EP2958942A1 - Effective targeting of primary human leukemia using anti-cd123 chimeric antigen receptor engineered t cells - Google Patents

Effective targeting of primary human leukemia using anti-cd123 chimeric antigen receptor engineered t cells

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Publication number
EP2958942A1
EP2958942A1 EP14711341.9A EP14711341A EP2958942A1 EP 2958942 A1 EP2958942 A1 EP 2958942A1 EP 14711341 A EP14711341 A EP 14711341A EP 2958942 A1 EP2958942 A1 EP 2958942A1
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European Patent Office
Prior art keywords
seq id
sequence
cd
anti
amino acid
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EP14711341.9A
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German (de)
French (fr)
Inventor
Jennifer BROGDON
Saar GILL
Carl H. June
Michael D. Kalos
Andreas Loew
John Scholler
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Novartis AG
University of Pennsylvania
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Novartis AG
University of Pennsylvania
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Priority to US201361767058P priority Critical
Priority to US201361865856P priority
Application filed by Novartis AG, University of Pennsylvania filed Critical Novartis AG
Priority to PCT/US2014/017328 priority patent/WO2014130635A1/en
Publication of EP2958942A1 publication Critical patent/EP2958942A1/en
Application status is Pending legal-status Critical

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    • C07K16/18Immunoglobulins [IGs], e.g. monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies against material from animals or humans
    • C07K16/28Immunoglobulins [IGs], e.g. monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies against material from animals or humans against receptors, cell surface antigens or cell surface determinants
    • C07K16/2866Immunoglobulins [IGs], e.g. monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies against material from animals or humans against receptors, cell surface antigens or cell surface determinants against receptors for cytokines, lymphokines, interferons
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    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
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    • A61K35/12Materials from mammals; Compositions comprising non-specified tissues or cells; Compositions comprising non-embryonic stem cells; Genetically modified cells
    • A61K35/14Blood; Artificial blood
    • A61K35/17Lymphocytes; B-cells; T-cells; Natural killer cells; Interferon-activated or cytokine-activated lymphocytes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
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    • A61K35/12Materials from mammals; Compositions comprising non-specified tissues or cells; Compositions comprising non-embryonic stem cells; Genetically modified cells
    • A61K35/28Bone marrow; Haematopoietic stem cells; Mesenchymal stem cells of any origin, e.g. adipose-derived stem cells
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    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61KPREPARATIONS FOR MEDICAL, DENTAL, OR TOILET PURPOSES
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    • A61K38/177Receptors; Cell surface antigens; Cell surface determinants
    • A61K38/1774Immunoglobulin superfamily (e.g. CD2, CD4, CD8, ICAM molecules, B7 molecules, Fc-receptors, MHC-molecules)
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61KPREPARATIONS FOR MEDICAL, DENTAL, OR TOILET PURPOSES
    • A61K39/00Medicinal preparations containing antigens or antibodies
    • A61K39/395Antibodies; Immunoglobulins; Immune serum, e.g. antilymphocytic serum
    • A61K39/39533Antibodies; Immunoglobulins; Immune serum, e.g. antilymphocytic serum against materials from animals
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    • C07K14/00Peptides having more than 20 amino acids; Gastrins; Somatostatins; Melanotropins; Derivatives thereof
    • C07K14/435Peptides having more than 20 amino acids; Gastrins; Somatostatins; Melanotropins; Derivatives thereof from animals; from humans
    • C07K14/705Receptors; Cell surface antigens; Cell surface determinants
    • C07K14/70503Immunoglobulin superfamily
    • C07K14/7051T-cell receptor (TcR)-CD3 complex
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    • C07K14/435Peptides having more than 20 amino acids; Gastrins; Somatostatins; Melanotropins; Derivatives thereof from animals; from humans
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    • C07K16/28Immunoglobulins [IGs], e.g. monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies against material from animals or humans against receptors, cell surface antigens or cell surface determinants
    • C07K16/2803Immunoglobulins [IGs], e.g. monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies against material from animals or humans against receptors, cell surface antigens or cell surface determinants against the immunoglobulin superfamily
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    • A61K2039/507Comprising a combination of two or more separate antibodies
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    • A61K39/00Medicinal preparations containing antigens or antibodies
    • A61K2039/51Medicinal preparations containing antigens or antibodies comprising whole cells, viruses or DNA/RNA
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    • A61K2039/5158Antigen-pulsed cells, e.g. T-cells
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Abstract

The invention provides compositions and methods for treating leukemia, for example, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and B-cell acute lymphoid leukemia (B- ALL). The invention also relates to at least one chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) specific to CD 123, vectors comprising the same, and recombinant T cells comprising the CD 123 CAR. The invention also includes methods of administering a genetically modified T cell expressing a CAR that comprises a CD 123 binding domain. The invention also includes methods of bone marrow ablation for use in treatments necessitating bone marrow reconditioning or transplant.

Description

EFFECTIVE TARGETING OF PRIMARY HUMAN LEUKEMIA USING ANTI- CD123 CHIMERIC ANTIGEN RECEPTOR ENGINEERED T CELLS

This application claims priority to U.S. Serial No. 61/865,856, filed August 14, 2013 and U.S. Serial No. 61/767,058, filed February 20, 2013, the entire contents of each of these applications is incorporated herein by reference.

SEQUENCE LISTING

The instant application contains a Sequence Listing which has been submitted electronically in ASCII format and is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety. Said ASCII copy, created on February 20, 2014, is named N2067-7001WO Sequence Listing.txt and is 269,793 bytes in size.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates generally to T cells engineered to express a Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) and their use, e.g., to treat a disease or condition associated expression of interleukin 3 receptor alpha chain (IL-3Ra, CD123).

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Most patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are incurable using standard therapy (Mrozek et al, 2012, J Clin Oncol, 30:4515-23) and those with relapsed or refractory AML (RR-AML) have a particularly poor prognosis (Kern et al, 2003, Blood 2003, 101:64-70; Wheatley et al, 1999, Br J Haematol, 107:69-79).

Genetic engineering can impart to T cells specificity toward a target of choice. T cells can be transduced with genetic material encoding a single chain variable fragment (scFv) of an antibody, in conjunction with a signaling molecule, thereby using the complementarity determining region (CDR) to recognize a cell surface antigen in a non- MHC restricted manner. These cells are termed chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells. Preclinical and clinical attempts to target at least 20 different surface molecules in a variety of malignancies have shown some activity yet were often limited by poor persistence of the infused CAR T cell product (Sadelain et al, 2009, Curr Opin Immunol 2009, 21:215-23). Recent success with anti-CD 19 redirected T cells in patients with advanced CLL and ALL (Porter et al, 2011, N Engl J Med, 365:725-33; Kalos et al, 2011, Science Transl Med, 3:95ra73; Grupp and Kalos, 2013, N Engl J Med, 368: 1509- 18) demonstrated that these cells can eradicate massive tumor burden after a single infusion with remission lasting up to 3 years to date, underscoring the dramatic potential of CAR T cell therapy. There have been few preclinical attempts to target AML in animal models (Marin et al, 2010, Haematologica, 95:2144-52; Tettamanti et al, 2013, Br J Haematol, 161:389-401) although a recently published small clinical trial demonstrated that it is feasible to produce and infuse T cells to patients with an aggressive malignancy (Ritchie et al, 2013, Mol Ther,epub ahead of print PMID 23831595).

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The invention provides, among other things, compositions comprising at least one chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) specific to CD 123 (referred as CAR 123, or CD 123 CAR), vectors comprising the same, and recombinant T cells comprising a CD 123 CAR. The invention also includes methods of making a genetically modified T cell expressing a CAR (CART) wherein the expressed CAR comprises an anti-CD 123 binding domain.

The present invention also relates generally to the use of T cells engineered to express a CAR to treat a disease associated with expression of interleukin 3 receptor alpha chain (IL-3Ra, CD 123). In one aspect, the disease is a cancer that associated with expression of CD 123. In one aspect, the cancer is a hematologic cancer.

A CAR of the invention can also be used in a method whereby a engineered CART123 cell is used to eradicate CD123-expressing normal cells.

Accordingly, in one aspect, the invention pertains to an isolated nucleic acid molecule encoding a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), wherein the CAR comprises an antibody or antibody fragment which includes an anti-CD123 binding domain (e.g., a humanized antibody or antibody fragment that specifically binds to CD 123), a transmembrane domain, and an intracellular signaling domain (e.g., an intracellular signaling domain comprising a co stimulatory domain and/or a primary signaling domain). In one embodiment, the CAR comprises an antibody or antibody fragment which includes an anti-CD 123 binding domain described herein (e.g., a humanized antibody or antibody fragment that specifically binds to CD 123 as described herein), a transmembrane domain described herein, and an intracellular signaling domain described herein (e.g., an intracellular signaling domain comprising a costimulatory domain and/or a primary signaling domain).

In one embodiment, the encoded anti-CD 123 binding domain comprises one or more (e.g., all three) light chain complementary determining region 1 (LC CDR1), light chain complementary determining region 2 (LC CDR2), and light chain complementary determining region 3 (LC CDR3) of an anti-CD 123 binding domain described herein, and one or more (e.g., all three) heavy chain complementary determining region 1 (HC CDR1), heavy chain complementary determining region 2 (HC CDR2), and heavy chain complementary determining region 3 (HC CDR3) of an anti-CD 123 binding domain described herein, e.g., a humanized anti-CD 123 binding domain comprising one or more, e.g., all three, LC CDRs and one or more, e.g., all three, HC CDRs. In one embodiment, the encoded anti-CD 123 binding domain comprises a light chain variable region described herein (e.g., in Table 1 or SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101) and/or a heavy chain variable region described herein (e.g., in Table 1 or SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101). In one embodiment, the encoded anti-CD123 binding domain is a scFv comprising a light chain and a heavy chain of an amino acid sequence of Table 1 or SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101. In an embodiment, the anti-CD123 binding domain (e.g., an scFv) comprises: a light chain variable region comprising an amino acid sequence having at least one, two or three modifications (e.g., substitutions) but not more than 30, 20 or 10 modifications (e.g., substitutions) of an amino acid sequence of a light chain variable region provided in Table 1 or SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101, or a sequence with 95-99% identity with an amino acid sequence of Table 1 or SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101; and/or a heavy chain variable region comprising an amino acid sequence having at least one, two or three modifications (e.g., substitutions) but not more than 30, 20 or 10 modifications (e.g., substitutions) of an amino acid sequence of a heavy chain variable region provided in Table 1 or SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101, or a sequence with 95-99% identity to an amino acid sequence of Table 1 or SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101. In one embodiment, the anti-CD123 binding domain comprises a sequence selected from a group consisting of SEQ ID NO:36, SEQ ID NO:42, SEQ ID NO:48, SEQ ID NO:54, SEQ ID NO:60, SEQ ID NO:66, SEQ ID NO:72, and SEQ ID NO:78, or a sequence with 95-99% identify thereof. In one embodiment, the nucleic acid sequence encoding the anti-CD 123 binding domain comprises a sequence selected from a group consisting of SEQ ID NO:37, SEQ ID NO:43, SEQ ID NO:49, SEQ ID NO:55, SEQ ID NO:61, SEQ ID NO:67, SEQ ID NO:73, and SEQ ID NO:79, or a sequence with 95-99% identify thereof. In one embodiment, the encoded anti-CD 123 binding domain is a scFv, and a light chain variable region comprising an amino acid sequence described herein, e.g., in Table 1 or SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101, is attached to a heavy chain variable region comprising an amino acid sequence described herein, e.g., in Table 1 or SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101, via a linker, e.g., a linker described herein. In one

embodiment, the encoded anti-CD 123 binding domain includes a (Gly4-Ser)n linker, wherein n is 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6, preferably 4 (SEQ ID NO: 126). The light chain variable region and heavy chain variable region of a scFv can be, e.g., in any of the following orientations: light chain variable region-linker-heavy chain variable region or heavy chain variable region-linker-light chain variable region.

In one embodiment, the encoded CAR includes a transmembrane domain that comprises a transmembrane domain of a protein selected from the group consisting of the alpha, beta or zeta chain of the T-cell receptor, CD28, CD3 epsilon, CD45, CD4, CD5, CD8, CD9, CD16, CD22, CD33, CD37, CD64, CD80, CD86, CD134, CD137 and CD 154. In one embodiment, the encoded transmembrane domain comprises a sequence of SEQ ID NO: 5. In one embodiment, the encoded transmembrane domain comprises an amino acid sequence having at least one, two or three modifications (e.g., substitutions) but not more than 20, 10 or 5 modifications (e.g., substitutions) of an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:5, or a sequence with 95-99% identity to an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:5. In one embodiment, the nucleic acid sequence encoding the transmembrane domain comprises a sequence of SEQ ID NO: 12, or a sequence with 95- 99% identify thereof.

In one embodiment, the encoded anti-CD 123 binding domain is connected to the transmembrane domain by a hinge region, e.g., a hinge region described herein. In one embodiment, the encoded hinge region comprises SEQ ID NO:4 or SEQ ID NO: 104 or SEQ ID NO: 122 or SEQ ID NO: 124, or a sequence with 95-99% identity thereof. In one embodiment, the nucleic acid sequence encoding the hinge region comprises a sequence of SEQ ID NO: 11 or SEQ ID NO: 105 or SEQ ID NO: 123 or SEQ ID NO: 125, or a sequence with 95-99% identify thereof.

In one embodiment, the isolated nucleic acid molecule further comprises a sequence encoding a costimulatory domain, e.g., a costimulatory domain described herein. In one embodiment, the encoded costimulatory domain comprises a functional signaling domain of a protein selected from the group consisting of OX40, CD2, CD27, CD28, CDS, ICAM-1, LFA-1 (CDl la/CD18), ICOS (CD278), and 4-lBB (CD137). In one embodiment, the encoded costimulatory domain comprises a sequence of SEQ ID NO:6 or SEQ ID NO:23. In one embodiment, the encoded costimulatory domain comprises an amino acid sequence having at least one, two or three modifications (e.g., substitutions) but not more than 20, 10 or 5 modifications (e.g., substitutions) of an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:6 or SEQ ID NO:23, or a sequence with 95-99% identity to an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:6 or SEQ ID NO:23. In one embodiment, the nucleic acid sequence encoding the costimulatory domain comprises a sequence of SEQ ID NO: 13 or SEQ ID NO:27, or a sequence with 95-99% identify thereof.

In one embodiment, the isolated nucleic acid molecule further comprises a sequence encoding an intracellular signaling domain, e.g., an intracellular signaling domain described herein. In one embodiment, the encoded intracellular signaling domain comprises a functional signaling domain of 4- IBB and/or a functional signaling domain of CD3 zeta. In one embodiment, the encoded intracellular signaling domain comprises a functional signaling domain of CD27 and/or a functional signaling domain of CD3 zeta. In one embodiment, the encoded intracellular signaling domain comprises the sequence of SEQ ID NO: 6 or SEQ ID NO:23 and/or the sequence of SEQ ID NO:7 or SEQ ID NO:98. In one embodiment, the intracellular signaling domain comprises an amino acid sequence having at least one, two or three modifications (e.g., substitutions) but not more than 20, 10 or 5 modifications (e.g., substitutions) of an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:6 or SEQ ID NO:23 and/or an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:7 or SEQ ID NO:98, or a sequence with 95-99% identity to an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:6 or SEQ ID NO:23 and/or an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:7 or SEQ ID NO:98. In one embodiment, the encoded intracellular signaling domain comprises the sequence of SEQ ID NO:6 or SEQ ID NO:23 and the sequence of SEQ ID NO:7 or SEQ ID NO:98, wherein the sequences comprising the intracellular signaling domain are expressed in the same frame and as a single polypeptide chain. In one embodiment, the nucleic acid sequence encoding the intracellular signaling domain comprises a sequence of SEQ ID NO: 13 or SEQ ID NO:27, or a sequence with 95-99% identify thereof, and/or a sequence of SEQ ID NO: 14 or SEQ ID NO:99, or a sequence with 95-99% identity thereof.

In another aspect, the invention pertains to an isolated nucleic acid molecule encoding a CAR construct comprising a leader sequence, e.g., a leader sequence described herein, e.g., of SEQ ID NO:3; an anti-CD123 binding domain described herein, e.g., an anti-CD 123 binding domain comprising a LC CDRl, a LC CDR2, a LC CDR3, a HC CDRl, a HC CDR2 and a HC CDR3 described herein, e.g., an anti-CD123 binding domain described in Table 1 or SEQ ID NO:2, or a sequence with 95-99% identify thereof; a hinge region described herein, e.g., of SEQ ID NO:4 or SEQ ID NO: 104 or SEQ ID NO: 122 or SEQ ID NO: 124; a transmembrane domain described herein, e.g., having a sequence of SEQ ID NO:5; and an intracellular signaling domain, e.g., an intracellular signaling domain described herein. In one embodiment, the encoded intracellular signaling domain comprises a costimulatory domain, e.g., a costimulatory domain described herein, e.g., a 4- IBB costimulatory domain having a sequence of SEQ ID NO:6, and/or a primary signaling domain, e.g., a primary signaling domain described herein, e.g., a CD3 zeta stimulatory domain having a sequence of SEQ ID NO:7 or SEQ ID NO:98. In one embodiment, the encoded intracellular signaling domain comprises a costimulatory domain, e.g., a costimulatory domain described herein, e.g., a CD27 costimulatory domain having a sequence of SEQ ID NO:23, and/or a primary signaling domain, e.g., a primary signaling domain described herein, e.g., a CD3 zeta stimulatory domain having a sequence of SEQ ID NO:7 or SEQ ID NO:98. In one embodiment, the isolated nucleic acid molecule encoding the CAR construct includes a leader sequence encoded by the nucleic acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:3, or a sequence with 95-99% identity thereto. In one embodiment, the isolated nucleic acid molecule encoding the CAR construct includes an anti-CD 123 binding domain sequence encoded by the nucleic acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:37, SEQ ID NO:43, SEQ ID NO:49, SEQ ID NO:55, SEQ ID NO:61, SEQ ID NO:67, SEQ ID NO:73, and SEQ ID NO:79, or a sequence with 95- 99% identity thereto. In one embodiment, the isolated nucleic acid molecule encoding the CAR construct includes a transmembrane sequence encoded by the nucleic acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 12, or a sequence with 95-99% identity thereto. In one embodiment, the isolated nucleic acid molecule encoding the CAR construct includes an intracellular signaling domain sequence encoded by the nucleic acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 13 or SEQ ID NO:27, or a sequence with 95-99% identity thereto and/or a nucleic acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 14 or SEQ ID NO:99, or a sequence with 95-99% identity thereto.

In one embodiment, the isolated nucleic acid molecule comprises (e.g., consists of) a nucleic acid encoding a CAR amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:41, SEQ ID NO:47, SEQ ID NO:53, SEQ ID NO:59, SEQ ID NO:65, SEQ ID NO:71, SEQ ID NO:77, or SEQ ID NO:83, or an amino acid sequence having at least one, two, three, four, five, 10, 15, 20 or 30 modifications (e.g., substitutions) but not more than 60, 50 or 40 modifications (e.g., substitutions) of an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:41, SEQ ID NO:47, SEQ ID NO:53, SEQ ID NO:59, SEQ ID NO:65, SEQ ID NO:71, SEQ ID NO:77, or SEQ ID NO:83, or an amino acid sequence having 85%, 90%, 95%, 96%, 97%, 98% or 99% identity to an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:41, SEQ ID NO:47, SEQ ID NO:53, SEQ ID NO:59, SEQ ID NO:65, SEQ ID NO:71, SEQ ID NO:77, or SEQ ID NO:83. In one embodiment, the isolated nucleic acid molecule comprises (e.g., consists of) a nucleic acid encoding a CAR amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: l, or an amino acid sequence having at least one, two, three, four, five, 10, 15, 20 or 30 modifications (e.g., substitutions) but not more than 60, 50 or 40 modifications (e.g., substitutions) of an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: l, or an amino acid sequence having 85%, 90%, 95%, 96%, 97%, 98% or 99% identity to an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 1.

In one embodiment, the isolated nucleic acid molecule comprises (e.g., consists of) a nucleic acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:40, SEQ ID NO:46, SEQ ID NO:52, SEQ ID NO:58, SEQ ID NO:64, SEQ ID NO:70, SEQ ID NO:76, or SEQ ID NO:80 or a nucleic acid sequence having 85%, 90%, 95%, 96%, 97%, 98% or 99% identity to a nucleic acid sequence of of SEQ ID NO:40, SEQ ID NO:46, SEQ ID NO:52, SEQ ID NO:58, SEQ ID NO:64, SEQ ID NO:70, SEQ ID NO:76, or SEQ ID NO:80. In one embodiment, the isolated nucleic acid molecule comprises (e.g., consists of) a nucleic acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:8, or a nucleic acid sequence having 85%, 90%, 95%, 96%, 97%, 98% or 99% identity to a nucleic acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 8.

In one aspect, the invention pertains to an isolated nucleic acid molecule encoding an anti-CD 123 binding domain, wherein the anti-CD 123 binding domain comprises one or more (e.g., all three) light chain complementary determining region 1 (LC CDR1), light chain complementary determining region 2 (LC CDR2), and light chain

complementary determining region 3 (LC CDR3) of an anti-CD 123 binding domain described herein, and one or more (e.g., all three) heavy chain complementary determining region 1 (HC CDR1), heavy chain complementary determining region 2 (HC CDR2), and heavy chain complementary determining region 3 (HC CDR3) of an anti- CD123 binding domain described herein, e.g., a humanized anti-CD123 binding domain comprising one or more, e.g., all three, LC CDRs and one or more, e.g., all three, HC CDRs. In one embodiment, the encoded anti-CD 123 binding domain comprises a light chain variable region described herein (e.g., in SEQ ID NO:36, 42, 48, 54, 60, 66, 72 or 78) and/or a heavy chain variable region described herein (e.g., in SEQ ID NO:36, 42, 48, 54, 60, 66, 72 or 78). In one embodiment, the encoded anti-CD123 binding domain is a scFv comprising a light chain and a heavy chain of an amino acid sequence of in SEQ ID NO:36, 42, 48, 54, 60, 66, 72 or 78. In an embodiment, the anti-CD123 binding domain (e.g., an scFv) comprises: a light chain variable region comprising an amino acid sequence having at least one, two or three modifications (e.g., substitutions) but not more than 30, 20 or 10 modifications (e.g., substitutions) of an amino acid sequence of a light chain variable region provided in SEQ ID NO:36, 42, 48, 54, 60, 66, 72 or 78, or a sequence with 95-99% identity with an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:36, 42, 48, 54, 60, 66, 72 or 78; and/or a heavy chain variable region comprising an amino acid sequence having at least one, two or three modifications (e.g., substitutions) but not more than 30, 20 or 10 modifications (e.g., substitutions) of an amino acid sequence of a heavy chain variable region provided SEQ ID NO:36, 42, 48, 54, 60, 66, 72 or 78, or a sequence with 95-99% identity to an amino acid sequence SEQ ID NO:36, 42, 48, 54, 60, 66, 72 or 78. In one embodiment, the anti-CD 123 binding domain comprises a sequence selected from a group consisting of SEQ ID NO:36, 42, 48, 54, 60, 66, 72 or 78, or a sequence with 95-99% identify thereof. In one embodiment, the nucleic acid sequence encoding the anti-CD 123 binding domain comprises a sequence selected from a group consisting of SEQ ID NO:37, SEQ ID NO:43, SEQ ID NO:49, SEQ ID NO:55, SEQ ID NO:61, SEQ ID NO:67, SEQ ID NO:73, and SEQ ID NO:79, or a sequence with 95-99% identify thereof.

In another aspect, the invention pertains to an isolated polypeptide molecule encoded by the nucleic acid molecule. In one embodiment, the isolated polypeptide molecule comprises a sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO:41, SEQ ID NO:47, SEQ ID NO:53, SEQ ID NO:59, SEQ ID NO:65, SEQ ID NO:71, SEQ ID NO:77, and SEQ ID NO:83, or a sequence with 95-99% identify thereof.

