side of said electromechanical transducer element (12, 20) facing said front exciter (14, 22), said electromechanical transducer element ( 12, 20) between said front exciter (14, 22) and said rear exciter (34, 36); and 10
an inertial or damping mass (54, 56) connected to said threaded stud (30, 32) at a spaced point of said rear exciter (34, 36), characterized in that said inertial or damping mass (54, 56) is fixedly connected or rigidly with said threaded stud (30, 32) by fillets or by welding so that said threaded stud (30, 32) and said inertial or damping mass (54, 56) are effectively a single or unitary object to consequently eliminate vibrations and premature transducer failure.
2. The transducer assembly according to claim 1, characterized in that said inertial or damping mass (54, 56) is a terminal plug of a transducer housing.
3. The transducer assembly according to claim 2, characterized in that said cover includes a substantially rigid envelope member (70, 73, 82) interlocked to said end cap in an elastic snap fit.
4. The transducer assembly according to claim 1, characterized in that said threaded stud (30, 32) is provided with an end element with external thread (46, 48), said inertial or damping mass being provided with a countersunk with internal thread, said threaded terminal element being inserted into said countersunk in a tight fit. 25
5. The transducer assembly according to claim 4, characterized in that a torque is applied to said inertial or damping mass on said threaded terminal element (46, 48) until an end thereof and an end of said countersink are married.
The transducer assembly according to claim 1, characterized in that said threaded stud (30, 32) protrudes a distance between 6.4 and 8.3 cm (2.50 and 3.25 inches) of a front face ( 42, 44) of said electromechanical transducer element.
7. The transducer assembly according to claim 6, characterized in that said threaded stud (30, 32) protrudes a distance between 6.9 and 7.8 cm (2.7 and 3.0 inches) of said front face (42 , 44) of said electromechanical transducer element.
The transducer assembly according to claim 1, characterized in that said threaded stud 35 (30, 32) has a wall of a sufficiently small thickness to allow said threaded stud (30, 32) to act as a flexible element for damping vibrations of said electromechanical transducer element (12, 20).
9. The transducer assembly according to claim 8, characterized in that said threaded stud has a wall thickness between about 0.03 and 0.64 cm (0.010 and 0.25 inches). 40
The transducer assembly according to claim 1, characterized in that said elongated shaft (16, 24) of said front exciter (22) is curved at the level of a region of incursion to form a first portion coaxial to said threaded stud and a second portion at an angle to said threaded stud, said first portion and said second portion being substantially rigid with each other, further comprising:
a first substantially rigid shell member (70, 82) disposed around said electromechanical transducer element and said first portion of said elongated shaft;
a second substantially rigid wrap member (86) disposed around said second portion of said elongated shaft; Y
a flexible coupling member (88) disposed around said elongated shaft at the level of said incursion region, said flexible coupling member connecting on one side with said first substantially rigid wrap member and on the opposite side with said second member of substantially rigid wrap.
11. The transducer assembly according to claim 10, characterized in that between said second substantially rigid shell member and said second portion of said shaft is provided a grooved ring (96).
12. The transducer assembly according to claim 11, characterized in that said second portion (26) of said elongated shaft is provided with a thickened amplification mass (26), said grooved ring being arranged to be crimped with said amplification mass.
13. The transducer assembly according to claim 10, characterized in that said first substantially rigid shell member (70, 82) is provided with a spike or access element (92) and a vent (94).
14. The transducer assembly according to claim 13, characterized in that said vent 10 (94) is spaced in a proximal direction of said spike or access element (92) and is located on the same side of said first substantially rigid shell member (70, 82) that said pick or access element.
ES03747575T 2002-04-05 2003-04-01 High performance medical transducer with an ergonomic form and manufacturing method. Active ES2355815T3 (en)

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US7442168B2 (en) 2008-10-28
JP2010046501A (en) 2010-03-04
AU2003265111A8 (en) 2003-11-17
EP1492592B1 (en) 2010-12-08
CA2480773C (en) 2011-10-11
US20040006269A1 (en) 2004-01-08
EP1492592A2 (en) 2005-01-05
CA2480773A1 (en) 2003-11-13
WO2003092793A3 (en) 2004-05-06
JP4429160B2 (en) 2010-03-10
AU2003265111A1 (en) 2003-11-17
DE60335251D1 (en) 2011-01-20
WO2003092793A2 (en) 2003-11-13
EP1492592A4 (en) 2008-02-27
JP2005522306A (en) 2005-07-28

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