In another aspect, the invention pertains to an isolated chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) molecule comprising an anti-CD123 binding domain (e.g., a humanized antibody or antibody fragment that specifically binds to CD 123), a transmembrane domain, and an intracellular signaling domain (e.g., an intracellular signaling domain comprising a costimulatory domain and/or a primary signaling domain). In one embodiment, the CAR comprises an antibody or antibody fragment which includes an anti-CD 123 binding domain described herein (e.g., a humanized antibody or antibody fragment that specifically binds to CD 123 as described herein), a transmembrane domain described herein, and an intracellular signaling domain described herein (e.g., an intracellular signaling domain comprising a costimulatory domain and/or a primary signaling domain described herein).

In one embodiment, the anti-CD 123 binding domain comprises one or more (e.g., all three) light chain complementary determining region 1 (LC CDR1), light chain complementary determining region 2 (LC CDR2), and light chain complementary determining region 3 (LC CDR3) of an anti-CD 123 binding domain described herein, and one or more (e.g., all three) heavy chain complementary determining region 1 (HC CDR1), heavy chain complementary determining region 2 (HC CDR2), and heavy chain complementary determining region 3 (HC CDR3) of an anti-CD 123 binding domain described herein, e.g., a humanized anti-CD 123 binding domain comprising one or more, e.g., all three, LC CDRs and one or more, e.g., all three, HC CDRs. In one embodiment, the anti-CD 123 binding domain comprises a light chain variable region described herein (e.g., in Table 1 or SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101) and/or a heavy chain variable region described herein (e.g., in Table 1 or SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101). In one embodiment, the anti-CD 123 binding domain is a scFv comprising a light chain and a heavy chain of an amino acid sequence of Table 1 or SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101. In an embodiment, the anti-CD123 binding domain (e.g., an scFv) comprises: a light chain variable region comprising an amino acid sequence having at least one, two or three modifications (e.g., substitutions) but not more than 30, 20 or 10 modifications

(e.g., substitutions) of an amino acid sequence of a light chain variable region provided in Table 1 or SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101, or a sequence with 95-99% identity with an amino acid sequence of Table 1 or SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101; and/or a heavy chain variable region comprising an amino acid sequence having at least one, two or three modifications (e.g., substitutions) but not more than 30, 20 or 10 modifications

(e.g., substitutions) of an amino acid sequence of a heavy chain variable region provided in Table 1 or SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101, or a sequence with 95-99% identity to an amino acid sequence of Table 1 or SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101. In one embodiment, the anti-CD 123 binding domain comprises a sequence selected from a group consisting of SEQ ID NO:36, SEQ ID NO:42, SEQ ID NO:48, SEQ ID NO:54,

SEQ ID NO:60, SEQ ID NO:66, SEQ ID NO:72, and SEQ ID NO:78, or a sequence with 95-99% identify thereof. In one embodiment, the anti-CD 123 binding domain is a scFv, and a light chain variable region comprising an amino acid sequence described herein, e.g., in Table 1 or SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101, is attached to a heavy chain variable region comprising an amino acid sequence described herein, e.g., in Table 1 or SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101, via a linker, e.g., a linker described herein. In one

embodiment, the anti-CD 123 binding domain includes a (Gly4-Ser)n linker, wherein n is 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6, preferably 4 (SEQ ID NO: 126). The light chain variable region and heavy chain variable region of a scFv can be, e.g., in any of the following orientations: light chain variable region-linker-heavy chain variable region or heavy chain variable region-linker-light chain variable region. In one embodiment, the isolated CAR molecule comprises a transmembrane domain of a protein selected from the group consisting of the alpha, beta or zeta chain of the T-cell receptor, CD28, CD3 epsilon, CD45, CD4, CD5, CD8, CD9, CD16, CD22, CD33, CD37, CD64, CD80, CD86, CD134, CD137 and CD154. In one embodiment, the transmembrane domain comprises a sequence of SEQ ID NO: 5. In one embodiment, the transmembrane domain comprises an amino acid sequence having at least one, two or three modifications (e.g., substitutions) but not more than 20, 10 or 5 modifications (e.g., substitutions) of an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 5, or a sequence with 95-99% identity to an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 5.

In one embodiment, the anti-CD 123 binding domain is connected to the transmembrane domain by a hinge region, e.g., a hinge region described herein. In one embodiment, the encoded hinge region comprises SEQ ID NO:4 or SEQ ID NO: 104 or SEQ ID NO: 122 or SEQ ID NO: 124, or a sequence with 95-99% identity thereof.

In one embodiment, the isolated CAR molecule further comprises a sequence encoding a costimulatory domain, e.g., a costimulatory domain described herein. In one embodiment, the costimulatory domain comprises a functional signaling domain of a protein selected from the group consisting of OX40, CD2, CD27, CD28, CDS, ICAM-1, LFA-1 (CDl la/CD18) and 4-1BB (CD137). In one embodiment, the costimulatory domain comprises a sequence of SEQ ID NO: 6. In one embodiment, the costimulatory domain comprises a sequence of SEQ ID NO:23. In one embodiment, the costimulatory domain comprises an amino acid sequence having at least one, two or three modifications (e.g., substitutions) but not more than 20, 10 or 5 modifications (e.g., substitutions) of an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 6 or SEQ ID NO:23, or a sequence with 95-99% identity to an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 6 or SEQ ID NO:23.

In one embodiment, the isolated CAR molecule further comprises a sequence encoding an intracellular signaling domain, e.g., an intracellular signaling domain described herein. In one embodiment, the intracellular signaling domain comprises a functional signaling domain of 4- IBB and/or a functional signaling domain of CD3 zeta. In one embodiment, the intracellular signaling domain comprises the sequence of SEQ ID NO: 6 and/or the sequence of SEQ ID NO:7. In one embodiment, the intracellular signaling domain comprises the sequence of SEQ ID NO:6 and/or the sequence of SEQ ID NO:98. In one embodiment, the intracellular signaling domain comprises a functional signaling domain of CD27 and/or a functional signaling domain of CD3 zeta. In one embodiment, the intracellular signaling domain comprises the sequence of SEQ ID NO:23 and/or the sequence of SEQ ID NO:7. In one embodiment, the intracellular signaling domain comprises the sequence of SEQ ID NO:23 and/or the sequence of SEQ ID NO:98. In one embodiment, the intracellular signaling domain comprises an amino acid sequence having at least one, two or three modifications (e.g., substitutions) but not more than 20, 10 or 5 modifications (e.g., substitutions) of an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:6 or SEQ ID NO:23 and/or an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:7 or SEQ ID NO:98, or a sequence with 95-99% identity to an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:6 or SEQ ID NO:23 and/or an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:7 or SEQ ID NO:98. In one embodiment, the intracellular signaling domain comprises the sequence of SEQ ID NO:6 or SEQ ID NO:23 and the sequence of SEQ ID NO: 7 or SEQ ID NO:98, wherein the sequences comprising the intracellular signaling domain are expressed in the same frame and as a single polypeptide chain.

In one embodiment, the isolated CAR molecule further comprises a leader sequence, e.g., a leader sequence described herein. In one embodiment, the leader sequence comprises an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 3, or a sequence with 95- 99% identity to an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:3.

In another aspect, the invention pertains to an isolated CAR molecule comprising a leader sequence, e.g., a leader sequence described herein, e.g., a leader sequence of SEQ ID NO: 3, or having 95-99% identity thereof,;an anti-CD123 binding domain described herein, e.g., an anti-CD123 binding domain comprising a LC CDR1, a LC

CDR2, a LC CDR3, a HC CDR1, a HC CDR2 and a HC CDR3 described herein, e.g., an anti-CD123 binding domain described in Table 1 or SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101, or a sequence with 95-99% identify thereof; a hinge region, e.g., a hinge region described herein, e.g., a hinge region of SEQ ID NO:4 or having 95-99% identity thereof; a transmembrane domain, e.g., a transmembrane domain described herein, e.g., a transmembrane domain having a sequence of SEQ ID NO:5 or a sequence having 95- 99% identity thereof; an intracellular signaling domain, e.g., an intracellular signaling domain described herein (e.g., an intracellular signaling domain comprising a

costimulatory domain and/or a primary signaling domain). In one embodiment, the intracellular signaling domain comprises a costimulatory domain, e.g., a costimulatory domain described herein, e.g., a 4- IBB costimulatory domain having a sequence of SEQ ID NO:6, or a CD27 costimulatory domain having a sequence of SEQ ID NO:23 or having 95-99%identity thereof, and/or a primary signaling domain, e.g., a primary signaling domain described herein, e.g., a CD3 zeta stimulatory domain having a sequence of SEQ ID NO:7 or SEQ ID NO:98, or having 95-99% identity thereof. In one embodiment, the intracellular signaling domain comprises a costimulatory domain, e.g., a costimulatory domain described herein, e.g., a 4- IBB costimulatory domain having a sequence of SEQ ID NO:6 or a CD27 costimulatory domain having a sequence of SEQ ID NO:23, and/ a primary signaling domain, e.g., a primary signaling domain described herein, e.g., a CD3 zeta stimulatory domain having a sequence of SEQ ID NO:7 or SEQ ID NO:98.

In one embodiment, the isolated CAR molecule comprises (e.g., consists of) an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:41, SEQ ID NO:47, SEQ ID NO:53, SEQ ID NO:59, SEQ ID NO:65, SEQ ID NO:71, SEQ ID NO:77, or SEQ ID NO:83, or an amino acid sequence having at least one, two, three, four, five, 10, 15, 20 or 30 modifications (e.g., substitutions) but not more than 60, 50 or 40 modifications (e.g., substitutions) of an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:41, SEQ ID NO:47, SEQ ID NO:53, SEQ ID NO:59, SEQ ID NO:65, SEQ ID NO:71, SEQ ID NO:77, or SEQ ID NO:83, or an amino acid sequence having 85%, 90%, 95%, 96%, 97%, 98% or 99% identity to an amino acid sequence SEQ ID NO:41, SEQ ID NO:47, SEQ ID NO:53, SEQ ID NO:59, SEQ ID NO:65, SEQ ID NO:71, SEQ ID NO:77, or SEQ ID NO:83. In one embodiment, the isolated CAR molecule comprises (e.g., consists of) an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 1 or SEQ ID NO: 107, SEQ ID NO: 109, SEQ ID NO: 111, SEQ ID NO: 113, SEQ ID NO: 115, SEQ ID NO: 117, SEQ ID NO: 119, or SEQ ID NO: 121, or an amino acid sequence having at least one, two, three, four, five, 10, 15, 20 or 30 modifications (e.g., substitutions) but not more than 60, 50 or 40 modifications (e.g., substitutions) of an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: l or SEQ ID NO: 107, SEQ ID NO: 109, SEQ ID NO: 111, SEQ ID NO: 113, SEQ ID NO: 115, SEQ ID NO: 117, SEQ ID NO: 119, or SEQ ID NO: 121, or an amino acid sequence having 85%, 90%, 95%, 96%, 97%, 98% or 99% identity to an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: l or SEQ ID NO: 107, SEQ ID

NO: 109, SEQ ID NO: 111, SEQ ID NO: 113, SEQ ID NO: 115, SEQ ID NO: 117, SEQ ID NO: 119, or SEQ ID NO: 121.

In one aspect, the invention pertains to an anti-CD 123 binding domain comprising one or more (e.g., all three) light chain complementary determining region 1 (LC CDRl), light chain complementary determining region 2 (LC CDR2), and light chain

complementary determining region 3 (LC CDR3) of an anti-CD 123 binding domain described herein, and one or more (e.g., all three) heavy chain complementary determining region 1 (HC CDRl), heavy chain complementary determining region 2 (HC CDR2), and heavy chain complementary determining region 3 (HC CDR3) of an anti- CD 123 binding domain described herein, e.g., a humanized anti-CD 123 binding domain comprising one or more, e.g., all three, LC CDRs and one or more, e.g., all three, HC CDRs. In one embodiment, the anti-CD123 binding domain comprises a light chain variable region described herein (e.g., in SEQ ID NO:36, SEQ ID NO:42, SEQ ID NO:48, SEQ ID NO:54, SEQ ID NO:60, SEQ ID NO:66, SEQ ID NO:72, and SEQ ID NO:78) and/or a heavy chain variable region described herein (e.g. in SEQ ID NO:36, SEQ ID NO:42, SEQ ID NO:48, SEQ ID NO:54, SEQ ID NO:60, SEQ ID NO:66, SEQ ID NO:72, or SEQ ID NO:78). In one embodiment, the anti-CD 123 binding domain is a scFv comprising a light chain and a heavy chain of an amino acid sequence of in SEQ ID NO:36, SEQ ID NO:42, SEQ ID NO:48, SEQ ID NO:54, SEQ ID NO:60, SEQ ID NO:66, SEQ ID NO:72, or SEQ ID NO:78. In an embodiment, the anti-CD123 binding domain (e.g., an scFv) comprises: a light chain variable region comprising an amino acid sequence having at least one, two or three modifications (e.g., substitutions) but not more than 30, 20 or 10 modifications (e.g., substitutions) of an amino acid sequence of a light chain variable region provided, in SEQ ID NO:36, SEQ ID NO:42, SEQ ID NO:48, SEQ ID NO:54, SEQ ID NO:60, SEQ ID NO:66, SEQ ID NO:72, or SEQ ID NO:78 or a sequence with 95-99% identity with an amino acid sequence in SEQ ID NO:36, SEQ ID NO:42, SEQ ID NO:48, SEQ ID NO:54, SEQ ID NO:60, SEQ ID NO:66, SEQ ID NO:72, or SEQ ID NO:78; and/or a heavy chain variable region comprising an amino acid sequence having at least one, two or three modifications (e.g., substitutions) but not more than 30, 20 or 10 modifications (e.g., substitutions) of an amino acid sequence of a heavy chain variable region provided SEQ ID NO:36, SEQ ID NO:42, SEQ ID NO:48, SEQ ID NO:54, SEQ ID NO:60, SEQ ID NO:66, SEQ ID NO:72, or SEQ ID NO:78, or a sequence with 95-99% identity to an amino acid sequence in SEQ ID NO:36, SEQ ID NO:42, SEQ ID NO:48, SEQ ID NO:54, SEQ ID NO:60, SEQ ID NO:66, SEQ ID NO:72, or SEQ ID NO:78. In one embodiment, the anti-CD123 binding domain comprises a sequence selected from a group consisting of SEQ ID NO:36, SEQ ID NO:42, SEQ ID NO:48, SEQ ID NO:54, SEQ ID NO:60, SEQ ID NO:66, SEQ ID NO:72, or SEQ ID NO:78, or a sequence with 95-99% identify thereof.

In another aspect, the invention pertains to a vector comprising a nucleic acid molecule described herein, e.g., a nucleic acid molecule encoding a CAR described herein. In one embodiment, the vector is selected from the group consisting of a DNA, a RNA, a plasmid, a lentivirus vector, adenoviral vector, or a retrovirus vector.

In one embodiment, the vector is a lentivirus vector. In one embodiment, the vector further comprises a promoter. In one embodiment, the promoter is an EF- 1 promoter. In one embodiment, the EF-1 promoter comprises a sequence of the promoter sequence of SEQ ID NO: 106.

In one embodiment, the vector is an in vitro transcribed vector, e.g., a vector that transcribes RNA of a nucleic acid molecule described herein. In one embodiment, the nucleic acid sequence in the vector further comprises a poly(A) tail, e.g., a poly A tail described herein, e.g., comprising about 150 adenosine bases (SEQ ID NO: 127). In one embodiment, the nucleic acid sequence in the vector further comprises a 3'UTR, e.g., a 3' UTR described herein, e.g., comprising at least one repeat of a 3'UTR derived from human beta-globulin, e.g., a 3' UTR present in SEQ ID NO:94. In one embodiment, the nucleic acid sequence in the vector further comprises promoter, e.g., a T2A promoter, e.g., a T2A promoter present in SEQ ID NO:94.

In another aspect, the invention pertains to a cell comprising a vector described herein. In one embodiment, the cell is a cell described herein, e.g., a human T cell, e.g., human T cell described herein. In one embodiment, the human T cell is a CD8+ T cell. In another aspect, the invention pertains to a method of making a cell comprising transducing a cell described herein, e.g., a T cell described herein, with a vector of comprising a nucleic acid encoding a CAR, e.g., a CAR described herein.

The present invention also provides a method of generating a population of RNA- engineered cells, e.g., cells described herein, e.g., T cells, transiently expressing exogenous RNA. The method comprises introducing an in vitro transcribed RNA or synthetic RNA into a cell, where the RNA comprises a nucleic acid encoding a CAR molecule described herein. In another aspect, the invention pertains to a method of providing an anti-tumor immunity in a mammal comprising administering to the mammal an effective amount of a cell expressing a CAR molecule, e.g., a cell expressing a CAR molecule described herein. In one embodiment, the cell is an autologous T cell. In one embodiment, the cell is an allogeneic T cell. In one embodiment, the mammal is a human.

In another aspect, the invention pertains to a method of treating a mammal having a disease or disorder associated with expression of CD 123 (e.g., a proliferative disease, a precancerous condition, and a noncancer related indication associated with the expression of CD 123) comprising administering to the mammal an effective amount of the cells expressing a CAR molecule, e.g., a CAR molecule described herein.

In one embodiment, the cells expressing a CAR molecule, e.g., a CAR molecule described herein, are administered in combination with an agent that increases the efficacy of a cell expressing a CAR molecule, e.g., an agent described herein.

In one embodiment, the cells expressing a CAR molecule, e.g., a CAR molecule described herein, are administered in combination with an agent that ameliorates one or more side effect associated with administration of a cell expressing a CAR molecule, e.g., an agent described herein.

In one embodiment, the cells expressing a CAR molecule, e.g., a CAR molecule described herein, are administered in combination with an agent that treats the disease associated with CD 123, e.g., an agent described herein.

In one embodiment, the cells expressing a CAR molecule, e.g., a CAR molecule described herein, are administered at a dose and/or dosing schedule described herein. In one embodiment, the cells expressing a CAR molecule, e.g., a CAR molecule described herein, are administered as a first line treatment for the disease, e.g., the cancer, e.g., the cancer described herein. In another embodiment, the cells expressing a CAR molecule, e.g., a CAR molecule described herein, are administered as a second, third, fourth line treatment for the disease, e.g., the cancer, e.g., the cancer described herein.

In one embodiment, the mammal, e.g., human subject, has previously received treatment with an anti-CD 19 therapy, e.g., a CD 19 CART therapy. In an embodiment, the mammal, e.g., human subject, experienced a relapse with the anti-CD19 therapy

In one embodiment, a population of cells described herein is administered.

In another aspect, the invention pertains to a method of eradicating CD 123- expressing normal cells, the method comprising administering a cell expressing a CAR molecule described herein. In one aspect, the eradication is in a subject to whom the a CD123-CAR molecule expressing cell has been administered, such that the method is applicable for use as a cellular conditioning therapy prior to cell transplantation. In one embodiment, the CD123-expressing normal cell is a CD123-expressing stem cell and the cell transplantation comprises a stem cell transplantation. For example, in one

embodiment, the cell expressing a CD 123 CAR molecule, e.g., described herein, is used for bone marrow ablation to eliminate at least a portion of existing bone marrow from a subject. Bone marrow ablation, using a cell expressing a CD 123 CAR molecule, may be performed, for example, in a subject in need of a bone marrow transplant. For example, in one embodiment, a cell expressing a CD123 CAR molecule, e.g., a CART123, is used in a cellular conditioning regimen prior to bone marrow or stem cell transplantation. In one embodiment, a cell expressing a CD 123 CAR molecule is used for bone marrow ablation in at least part of a treatment for a disease including, but not limited to a hematological cancer, a solid tumor, a hematologic disease, a metabolic disorder, HIV, HTLV, a lysosomal storage disorder, and an immunodeficiency.

In another aspect, the invention pertains to the isolated nucleic acid molecule encoding a CAR of the invention, the isolated polypeptide molecule of a CAR of the invention, the vector comprising a CAR of the invention, and the cell comprising a CAR of the invention for use as a medicament, e.g., as described herein.

In another aspect, the invention pertains to a the isolated nucleic acid molecule encoding a CAR of the invention, the isolated polypeptide molecule of a CAR of the invention, the vector comprising a CAR of the invention, and the cell comprising a CAR of the invention for use in the treatment of a disease expressing CD123, e.g., a disease expressing CD 123 as described herein.

In one aspect, the CD 123 CAR of the invention is used for therapy against a disease, disorder or condition associated with CD 123 expression. In one aspect, the disease, disorder or condition is cancer associated with CD 123 expression, including but is not limited to AML, myelodysplastic syndrome, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), hairy cell leukemia, Prolymphocytic leukemia, Chronic myeloid leukemia, Hodgkin lymphoma, Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm, and the like.

In one aspect, a cell expressing a CD 123 CAR is used for cancer therapy against cancers which express CD 123. In one embodiment, the cancer is a hematologic cancer such as, e.g., acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

The present invention also relates generally to the treatment of a patient having a cancer associated with expression of CD 123, or at risk of having a cancer associated with expression of CD 123, using cellular infusion. In one embodiment, the cellular infusion comprises at least one CD 123 CAR-expressing cell. An example of a cancer associated with expression of CD 123 includes, but is not limited to AML, myelodysplastic syndrome, ALL, hairy cell leukemia, Prolymphocytic leukemia, Chronic myeloid leukemia, Hodgkin lymphoma, Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm, and the like.

In one embodiment, lymphocyte infusion, for example allogeneic lymphocyte infusion, is used in the treatment of the cancer, wherein the lymphocyte infusion comprises at least one CD 123 CAR-expressing cell. In one embodiment, autologous lymphocyte infusion is used in the treatment of the cancer, wherein the autologous lymphocyte infusion comprises at least one CD123-expressing cell. In another embodiment, a CD 123 CAR-expressing cell of the invention can be used to eradicate CD123-expressing normal cells, thereby being applicable for use as a cellular

conditioning therapy prior to cell transplantation. In one embodiment, the CD 123- expressing normal cell is a CD123-expressing stem cell and the cell transplantation comprises a stem cell transplantation.

In one aspect, the invention relates to a method of bone marrow ablation in a subject that comprises using a CD123 CAR-expressing cell, e.g., described herein, to eliminate at least a portion of native bone marrow in a subject in need of a bone marrow transplant. In one embodiment, the invention includes a method of treating a subject having a disease or disorder where bone marrow transplantation may be beneficial that comprises administering a CD 123 Car-expressing cell, e.g., described herein, to a subject in need of a bone marrow transplant. Exemplary diseases in which the present method of using a CD 123 CAR-expressing cell for bone marrow ablation may be used as at least a part of a treatment include, but are not limited to a hematological cancer, a solid tumor, a hematologic disease, a metabolic disorder, HIV, HTLV, a lysosomal storage disorder, and an immunodeficiency.

In one embodiment, the CD 123 CAR is introduced into T cells, e.g., using in vitro transcription, and the subject (e.g., human) receives an initial administration of cells comprising a CD 123 CAR molecule, and one or more subsequent administrations of cells comprising a CD 123 CAR molecule, wherein the one or more subsequent administrations are administered less than 15 days, e.g., 14, 13, 12, 11, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, or 2 days after the previous administration. In one embodiment, more than one administration of cells comprising a CD123 CAR molecule are administered to the subject (e.g., human) per week, e.g., 2, 3, or 4 administrations of cells comprising a CD 123 CAR molecule are administered per week. In one embodiment, the subject (e.g., human subject) receives more than one administration of cells comprising a CD 123 CAR molecule per week (e.g., 2, 3 or 4 administrations per week) (also referred to herein as a cycle), followed by a week of no administration of cells comprising a CD 123 CAR molecule, and then one or more additional administration of cells comprising a CD123 CAR molecule (e.g., more than one administration of the cells comprising a CD 123 CAR molecule per week) is administered to the subject. In another embodiment, the subject (e.g., human subject) receives more than one cycle of cells comprising a CD 123 CAR molecule, and the time between each cycle is less than 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, or 3 days. In one embodiment, the cells comprising a CD 123 CAR molecule are administered every other day for 3 administrations per week. In one embodiment, the cells comprising a CD 123 CAR molecule are administered for at least two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight or more weeks.

In one aspect, the invention includes a population of autologous cells that are transfected or transduced with a vector comprising a nucleic acid molecule encoding a CD123-CAR molecule, e.g., as described herein. In one embodiment, the vector is a retroviral vector. In one embodiment, the vector is a self-inactivating lentiviral vector as described elsewhere herein. In one embodiment, the vector is delivered (e.g., by transfecting or electroporating) to a cell, e.g., a T cell, wherein the vector comprises a nucleic acid molecule encoding a CD 123 CAR molecule as described herein, which is transcribed as an mRNA molecule, and the CD 123 CAR molecule is translated from the RNA molecule and expressed on the surface of the cell.

In one embodiment, the nucleic acid molecule encoding a CD 123 CAR molecule, e.g., as described herein, is expressed as an mRNA molecule. In one embodiment, the genetically modified CD123 CAR-expressing cells, e.g., T cells, can be generated by transfecting or electroporating an RNA molecule encoding the desired CARs (e.g., without a vector sequence) into the cell. In one embodiment, a CD 123 CAR molecule is translated from the RNA molecule once it is incorporated and expressed on the surface of the recombinant cell.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Figure 1 depicts the results of the following experiments: (Figure 1A) Primary patient AML samples are frequently CD123+. Blasts were gated using standard side scatterlow CD45dim characteristics. (Fi gure IB) The expression of CD123 within different primary samples is heterogeneous but always present, as revealed by gating on blasts and using residual normal lymphocytes or isotype-matched controls to determine the correct gating for CD123. (Figure 1C) CD123Bngnt and CD123aim sub-populations were flow- sorted from primary AML specimens, and the expression of CD 123 RNA was quantified using Taqman RTqPCR. A melanoma cell line (A375) was employed as negative control. (Figure ID) Results of the degranulation and cytokine production assays. (Figure IE) CART 123 cells, but not CART 19 cells, produce cytokines in response to MOLM14 (a CD123+ AML cell line) or primary AML. CAR staining was accomplished using antiidiotype anti-mouseCAR19 or with goat anti-mouse Fab (for CD 123 CAR). Intracellular cytokines were IFNy, ΜΙΡΙβ, and TNFa. (Figure IF) CART 123, CART 19, or

untransduced T cells were labeled with CFSE and exposed to primary AML cells for 96 hours. Proliferation and enrichment of the CART123 cell population is shown. (Figure 1G) An overnight fluorocytometric based killing assay demonstrated killing of primary AML blasts by CART 123, but not by CART 19 cells. (Figure 1H) Elaboration of the indicated cytokines after a 24 hour incubation of CART 123 (black) or CART 19 (white) with MOLM14 AML.

Figure 2 depicts the results of experiments demonstrating the preclinical efficacy of CD 123 CAR T cells in human AML xenograft models. (Figure 2A) Schematic of xenograft model, IV: intravenous injection; BLI: Bioluminescent imaging. Quantification of BLI radiance was used as a surrogate measurement of AML burden. (Figure 2B) Eradication of MOLM14 occurred only in xenografted mice treated with CART 123 cells, as measured by BLI radiance and displayed colorimetrically. (Figure 2C) Summary BLI data from three MOLM14 xenograft experiments. (Figure 2D) Survival analysis of MOLM14-bearing xenograft mice demonstrates significant survival of CART 123 -treated mice in comparison to vehicle- and CART19-treated mice. (Figure 2E) Schematic of re- challenge model. (Figure 2F) Summary of BLI of control mice (not depicted in Figure 2E, these mice received lxlO6 gfp/luciferase+ MOLM14 without prior CART123), primary challenge mice (top row in Figure 2E) or secondary challenge mice that had previously cleared MOLM14 (bottom row in Figure 2E). The dotted line indicates the baseline BLI in mice with no luciferase+ disease. (Figure 2G) Mice experiencing re- challenge (secondary challenge) with MOLM14 demonstrate more robust increase in peripheral CART123 cells than mice undergoing a primary MOLM14 challenge. (Figure 2H) Representative mouse showing that initial successful engraftment of MOLM14 is associated with low PB CART123 number, and that late rejection is accompanied by elevation in CART123 cells.

Figure 3 depicts the results of the following experiments: (Figure 3A) Schematic of Primary AML xenograft model (Figure 3B) Peripheral blood 15 days after receiving T cells (experiment D29) showing eradication or marked reduction of circulating blasts. (Figure 3C) Composite survival of mice from three independent experiments. T cells were injected on D15. (Figure 3D) Blasts up-regulate CD123 in vivo. Ungated representation of a primary AML (UPN34) showing low level expression of CD 123 and high level expression of CD33. Upon injection into NSGS mice treated with control un- transduced T cells, UPN34 up-regulated CD 123 expression as shown using a comparison before T cells (D13, left) and after T cells (D27, right). All mice receiving control T cells subsequently died of disease, and all mice receiving CART123 cells exhibited long-term survival. (Figure 3E) CD 123 expression level inversely correlates with proliferation and the majority of AML blast proliferation occurs in the BM. Blood, BM, and spleen isolated from moribund mice was stained for intracellular expression of the proliferation marker Ki67 after surface staining for CD 123 in CD45dim blasts.

Figure 4 depicts the results of the following experiments: (Figure 4A) Healthy bone marrow progenitor populations exhibit moderate to bright expression of CD123. FMO: fluorescence-minus-one. (Figure 4B) CD123dim/neg BM progenitors differentiate to CD123+ in semisolid culture. (Figure 4C) CART123 cells markedly impair hematopoietic function. (Figure 4D) Cycling BM cells upregulate CD123. (Figure 4E) Xenograft model for myeloablative potential of CART123 cells. (Figure 4F) Progressive decline in circulating human B-cells (left) is seen in CART123 mice, and is accompanied by an increase in T cells (right). (Figure 4G) Myeloablation of human BM in CART123 mice.

Figure 5 depicts the results of experiments demonstrating that blasts can grow ex vivo regardless of baseline CD 123 expression.

Figure 6 depicts the results of experiments demonstrating that CD 123 is expressed at equivalent levels regardless of leukemia stem cell, progenitor or bulk blast populations as defined CD34//CD38 of primary AML cells.

Figure 7 depicts a schematic representation of the different CD 123 CAR constructs (Figure 7 A) and vector map of one CD 123 CAR molecule (Figure 7B). Figure 8 depicts the results of experiments demonstrating the selection of the optimal CD 123 CAR construct.

Figure 9 depicts the results of experiments demonstrating the formation of memory cell populations in CART123 cells after exposure to human leukemia in xenografted mice. Mice previously challenged with AML (2ry challenge group) or not previously challenged (l17 challenge group) were injected with CART123 cells and bled serially for peripheral blood T cell numbers and phenotype.

Figure 10 depicts the results of experiments where four primary AML specimens were injected in different experiments into immunodeficient NSGS mice. Variable levels of CD 123 are seen.

Figure 11 depicts a gating strategy for normal bone marrow precursors.

Figure 12 depicts the results of experiments demonstrating that CD 123 is expressed on normal circulating B cells and myelomonocytic cells.

Figure 13 depicts the results of experiments demonstrating the virtual absence of flow cytometry-defined Common Myeloid Progenitors, Granulocyte-Monocyte

Precursors, or Common Lymphoid Progenitors in the marrow 28 days after infusion of CART123 cells into "humanized immune system" mice.

Figure 14 is an image demonstrating expression of CD 123 on the surface of a primary ALL bone marrow sample, which is also positive for the CD34+ marker. Top panel shows a dot plot, bottom panel shows a histogram of expression by the CD34+ cells vs. the CD34-negatiev population in the same sample.

Figure 15 is an image demonstrating that CART 123 cells selectively recognize and are triggered by CD123-positive B-ALL blasts.

Figure 16 is an image demonstrating that CART123 cells kill B-ALL blasts. Figure 17 is a graph showing expression of CD19, CD22, and CD123 in (A) adult and (B) pediatric ALL specimens.

Figure 18 is a graph showing expression of CD 123 in a patient relapsing with CD 19- ALL after CART 19 therapy.

Figure 19 is a graph showing expression of CD123 in another patient relapsing with CD 19- ALL after CART 19 therapy. Figure 20 is a graph showing proliferation in CART 19 and CART 123 T cells after exposure to the B-ALL cell line.

Figure 21 is a graph showing proliferation in CART 19 and CART 123 T cells after exposure to primary B-cell ALL samples..

Figure 22 is a graph showing CD 123 cell degranulation in response to NALM6

B-ALL, MOLM14, primary ALL and primary AML.

Figure 23 is a graph showing secretion of soluble cytokines in response to exposure of CART19 and CART123 T cells to primary ALL samples. Co-culture was performed with primary ALL samples.

Figure 24 is a graph showing cytotoxicity at 4 hours. CART 123 and CART 19 T cells were tested for the ability to kill NALM6 B-ALL cells.

Figure 25 is a graph showing survival of NSG mice that were injected with lxlO6 Nalm6 click beetle green luciferase cells on DO. On D7, the mice were injected with UTD T cells, CART 19 cells, CART 123 cells, or a 50:50 mixed population of CART19 and CART 123 to a total cell dose of lxlO6 (combo group).

Figure 26 is a table showing the VH sequences of humanized anti-CD 123 (SEQ ID NOS 93 and 33-34, respectively, in order of appearance).

Figure 27 is a table showing the VL sequences of humanized anti-CD 123 (SEQ ID NOS 92 and 31-32, respectively, in order of appearance).

Figure 28 is an image showing expression of humanized anti-CD 123 scFv variants which were transiently expressed in HEK293 cells and were purified to near homogeneity via the C-terminal 6xHis tag (SEQ ID NO: 128).

Figure 29 is an image showing expression of humanized anti-CD 123 scFv variants which were transiently expressed in HEK293 cells and were purified to near homogeneity via the C-terminal 6xHis tag (SEQ ID NO: 128).

Figure 30 is a graph showing binding of humanized anti-C123 scFv variants to immobilized CD 123 determined by ELISA.

Figure 31 is a graph showing melting temperatures of humanized anti-CD 123 scFv variants measured using differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF).

Figure 32 is an image showing surface CAR expression in transduced T cells on day 10 of expansion. Figure 33 is an image showing functional studies of T cells transduced with different humanized CAR constructs, or with control mouse anti-human CD 123 CAR.

Figure 34 is a graph showing results from killing assays with T cells transduced with different humanized CAR constructs, or with control mouse anti-human CD 123 CAR.

Figure 35 is an image showing analysis of electroporated human T cells that were rested overnight, followed by a 2 hour co-incubation with targets in the presence of anti- CD107a, anti-CD49d and anti-CD28, and monensin, in a standard degranulation assay

Figure 36 is an image showing bioluminescence on D21 and D28 post- T cell injection into tumor-engrafted mice.

Figure 37 is a graph showing that RNA-electroporated T cells can be used to induce an anti-tumor response in vivo in immunodeficient animals.

Figure 38 is an image showing tumor burden by bioluminescent imaging of tumor engrafted mice injected with CD 123 CART T cells.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Definitions

Unless defined otherwise, all technical and scientific terms used herein have the same meaning as commonly understood by one of ordinary skill in the art to which the invention pertains.

The terms "a" and "an" are used herein to refer to one or to more than one (i.e., to at least one) of the grammatical object of the article. By way of example, "an element" means one element or more than one element.

The term "about" as used herein when referring to a measurable value such as an amount, a temporal duration, and the like, is meant to encompass variations of +20% or in some instances +10%, or in some instances +5%, or in some instances +1%, or in some instances +0.1% from the specified value, as such variations are appropriate to perform the disclosed methods.

As used herein, the terms "alpha subunit of the IL-3 receptor," "IL3Ra,"

"CD 123," "IL3Ra chain" and "IL3Ra subunit" refer interchangeably to an antigenic determinant known to be detectable on leukemia precursor cells. The human and murine amino acid and nucleic acid sequences can be found in a public database, such as GenBank, UniProt and Swiss-Prot. For example, the amino acid sequence of human IL3Ra can be found at Accession No. NP 002174 and the nucleotide sequence encoding of the human IL3Ra can be found at Accession No. NM 005191. In one aspect the antigen-binding portion of the CAR recognizes and binds an antigen within the extracellular domain of the CD 123 protein. In one aspect, the CD 123 protein is expressed on a cancer cell.

As used herein, the term "Chimeric Antigen Receptor" or alternatively a "CAR" refers to a recombinant polypeptide construct comprising at least an extracellular antigen binding domain, a transmembrane domain and a cytoplasmic signaling domain (also referred to herein as "an intracellular signaling domain") comprising a functional signaling domain derived from a stimulatory molecule as defined herein. In one aspect, the stimulatory molecule is the zeta chain associated with the T cell receptor complex. In one aspect, the intracellular signaling domain further comprises one or more functional signaling domains derived from at least one costimulatory molecule as defined below. In one aspect, the costimulatory molecule is chosen from 4-1BB (i.e., CD137), CD27, and/or CD28. In one aspect, the CAR comprises a chimeric fusion protein comprising an extracellular antigen recognition domain, a transmembrane domain and a cytoplasmic signaling domain comprising a functional signaling domain derived from a stimulatory molecule. In one aspect, the CAR comprises a chimeric fusion protein comprising an extracellular antigen recognition domain, a transmembrane domain and a cytoplasmic signaling domain comprising a functional signaling domain derived from a costimulatory molecule and a functional signaling domain derived from a stimulatory molecule. In one aspect, the CAR comprises a chimeric fusion protein comprising an extracellular antigen recognition domain, a transmembrane domain and an intracellular signaling domain comprising two functional signaling domains derived from one or more co-stimulatory molecule(s) and a functional signaling domain derived from a stimulatory molecule. In one aspect, the CAR comprises a chimeric fusion protein comprising an extracellular antigen recognition domain, a transmembrane domain and an intracellular signaling domain comprising at least two functional signaling domains derived from one or more co-stimulatory molecule(s) and a functional signaling domain derived from a stimulatory molecule. In one aspect the CAR comprises an optional leader sequence at the amino-terminus (N-ter) of the CAR fusion protein. In one aspect, the CAR further comprises a leader sequence at the N-terminus of the extracellular antigen recognition domain, wherein the leader sequence is optionally cleaved from the antigen recognition domain, e.g., a scFv) during cellular processing and localization of the CAR to the cellular membrane. As used herein, the terms intracellular and cytoplasmic are used interchangeably.

The term "signaling domain" refers to the functional portion of a protein which acts by transmitting information within the cell to regulate cellular activity via defined signaling pathways by generating second messengers or functioning as effectors by responding to such messengers.

The term "antibody," as used herein, refers to a protein , or polypeptide sequence derived from an immunoglobulin molecule which specifically binds with an antigen, e.g., non-covalently, reversibly, and in a specific manner. An antibody can be polyclonal or monoclonal, multiple or single chain, or an intact immunoglobulin, and may be derived from natural sources or from recombinant sources. An antibody can be a tetramer of immunoglobulin molecule. For example, a naturally occurring IgG antibody is a tetramer comprising at least two heavy (H) chains and two light (L) chains inter-connected by disulfide bonds. Each heavy chain is comprised of a heavy chain variable region

(abbreviated herein as VH) and a heavy chain constant region. The heavy chain constant region is comprised of three domains, CHI, CH2 and CH3. Each light chain is comprised of a light chain variable region (abbreviated herein as VL) and a light chain constant region. The light chain constant region is comprised of one domain, CL. The VH and VL regions can be further subdivided into regions of hyper variability, termed

complementarity determining regions (CDR), interspersed with regions that are more conserved, termed framework regions (FR). Each VH and VL is composed of three CDRs and four FRs arranged from amino-terminus to carboxy-terminus in the following order: FR1, CDR1, FR2, CDR2, FR3, CDR3, and FR4. The variable regions of the heavy and light chains contain a binding domain that interacts with an antigen. The constant regions of the antibodies may mediate the binding of the immunoglobulin to host tissues or factors, including various cells of the immune system (e.g., effector cells) and the first component (Clq) of the classical complement system. The term "antibody" includes, but is not limited to, monoclonal antibodies, human antibodies, humanized antibodies, camelid antibodies, and chimeric antibodies. The antibodies can be of any isotype/class (e.g., IgG, IgE, IgM, IgD, IgA and IgY), or subclass (e.g., IgGl, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4, IgAl and IgA2).

The term "antibody fragment" refers to at least one portion of an intact antibody, or recombinant variants thereof, and refers to the antigen binding domain, e.g., an antigenic determining variable regions of an intact antibody that is sufficient to confer recognition and specific binding of the antibody fragment to a target, such as an antigen. Examples of antibody fragments include, but are not limited to, Fab, Fab', F(ab')2, and Fv fragments, single chain or "scFv" antibody fragments, linear antibodies, single domain antbodies such as sdAb (either VL or VH), camelid VHH domains, and multi- specific antibodies formed from antibody fragments. The term "scFv" refers to a fusion protein comprising at least one antibody fragment comprising a variable region of a light chain and at least one antibody fragment comprising a variable region of a heavy chain, wherein the light and heavy chain variable regions are contiguously linked via a short flexible polypeptide linker, and capable of being expressed as a single chain polypeptide, and wherein the scFv retains the specificity of the intact antibody from which it is derived. Unless specified, as used herein an scFv may have the VL and VH variable regions in either order, e.g., with respect to the N-terminal and C-terminal ends of the polypeptide, the scFv may comprise VL-linker-Vfi or may comprise Vfj-linker-VL.

The portion of the CAR composition of the invention comprising an antibody or antibody fragment thereof may exist in a variety of forms where the antigen binding domain is expressed as part of a contiguous polypeptide chain including, for example, a single domain antibody fragment (sdAb), a single chain antibody (scFv) and a humanized antibody (Harlow et al., 1999, In: Using Antibodies: A Laboratory Manual, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, NY; Harlow et al., 1989, In: Antibodies: A Laboratory Manual, Cold Spring Harbor, New York; Houston et al., 1988, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 85:5879-5883; Bird et al., 1988, Science 242:423-426). In one aspect, the antigen binding domain of a CAR composition of the invention comprises an antibody fragment. In a further aspect, the CAR comprises an antibody fragment that comprises a scFv.

By the term "recombinant antibody" as used herein, is meant an antibody which is generated using recombinant DNA technology, such as, for example, an antibody expressed by a bacteriophage or yeast expression system. The term should also be construed to mean an antibody which has been generated by the synthesis of a DNA molecule encoding the antibody and which DNA molecule expresses an antibody protein, or an amino acid sequence specifying the antibody, wherein the DNA or amino acid sequence has been obtained using recombinant or synthetic DNA or amino acid sequence technology which is available and well known in the art.

The term "antibody heavy chain" refers to the larger of the two types of polypeptide chains present in antibody molecules in their naturally occurring conformations, and which normally determines the class to which the antibody belongs.

The term "antibody light chain," refers to the smaller of the two types of polypeptide chains present in antibody molecules in their naturally occurring conformations. Kappa (K) and lambda (λ) light chains refer to the two major antibody light chain isotypes.

The term "recombinant antibody" refers to an antibody which is generated using recombinant DNA technology, such as, for example, an antibody expressed by a bacteriophage or yeast expression system. The term should also be construed to mean an antibody which has been generated by the synthesis of a DNA molecule encoding the antibody and which DNA molecule expresses an antibody protein, or an amino acid sequence specifying the antibody, wherein the DNA or amino acid sequence has been obtained using recombinant DNA or amino acid sequence technology which is available and well known in the art.

The term "antigen" or "Ag" as used herein is defined as a molecule that provokes an immune response. This immune response may involve either antibody production, or the activation of specific immunologically-competent cells, or both. The skilled artisan will understand that any macromolecule, including virtually all proteins or peptides, can serve as an antigen. Furthermore, antigens can be derived from recombinant or genomic DNA. A skilled artisan will understand that any DNA, which comprises a nucleotide sequences or a partial nucleotide sequence encoding a protein that elicits an immune response therefore encodes an "antigen" as that term is used herein. Furthermore, one skilled in the art will understand that an antigen need not be encoded solely by a full length nucleotide sequence of a gene. It is readily apparent that the present invention includes, but is not limited to, the use of partial nucleotide sequences of more than one gene and that these nucleotide sequences are arranged in various combinations to encode polypeptides that elicit the desired immune response. Moreover, a skilled artisan will understand that an antigen need not be encoded by a "gene" at all. It is readily apparent that an antigen can be generated, synthesized or can be derived from a biological sample, or it can be a macromolecule that is not necessarily a polypeptide. Such a biological sample can include, but is not limited to a tissue sample, a tumor sample, a cell or a fluid with other biological components.

The term "anti-tumor effect" as used herein, refers to a biological effect which can be manifested by various means, including but not limited to, e.g., a decrease in tumor volume, a decrease in the number of tumor cells, a decrease in the number of metastases, an increase in life expectancy, decrease in tumor cell proliferation, decrease in tumor cell survival, or amelioration of various physiological symptoms associated with the cancerous condition. An "anti-tumor effect" can also be manifested by the ability of the peptides, polynucleotides, cells and antibodies of the invention in prevention of the occurrence of tumor in the first place.

As used herein, the term "autologous" is meant to refer to any material derived from the same individual to whom it is later to be re-introduced into the individual.

"Allogeneic" refers to any material derived from a different animal of the same species as the individual to whom the material is introduced. Two or more individuals are said to be allogeneic to one another when the genes at one or more loci are not identical. In some aspects, allogeneic material from individuals of the same species may be sufficiently unlike genetically to interact antigenically.

"Xenogeneic" refers to a graft derived from an animal of a different species. The term "cancer" as used herein is defined as disease characterized by the rapid and uncontrolled growth of aberrant cells. Cancer cells can spread locally or through the bloodstream and lymphatic system to other parts of the body. Examples of various cancers include but are not limited to, breast cancer, prostate cancer, ovarian cancer, cervical cancer, skin cancer, pancreatic cancer, colorectal cancer, renal cancer, liver cancer, brain cancer, lymphoma, leukemia, lung cancer and the like.

The phrase "disease associated with expression of CD 123" as used herein includes but is not limited to, a disease associated with expression of CD 123 or condition associated with cells which express CD123 including, e.g., a proliferative disease such as a cancer or malignancy or a precancerous condition such as a myelodysplasia, a myelodysplasia syndrome or a preleukemia; or a noncancer related indication associated with cells which express CD123. In one aspect, a cancer associated with expression of CD 123 is a hematological cancer. In one aspect, a hematological cancer includes but is not limited to AML, myelodysplasia syndrome, ALL, hairy cell leukemia,

Prolymphocytic leukemia, Chronic myeloid leukemia, Hodgkin lymphoma, Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm, and the like. Further disease associated with expression of CD 123 expression include, but are not limited to, e.g., atypical and/or non- classical cancers, malignancies, precancerous conditions or proliferative diseases associated with expression of CD123. Non-cancer related indications associated with expression of CD 123 may also be included.

As used herein, the term "conservative sequence modifications" is intended to refer to amino acid modifications that do not significantly affect or alter the binding characteristics of the antibody or antibody fragment containing the amino acid sequence. Such conservative modifications include amino acid substitutions, additions and deletions. Modifications can be introduced into an antibody or antibody fragment of the invention by standard techniques known in the art, such as site-directed mutagenesis and PCR-mediated mutagenesis. Conservative amino acid substitutions are ones in which the amino acid residue is replaced with an amino acid residue having a similar side chain. Families of amino acid residues having similar side chains have been defined in the art. These families include amino acids with basic side chains (e.g., lysine, arginine, histidine), acidic side chains (e.g., aspartic acid, glutamic acid), uncharged polar side chains (e.g., glycine, asparagine, glutamine, serine, threonine, tyrosine, cysteine, tryptophan), nonpolar side chains (e.g., alanine, valine, leucine, isoleucine, proline, phenylalanine, methionine), beta-branched side chains (e.g., threonine, valine, isoleucine) and aromatic side chains (e.g., tyrosine, phenylalanine, tryptophan, histidine). Thus, one or more amino acid residues within a CAR of the invention can be replaced with other amino acid residues from the same side chain family and the altered CAR can be tested for the ability to bind CD 123 using the functional assays described herein.

By the term "stimulation," is meant a primary response induced by binding of a stimulatory molecule (e.g., a TCR/CD3 complex) with its cognate ligand thereby mediating a signal transduction event, such as, but not limited to, signal transduction via the TCR/CD3 complex. Stimulation can mediate altered expression of certain molecules, such as downregulation of TGF-β, and/or reorganization of cytoskeletal structures, and the like.

A "stimulatory molecule," as the term is used herein, means a molecule expressed by a T cell that provides the primary cytoplasmic signaling sequence(s) that regulate primary activation of the TCR complex in a stimulatory way for at least some aspect of the T cell signaling pathway. In one aspect, the primary signal is initiated by, for instance, binding of a TCR/CD3 complex with an MHC molecule loaded with peptide, and which leads to mediation of a T cell response, including, but not limited to, proliferation, activation, differentiation, and the like. A primary cytoplasmic signaling sequence (also referred to as a "primary signaling domain") that acts in a stimulatory manner may contain a signaling motif which is known as immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif or ITAM. Examples of an IT AM containing primary cytoplasmic signaling sequence that is of particular use in the invention includes, but is not limited to, those derived from TCR zeta, FcR gamma, FcR beta, CD3 gamma, CD3 delta , CD3 epsilon, CD5, CD22, CD79a, CD79b, CD278 (also known as "ICOS") and CD66d. In a specific CAR molecule of the invention, the intracellular signaling domain in any one or more CAR molecules of the invention comprises an intracellular signaling sequence, e.g., a primary signaling sequence of CD3-zeta. In a specific CAR of the invention, the primary signaling sequence of CD3-zeta is the human sequence (SEQ ID NO:98), or the equivalent residues from a non-human species, e.g., mouse, rodent, monkey, ape and the like.

An "antigen presenting cell" or "APC" as used herein, means an immune system cell such as an accessory cell (e.g., a B-cell, a dendritic cell, and the like) that displays a foreign antigen complexed with major histocompatibility complexes (MHC's) on its surface. T-cells may recognize these complexes using their T-cell receptors (TCRs). APCs process antigens and present them to T-cells.

An "intracellular signaling domain," as the term is used herein, refers to an intracellular portion of a molecule. The intracellular signaling domain generates a signal that promotes an immune effector function of the CAR containing cell, e.g., a CART cell. Examples of immune effector function, e.g., in a CART cell, include cytolytic activity and helper activity, including the secretion of cytokines.

In an embodiment, the intracellular signaling domain can comprise a primary intracellular signaling domain. Exemplary primary intracellular signaling domains include those derived from the molecules responsible for primary stimulation, or antigen dependent simulation. In an embodiment, the intracellular signaling domain can comprise a costimulatory intracellular domain. Exemplary costimulatory intracellular signaling domains include those derived from molecules responsible for costimulatory signals, or antigen independent stimulation. For example, in the case of a CART, a primary intracellular signaling domain can comprise a cytoplasmic sequence of a T cell receptor, and a costimulatory intracellular signaling domain can comprise cytoplasmic sequence from co-receptor or costimulatory molecule.

A primary intracellular signaling domain can comprise a signaling motif which is known as an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif or IT AM. Examples of IT AM containing primary cytoplasmic signaling sequences include, but are not limited to, those derived from CD3 zeta, FcR gamma, FcR beta, CD3 gamma, CD3 delta, CD3 epsilon, CD5, CD22, CD79a, CD79b, and CD66d DAP10 and DAP12.

As used herein "zeta" or alternatively "zeta chain", "CD3-zeta" or "TCR-zeta" is defined as the protein provided as GenBan Acc. No. BAG36664.1, or the equivalent residues from a non-human species, e.g., mouse, rodent, monkey, ape and the like, and a "zeta stimulatory domain" or alternatively a "CD3-zeta stimulatory domain" or a "TCR- zeta stimulatory domain" is defined as the amino acid residues from the cytoplamic domain of the zeta chain that are sufficient to functionally transmit an initial signal necessary for T cell activation. In one aspect the cytoplasmic domain of zeta comprises residues 52 through 164 of GenBank Acc. No. BAG36664.1 or the equivalent residues from a non-human species, e.g., mouse, rodent, monkey, ape and the like, that are functional orthologs thereof. In one aspect, the "zeta stimulatory domain" or a "CD3- zeta stimulatory domain" is the sequence provided as SEQ ID NO:7 and SEQ ID NO:98. A "costimulatory molecule" refers to the cognate binding partner on a T cell that specifically binds with a costimulatory ligand, thereby mediating a costimulatory response by the T cell, such as, but not limited to, proliferation. Costimulatory molecules are cell surface molecules other than antigen receptors or their ligands that are required for an efficient immune response. Costimulatory molecules include, but are not limited to, an MHC class I molecule, BTLA and a Toll ligand receptor, as well as OX40, CD27, CD28, CDS, ICAM-1, LFA-1 (CDl la/CD18) and 4-1BB (CD137).

A costimulatory intracellular signaling domain can be derived from the intracellular portion of a costimulatory molecule. A costimulatory molecule can be represented in the following protein families: TNF receptor proteins, Immunoglobulin-like proteins, cytokine receptors, integrins, signaling lymphocytic activation molecules (SLAM proteins), and activating NK cell receptors. Examples of such molecules include CD27, CD28, 4-1BB (CD137), OX40, GITR, CD30, CD40, , ICOS, BAFFR, HVEM, lymphocyte function-associated antigen- 1 (LFA-1), CD2, CD7, LIGHT, NKG2C, SLAMF7, NKp80, CD160, B7-H3, and a ligand that specifically binds with CD83, and the like.

The intracellular signaling domain can comprise the entire intracellular portion, or the entire native intracellular signaling domain, of the molecule from which it is derived, or a functional fragment thereof.

As used herein "4- IBB" refers to a member of the TNFR superfamily with an amino acid sequence provided as GenBank Acc. No. AAA62478.2, or the equivalent residues from a non-human species, e.g., mouse, rodent, monkey, ape and the like; and a "4-1BB costimulatory domain" is defined as amino acid residues 214-255 of GenBank Acc. No. AAA62478.2, or the equivalent residues from a non-human species, e.g., mouse, rodent, monkey, ape and the like. In one aspect, the "4- IBB costimulatory domain" is the human sequence or the equivalent residues from a non-human species, e.g., mouse, rodent, monkey, ape and the like. In one aspect, the "4-1BB costimulatory domain" is the sequence provided as SEQ ID NO:6 or the equivalent residues from a non-human species, e.g., mouse, rodent, monkey, ape and the like. "Encoding" refers to the inherent property of specific sequences of nucleotides in a polynucleotide, such as a gene, a cDNA, or an mRNA, to serve as templates for synthesis of other polymers and macromolecules in biological processes having either a defined sequence of nucleotides (e.g. , rRNA, tRNA and mRNA) or a defined sequence of amino acids and the biological properties resulting therefrom. Thus, a gene, cDNA, or RNA encodes a protein if transcription and translation of mRNA corresponding to that gene, cDNA, or RNA produces the protein in a cell or other biological system. Both the coding strand, the nucleotide sequence of which is identical to the mRNA sequence and is usually provided in sequence listings, and the non-coding strand, used as the template for transcription of a gene or cDNA, can be referred to as encoding the protein or other product of that gene or cDNA.

Unless otherwise specified, a "nucleotide sequence encoding an amino acid sequence" includes all nucleotide sequences that are degenerate versions of each other and that encode the same amino acid sequence. Nucleotide sequences that encode proteins or a RNA may also include introns to the extent that the nucleotide sequence encoding the protein may in some version contain an intron(s).

"Effective amount" or "therapeutically effective amount" are used

interchangeably herein, and refer to an amount of a compound, formulation, material, or composition, as described herein effective to achieve a particular biological result.

As used herein "endogenous" refers to any material from or produced inside an organism, cell, tissue or system.

As used herein, the term "exogenous" refers to any material introduced from or produced outside an organism, cell, tissue or system.

The term "expression" as used herein is defined as the transcription and/or translation of a particular nucleotide sequence driven by a regulatory sequence, e.g., a promoter.

The term "transfer vector" refers to a composition of matter which comprises an isolated nucleic acid and which can be used to deliver the isolated nucleic acid to the interior of a cell. Numerous vectors are known in the art including, but not limited to, linear polynucleotides, polynucleotides associated with ionic or amphiphilic compounds, plasmids, and viruses. Thus, the term "transfer vector" includes an autonomously replicating plasmid or a virus. The term should also be construed to further include non- plasmid and non- viral compounds which facilitate transfer of nucleic acid into cells, such as, for example, a polylysine compound, a liposome, and the like. Examples of viral transfer vectors include, but are not limited to, adenoviral vectors, adeno-associated virus vectors, retroviral vectors, lentiviral vectors, and the like.

"Expression vector" refers to a vector comprising a recombinant polynucleotide comprising expression control sequences operatively linked to a nucleotide sequence to be expressed. An expression vector comprises sufficient cis-acting elements for expression; other elements for expression can be supplied by the host cell or in an in vitro expression system. Expression vectors include all those known in the art, including cosmids, plasmids (e.g. , naked or contained in liposomes) and viruses (e.g. , lentiviruses, retroviruses, adenoviruses, and adeno-associated viruses) that incorporate the

recombinant polynucleotide.

The term "homologous" or "identity" as used herein, refers to the subunit sequence identity between two polymeric molecules, e.g. , between two nucleic acid molecules, such as, two DNA molecules or two RNA molecules, or between two polypeptide molecules. When a subunit position in both of the two molecules is occupied by the same monomeric subunit; e.g. , if a position in each of two DNA molecules is occupied by adenine, then they are homologous or identical at that position. The homology between two sequences is a direct function of the number of matching or homologous positions; e.g. , if half (e.g. , five positions in a polymer ten subunits in length) of the positions in two sequences are homologous, the two sequences are 50% homologous; if 90% of the positions (e.g. , 9 of 10), are matched or homologous, the two sequences are 90% homologous.

"Humanized" forms of non-human (e.g., murine) antibodies are chimeric immunoglobulins, immunoglobulin chains or fragments thereof (such as Fv, Fab, Fab', F(ab')2 or other antigen-binding subsequences of antibodies) which contain minimal sequence derived from non-human immunoglobulin. For the most part, humanized antibodies and antibody fragments thereof are human immunoglobulins (recipient antibody or antibody fragments) in which residues from a complementary-determining region (CDR) of the recipient are replaced by residues from a CDR of a non-human species (donor antibody) such as mouse, rat or rabbit having the desired specificity, affinity, and capacity. In some instances, Fv framework region (FR) residues of the human immunoglobulin are replaced by corresponding non-human residues.

Furthermore, a humanized antibody or antibody fragment can comprise residues which are found neither in the recipient antibody or antibody fragment nor in the imported CDR or framework sequences. These modifications can further refine and optimize antibody or antibody fragment performance. In general, the humanized antibody or antibody fragment thereof will comprise substantially all of at least one, and typically two, variable domains, in which all or substantially all of the CDR regions correspond to those of a non-human immunoglobulin and all or a significant portion of the FR regions are those of a human immunoglobulin sequence. The humanized antibody or antibody fragment can also comprise at least a portion of an immunoglobulin constant region (Fc), typically that of a human immunoglobulin. For further details, see Jones et al., Nature, 321: 522-525, 1986; Reichmann et al., Nature, 332: 323-329, 1988; Presta, Curr. Op. Struct. Biol., 2: 593-596, 1992.

The term "human" antibody refers to fully human antibodies as well as effectively human antibodies. "Fully human" refers to an immunoglobulin, such as an antibody or fragment, where the whole molecule is of human origin or consists of an amino acid sequence identical to a human form of the antibody or immunoglobulin. An "effectively human" antibody is an antibody that includes a sufficient number of human amino acid positions such that the antibody does not elicit an immunogenic response in a normal human.

As used herein, an "instructional material" includes a publication, a recording, a diagram, or any other medium of expression which can be used to communicate the usefulness of the compositions and methods of the invention. The instructional material of the kit of the invention may, for example, be affixed to a container which contains the nucleic acid, peptide, and/or composition of the invention or be shipped together with a container which contains the nucleic acid, peptide, and/or composition. Alternatively, the instructional material may be shipped separately from the container with the intention that the instructional material and the compound be used cooperatively by the recipient.

The term "isolated" means altered or removed from the natural state. For example, a nucleic acid or a peptide naturally present in a living animal is not "isolated," but the same nucleic acid or peptide partially or completely separated from the coexisting materials of its natural state is "isolated." An isolated nucleic acid or protein can exist in substantially purified form, or can exist in a non-native environment such as, for example, a host cell.

In the context of the present invention, the following abbreviations for the commonly occurring nucleic acid bases are used. "A" refers to adenosine, "C" refers to cytosine, "G" refers to guanosine, "T" refers to thymidine, and "U" refers to uridine.

A "lentivirus" as used herein refers to a genus of the Retroviridae family.

Lentiviruses are unique among the retroviruses in being able to infect non-dividing cells; they can deliver a significant amount of genetic information into the DNA of the host cell, so they are one of the most efficient methods of a gene delivery vector. HIV, SIV, and FIV are all examples of lentiviruses.

A "lentiviral vector" is a vector derived from at least a portion of a lentivirus genome, including especially a self-inactivating lentiviral vector as provided in Milone et al., Mol. Ther. 17(8): 1453-1464 (2009). Other Examples or lentivirus vectors that may be used in the clinic include but are not limited to, e.g., the LENTIVECTOR® gene delivery technology from Oxford BioMedica, the LENTIMAX™ vector system from Lentigen and the like. Nonclinical types of lentiviral vectors are also available and would be known to one skilled in the art.

The term "operably linked" or alternatively "transcriptional control" refers to functional linkage between a regulatory sequence and a heterologous nucleic acid sequence resulting in expression of the latter. For example, a first nucleic acid sequence is operably linked with a second nucleic acid sequence when the first nucleic acid sequence is placed in a functional relationship with the second nucleic acid sequence. For instance, a promoter is operably linked to a coding sequence if the promoter affects the transcription or expression of the coding sequence. Operably linked DNA sequences can be contiguous with each other and, e.g., where necessary to join two protein coding regions, are in the same reading frame.

"Parenteral" administration of an immunogenic composition includes, e.g. , subcutaneous (s.c), intravenous (i.v.), intramuscular (i.m.), or intrasternal injection, intratumoral, or infusion techniques.

The term "nucleic acid" or "polynucleotide" refers to deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) or ribonucleic acids (RNA) and polymers thereof in either single- or double- stranded form. Unless specifically limited, the term encompasses nucleic acids containing known analogues of natural nucleotides that have similar binding properties as the reference nucleic acid and are metabolized in a manner similar to naturally occurring nucleotides. Unless otherwise indicated, a particular nucleic acid sequence also implicitly encompasses conservatively modified variants thereof (e.g., degenerate codon substitutions), alleles, orthologs, SNPs, and complementary sequences as well as the sequence explicitly indicated. Specifically, degenerate codon substitutions may be achieved by generating sequences in which the third position of one or more selected (or all) codons is substituted with mixed-base and/or deoxyinosine residues (Batzer et al., Nucleic Acid Res. 19:5081 (1991); Ohtsuka et al., J. Biol. Chem. 260:2605-2608 (1985); and Rossolini et al., Mol. Cell. Probes 8:91-98 (1994)).

As used herein, the terms "peptide," "polypeptide," and "protein" are used interchangeably, and refer to a compound comprised of amino acid residues covalently linked by peptide bonds. A protein or peptide must contain at least two amino acids, and no limitation is placed on the maximum number of amino acids that can comprise a protein's or peptide's sequence. Polypeptides include any peptide or protein comprising two or more amino acids joined to each other by peptide bonds. As used herein, the term refers to both short chains, which also commonly are referred to in the art as peptides, oligopeptides and oligomers, for example, and to longer chains, which generally are referred to in the art as proteins, of which there are many types. "Polypeptides" include, for example, biologically active fragments, substantially homologous polypeptides, oligopeptides, homodimers, heterodimers, variants of polypeptides, modified

polypeptides, derivatives, analogs, fusion proteins, among others. A polypeptide includes a natural peptide, a recombinant peptide, a synthetic peptide, or a combination thereof.

The term "promoter" as used herein is defined as a DNA sequence recognized by the synthetic machinery of the cell, or introduced synthetic machinery, required to initiate the specific transcription of a polynucleotide sequence. As used herein, the term "promoter/regulatory sequence" means a nucleic acid sequence which is required for expression of a gene product operably linked to the promoter/regulatory sequence. In some instances, this sequence may be the core promoter sequence and in other instances, this sequence may also include an enhancer sequence and other regulatory elements which are required for expression of the gene product. The promoter/regulatory sequence may, for example, be one which expresses the gene product in a tissue specific manner.

A "constitutive" promoter is a nucleotide sequence which, when operably linked with a polynucleotide which encodes or specifies a gene product, causes the gene product to be produced in a cell under most or all physiological conditions of the cell.

An "inducible" promoter is a nucleotide sequence which, when operably linked with a polynucleotide which encodes or specifies a gene product, causes the gene product to be produced in a cell substantially only when an inducer which corresponds to the promoter is present in the cell.

A "tissue-specific" promoter is a nucleotide sequence which, when operably linked with a polynucleotide encodes or specified by a gene, causes the gene product to be produced in a cell substantially only if the cell is a cell of the tissue type

corresponding to the promoter.

A "flexible polypeptide linker" as used in the context of an scFv refers to a peptide linker that consists of amino acids such as glycine and/or serine residues used alone or in combination, to link variable heavy and variable light chain regions together. In one embodiment, the flexible polypeptide linker is a Gly/Ser linker and comprises the amino acid sequence (Gly-Gly-Gly-Ser)n (SEQ ID NO: 129), where n is a positive integer equal to or greater than 1. For example, n=l, n=2, n=3. n=4, n=5 and n=6, n=7, n=8, n=9 and n=10. In one embodiment, the flexible polypeptide linkers include, but are not limited to, (Gly4 Ser)4 (SEQ ID NO: 130) or (Gly4 Ser)3 (SEQ ID NO: 131). In another embodiment, the linkers include multiple repeats of (Gly2Ser), (GlySer) or (Gly3Ser) (SEQ ID NO: 129). Also included within the scope of the invention are linkers described in WO2012/138475, incorporated herein by reference in its entirety).

As used herein, a 5' cap (also termed an RNA cap, an RNA 7-methylguanosine cap or an RNA m G cap) is a modified guanine nucleotide that has been added to the "front" or 5' end of a eukaryotic messenger RNA shortly after the start of transcription. The 5' cap consists of a terminal group which is linked to the first transcribed nucleotide. Its presence is critical for recognition by the ribosome and protection from RNases. Cap addition is coupled to transcription, and occurs co-transcriptionally, such that each influences the other. Shortly after the start of transcription, the 5' end of the mRNA being synthesized is bound by a cap-synthesizing complex associated with RNA polymerase. This enzymatic complex catalyzes the chemical reactions that are required for mRNA capping. Synthesis proceeds as a multi-step biochemical reaction. The capping moiety can be modified to modulate functionality of mRNA such as its stability or efficiency of translation.

As used herein, "in vitro transcribed RNA" refers to RNA, preferably mRNA, that has been synthesized in vitro. Generally, the in vitro transcribed RNA is generated from an in vitro transcription vector. The in vitro transcription vector comprises a template that is used to generate the in vitro transcribed RNA.

As used herein, a "poly(A)" is a series of adenosines attached by polyadenylation to the mRNA. In the preferred embodiment of a construct for transient expression, the polyA is between 50 and 5000 (SEQ ID NO: 132), preferably greater than 64, more preferably greater than 100, most preferably greater than 300 or 400. poly(A) sequences can be modified chemically or enzymatically to modulate mRNA functionality such as localization, stability or efficiency of translation.

As used herein, "polyadenylation" refers to the covalent linkage of a polyadenylyl moiety, or its modified variant, to a messenger RNA molecule. In eukaryotic organisms, most messenger RNA (mRNA) molecules are polyadenylated at the 3' end. The 3' poly(A) tail is a long sequence of adenine nucleotides (often several hundred) added to the pre-mRNA through the action of an enzyme, polyadenylate polymerase. In higher eukaryotes, the poly(A) tail is added onto transcripts that contain a specific sequence, the polyadenylation signal. The poly(A) tail and the protein bound to it aid in protecting mRNA from degradation by exonucleases. Polyadenylation is also important for transcription termination, export of the mRNA from the nucleus, and translation.

Polyadenylation occurs in the nucleus immediately after transcription of DNA into RNA, but additionally can also occur later in the cytoplasm. After transcription has been terminated, the mRNA chain is cleaved through the action of an endonuclease complex associated with RNA polymerase. The cleavage site is usually characterized by the presence of the base sequence AAUAAA near the cleavage site. After the mRNA has been cleaved, adenosine residues are added to the free 3' end at the cleavage site. A "signal transduction pathway" refers to the biochemical relationship between a variety of signal transduction molecules that play a role in the transmission of a signal from one portion of a cell to another portion of a cell. The phrase "cell surface receptor" includes molecules and complexes of molecules capable of receiving a signal and transmitting signal across the membrane of a cell.

The term "subject" is intended to include living organisms in which an immune response can be elicited (e.g., mammals including human).

As used herein, a "substantially purified" cell is a cell that is essentially free of other cell types. A substantially purified cell also refers to a cell which has been separated from other cell types with which it is normally associated in its naturally occurring state. In some instances, a population of substantially purified cells refers to a homogenous population of cells. In other instances, this term refers simply to cell that have been separated from the cells with which they are naturally associated in their natural state. In some aspects, the cells are cultured in vitro. In other aspects, the cells are not cultured in vitro.

By the term "synthetic" as it refers to a nucleic acid or polypeptide, including an antibody, is meant a nucleic acid, polypeptide, including an antibody, which has been generated by a mechanism not found naturally within a cell. In some instances, the term "synthetic" may include and therefore overlap with the term "recombinant" and in other instances, the term "synthetic" means that the nucleic acid, polypeptide, including an antibody, has been generated by purely chemical or other means.

The term "therapeutic" as used herein means a treatment. A therapeutic effect is obtained by reduction, suppression, remission, or eradication of a disease state.

The term "prophylaxis" as used herein means the prevention of or protective treatment for a disease or disease state.

The term "transfected" or "transformed" or "transduced" as used herein refers to a process by which exogenous nucleic acid is transferred or introduced into the host cell. A "transfected" or "transformed" or "transduced" cell is one which has been transfected, transformed or transduced with exogenous nucleic acid. The cell includes the primary subject cell and its progeny.

As used herein, "transient" refers to expression of a non-integrated transgene for a period of hours, days or weeks, wherein the period of time of expression is less than the period of time for expression of the gene if integrated into the genome or contained within a stable plasmid replicon in the host cell.The phrase "under transcriptional control" or "operatively linked" as used herein means that the promoter is in the correct location and orientation in relation to a polynucleotide to control the initiation of transcription by RNA polymerase and expression of the polynucleotide.

A "vector" is a composition of matter which comprises an isolated nucleic acid and which can be used to deliver the isolated nucleic acid to the interior of a cell.

Numerous vectors are known in the art including, but not limited to, linear

polynucleotides, polynucleotides associated with ionic or amphiphilic compounds, plasmids, and viruses.

By the term "specifically binds," as used herein, is meant an antibody or antigen binding fragment thereof, or a ligand, which recognizes and binds with a cognate binding partner (e.g. , a stimulatory and/or costimulatory molecule present on a T cell) protein present in a sample, but which antibody, antigen binding fragment thereof or ligand does not substantially recognize or bind other molecules in the sample.

Ranges: throughout this disclosure, various aspects of the invention can be presented in a range format. It should be understood that the description in range format is merely for convenience and brevity and should not be construed as an inflexible limitation on the scope of the invention. Accordingly, the description of a range should be considered to have specifically disclosed all the possible subranges as well as individual numerical values within that range. For example, description of a range such as from 1 to 6 should be considered to have specifically disclosed subranges such as from 1 to 3, from 1 to 4, from 1 to 5, from 2 to 4, from 2 to 6, from 3 to 6 etc., as well as individual numbers within that range, for example, 1, 2, 2.7, 3, 4, 5, 5.3, and 6. As another example, a range such as 95-99% identity, includes something with 95%, 96%, 97%, 98% or 99% identity, and includes subranges such as 96-99%, 96-98%, 96-97%, 97-99%, 97-98% and 98-99% identity. This applies regardless of the breadth of the range.

Description

Provided herein are compositions and methods of use for the treatment of a disease such as a cancer using an anti-CD 123 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) and T cells comprising a CD 123 CAR molecule.

In one aspect, the invention provides CD 123 CAR constructs comprising an antibody or antibody fragment that specifically binds to a CD 123 protein expressed on a cell surface. In one aspect, the invention provides a cell (e.g., T cell) engineered to express a CAR, wherein the CAR T cell ("CART") exhibits an antitumor property. In one aspect a cell is transformed with the CAR and the CAR is expressed on the cell surface. In some embodiments, the cell (e.g., T cell) is transduced with a viral vector encoding a CAR. In some embodiments, the viral vector is a retroviral vector. In some embodiments, the viral vector is a lentiviral vector. In some such embodiments, the cell may stably express the CAR. In another embodiment, the cell (e.g., T cell) is transfected with a nucleic acid, e.g., mRNA, cDNA, DNA, encoding a CAR. In some such embodiments, the cell may transiently express the CAR.

In one aspect, the anti-CD 123 protein binding portion of the CD 123 CAR is a scFv antibody fragment. In one aspect such antibody fragments are functional in that they retain the equivalent binding affinity, e.g., they bind the same antigen with comparable efficacy, as the IgG antibody from which it is derived. In one aspect such antibody fragments are functional in that they provide a biological response that can include, but is not limited to, activation of an immune response, inhibition of signal-transduction origination from its target antigen, inhibition of kinase activity, and the like, as will be understood by a skilled artisan.

In one aspect, the CD 123 antigen binding domain of the CAR is a murine scFv antibody fragment. In another aspect, the CD 128 antigen binding domain of the CAR is a scFv antibody fragment that is humanized compared to the murine sequence of the scFv from which it is derived. In one aspect, the scFv for the murine sequence comprises SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101. Humanization of this mouse scFv may be desired for the clinical setting, where the mouse- specific residues may induce a human-anti-mouse antigen (HAMA) response in patients who receive CD 123 treatment, e.g., treatment with T cells transduced with the CD 123 construct.

In one aspect, the anti-CD 123 binding domain portion of a CAR is encoded by a transgene whose sequence has been codon optimized for expression in a mammalian cell. In one aspect, entire CAR construct of the invention is encoded by a transgene whose entire sequence has been codon optimized for expression in a mammalian cell. Codon optimization refers to the discovery that the frequency of occurrence of synonymous codons (i.e., codons that code for the same amino acid) in coding DNA is biased in different species. Such codon degeneracy allows an identical polypeptide to be encoded by a variety of nucleotide sequences. A variety of codon optimization methods is known in the art, and include, e.g., methods disclosed in at least US Patent Numbers 5,786,464 and 6, 114,148.

In one aspect, the anti-CD 123 binding domain of a CAR is a humanized anti- CD123 binding domain. For example, in one embodiment, the anti-CD123 binding domain comprises the scFv portion provided in SEQ ID NO:36. In one aspect, the humanized anti-CD 123 binding domain comprises the scFv portion provided in SEQ ID NO:42. In one aspect, the humanized anti-CD 123 binding domain comprises the scFv portion provided in SEQ ID NO:48. In one aspect, the humanized anti-CD123 binding domain comprises the scFv portion provided in SEQ ID NO:54. In one aspect, the humanized anti-CD 123 binding domain comprises the scFv portion provided in SEQ ID NO:60. In one aspect, the humanized anti-CD 123 binding domain comprises the scFv portion provided in SEQ ID NO:66. In one aspect, the humanized anti-CD 123 binding domain comprises the scFv portion provided in SEQ ID NO:72. In one aspect, the humanized anti-CD 123 binding domain comprises the scFv portion provided in SEQ ID NO:80.

In one aspect, a CAR disclosed herein includes an antigen binding domain of a specific antibody with an intracellular signaling domain. For example, in some aspects, the intracellular signaling domain includes, but is not limited to, CD3-zeta chain, 4- IBB, CD27 and CD28 signaling modules and combinations thereof. In one aspect, the antigen binding domain binds to CD 123. In one aspect, the CAR comprises the polypeptide sequence shown in SEQ ID NO: l. In one aspect, the CAR comprises the polypeptide sequence shown in SEQ ID NO:41. In one aspect, the CAR comprises the polypeptide sequence shown in SEQ ID NO:47. In one aspect, the CAR comprises the polypeptide sequence shown in SEQ ID NO:53. In one aspect, the CAR comprises the polypeptide sequence shown in SEQ ID NO:59. In one aspect, the CAR comprises the polypeptide sequence shown in SEQ ID NO:65. In one aspect, the CAR comprises the polypeptide sequence shown in SEQ ID NO:71. In one aspect, the CAR comprises the polypeptide sequence shown in SEQ ID NO:77. In one aspect, the CAR comprises the polypeptide sequence shown in SEQ ID NO: 83.

Furthermore, the present invention provides anti-CD123 CAR compositions and their use in recombinantly engineered T cells (also referred to herein as "CART123 cells") for use in methods for treating, among other diseases, cancer or any malignancy or autoimmune disease involving cells or tissues in which CD 123 is expressed.

In another aspect, the CART 123 cells comprising a CAR of the invention can be used to eradicate CD123-expressing normal cells, and may be applicable for use as a cellular conditioning therapy prior to cell transplantation. In one aspect, the CD 123- expressing normal cell is a CD123-expressing normal stem cell and the cell

transplantation is a stem cell transplantation. For example, in one aspect, a CAR of the invention is used for bone marrow ablation, e.g., to eliminate at least a portion of existing bone marrow from a subject. Bone marrow ablation, using a CAR of the invention, may be performed, for example, in a subject in need of a bone marrow transplant. For example, in certain instances, treatment of hematologic malignancies, such as AML, would benefit from a combined therapy comprising an anti-cancer therapy and a bone marrow transplant or reconditioning therapy. However, the present invention is not limited to bone marrow ablation for treating cancer. Rather, a CAR of the invention may be used as a cellular conditioning regimen for ablating existing bone marrow prior to bone marrow or stem cell transplant for the treatment for any disease, disorder, or condition in which bone marrow transplantation would be beneficial. In one aspect, a CAR of the invention is used for bone marrow ablation as at least part of a treatment for a disease including, but not limited to, a hematological cancer, a solid tumor, a hematologic disease, a metabolic disorder, HIV, HTLV, a lysosomal storage disorder, and an immunodeficiency.

In one aspect, the invention provides a cell (e.g., T cell) engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), wherein the CAR T cell exhibits an antitumor property. A preferred antigen is CD 123. In one aspect, the antigen recognition domain of the CAR comprises a fully human anti-CD 123 antibody or antibody fragment. Accordingly, the invention provides a fully human anti-CD 123 -CAR engineered into a T cell and methods of their use for adoptive therapy.

In one aspect, the anti-CD 123-CAR comprises at least one intracellular domain selected from the group of a CD 137 (4- IBB) signaling domain, a CD28 signaling domain, a CD3zeta signal domain, a CD27 signaling domain, and any combination thereof. In one aspect, the anti-CD 123-CAR comprises at least one intracellular signaling domain is from one or more co-stimulatory molecule(s) other than a CD137 (4-1BB) or CD28, a CD3zeta signal domain, and any combination thereof.

Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR)

The present invention encompasses a recombinant DNA construct comprising polynucleotide sequences encoding a CAR, wherein the CAR comprises an antibody fragment that binds specifically to CD123, e.g., a human antibody fragment that specifically binds to CD 123. In one aspect, CD 123 is human CD 123, and the nucleic acid sequence encoding the antibody fragment is contiguous with and in the same reading frame as a nucleic acid sequence encoding an intracellular signaling domain. The intracellular signaling domain can comprise, a costimulatory signaling domain and/or a primary signaling domain, e.g., a zeta chain portion. The costimulatory signaling domain refers to a portion of the CAR comprising at least a portion of the intracellular domain of a costimulatory molecule.

In one aspect, the present invention encompasses an isolated chimeric nucleic acid construct comprising sequences of a CAR, wherein the sequence comprises the nucleic acid sequence of an anti-CD 123 binding domain operably linked to the nucleic acid sequence of an intracellular domain. An exemplary intracellular domain that can be used in the CAR includes but is not limited to the intracellular domain of CD3-zeta, CD28, 4- IBB, and the like. In some instances, the CAR can comprise any combination of CD3- zeta, CD28, 4- IBB, and the like.

In specific aspects, a CAR construct of the invention comprises a scFv domain selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO:36, SEQ ID NO:42, SEQ ID NO:48, SEQ ID NO:54, SEQ ID NO:60, SEQ ID NO:66, SEQ ID NO:72, and SEQ ID NO:78, wherein the scFv may be preceded by an optional leader sequence such as provided in SEQ ID NO:3, and followed by an optional hinge sequence such as provided in SEQ ID NO:4, a transmembrane region such as provided in SEQ ID NO:5, an intracellular signalling domain that includes SEQ ID NO:6 and a CD3 zeta sequence that includes SEQ ID NO:7 or SEQ ID NO:98, wherein the domains are contiguous with and in the same reading frame to form a single fusion protein. Also included in the invention is a nucleotide sequence that encodes the polypeptide of each of the scFv fragments selected from the group consisting of of SEQ ID NO:36, SEQ ID NO:42, SEQ ID NO:48, SEQ ID NO:54, SEQ ID NO:60, SEQ ID NO:66, SEQ ID NO:72, and SEQ ID NO:78, and each of the domains of SEQ ID NOS:3-7. Also included in the invention is a nucleotide sequence that encodes the polypeptide of each of the scFv fragments selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO:36, SEQ ID NO:42, SEQ ID NO:48, SEQ ID NO:54, SEQ ID NO:60, SEQ ID NO:66, SEQ ID NO:72, and SEQ ID NO:78, and each of the domains of SEQ ID NOS: 3-6 and SEQ ID NO:98. In one aspect, the CD123 CAR construct comprises an optional leader sequence, an extracellular antigen binding domain that specifically binds CD 123, a hinge, a transmembrane domain, and an intracellular stimulatory domain. In one aspect, the CD 123 CAR construct comprises an optional leader sequence, an extracellular antigen binding domain that specifically binds CD 123, a hinge, a transmembrane domain, an intracellular signaling domain that includes a costimulatory domain and a primary stimulatory domain. Specific CD123CAR constructs containing a humanized scFv domain are provided in SEQ ID NO:41, SEQ ID NO:47, SEQ ID NO:53, SEQ ID NO:59, SEQ ID NO:65, SEQ ID NO:71, SEQ ID NO:77, and SEQ ID NO:83. Specific CD123 CAR constructs containing a murine scFv domain is provided in SEQ ID NO: l and SEQ ID NO: 107, SEQ ID NO: 109, SEQ ID NO: 111, SEQ ID NO: 113, SEQ ID NO: 115, SEQ ID NO: 117, SEQ ID NO: 119, and SEQ ID NO: 121. An exemplary leader sequence is provided as SEQ ID NO: 3. An exemplary hinge/spacer sequence is provided as SEQ ID NO:4. An exemplary transmembrane domain sequence is provided as SEQ ID NO:5. An exemplary sequence of a

costimulatory domain of the 4- IBB protein is provided as SEQ ID NO:6. An exemplary sequence of a costimulatory domain of the CD27 protein is provided as SEQ ID NO:23. An exemplary primary signaling domain of a CD3zeta domain sequence is provided as SEQ ID NO:7. Another exemplary primary signaling domain of a CD3zeta domain sequence is provided as SEQ ID NO:98.

In one aspect, the present invention encompasses a recombinant nucleic acid construct comprising a nucleic acid molecule encoding a CAR, wherein the nucleic acid molecule comprises the nucleic acid sequence encoding an anti-CD 123 binding domain, e.g., described herein, that is contiguous with, and in the same reading frame as a nucleic acid sequence encoding an intracellular signaling domain. In one aspect, the anti-CD 123 binding domain is selected from one or more of SEQ ID NO:36, SEQ ID NO:42, SEQ ID NO:48, SEQ ID NO:54, SEQ ID NO:60, SEQ ID NO:66, SEQ ID NO:72, and SEQ ID NO:78. In one aspect, the anti-CD123 binding domain is encoded by a nucleotide sequence provided in a sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO: 37, SEQ ID NO: 43, SEQ ID NO: 49, SEQ ID NO:55, SEQ ID NO: 61, SEQ ID NO: 67, SEQ ID NO:73, and SEQ ID NO:79. In one aspect, the anti-CD 123 binding domain is encoded by SEQ ID NO: 37. In one aspect, the anti-CD123 binding domain is encoded by SEQ ID NO: 43. In one aspect, the anti-CD123 binding domain is encoded by SEQ ID NO: 49. In one aspect, the anti-CD 123 binding domain is encoded by SEQ ID NO: 55. In one aspect, the anti-CD123 binding domain is encoded by SEQ ID NO: 61. In one aspect, the anti-CD123 binding domain is encoded by SEQ ID NO: 67. In one aspect, the anti-CD123 binding domain is encoded by SEQ ID NO: 73. In one aspect, the anti- CD 123 binding domain is encoded by SEQ ID NO: 80.

In one aspect, the present invention encompasses a recombinant nucleic acid construct comprising a nucleic acid molecule encoding a CAR, wherein the nucleic acid molecule comprises a nucleic acid sequence encoding an anti-CD 123 binding domain selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO:40, SEQ ID NO:46, SEQ ID NO:52, SEQ ID NO:58, SEQ ID NO:64, SEQ ID NO:70, SEQ ID NO:76, and SEQ ID NO:82 wherein the sequence is contiguous with and in the same reading frame as the nucleic acid sequence encoding an intracellular signaling domain. An exemplary intracellular signaling domain that can be used in the CAR includes, but is not limited to, one or more intracellular signaling domains of, e.g., CD3-zeta, CD28, 4- IBB, and the like. In some instances, the CAR can comprise any combination of intracellular signaling domains of CD3-zeta, CD28, 4- IBB, and the like. In one aspect the nucleic acid construct comprises SEQ ID NO: 40. In one aspect the nucleic acid sequence of a CAR construct is SEQ ID NO:46. In one aspect the nucleic acid construct comprises SEQ ID NO:52. In one aspect the nucleic acid construct comprises SEQ ID NO:58. In one aspect the nucleic acid construct comprises SEQ ID NO:64. In one aspect the nucleic acid construct comprises SEQ ID NO:70. In one aspect the nucleic acid construct comprises SEQ ID NO:76. In one aspect the nucleic acid construct comprises SEQ ID NO: 82.

The nucleic acid sequences coding for the desired molecules can be obtained using recombinant methods known in the art, such as, for example by screening libraries from cells expressing the gene, by deriving the gene from a vector known to include the same, or by isolating directly from cells and tissues containing the same, using standard techniques. Alternatively, the nucleic acid of interest can be produced synthetically, rather than cloned.

The present invention includes retroviral and lentiviral vector constructs expressing a CAR that can be directly transduced into a cell.

The present invention also includes an RNA construct that can be directly transfected into a cell. A method for generating mRNA for use in transfection involves in vitro transcription (IVT) of a template with specially designed primers, followed by polyA addition, to produce a construct containing 3' and 5' untranslated sequence

("UTR"), a 5' cap and/or Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES), the nucleic acid to be expressed, and a polyA tail, typically 50-2000 bases in length (SEQ ID NO: 133). RNA so produced can efficiently transfect different kinds of cells. In one aspect, the template includes sequences for the CAR. In an embodiment, an RNA CAR vector is transduced into a T cell by elecroporation.

Antigen binding domain In one aspect, a CAR of the invention comprises a target- specific binding element otherwise referred to as an antigen binding moiety. The choice of moiety depends upon the type and number of ligands that define the surface of a target cell. For example, the antigen binding domain may be chosen to recognize a ligand that acts as a cell surface marker on target cells associated with a particular disease state. Thus examples of cell surface markers that may act as ligands for the antigen binding domain in a CAR of the invention include those associated with viral, bacterial and parasitic infections, autoimmune disease and cancer cells.

In one aspect, the CAR-mediated T-cell response can be directed to an antigen of interest by way of engineering an antigen binding domain that specifically binds a desired antigen into the CAR. In the context of the present invention, "tumor antigen" or

"hyperproliferative disorder antigen" or "antigen associated with a hyperproliferative disorder" refers to an antigen that is common to a specific hyperproliferative disorder. In certain aspects, a hyperproliferative disorder antigen is derived from a cancer, including but not limited to primary or metastatic melanoma, thymoma, lymphoma, sarcoma, lung cancer, liver cancer, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, Hodgkins lymphoma, leukemias, uterine cancer, cervical cancer, bladder cancer, kidney cancer and adenocarcinoma such as breast cancer, prostate cancer, ovarian cancer, pancreatic cancer, and the like.

In one aspect, the tumor antigen of the present invention comprises one or more antigenic cancer epitopes immunologically recognized by tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) derived from a cancer tumor of a mammal.

In one aspect, the antigen binding moiety portion of a CAR comprises an antigen binding domain that targets CD 123, including but not limited to human CD 123. An exemplary human CD 123 mRNA sequence is provided as GenBank Accession No.

M74782. An exemplary CD 123 protein sequence is available as UniProtKB Accession No. P26951. In some embodiments, an antigen binding domain targets an epitope found in the CD123 extracellular domain, e.g., an epitope within human CD123 extracellular domain; e.g., an epitope comprising one or more amino acid residues 19-305 of

UniProtKB Accession No. P26951.

The antigen binding domain can be any domain that binds to the antigen including, but not limited to, a monoclonal antibody, a polyclonal antibody, a recombinant antibody, a synthetic antibody, a human antibody, a humanized antibody, and a functional fragment thereof, including but not limited to a single-domain antibody such as a heavy chain variable domain (VH), a light chain variable domain (VL) and a variable domain (VHH) of camelid derived nanobody, and to an alternative scaffold known in the art to function as antigen binding domain, such as a recombinant fibronectin domain, and the like. In some instances, it is beneficial for the antigen binding domain to be derived from the same species in which the CAR will ultimately be used in. For example, for use in humans, it may be beneficial for the antigen binding domain of the CAR to comprise a human antibody or a fragment thereof. Thus, in one aspect, the antigen binding domain comprises a human antibody or an antibody fragment. In another aspect, the antigen binding domain comprises a humanized antibody or antibody fragment. In one embodiment, the anti-CD 123 binding domain comprises one or more (e.g., one, two, or all three) light chain complementary determining region 1 (LC CDR1), light chain complementary determining region 2 (LC CDR2), and light chain

complementary determining region 3 (LC CDR3) of an anti- CD 123 binding domain described herein, and one or more (e.g., one, two, or all three) heavy chain

complementary determining region 1 (HC CDR1), heavy chain complementary determining region 2 (HC CDR2), and heavy chain complementary determining region 3 (HC CDR3) of an anti- CD 123 binding domain described herein. In one embodiment, the anti- CD 123 binding domain comprises a light chain variable region described herein and/or a heavy chain variable region described herein. In one embodiment, the anti- CD 123 binding domain is a scFv comprising a light chain variable region and a heavy chain variable region of an amino acid sequence, e.g., a light chain variable region and heavy chain variable region described herein. In an embodiment, the anti- CD 123 binding domain (e.g., an scFv) comprises: a light chain variable region comprising an amino acid sequence having at least one, two or three modifications (e.g., substitutions) but not more than 30, 20 or 10 modifications (e.g., substitutions) of an amino acid sequence of a light chain variable region provided herein, or a sequence with 85-99% (e.g., 90-99%, or 95-99%) identity to an amino acid sequence provided herein; and/or a heavy chain variable region comprising an amino acid sequence having at least one, two or three modifications (e.g., substitutions) but not more than 30, 20 or 10 modifications (e.g., substitutions) of an amino acid sequence of a heavy chain variable region provided herein, or a sequence with 85-99% (e.g., 90-99%, or 95-99%) identity to an amino acid sequence provided herein. In one aspect, the antigen binding domain comprises one or more sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO:36, SEQ ID NO:42, SEQ ID NO:48, SEQ ID NO:54, SEQ ID NO:60, SEQ ID NO:66, SEQ ID NO:72, and SEQ ID NO:78. In one aspect the humanized CAR is selected from one or more sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO:41, SEQ ID NO:47, SEQ ID NO:53, SEQ ID NO:59, SEQ ID NO:65, SEQ ID NO:71, SEQ ID NO:77, and SEQ ID NO:83.

In some aspects, a non-human antibody or fragment thereof is humanized, where specific sequences or regions of the antibody or fragment thereof are modified to increase similarity to an antibody naturally produced in a human. In one aspect, the antigen binding domain portion is humanized.

A humanized antibody or fragment thereof can be produced using a variety of techniques known in the art, including but not limited to, CDR-grafting (see, e.g.,

European Patent No. EP 239,400; International Publication No. WO 91/09967; and U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,225,539, 5,530,101, and 5,585,089, each of which is incorporated herein in its entirety by reference), veneering or resurfacing (see, e.g., European Patent Nos. EP 592,106 and EP 519,596; Padlan, 1991, Molecular Immunology, 28(4/5):489-498;

Studnicka et al., 1994, Protein Engineering, 7(6):805-814; and Roguska et al., 1994, PNAS, 91:969-973, each of which is incorporated herein by its entirety by reference), chain shuffling (see, e.g., U.S. Pat. No. 5,565,332, which is incorporated herein in its entirety by reference), and techniques disclosed in, e.g., U.S. Patent Application

Publication No. US2005/0042664, U.S. Patent Application Publication No.

US2005/0048617, U.S. Pat. No. 6,407,213, U.S. Pat. No. 5,766,886, International

Publication No. WO 9317105, Tan et al., J. Immunol., 169: 1119-25 (2002), Caldas et al., Protein Eng., 13(5):353-60 (2000), Morea et al., Methods, 20(3):267-79 (2000), Baca et al., J. Biol. Chem., 272(16): 10678-84 (1997), Roguska et al., Protein Eng., 9(10):895-904 (1996), Couto et al., Cancer Res., 55 (23 Supp):5973s-5977s (1995), Couto et al., Cancer Res., 55(8): 1717-22 (1995), Sandhu J S, Gene, 150(2):409-10 (1994), and Pedersen et al., J. Mol. Biol., 235(3):959-73 (1994), each of which is incorporated herein in its entirety by reference. Often, framework residues in the framework regions will be substituted with the corresponding residue from the CDR donor antibody to alter, for example improve, antigen binding. These framework substitutions are identified by methods well- known in the art, e.g., by modeling of the interactions of the CDR and framework residues to identify framework residues important for antigen binding and sequence comparison to identify unusual framework residues at particular positions. (See, e.g., Queen et al., U.S. Pat. No. 5,585,089; and Riechmann et al., 1988, Nature, 332:323, which are incorporated herein by reference in their entireties.)

A humanized antibody or fragment thereof has one or more amino acid residues introduced into it from a source which is nonhuman. These nonhuman amino acid residues are often referred to as "import" residues, which are typically taken from an "import" variable domain. As provided herein, a humanized antibody or antibody fragment comprises one or more CDRs from nonhuman immunoglobulin molecules and framework regions wherein the amino acid residues comprising the framework are derived completely or mostly from human germline. Multiple techniques for

humanization of antibodies or antibody fragments are well-known in the art and can essentially be performed following the method of Winter and co-workers (Jones et al., Nature, 321:522-525 (1986); Riechmann et al., Nature, 332:323-327 (1988); Verhoeyen et al., Science, 239: 1534-1536 (1988)), by substituting rodent CDRs or CDR sequences for the corresponding sequences of a human antibody, i.e., CDR-grafting (EP 239,400; PCT Publication No. WO 91/09967; and U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,816,567; 6,331,415; 5,225,539; 5,530,101; 5,585,089; 6,548,640, the contents of which are incorporated herein by reference herein in their entirety). In such humanized antibodies, substantially less than an intact human variable domain has been substituted by the corresponding sequence from a nonhuman species. Humanized antibodies are often human antibodies in which some CDR residues and possibly some framework (FR) residues are substituted by residues from analogous sites in rodent antibodies. Humanization of antibodies can also be achieved by veneering or resurfacing (EP 592,106; EP 519,596; Padlan, 1991, Molecular Immunology, 28(4/5):489-498; Studnicka et al., Protein Engineering,

7(6):805-814 (1994); and Roguska et al., PNAS, 91:969-973 (1994)) or chain shuffling (U.S. Pat. No. 5,565,332), the contents of which are incorporated herein by reference herein in their entirety.

The choice of human variable domains, both light and heavy, to be used in making the humanized antibodies is to reduce antigenicity. According to the so-called "best-fit" method, the sequence of the variable domain of a rodent antibody is screened against the entire library of known human variable-domain sequences. The human sequence which is closest to that of the rodent is then accepted as the human framework (FR) for the humanized antibody (Sims et al., J. Immunol., 151:2296 (1993); Chothia et al., J. Mol. Biol., 196:901 (1987), the contents of which are incorporated herein by reference herein in their entirety). Another method uses a particular framework derived from the consensus sequence of all human antibodies of a particular subgroup of light or heavy chains. The same framework may be used for several different humanized antibodies (Carter et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 89:4285 (1992); Presta et al., J. Immunol., 151:2623 (1993), the contents of which are incorporated herein by reference herein in their entirety).

In some aspects, an antibody or antibody fragment is humanized with retention of high affinity for the target antigen and other favorable biological properties. According to one aspect of the invention, humanized antibodies or antibody fragments are prepared by a process of analysis of the parental sequences and various conceptual humanized products using three-dimensional models of the parental and humanized sequences.

Three-dimensional immunoglobulin models are commonly available and are familiar to those skilled in the art. Computer programs are available which illustrate and display probable three-dimensional conformational structures of selected candidate

immunoglobulin sequences. Inspection of these displays permits analysis of the likely role of the residues in the functioning of the candidate immunoglobulin sequence, e.g., the analysis of residues that influence the ability of the candidate immunoglobulin to bind the target antigen. In this way, FR residues can be selected and combined from the recipient and import sequences so that the desired antibody characteristic, such as increased affinity for the target antigen, is achieved. In general, the CDR residues are directly and most substantially involved in influencing antigen binding. A humanized antibody or fragment thereof may retain a similar antigenic specificity as the original antibody, e.g., in the present invention, the ability to bind human CD 123. However, using certain methods of humanization, the affinity and/or specificity of binding of the antibody or fragment thereof for human CD 123 may be increased using methods of "directed evolution," as described by Wu et al., J. Mol. Biol., 294: 151 (1999), the contents of which are incorporated herein by reference herein in their entirety.

In one aspect, an antigen binding moiety is characterized by particular functional features or properties of an antibody. For example, the antigen binding moiety binds specifically to CD 123, including but is not limited to human CD 123. In one aspect, the invention relates to an antigen binding moiety comprising an antibody or functional (e.g., antigen binding) fragment thereof, wherein the antibody or functional fragment thereof specifically binds to a CD 123 protein or fragment thereof, wherein the antibody or functional fragment thereof is encoded by an amino acid sequence comprising SEQ ID NO: 2. In another aspect, the antigen binding moiety comprises an amino acid sequence encoded by a nucleic acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 9.

In one aspect, an anti-CD 123 binding domain is a single chain variable fragment (scFv). In another aspect, an anti-CD 123 binding domain is, for example, a Fv, a Fab, and or a (Fab')2, or a bi-functional (e.g. bi-specific) hybrid antibody (e.g., Lanzavecchia et al., Eur. J. Immunol. 17, 105 (1987)). In one aspect, an antibody or antibody fragment of the invention binds a CD 123 protein with wild-type or enhanced affinity. In some instances, scFvs can be prepared according to method known in the art (see, for example, Bird et al, (1988) Science 242:423-426 and Huston et al, (1988) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 85:5879-5883). ScFv molecules can be produced by linking VH and VL regions together using flexible polypeptide linkers. The scFv molecules comprise a linker (e.g., a Ser-Gly linker) with an optimized length and/or amino acid composition. The linker length can greatly affect how the variable regions of an scFv fold and interact. In fact, if a short polypeptide linker is employed (e.g., between 5-10 amino acids, intrachain folding is prevented. Interchain folding is also required to bring the two variable regions together to form a functional epitope binding site. For examples of linker orientation and size see, e.g., Hollinger et al 1993 Proc Natl Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 90:6444-6448, U.S. Patent Application Publication Nos. 2005/0100543, 2005/0175606, 2007/0014794, and PCT publication Nos. WO2006/020258 and WO2007/024715, is incorporated herein by reference.

An scFv can comprise a linker of at least 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, or more amino acid residues between its VL and VH regions. The linker sequence may comprise any naturally occurring amino acid. In some embodiments, the linker sequence comprises amino acids glycine and serine. In another embodiment, the linker sequence comprises sets of glycine and serine repeats such as (Gly4Ser)n (SEQ ID NO: 35), where n is a positive integer equal to or greater than 1. In one embodiment, the linker can be (Gly4Ser)4 (SEQ ID NO: 130) or (Gly4Ser)3 (SEQ ID NO: 131). Variation in the linker length may retain or enhance activity, giving rise to superior efficacy in activity studies.

In one aspect, a portion of a CAR composition of the invention comprising an antibody or antibody fragment further comprises heavy and light chain variable regions comprising amino acid sequences that are homologous to the amino acid sequences of the anti-CD 123 antibodies described herein, and wherein the anti-CD 123 binding portion retains the desired functional properties of the anti-CD 123 antibodies.

In some aspects, the CD 123 CAR composition of the invention further comprises one or more altered residues compared to the VH and/or VL sequences disclosed herein, e.g., sequences which can be used as starting material to engineer a modified antibody fragment portion, which modified anti-CD 123 binding portion may have altered properties as compared to the starting antibody. In various aspects, the portion

comprising an antibody or antibody fragment of the CAR composition of the invention is engineered by modifying one or more amino acids within one or both variable regions (e.g., VH and/or VL), for example within one or more CDR regions and/or within one or more framework regions. In one specific aspect, the CAR composition of the invention comprises an antibody fragment. In a further aspect, that antibody fragment comprises an scFv.

Stability and Mutations The stability of an anti-CD123 binding domain, e.g., scFv molecules (e.g., soluble scFv), can be evaluated in reference to the biophysical properties (e.g., thermal stability) of a conventional control scFv molecule or a full length antibody. In one embodiment, the humanized scFv has a thermal stability that is greater than about 0.1, about 0.25, about 0.5, about 0.75, about 1, about 1.25, about 1.5, about 1.75, about 2, about 2.5, about 3, about 3.5, about 4, about 4.5, about 5, about 5.5, about 6, about 6.5, about 7, about 7.5, about 8, about 8.5, about 9, about 9.5, about 10 degrees, about 11 degrees, about 12 degrees, about 13 degrees, about 14 degrees, or about 15 degrees Celsius than a control binding molecule (e.g. a conventional scFv molecule) in the described assays.

The improved thermal stability of the anti-CD 123 binding domain, e.g., scFv, is subsequently conferred to the entire CD 123 CAR construct, leading to improved therapeutic properties of the CD 123 CAR construct. The thermal stability of the anti- CD123 binding domain, e.g., scFv, can be improved by at least about 2°C or 3°C as compared to a conventional antibody. In one embodiment, the anti-CD123 binding domain, e.g., scFv, has a 1°C improved thermal stability as compared to a conventional antibody. In another embodiment, the anti-CD 123 binding domain, e.g., scFv, has a 2°C improved thermal stability as compared to a conventional antibody. In another embodiment, the anti-CD123 binding domain, e.g., scFv, has a 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 °C improved thermal stability as compared to a conventional antibody.

Comparisons can be made, for example, between the scFv molecules disclosed herein and scFv molecules or Fab fragments of an antibody from which the scFv VH and VL were derived. Thermal stability can be measured using methods known in the art. For example, in one embodiment, Tm can be measured. Methods for measuring Tm and other methods of determining protein stability are described in more detail below.

Mutations in scFv (arising through humanization or direct mutagenesis of the soluble scFv) alter the stability of the scFv and improve the overall stability of the scFv and the CD 123 CAR construct. Stability of the humanized scFv is compared against the murine scFv using measurements such as Tm, temperature denaturation and temperature aggregation. The binding capacity of the mutant scFvs can be determined using assays described in the Examples. In one embodiment, the anti-CD123 binding domain, e.g., scFv, comprises at least one mutation arising from the humanization process such that the mutated scFv confers improved stability to the CD 123 construct. In another embodiment, the anti-CD 123 binding domain, e.g., scFv, comprises at least 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 mutations arising from the humanization process such that the mutated scFv confers improved stability to the CD 123 construct.

Methods of Evaluating Protein Stability The stability of an antigen binding domain may be assessed using, e.g., the methods described below. Such methods allow for the determination of multiple thermal unfolding transitions where the least stable domain either unfolds first or limits the overall stability threshold of a multidomain unit that unfolds cooperatively (e.g. a multidomain protein which exhibits a single unfolding transition). The least stable domain can be identified in a number of additional ways. Mutagenesis can be performed to probe which domain limits the overall stability. Additionally, protease resistance of a multidomain protein can be performed under conditions where the least stable domain is known to be intrinsically unfolded via DSC or other spectroscopic methods (Fontana, et al., (1997) Fold. Des., 2: R17-26; Dimasi et al. (2009) J. Mol. Biol. 393: 672-692). Once the least stable domain is identified, the sequence encoding this domain (or a portion thereof) may be employed as a test sequence in the methods. a) Thermal Stability

The thermal stability of the compositions may be analyzed using a number of non-limiting biophysical or biochemical techniques known in the art. In certain embodiments, thermal stability is evaluated by analytical spectroscopy.

An exemplary analytical spectroscopy method is Differential Scanning

Calorimetry (DSC). DSC employs a calorimeter which is sensitive to the heat

absorbances that accompany the unfolding of most proteins or protein domains (see, e.g. Sanchez-Ruiz, et al., Biochemistry, 27: 1648-52, 1988). To determine the thermal stability of a protein, a sample of the protein is inserted into the calorimeter and the temperature is raised until the Fab or scFv unfolds. The temperature at which the protein unfolds is indicative of overall protein stability.

Another exemplary analytical spectroscopy method is Circular Dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. CD spectrometry measures the optical activity of a composition as a function of increasing temperature. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy measures differences in the absorption of left-handed polarized light versus right-handed polarized light which arise due to structural asymmetry. A disordered or unfolded structure results in a CD spectrum very different from that of an ordered or folded structure. The CD spectrum reflects the sensitivity of the proteins to the denaturing effects of increasing temperature and is therefore indicative of a protein's thermal stability (see van Mierlo and Steemsma, J. Biotechnol., 79(3):281-98, 2000).

Another exemplary analytical spectroscopy method for measuring thermal stability is Fluorescence Emission Spectroscopy (see van Mierlo and Steemsma, supra). Yet another exemplary analytical spectroscopy method for measuring thermal stability is Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy (see, e.g. van Mierlo and Steemsma, supra).

The thermal stability of a composition can be measured biochemically. An exemplary biochemical method for assessing thermal stability is a thermal challenge assay. In a "thermal challenge assay", a composition is subjected to a range of elevated temperatures for a set period of time. For example, in one embodiment, test scFv molecules or molecules comprising scFv molecules are subject to a range of increasing temperatures, e.g., for 1-1.5 hours. The activity of the protein is then assayed by a relevant biochemical assay. For example, if the protein is a binding protein (e.g. an scFv or scFv-containing polypeptide) the binding activity of the binding protein may be determined by a functional or quantitative ELISA.

Such an assay may be done in a high-throughput format and those disclosed in the Examples using E. coli and high throughput screening. A library of anti-CD 123 binding domain, e.g., scFv, variants may be created using methods known in the art. Anti-CD 123 binding domain, e.g., scFv, expression may be induced and the anti-CD123 binding domain, e.g., scFv, may be subjected to thermal challenge. The challenged test samples may be assayed for binding and those anti-CD 123 binding domains, e.g., scFvs, which are stable may be scaled up and further characterized.

Thermal stability is evaluated by measuring the melting temperature (Tm) of a composition using any of the above techniques (e.g. analytical spectroscopy techniques). The melting temperature is the temperature at the midpoint of a thermal transition curve wherein 50% of molecules of a composition are in a folded state (See e.g., Dimasi et al. (2009) J. Mol Biol. 393: 672-692). In one embodiment, Tm values for an anti-CD123 binding domain, e.g., scFv, are about 40°C, 41°C, 42°C, 43°C, 44°C, 45°C, 46°C, 47°C, 48°C, 49°C, 50°C, 51°C, 52°C, 53°C, 54°C, 55°C, 56°C, 57°C, 58°C, 59°C, 60°C, 61°C, 62°C, 63°C, 64°C, 65°C, 66°C, 67°C, 68°C, 69°C, 70°C, 71°C, 72°C, 73°C, 74°C, 75°C, 76°C, 77°C, 78°C, 79°C, 80°C, 81°C, 82°C, 83°C, 84°C, 85°C, 86°C, 87°C, 88°C, 89°C, 90°C, 91°C, 92°C, 93°C, 94°C, 95°C, 96°C, 97°C, 98°C, 99°C, 100°C. In one embodiment, Tm values for an IgG is about 40°C, 41°C, 42°C, 43°C, 44°C, 45°C, 46°C, 47°C, 48°C, 49°C, 50°C, 51°C, 52°C, 53°C, 54°C, 55°C, 56°C, 57°C, 58°C, 59°C, 60°C, 61°C, 62°C, 63°C, 64°C, 65°C, 66°C, 67°C, 68°C, 69°C, 70°C, 71°C, 72°C, 73°C, 74°C, 75°C, 76°C, 77°C, 78°C, 79°C, 80°C, 81°C, 82°C, 83°C, 84°C, 85°C, 86°C, 87°C, 88°C, 89°C, 90°C, 91°C, 92°C, 93°C, 94°C, 95°C, 96°C, 97°C, 98°C, 99°C, 100°C. In one embodiment, Tm values for an multivalent antibody is about 40°C, 41°C, 42°C, 43°C, 44°C, 45°C, 46°C, 47°C, 48°C, 49°C, 50°C, 51°C, 52°C, 53°C, 54°C, 55°C, 56°C, 57°C, 58°C, 59°C, 60°C, 61°C, 62°C, 63°C, 64°C, 65°C, 66°C, 67°C, 68°C, 69°C, 70°C, 71°C, 72°C, 73°C, 74°C, 75°C, 76°C, 77°C, 78°C, 79°C, 80°C, 81°C, 82°C, 83°C, 84°C, 85°C, 86°C, 87°C, 88°C, 89°C, 90°C, 91°C, 92°C, 93°C, 94°C, 95°C, 96°C, 97°C, 98°C, 99°C, 100°C.

Thermal stability is also evaluated by measuring the specific heat or heat capacity (Cp) of a composition using an analytical calorimetric technique (e.g. DSC). The specific heat of a composition is the energy (e.g. in kcal/mol) is required to rise by 1°C, the temperature of 1 mol of water. As large Cp is a hallmark of a denatured or inactive protein composition. The change in heat capacity (ACp) of a composition is measured by determining the specific heat of a composition before and after its thermal transition. Thermal stability may also be evaluated by measuring or determining other parameters of thermodynamic stability including Gibbs free energy of unfolding (AG), enthalpy of unfolding (ΔΗ), or entropy of unfolding (AS). One or more of the above biochemical assays (e.g. a thermal challenge assay) are used to determine the temperature (e.g. the Tc value) at which 50% of the composition retains its activity (e.g. binding activity). In addition, mutations to the anti-CD123 binding domain, e.g., scFv, alter the thermal stability of the anti-CD 123 binding domain, e.g., scFv, compared with the unmutated anti-CD123 binding domain, e.g., scFv. When the humanized anti-CD123 binding domain, e.g., scFv, is incorporated into an anti-CD123 CAR construct, the anti- CD123 binding domain, e.g., humanized scFv confers thermal stability to the overall anti- CD123 CAR construct. In one embodiment, the anti-CD123 binding domain, e.g., scFv, comprises a single mutation that confers thermal stability to the anti-CD 123 binding domain, e.g., scFv. In another embodiment, the anti-CD 123 binding domain, e.g., scFv, comprises multiple mutations that confer thermal stability to the anti-CD 123 binding domain, e.g., scFv. In one embodiment, the multiple mutations in the anti-CD 123 binding domain, e.g., scFv, have an additive effect on thermal stability of the anti-CD 123 binding domain, e.g., scFv. b) % Aggregation

The stability of a composition can be determined by measuring its propensity to aggregate. Aggregation can be measured by a number of non-limiting biochemical or biophysical techniques. For example, the aggregation of a composition may be evaluated using chromatography, e.g. Size-Exclusion Chromatography (SEC). SEC separates molecules on the basis of size. A column is filled with semi-solid beads of a polymeric gel that will admit ions and small molecules into their interior but not large ones. When a protein composition is applied to the top of the column, the compact folded proteins (e.g. non-aggregated proteins) are distributed through a larger volume of solvent than is available to the large protein aggregates. Consequently, the large aggregates move more rapidly through the column, and in this way the mixture can be separated or fractionated into its components. Each fraction can be separately quantified (e.g. by light scattering) as it elutes from the gel. Accordingly, the % aggregation of a composition can be determined by comparing the concentration of a fraction with the total concentration of protein applied to the gel. Stable compositions elute from the column as essentially a single fraction and appear as essentially a single peak in the elution profile or

chromatogram. c) Binding Affinity

The stability of a composition can be assessed by determining its target binding affinity. A wide variety of methods for determining binding affinity are known in the art. An exemplary method for determining binding affinity employs surface plasmon resonance. Surface plasmon resonance is an optical phenomenon that allows for the analysis of real-time biospecific interactions by detection of alterations in protein concentrations within a biosensor matrix, for example using the BIAcore system

(Pharmacia Biosensor AB, Uppsala, Sweden and Piscataway, N.J.). For further descriptions, see Jonsson, U., et al. (1993) Ann. Biol. Clin. 51: 19-26; Jonsson, U., i (1991) Biotechniques 11:620-627; Johnsson, B., et al. (1995) J. Mol. Recognit. 8: 125- 131; and Johnnson, B., et al. (1991) Anal. Biochem. 198:268-277.

In one aspect, the antigen binding domain of the CAR comprises an amino acid sequence that is homologous to an antigen binding domain amino acid sequence described herein, and the antigen binding domain retains the desired functional properties of the anti-CD 123 antibody fragments described herein. In one specific aspect, the CAR composition of the invention comprises an antibody fragment. In a further aspect, that antibody fragment comprises an scFv.

In various aspects, the antigen binding domain of the CAR is engineered by modifying one or more amino acids within one or both variable regions (e.g., VH and/or VL), for example within one or more CDR regions and/or within one or more framework regions. In one specific aspect, the CAR composition of the invention comprises an antibody fragment. In a further aspect, that antibody fragment comprises an scFv.

It will be understood by one of ordinary skill in the art that the antibody or antibody fragment of the invention may further be modified such that they vary in amino acid sequence (e.g., from wild-type), but not in desired activity. For example, additional nucleotide substitutions leading to amino acid substitutions at "non-essential" amino acid residues may be made to the protein For example, a nonessential amino acid residue in a molecule may be replaced with another amino acid residue from the same side chain family. In another embodiment, a string of amino acids can be replaced with a structurally similar string that differs in order and/or composition of side chain family members, e.g., a conservative substitution, in which an amino acid residue is replaced with an amino acid residue having a similar side chain, may be made.

Families of amino acid residues having similar side chains have been defined in the art, including basic side chains (e.g., lysine, arginine, histidine), acidic side chains (e.g., aspartic acid, glutamic acid), uncharged polar side chains (e.g., glycine, asparagine, glutamine, serine, threonine, tyrosine, cysteine), nonpolar side chains (e.g., alanine, valine, leucine, isoleucine, proline, phenylalanine, methionine, tryptophan), beta- branched side chains (e.g., threonine, valine, isoleucine) and aromatic side chains (e.g., tyrosine, phenylalanine, tryptophan, histidine).

Percent identity in the context of two or more nucleic acids or polypeptide sequences, refers to two or more sequences that are the same. Two sequences are "substantially identical" if two sequences have a specified percentage of amino acid residues or nucleotides that are the same (e.g., 60% identity, optionally 70%, 71%. 72%. 73%, 74%, 75%, 76%, 77%, 78%, 79%, 80%,81%, 82%, 83%, 84%, 85%, 86%, 87%, 88%, 89%, 90%, 91%, 92%, 93%, 94%, 95%, 96%, 97%, 98%, 99% identity over a specified region, or, when not specified, over the entire sequence), when compared and aligned for maximum correspondence over a comparison window, or designated region as measured using one of the following sequence comparison algorithms or by manual alignment and visual inspection. Optionally, the identity exists over a region that is at least about 50 nucleotides (or 10 amino acids) in length, or more preferably over a region that is 100 to 500 or 1000 or more nucleotides (or 20, 50, 200 or more amino acids) in length.

For sequence comparison, typically one sequence acts as a reference sequence, to which test sequences are compared. When using a sequence comparison algorithm, test and reference sequences are entered into a computer, subsequence coordinates are designated, if necessary, and sequence algorithm program parameters are designated. Default program parameters can be used, or alternative parameters can be designated. The sequence comparison algorithm then calculates the percent sequence identities for the test sequences relative to the reference sequence, based on the program parameters. Methods of alignment of sequences for comparison are well known in the art. Optimal alignment of sequences for comparison can be conducted, e.g., by the local homology algorithm of Smith and Waterman, (1970) Adv. Appl. Math. 2:482c, by the homology alignment algorithm of Needleman and Wunsch, (1970) J. Mol. Biol. 48:443, by the search for similarity method of Pearson and Lipman, (1988) Proc. Nat'l. Acad. Sci. USA 85:2444, by computerized implementations of these algorithms (GAP, BESTFIT, FASTA, and TFASTA in the Wisconsin Genetics Software Package, Genetics Computer Group, 575 Science Dr., Madison, WI), or by manual alignment and visual inspection (see, e.g., Brent et al., (2003) Current Protocols in Molecular Biology).

Two examples of algorithms that are suitable for determining percent sequence identity and sequence similarity are the BLAST and BLAST 2.0 algorithms, which are described in Altschul et al., (1977) Nuc. Acids Res. 25:3389-3402; and Altschul et al., (1990) J. Mol. Biol. 215:403-410, respectively. Software for performing BLAST analyses is publicly available through the National Center for Biotechnology Information.

The percent identity between two amino acid sequences can also be determined using the algorithm of E. Meyers and W. Miller, (1988) Comput. Appl. Biosci. 4: 11-17) which has been incorporated into the ALIGN program (version 2.0), using a PAM120 weight residue table, a gap length penalty of 12 and a gap penalty of 4. In addition, the percent identity between two amino acid sequences can be determined using the

Needleman and Wunsch (1970) J. Mol. Biol. 48:444-453) algorithm which has been incorporated into the GAP program in the GCG software package (available at www.gcg.com), using either a Blossom 62 matrix or a PAM250 matrix, and a gap weight of 16, 14, 12, 10, 8, 6, or 4 and a length weight of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6.

In one aspect, the present invention contemplates modifications of the starting antibody or fragment (e.g., scFv) amino acid sequence that generate functionally equivalent molecules. For example, the VH or VL of an anti-CD 123 binding domain, e.g., scFv, comprised in the CAR can be modified to retain at least about 70%, 71%. 72%. 73%, 74%, 75%, 76%, 77%, 78%, 79%, 80%,81%, 82%, 83%, 84%, 85%, 86%, 87%, 88%, 89%, 90%, 91%, 92%, 93%, 94%, 95%, 96%, 97%, 98%, 99% identity of the starting VH or VL framework region of the anti-CD 123 binding domain, e.g., scFv. The present invention contemplates modifications of the entire CAR construct, e.g., modifications in one or more amino acid sequences of the various domains of the CAR construct in order to generate functionally equivalent molecules. The CAR construct can be modified to retain at least about 70%, 71%. 72%. 73%, 74%, 75%, 76%, 77%, 78%, 79%, 80%,81%, 82%, 83%, 84%, 85%, 86%, 87%, 88%, 89%, 90%, 91%, 92%, 93%, 94%, 95%, 96%, 97%, 98%, 99% identity of the starting CAR construct.

Transmembrane domain

With respect to the transmembrane domain, in various embodiments, a CAR can be designed to comprise a transmembrane domain that is attached to the extracellular domain of the CAR. A transmembrane domain can include one or more additional amino acids adjacent to the transmembrane region, e.g., one or more amino acid associated with the extracellular region of the protein from which the transmembrane was derived (e.g., 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 up to 15 amino acids of the extracellular region) and/or one or more additional amino acids associated with the intracellular region of the protein from which the transmembrane protein is derived (e.g., 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 up to 15 amino acids of the intracellular region). In one aspect, the transmembrane domain is one that is associated with one of the other domains of the CAR is used. In some instances, the transmembrane domain can be selected or modified by amino acid substitution to avoid binding of such domains to the transmembrane domains of the same or different surface membrane proteins, e.g., to minimize interactions with other members of the receptor complex. In one aspect, the transmembrane domain is capable of

homodimerization with another CAR on the CART cell surface. In a different aspect, the amino acid sequence of the transmembrane domain may be modified or substituted so as to minimize interactions with the binding domains of the native binding partner present in the same CART.

The transmembrane domain may be derived either from a natural or from a recombinant source. Where the source is natural, the domain may be derived from any membrane-bound or transmembrane protein. A transmembrane region of particular use in this invention may include at least the transmembrane region(s) of e.g., the alpha, beta or zeta chain of the T-cell receptor, CD28, CD3 epsilon, CD45, CD4, CD5, CD8, CD9, CD16, CD22, CD33, CD37, CD64, CD80, CD86, CD134, CD137, CD154. In some instances, the transmembrane domain can be attached to the extracellular region of the CAR, e.g., the antigen binding domain of the CAR, via a hinge, e.g., a hinge from a human protein. For example, in one embodiment, the hinge can be a human Ig

(immunoglobulin) hinge, e.g., an IgG4 hinge, or a CD8a hinge. In one embodiment, the hinge or spacer comprises (e.g., consists of) the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:4. In one aspect, the transmembrane domain comprises (e.g., consists of) a transmembrane domain of SEQ ID NO: 5 or 12.

In one aspect, the hinge or spacer comprises an IgG4 hinge. For example, in one embodiment, the hinge or spacer comprises a hinge of the amino acid sequence

ESKYGPPCPPCPAPEFLGGPSVFLFPPKPKDTLMISRTPEVTCVVVDVSQEDPEVQ FNWYVDGVEVHNAKTKPREEQFNSTYRVVS VLTVLHQDWLNGKEYKCKVSNK GLPS SIEKTIS KAKGQPREPQ V YTLPPS QEEMTKNQ VS LTCLVKGF YPSDIA VEWE SNGQPENNYKTTPPVLDSDGSFFLYSRLTVDKSRWQEGNVFSCSVMHEALHNHY TQKSLSLSLGKM (SEQ ID NO: 104). In some embodiments, the hinge or spacer comprises a hinge encoded by a nucleotide sequence of

GAGAGCAAGTACGGCCCTCCCTGCCCCCCTTGCCCTGCCCCCGAGTTCCTGGG CGGACCCAGCGTGTTCCTGTTCCCCCCCAAGCCCAAGGACACCCTGATGATC AGCCGGACCCCCGAGGTGACCTGTGTGGTGGTGGACGTGTCCCAGGAGGACC CCGAGGTCCAGTTCAACTGGTACGTGGACGGCGTGGAGGTGCACAACGCCAA GACCAAGCCCCGGGAGGAGCAGTTCAATAGCACCTACCGGGTGGTGTCCGTG CTGACCGTGCTGCACCAGGACTGGCTGAACGGCAAGGAATACAAGTGTAAGG TGTCCAACAAGGGCCTGCCCAGCAGCATCGAGAAAACCATCAGCAAGGCCA AGGGCCAGCCTCGGGAGCCCCAGGTGTACACCCTGCCCCCTAGCCAAGAGGA GATGACCAAGAACCAGGTGTCCCTGACCTGCCTGGTGAAGGGCTTCTACCCC AGCGACATCGCCGTGGAGTGGGAGAGCAACGGCCAGCCCGAGAACAACTAC AAGACCACCCCCCCTGTGCTGGACAGCGACGGCAGCTTCTTCCTGTACAGCC GGCTGACCGTGGACAAGAGCCGGTGGCAGGAGGGCAACGTCTTTAGCTGCTC CGTGATGCACGAGGCCCTGCACAACCACTACACCCAGAAGAGCCTGAGCCTG TCCCTGGGCAAGATG (SEQ ID NO: 105).

In one aspect, the hinge or spacer comprises an IgD hinge. For example, in one embodiment, the hinge or spacer comprises a hinge of the amino acid sequence

RWPESPKAQASSVPTAQPQAEGSLAKATTAPATTRNTGRGGEEKKKEKEKEEQE ERETKTPECPSHTQPLGVYLLTPAVQDLWLRDKATFTCFVVGSDLKDAHLTWEV AGKVPTGGVEEGLLERHSNGSQSQHSRLTLPRSLWNAGTSVTCTLNHPSLPPQRL MALREPAAQAPVKLSLNLLASSDPPEAASWLLCEVSGFSPPNILLMWLEDQREV NTSGFAPARPPPQPGSTTFWAWSVLRVPAPPSPQPATYTCVVSHEDSRTLLNASR SLEVSYVTDH (SEQ ID NO: 122). In some embodiments, the hinge or spacer comprises a hinge encoded by a nucleotide sequence of

AGGTGGCCCGAAAGTCCCAAGGCCCAGGCATCTAGTGTTCCTACTGCACAGC CCCAGGCAGAAGGCAGCCTAGCCAAAGCTACTACTGCACCTGCCACTACGCG CAATACTGGCCGTGGCGGGGAGGAGAAGAAAAAGGAGAAAGAGAAAGAAG AACAGGAAG AGAGGGAGACC AAGACCCCTGAATGTCCATCCCATACCCAGC CGCTGGGCGTCTATCTCTTGACTCCCGCAGTACAGGACTTGTGGCTTAGAGAT AAGGCCACCTTTACATGTTTCGTCGTGGGCTCTGACCTGAAGGATGCCCATTT GACTTGGGAGGTTGCCGGAAAGGTACCCACAGGGGGGGTTGAGGAAGGGTT GCTGGAGCGCCATTCCAATGGCTCTCAGAGCCAGCACTCAAGACTCACCCTT CCGAGATCCCTGTGGAACGCCGGGACCTCTGTCACATGTACTCTAAATCATCC TAGCCTGCCCCCACAGCGTCTGATGGCCCTTAGAGAGCCAGCCGCCCAGGCA CCAGTTAAGCTTAGCCTGAATCTGCTCGCCAGTAGTGATCCCCCAGAGGCCG CCAGCTGGCTCTTATGCGAAGTGTCCGGCTTTAGCCCGCCCAACATCTTGCTC ATGTGGCTGGAGGACCAGCGAGAAGTGAACACCAGCGGCTTCGCTCCAGCCC GGCCCCCACCCCAGCCGGGTTCTACCACATTCTGGGCCTGGAGTGTCTTAAG GGTCCCAGCACCACCTAGCCCCCAGCCAGCCACATACACCTGTGTTGTGTCCC ATGAAGATAGCAGGACCCTGCTAAATGCTTCTAGGAGTCTGGAGGTTTCCTA CGTGACTGACCATT (SEQ ID NO: 123).

In one aspect, the transmembrane domain may be recombinant, in which case it will comprise predominantly hydrophobic residues such as leucine and valine. In one aspect, a triplet of phenylalanine, tryptophan and valine may be found at each end of a recombinant transmembrane domain.

Optionally, a short oligo- or polypeptide linker, e.g., between 2 and 10 amino acids in length may form the linkage between the transmembrane domain and the cytoplasmic region of the CAR. A glycine- serine is an example of a suitable linker. For example, in one aspect, the linker comprises the amino acid sequence of GGGGSGGGGS (SEQ ID NO: 124). In some embodiments, the linker is encoded by a nucleotide sequence of GGTGGCGGAGGTTCTGGAGGTGGAGGTTCC (SEQ ID NO: 125). Cytoplasmic domain

The cytoplasmic domain or region of the CAR includes an intracellular signaling domain. An intracellular signaling domain is generally responsible for activation of at least one of the normal effector functions of the immune cell in which the CAR has been introduced. The term "effector function" refers to a specialized function of a cell.

Effector function of a T cell, for example, may be cytolytic activity or helper activity including the secretion of cytokines. Thus the term "intracellular signaling domain" or alternatively "cytoplasmic signaling domain" refers to the portion of a protein which transduces the effector function signal and directs the cell to perform a specialized function. While usually the entire intracellular signaling domain can be employed, in many cases it is not necessary to use the entire chain. To the extent that a truncated portion of the intracellular signaling domain is used, such truncated portion may be used in place of the intact chain as long as it transduces the effector function signal. The term intracellular signaling domain is thus meant to include any truncated portion of the intracellular signaling domain sufficient to transduce the effector function signal.

Examples of intracellular signaling domains for use in the CAR of the invention include the cytoplasmic sequences of the T cell receptor (TCR) and co-receptors that act in concert to initiate signal transduction following antigen receptor engagement, as well as any derivative or variant of these sequences and any recombinant sequence that has the same functional capability.

It is known that signals generated through the TCR alone are insufficient for full activation of the T cell and that a secondary or co- stimulatory signal is also required. Thus, T cell activation can be said to be mediated by two distinct classes of cytoplasmic signaling sequence: those that initiate antigen-dependent primary activation through the TCR (primary intracellular signaling domain) and those that act in an antigen- independent manner to provide a secondary or co- stimulatory signal (secondary cytoplasmic signaling domain, e.g., a costimulatory domain).

A primary signaling domain regulates primary activation of the TCR complex either in a stimulatory way, or in an inhibitory way. Primary intracellular signaling domains that act in a stimulatory manner may contain signaling motifs which are known as immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs or ITAMs.

Examples of ITAM containing primary intracellular signaling domains that are of particular use in the invention include those of TCR zeta, FcR gamma, FcR beta, CD3 gamma , CD3 delta , CD 3 epsilon, CD5, CD22, CD79a, CD79b, and CD66d. In one embodiment, a CAR of the invention , e.g., a CAR selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO:41, SEQ ID NO:47, SEQ ID NO:53, SEQ ID NO:59, SEQ ID NO:65, SEQ ID NO:71, SEQ ID NO:77, and SEQ ID NO:83, comprises an intracellular signaling domain, e.g., a primary signaling domain, of CD3-zeta. In one embodiment, a primary signaling domain comprises a modified ITAM domain, e.g., a mutated ITAM domain which has altered (e.g., increased or decreased) activity as compared to the native ITAM domain. In one embodiment, a primary signaling domain comprises a modified ITAM- containing primary intracellular signaling domain, e.g., an optimized and/or truncated ITAM-containing primary intracellular signaling domain. In an embodiment, a primary signaling domain comprises one, two, three, four or more ITAM motifs.

The intracellular signaling domain of the CAR can comprise the CD3-zeta signaling domain by itself or it can be combined with any other desired intracellular signaling domain(s) useful in the context of a CAR of the invention. For example, the intracellular signaling domain of the CAR can comprise a CD3 zeta chain portion and a costimulatory signaling domain. The costimulatory signaling domain refers to a portion of the CAR comprising the intracellular domain of a costimulatory molecule. A costimulatory molecule is a cell surface molecule other than an antigen receptor or its ligands that is required for an efficient response of lymphocytes to an antigen. Examples of such molecules include CD27, CD28, 4-1BB (CD137), OX40, CD30, CD40, PD-1, ICOS, lymphocyte function-associated antigen- 1 (LFA-1), CD2, CD7, LIGHT, NKG2C, B7-H3, and a ligand that specifically binds with CD83, and the like. For example, CD27 costimulation has been demonstrated to enhance expansion, effector function, and survival of human CART cells in vitro and augments human T cell persistence and antitumor activity in vivo (Song et al. Blood. 2012; 119(3):696-706).

The intracellular signaling sequences within the cytoplasmic portion of a CAR of the invention may be linked to each other in a random or specified order. Optionally, a short oligo- or polypeptide linker, for example, between 2 and 10 amino acids (e.g., 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 or 10 amino acids) in length may form the linkage between intracellular signaling sequences. In one embodiment, a glycine- serine doublet can be used as a suitable linker. In one embodiment, a single amino acid, e.g., an alanine, a glycine, can be used as a suitable linker.

In one aspect, the intracellular signaling domain is designed to comprise two or more, e.g., 2, 3, 4, 5, or more, costimulatory signaling domains. In an embodiment, the two or more, e.g., 2, 3, 4, 5, or more, costimulatory signaling domains, are separated by a linker molecule, e.g., a linker molecule described herein. In one embodiment, the intracellular signaling domain comprises two costimulatory signaling domains. In some embodiments, the linker molecule is a glycine residue. In some embodiments, the linker is an alanine residue.

In one aspect, the intracellular signaling domain is designed to comprise the signaling domain of CD3-zeta and the signaling domain of CD28. In one aspect, the intracellular signaling domain is designed to comprise the signaling domain of CD3-zeta and the signaling domain of 4- IBB. In one aspect, the signaling domain of CD3-zeta is a signaling domain of SEQ ID NO: 7 or 14. In one aspect, the signaling domain of 4- IBB is a signaling domain of SEQ ID NO: 6 or 13.

In one aspect, the intracellular signaling domain is designed to comprise the signaling domain of CD3-zeta and the signaling domain of CD27. In one aspect, the signaling domain of CD27 comprises an amino acid sequence of

QRRKYRSNKGESPVEPAEPCRYSCPREEEGSTIPIQEDYRKPEPACSP (SEQ ID NO:23). In one aspect, the signalling domain of CD27 is encoded by a nucleic acid sequence of AGGAGTAAGAGGAGCAGGCTCCTGCACAGTGACTACATGAACATGACTCCCC GCCGCCCCGGGCCCACCCGCAAGCATTACCAGCCCTATGCCCCACCACGCGA CTTCGCAGCCTATCGCTCC (SEQ ID NO:27). In one aspect, a CAR-expressing cell described herein can further comprise a second CAR, e.g., a second CAR that includes a different antigen binding domain, e.g., to the same target (CD123) or a different target, e.g., CD19.

In another aspect, the present invention provides a population of CAR-expressing cells, e.g., CART cells. In some embodiments, the population of CAR-expressing cells comprises a mixture of cells expressing different CARs. For example, in one

embodiment, the population of CART cells can include a first cell expressing a CAR having an anti-CD 123 binding domain described herein, and a second cell expressing a CAR having a different anti-CD123 binding domain, e.g., an anti-CD123 binding domain described herein that differs from the anti-CD 123 binding domain in the CAR expressed by the first cell. As another example, the population of CAR-expressing cells can include a first cell expressing a CAR that includes an anti-CD123 binding domain, e.g., as described herein, and a second cell expressing a CAR that includes an antigen binding domain to a target other than CD 123, e.g., an antigen binding domain to a target expressed on a cancer cell or a target expressed on normal tissue. In one embodiment, the population of CAR-expressing cells includes, e.g., a first cell expressing a CAR that includes a primary intracellular signaling domain, and a second cell expressing a CAR that includes a secondary signaling domain.

In another aspect, the present invention provides a population of cells wherein at least one cell in the population expresses a CAR having an anti-CD 123 binding domain described herein, and a second cell expressing another agent, e.g., an agent which enhances the activity of a CAR-expressing cell. For example, in one embodiment, the agent is an agent which inhibits an inhibitory molecule. Inhibitory molecules, e.g., PD1, can, in some embodiments, decrease the ability of a CAR-expressing cell to mount an immune effector response. Examples of inhibitory molecules include PD1, PD-L1, CTLA4, TIM3, LAG3, VISTA, BTLA, TIGIT, LAIR1, CD160, 2B4 and TGFR beta. The agent which enhances the activity of a CAR-expressing cell can be, e.g., a fusion protein comprising a first domain and a second domain, wherein the first domain is an inhibitory molecule, or fragment thereof, and the second domain is a polypeptide that is associated with a positive signal, e.g., the polypeptide that is associated with a positive signal is CD28, ICOS, and fragments thereof, e.g., an intracellular signaling domain of CD28 and/or ICOS. In one embodiment, the fusion protein is expressed by the same cell that expressed the CAR. In another embodiment, the fusion protein is expressed by a cell, e.g., a T cell that does not express an anti-CD123 CAR.

RNA Transfection

Disclosed herein are methods for producing an in vitro transcribed RNA CAR. The present invention also includes a CAR encoding RNA construct that can be directly transfected into a cell. A method for generating mRNA for use in transfection can involve in vitro transcription (IVT) of a template with specially designed primers, followed by polyA addition, to produce a construct containing 3' and 5' untranslated sequence

("UTR"), a 5' cap and/or Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES), the nucleic acid to be expressed, and a polyA tail, typically 50-2000 bases in length (SEQ ID NO: 133). RNA so produced can efficiently transfect different kinds of cells. In one aspect, the template includes sequences for the CAR.

In one aspect the CD 123 CAR is encoded by a messenger RNA (mRNA). In one aspect the mRNA encoding the CD 123 CAR is introduced into a T cell for production of a CART cell.

In one embodiment, the in vitro transcribed RNA CAR can be introduced to a cell as a form of transient transfection. The RNA is produced by in vitro transcription using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-generated template. DNA of interest from any source can be directly converted by PCR into a template for in vitro mRNA synthesis using appropriate primers and RNA polymerase. The source of the DNA can be, for example, genomic DNA, plasmid DNA, phage DNA, cDNA, synthetic DNA sequence or any other appropriate source of DNA. The desired temple for in vitro transcription is a CAR of the present invention. For example, the template for the RNA CAR comprises an

extracellular region comprising a single chain variable domain of an anti-tumor antibody; a hinge region, a transmembrane domain (e.g., a transmembrane domain of CD8a); and a cytoplasmic region that includes an intracellular signaling domain, e.g., comprising the signaling domain of CD3-zeta and the signaling domain of 4- IBB.

In one embodiment, the DNA to be used for PCR contains an open reading frame. The DNA can be from a naturally occurring DNA sequence from the genome of an organism. In one embodiment, the nucleic acid can include some or all of the 5' and/or 3' untranslated regions (UTRs). The nucleic acid can include exons and introns. In one embodiment, the DNA to be used for PCR is a human nucleic acid sequence. In another embodiment, the DNA to be used for PCR is a human nucleic acid sequence including the 5' and 3' UTRs. The DNA can alternatively be an artificial DNA sequence that is not normally expressed in a naturally occurring organism. An exemplary artificial DNA sequence is one that contains portions of genes that are ligated together to form an open reading frame that encodes a fusion protein. The portions of DNA that are ligated together can be from a single organism or from more than one organism.

PCR is used to generate a template for in vitro transcription of mRNA which is used for transfection. Methods for performing PCR are well known in the art. Primers for use in PCR are designed to have regions that are substantially complementary to regions of the DNA to be used as a template for the PCR. "Substantially complementary," as used herein, refers to sequences of nucleotides where a majority or all of the bases in the primer sequence are complementary, or one or more bases are non-complementary, or mismatched. Substantially complementary sequences are able to anneal or hybridize with the intended DNA target under annealing conditions used for PCR. The primers can be designed to be substantially complementary to any portion of the DNA template. For example, the primers can be designed to amplify the portion of a nucleic acid that is normally transcribed in cells (the open reading frame), including 5' and 3' UTRs. The primers can also be designed to amplify a portion of a nucleic acid that encodes a particular domain of interest. In one embodiment, the primers are designed to amplify the coding region of a human cDNA, including all or portions of the 5' and 3' UTRs. Primers useful for PCR can be generated by synthetic methods that are well known in the art. "Forward primers" are primers that contain a region of nucleotides that are substantially complementary to nucleotides on the DNA template that are upstream of the DNA sequence that is to be amplified. "Upstream" is used herein to refer to a location 5, to the DNA sequence to be amplified relative to the coding strand. "Reverse primers" are primers that contain a region of nucleotides that are substantially complementary to a double- stranded DNA template that are downstream of the DNA sequence that is to be amplified. "Downstream" is used herein to refer to a location 3' to the DNA sequence to be amplified relative to the coding strand.

Any DNA polymerase useful for PCR can be used in the methods disclosed herein. The reagents and polymerase are commercially available from a number of sources.

Chemical structures with the ability to promote stability and/or translation efficiency may also be used. The RNA preferably has 5' and 3' UTRs. In one

embodiment, the 5' UTR is between one and 3000 nucleotides in length. The length of 5' and 3' UTR sequences to be added to the coding region can be altered by different methods, including, but not limited to, designing primers for PCR that anneal to different regions of the UTRs. Using this approach, one of ordinary skill in the art can modify the 5' and 3' UTR lengths required to achieve optimal translation efficiency following transfection of the transcribed RNA.

The 5' and 3' UTRs can be the naturally occurring, endogenous 5' and 3' UTRs for the nucleic acid of interest. Alternatively, UTR sequences that are not endogenous to the nucleic acid of interest can be added by incorporating the UTR sequences into the forward and reverse primers or by any other modifications of the template. The use of UTR sequences that are not endogenous to the nucleic acid of interest can be useful for modifying the stability and/or translation efficiency of the RNA. For example, it is known that AU-rich elements in 3' UTR sequences can decrease the stability of mRNA. Therefore, 3' UTRs can be selected or designed to increase the stability of the transcribed RNA based on properties of UTRs that are well known in the art.

In one embodiment, the 5' UTR can contain the Kozak sequence of the endogenous nucleic acid. Alternatively, when a 5' UTR that is not endogenous to the nucleic acid of interest is being added by PCR as described above, a consensus Kozak sequence can be redesigned by adding the 5' UTR sequence. Kozak sequences can increase the efficiency of translation of some RNA transcripts, but does not appear to be required for all RNAs to enable efficient translation. The requirement for Kozak sequences for many mRNAs is known in the art. In other embodiments the 5' UTR can be 5'UTR of an RNA virus whose RNA genome is stable in cells. In other embodiments various nucleotide analogues can be used in the 3' or 5' UTR to impede exonuclease degradation of the mRNA.

In one embodiment, the nucleic acid sequence in the vector further comprises a 3'UTR, e.g., a 3' UTR described herein, e.g., comprising at least one repeat of a 3'UTR derived from human beta-globulin, e.g., a 3' UTR present in SEQ ID NO:94. In one embodiment, the nucleic acid sequence in the vector further comprises a cleavable peptide, e.g., a T2A self-cleavable peptide, e.g., a T2A self-cleavable peptide present in SEQ ID NO:94.

To enable synthesis of RNA from a DNA template without the need for gene cloning, a promoter of transcription should be attached to the DNA template upstream of the sequence to be transcribed. When a sequence that functions as a promoter for an RNA polymerase is added to the 5' end of the forward primer, the RNA polymerase promoter becomes incorporated into the PCR product upstream of the open reading frame that is to be transcribed. In one preferred embodiment, the promoter is a T7 polymerase promoter, as described elsewhere herein. Other useful promoters include, but are not limited to, T3 and SP6 RNA polymerase promoters. Consensus nucleotide sequences for T7, T3 and SP6 promoters are known in the art.

In a preferred embodiment, the mRNA has both a cap on the 5' end and a 3' poly(A) tail which determine ribosome binding, initiation of translation and stability mRNA in the cell. On a circular DNA template, for instance, plasmid DNA, RNA polymerase produces a long concatameric product which is not suitable for expression in eukaryotic cells. The transcription of plasmid DNA linearized at the end of the 3' UTR results in normal sized mRNA which is not effective in eukaryotic transfection even if it is polyadenylated after transcription.

On a linear DNA template, phage T7 RNA polymerase can extend the 3' end of the transcript beyond the last base of the template (Schenborn and Mierendorf, Nuc Acids Res., 13:6223-36 (1985); Nacheva and Berzal-Herranz, Eur. J. Biochem., 270: 1485-65 (2003). The conventional method of integration of polyA/T stretches into a DNA template is molecular cloning. However polyA/T sequence integrated into plasmid DNA can cause plasmid instability, which is why plasmid DNA templates obtained from bacterial cells are often highly contaminated with deletions and other aberrations. This makes cloning procedures not only laborious and time consuming but often not reliable. That is why a method which allows construction of DNA templates with polyA/T 3' stretch without cloning highly desirable.

The polyA/T segment of the transcriptional DNA template can be produced during PCR by using a reverse primer containing a polyT tail, such as 100T tail (SEQ ID NO: 134) (size can be 50-5000 T (SEQ ID NO: 135)), or after PCR by any other method, including, but not limited to, DNA ligation or in vitro recombination. Poly(A) tails also provide stability to RNAs and reduce their degradation. Generally, the length of a poly(A) tail positively correlates with the stability of the transcribed RNA. In one embodiment, the poly(A) tail is between 100 and 5000 adenosines (SEQ ID NO: 136).

Poly(A) tails of RNAs can be further extended following in vitro transcription with the use of a poly(A) polymerase, such as E. coli polyA polymerase (E-PAP). In one embodiment, increasing the length of a poly(A) tail from 100 nucleotides to between 300 and 400 nucleotides (SEQ ID NO: 90) results in about a two-fold increase in the translation efficiency of the RNA. Additionally, the attachment of different chemical groups to the 3' end can increase mRNA stability. Such attachment can contain modified/artificial nucleotides, aptamers and other compounds. For example, ATP analogs can be incorporated into the poly(A) tail using poly(A) polymerase. ATP analogs can further increase the stability of the RNA.

5' caps on also provide stability to RNA molecules. In a preferred embodiment, RNAs produced by the methods disclosed herein include a 5' cap. The 5' cap is provided using techniques known in the art and described herein (Cougot, et al., Trends in

Biochem. Sci., 29:436-444 (2001); Stepinski, et al., RNA, 7: 1468-95 (2001); Elango, et al., Biochim. Biophys. Res. Commun., 330:958-966 (2005)).

The RNAs produced by the methods disclosed herein can also contain an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) sequence. The IRES sequence may be any viral, chromosomal or artificially designed sequence which initiates cap-independent ribosome binding to mRNA and facilitates the initiation of translation. Any solutes suitable for cell electroporation, which can contain factors facilitating cellular permeability and viability such as sugars, peptides, lipids, proteins, antioxidants, and surfactants can be included.

RNA can be introduced into target cells using any of a number of different methods, for instance, commercially available methods which include, but are not limited to, electroporation (Amaxa Nucleofector-II (Amaxa Biosystems, Cologne, Germany)), (ECM 830 (BTX) (Harvard Instruments, Boston, Mass.) or the Gene Pulser II (BioRad, Denver, Colo.), Multiporator (Eppendort, Hamburg Germany), cationic liposome mediated transfection using lipofection, polymer encapsulation, peptide mediated transfection, or biolistic particle delivery systems such as "gene guns" (see, for example, Nishikawa, et al. Hum Gene Ther., 12(8):861-70 (2001).

Nucleic Acid Constructs Encoding a CAR

The present invention provides nucleic acid molecules encoding one or more CAR constructs described herein. In one aspect, the nucleic acid molecule is provided as a messenger RNA transcript. In one aspect, the nucleic acid molecule is provided as a DNA construct.

Accordingly, in one aspect, the invention pertains to an isolated nucleic acid molecule encoding a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), wherein the CAR comprises a anti-CD 123 binding domain (e.g., a humanized anti-CD 123 binding domain), a transmembrane domain, and an intracellular signaling domain comprising a stimulatory domain, e.g., a costimulatory signaling domain and/or a primary signaling domain, e.g., zeta chain. In one embodiment, the anti-CD 123 binding domain is an anti-CD 123 binding domain described herein, e.g., an anti-CD 123 binding domain which comprises a sequence selected from a group consisting of SEQ ID NO:36, SEQ ID NO:42, SEQ ID NO:48, SEQ ID NO:54, SEQ ID NO:60, SEQ ID NO:66, SEQ ID NO:72, and SEQ ID NO:78, or a sequence with 95-99% identify thereof. In one embodiment, the isolated nucleic acid molecule further comprises a sequence encoding a costimulatory domain. In one embodiment, the costimulatory domain is a functional signaling domain of a protein selected from the group consisting of OX40, CD27, CD28, CDS, ICAM- 1 , LFA- 1 (CDl la/CD18), ICOS (CD278), and 4-1BB (CD137). In one embodiment, the co stimulatory domain comprises a sequence of SEQ ID NO: 6 or SEQ ID NO:23, or a sequence with 95-99% identity thereof. In one embodiment, the transmembrane domain is transmembrane domain of a protein selected from the group consisting of the alpha, beta or zeta chain of the T-cell receptor, CD28, CD3 epsilon, CD45, CD4, CD5, CD8, CD9, CD16, CD22, CD33, CD37, CD64, CD80, CD86, CD134, CD137 and CD154. In one embodiment, the transmembrane domain comprises a sequence of SEQ ID NO: 5, or a sequence with 95-99% identity thereof. In one embodiment, the intracellular signaling domain comprises a functional signaling domain of 4- IBB and a functional signaling domain of CD3 zeta. In one embodiment, the intracellular signaling domain comprises a functional signaling domain of CD27 and a functional signaling domain of CD3 zeta. In one embodiment, the intracellular signaling domain comprises the sequence of SEQ ID NO:6 or SEQ ID NO:23, or a sequence with 95-99% identity thereof, and the sequence of SEQ ID NO: 7 or SEQ ID NO:98, or a sequence with 95-99% identity thereof, wherein the sequences comprising the intracellular signaling domain are expressed in the same frame and as a single polypeptide chain. In one embodiment, the anti-CD123 binding domain is connected to the transmembrane domain by a hinge region, e.g., a hinge described herein. In one embodiment, the hinge region comprises SEQ ID NO:4, or a sequence with 95-99% identity thereof. In one embodiment, the hinge region comprises SEQ ID NO: 104 or SEQ ID NO: 122 or SEQ ID NO: 124, or a sequence with 95-99% identity thereof.

In another aspect, the invention pertains to an isolated nucleic acid molecule encoding a CAR construct comprising a leader sequence of SEQ ID NO:3, a scFv domain having a sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO:36, SEQ ID NO:42, SEQ ID NO:48, SEQ ID NO:54, SEQ ID NO:60, SEQ ID NO:66, SEQ ID NO:72, , and SEQ ID NO:78 (or a sequence with 95-99% identify thereof), a hinge region of SEQ ID NO:4 (or a sequence with 95-99% identity thereof), a transmembrane domain having a sequence of SEQ ID NO:5 (or a sequence with 95-99% identity thereof), a 4- IBB costimulatory domain having a sequence of SEQ ID NO:6 (or a sequence with 95-99% identity thereof) or a CD27 costimulatory domain having a sequence of SEQ ID NO:23 (or a sequence with 95-99% identity thereof), and a CD3 zeta stimulatory domain having a sequence of SEQ ID NO:7 or SEQ ID NO:98 (or a sequence with 95-99% identity thereof).

In another aspect, the invention pertains to an isolated polypeptide molecule encoded by the nucleic acid molecule. In one embodiment, the isolated polypeptide molecule comprises a sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO:41, SEQ ID NO:47, SEQ ID NO:53, SEQ ID NO:59, SEQ ID NO:65, SEQ ID NO:71, SEQ ID NO:77, and SEQ ID NO:83 or a sequence with 95-99% identify thereof.

In another aspect, the invention pertains to a nucleic acid molecule encoding a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) molecule that comprises an anti-CD 123 binding domain, a transmembrane domain, and an intracellular signaling domain comprising a stimulatory domain, and wherein said anti-CD 123 binding domain comprises a sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO:36, SEQ ID NO:42, SEQ ID NO:48, SEQ ID NO:54, SEQ ID NO:60, SEQ ID NO:66, SEQ ID NO:72, and SEQ ID NO:78, or a sequence with 95-99% identify thereof. In one embodiment, the encoded CAR molecule further comprises a sequence encoding a costimulatory domain. In one embodiment, the costimulatory domain is a functional signaling domain of a protein selected from the group consisting of OX40, CD27, CD28, CDS, ICAM-1, LFA-1 (CDl la/CD18) and 4-lBB (CD137). In one embodiment, the costimulatory domain comprises a sequence of SEQ ID NO:6. In one embodiment, the costimulatory domain comprises a sequence of SEQ ID NO:23. In one embodiment, the transmembrane domain is a transmembrane domain of a protein selected from the group consisting of the alpha, beta or zeta chain of the T-cell receptor, CD28, CD3 epsilon, CD45, CD4, CD5, CD8, CD9, CD16, CD22, CD33, CD37, CD64, CD80, CD86, CD 134, CD 137 and CD 154. In one embodiment, the transmembrane domain comprises a sequence of SEQ ID NO:5. In one embodiment, the intracellular signaling domain comprises a functional signaling domain of 4- IBB and a functional signaling domain of zeta. In one embodiment, the intracellular signaling domain comprises the sequence of SEQ ID NO:6 and the sequence of SEQ ID NO:7, wherein the sequences comprising the intracellular signaling domain are expressed in the same frame and as a single polypeptide chain. In one embodiment, the intracellular signaling domain comprises a functional signaling domain of CD27 and a functional signaling domain of zeta. In one embodiment, the intracellular signaling domain comprises the sequence of SEQ ID NO:23 and the sequence of SEQ ID NO:7, wherein the sequences comprising the intracellular signaling domain are expressed in the same frame and as a single

polypeptide chain. In one embodiment, the anti-CD 123 binding domain is connected to the transmembrane domain by a hinge region. In one embodiment, the hinge region comprises SEQ ID NO:4. In one embodiment, the hinge region comprises SEQ ID NO: 104 or SEQ ID NO: 122 or SEQ ID NO: 124.

In another aspect, the invention pertains to an encoded CAR molecule comprising a leader sequence of SEQ ID NO:3, a scFv domain having a sequence selected from the group consisting SEQ ID NO:36, SEQ ID NO:42, SEQ ID NO:48, SEQ ID NO:54, SEQ ID NO:60, SEQ ID NO:66, SEQ ID NO:72, and SEQ ID NO:78, or a sequence with 95- 99% identify thereof, a hinge region of SEQ ID NO:4 or SEQ ID NO: 104 or SEQ ID NO: 122 or SEQ ID NO: 124, a transmembrane domain having a sequence of SEQ ID NO:5, a 4- IBB costimulatory domain having a sequence of SEQ ID NO:6 or a CD27 costimulatory domain having a sequence of SEQ ID NO:23, and a CD3 zeta stimulatory domain having a sequence of SEQ ID NO:7 or SEQ ID NO:98. In one embodiment, the encoded CAR molecule comprises a sequence selected from a group consisting of SEQ ID NO:41, SEQ ID NO:47, SEQ ID NO:53, SEQ ID NO:59, SEQ ID NO:65, SEQ ID NO:71, SEQ ID NO:77, and SEQ ID NO:83, or a sequence with 95-99% identify thereof.

The nucleic acid sequences coding for the desired molecules can be obtained using recombinant methods known in the art, such as, for example by screening libraries from cells expressing the gene, by deriving the gene from a vector known to include the same, or by isolating directly from cells and tissues containing the same, using standard techniques. Alternatively, the gene of interest can be produced synthetically, rather than cloned.

The present invention also provides vectors in which a nucleic acid, e.g., DNA, of the present invention is inserted. Vectors derived from retroviruses, such as the lentivirus, are suitable tools to achieve long-term gene transfer since they allow long-term, stable integration of a transgene and its propagation in daughter cells. Lentiviral vectors have the added advantage over vectors derived from onco-retroviruses, such as murine leukemia viruses, in that they can transduce non-proliferating cells, such as hepatocytes. They also have the added advantage of low immunogenicity.

In brief summary, the expression of nucleic acids encoding CARs is typically achieved by operably linking a nucleic acid encoding the CAR polypeptide or portions thereof to a promoter, and incorporating the construct into an expression vector. The vectors can be suitable for replication and integration eukaryotes. Typical cloning vectors contain transcription and translation terminators, initiation sequences, and promoters useful for regulation of the expression of the desired nucleic acid sequence.

An expression construct of the present invention may also be used for nucleic acid immunization and gene therapy, using standard gene delivery protocols. Methods for gene delivery are known in the art. See, e.g., U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,399,346, 5,580,859, 5,589,466, incorporated by reference herein in their entireties. In another embodiment, the invention provides a gene therapy vector.

The nucleic acid can be cloned into a number of types of vectors. For example, the nucleic acid can be cloned into a vector including, but not limited to a plasmid, a phagemid, a phage derivative, an animal virus, and a cosmid. Vectors of particular interest include expression vectors, replication vectors, probe generation vectors, and sequencing vectors.

Further, the expression vector may be provided to a cell in the form of a viral vector. Viral vector technology is well known in the art and is described, for example, in Sambrook et al., 2012, MOLECULAR CLONING: A LABORATORY MANUAL, volumes 1 -4, Cold Spring Harbor Press, NY), and in other virology and molecular biology manuals. Viruses, which are useful as vectors include, but are not limited to, retroviruses, adenoviruses, adeno- associated viruses, herpes viruses, and lentiviruses. In general, a suitable vector contains an origin of replication functional in at least one organism, a promoter sequence, convenient restriction endonuclease sites, and one or more selectable markers, (e.g., WO 01/96584; WO 01/29058; and U.S. Pat. No.

6,326,193).

A number of viral based systems have been developed for gene transfer into mammalian cells. For example, retroviruses provide a convenient platform for gene delivery systems. A selected gene can be inserted into a vector and packaged in retroviral particles using techniques known in the art. The recombinant virus can then be isolated and delivered to cells of the subject either in vivo or ex vivo. A number of retroviral systems are known in the art. In some embodiments, adenovirus vectors are used. A number of adenovirus vectors are known in the art. In one embodiment, lentivirus vectors are used.

Additional promoter elements, e.g., enhancers, regulate the frequency of transcriptional initiation. Typically, these are located in the region 30-110 bp upstream of the start site, although a number of promoters have recently been shown to contain functional elements downstream of the start site as well. The spacing between promoter elements frequently is flexible, so that promoter function is preserved when elements are inverted or moved relative to one another. In the thymidine kinase (tk) promoter, the spacing between promoter elements can be increased to 50 bp apart before activity begins to decline. Depending on the promoter, it appears that individual elements can function either cooperatively or independently to activate transcription.

An example of a promoter is the immediate early cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter sequence. This promoter sequence is a strong constitutive promoter sequence capable of driving high levels of expression of any polynucleotide sequence operatively linked thereto. However, other constitutive promoter sequences may also be used, including, but not limited to the simian virus 40 (SV40) early promoter, mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter, MoMuLV promoter, an avian leukemia virus promoter, an Epstein-Barr virus immediate early promoter, a Rous sarcoma virus promoter, the elongation factor- la promoter, as well as human gene promoters such as, but not limited to, the actin promoter, the myosin promoter, the hemoglobin promoter, and the creatine kinase promoter. Further, the invention should not be limited to the use of constitutive promoters. Inducible promoters are also contemplated as part of the invention. The use of an inducible promoter provides a molecular switch capable of turning on expression of the polynucleotide sequence which it is operatively linked when such expression is desired, or turning off the expression when expression is not desired. Examples of inducible promoters include, but are not limited to a metallothionine promoter, a glucocorticoid promoter, a progesterone promoter, and a tetracycline promoter.

In order to assess the expression of a CAR polypeptide or portions thereof, the expression vector to be introduced into a cell can also contain either a selectable marker gene or a reporter gene or both to facilitate identification and selection of expressing cells from the population of cells sought to be transfected or infected through viral vectors. In other aspects, the selectable marker may be carried on a separate piece of DNA and used in a co- transfection procedure. Both selectable markers and reporter genes may be flanked with appropriate regulatory sequences to enable expression in the host cells. Useful selectable markers include, for example, antibiotic-resistance genes, such as neo and the like.

Reporter genes are used for identifying potentially transfected cells and for evaluating the functionality of regulatory sequences. In general, a reporter gene is a gene that is not present in or expressed by the recipient organism or tissue and that encodes a polypeptide whose expression is manifested by some easily detectable property, e.g., enzymatic activity. Expression of the reporter gene is assayed at a suitable time after the DNA has been introduced into the recipient cells. Suitable reporter genes may include genes encoding luciferase, beta-galactosidase, chloramphenicol acetyl transferase, secreted alkaline phosphatase, or the green fluorescent protein gene (e.g., Ui-Tei et al., 2000 FEBS Letters 479: 79-82). Suitable expression systems are well known and may be prepared using known techniques or obtained commercially. In general, the construct with the minimal 5' flanking region showing the highest level of expression of reporter gene is identified as the promoter. Such promoter regions may be linked to a reporter gene and used to evaluate agents for the ability to modulate promoter- driven

transcription.

In one aspect, the vector comprises a suicide gene, where expression of the gene results in the death of the cell comprising the vector. For example, in some instances, prolonged expression of the CAR of the invention is not desirable. In one aspect, inclusion of a suicide gene in the vector allows for finer control over CAR expression in a subject. In one aspect, expression of the suicide gene is inducible, for example with the use of an inducible promoter regulating suicide gene expression. Methods of introducing and expressing genes into a cell are known in the art. In the context of an expression vector, the vector can be readily introduced into a host cell, e.g., mammalian, bacterial, yeast, or insect cell by any method in the art. For example, the expression vector can be transferred into a host cell by physical, chemical, or biological means.

Physical methods for introducing a polynucleotide into a host cell include calcium phosphate precipitation, lipofection, particle bombardment, microinjection,

electroporation, and the like. Methods for producing cells comprising vectors and/or exogenous nucleic acids are well-known in the art. See, for example, Sambrook et al., 2012, MOLECULAR CLONING: A LABORATORY MANUAL, volumes 1 -4, Cold Spring Harbor Press, NY). In some embodiments, a method for the introduction of a polynucleotide into a host cell is calcium phosphate transfection.

Biological methods for introducing a polynucleotide of interest into a host cell include the use of DNA and RNA vectors. Viral vectors, and especially retroviral vectors, have become the most widely used method for inserting genes into mammalian, e.g., human cells. Other viral vectors can be derived from lentivirus, poxviruses, herpes simplex virus I, adenoviruses and adeno-associated viruses, and the like. See, for example, U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,350,674 and 5,585,362.

Chemical means for introducing a polynucleotide into a host cell include colloidal dispersion systems, such as macromolecule complexes, nanocapsules, microspheres, beads, and lipid-based systems including oil-in- water emulsions, micelles, mixed micelles, and liposomes. An exemplary colloidal system for use as a delivery vehicle in vitro and in vivo is a liposome (e.g., an artificial membrane vesicle).

In the case where a non- viral delivery system is utilized, an exemplary delivery vehicle is a nanoparticle, e.g., a liposome or other suitable sub-micron sized delivery system. The use of lipid formulations is contemplated for the introduction of the nucleic acids into a host cell (in vitro, ex vivo or in vivo). In another aspect, the nucleic acid may be associated with a lipid. The nucleic acid associated with a lipid may be encapsulated in the aqueous interior of a liposome, interspersed within the lipid bilayer of a liposome, attached to a liposome via a linking molecule that is associated with both the liposome and the oligonucleotide, entrapped in a liposome, complexed with a liposome, dispersed in a solution containing a lipid, mixed with a lipid, combined with a lipid, contained as a suspension in a lipid, contained or complexed with a micelle, or otherwise associated with a lipid. Lipid, lipid/DNA or lipid/expression vector associated compositions are not limited to any particular structure in solution. For example, they may be present in a bilayer structure, as micelles, or with a "collapsed" structure. They may also simply be interspersed in a solution, possibly forming aggregates that are not uniform in size or shape. Lipids are fatty substances which may be naturally occurring or synthetic lipids. For example, lipids include the fatty droplets that naturally occur in the cytoplasm as well as the class of compounds which contain long-chain aliphatic hydrocarbons and their derivatives, such as fatty acids, alcohols, amines, amino alcohols, and aldehydes.

Lipids suitable for use can be obtained from commercial sources. For example, dimyristyl phosphatidylcholine ("DMPC") can be obtained from Sigma, St. Louis, MO; dicetyl phosphate ("DCP") can be obtained from K & K Laboratories (Plainview, NY); cholesterol ("Choi") can be obtained from Calbiochem-Behring; dimyristyl

phosphatidylglycerol ("DMPG") and other lipids may be obtained from Avanti Polar Lipids, Inc. (Birmingham, AL.). Stock solutions of lipids in chloroform or

chloroform/methanol can be stored at about -200C. Chloroform is used as the only solvent since it is more readily evaporated than methanol. "Liposome" is a generic term encompassing a variety of single and multilamellar lipid vehicles formed by the generation of enclosed lipid bilayers or aggregates. Liposomes can be characterized as having vesicular structures with a phospholipid bilayer membrane and an inner aqueous medium. Multilamellar liposomes have multiple lipid layers separated by aqueous medium. They form spontaneously when phospholipids are suspended in an excess of aqueous solution. The lipid components undergo self-rearrangement before the formation of closed structures and entrap water and dissolved solutes between the lipid bilayers

(Ghosh et al., 1991 Glycobiology 5: 505-10). However, compositions that have different structures in solution than the normal vesicular structure are also encompassed. For example, the lipids may assume a micellar structure or merely exist as nonuniform aggregates of lipid molecules. Also contemplated are lipofectamine-nucleic acid complexes. Regardless of the method used to introduce exogenous nucleic acids into a host cell or otherwise expose a cell to the inhibitor of the present invention, in order to confirm the presence of the recombinant DNA sequence in the host cell, a variety of assays may be performed. Such assays include, for example, "molecular biological" assays well known to those of skill in the art, such as Southern and Northern blotting, RT-PCR and PCR; "biochemical" assays, such as detecting the presence or absence of a particular peptide, e.g., by immunological means (ELISAs and Western blots) or by assays described herein to identify agents falling within the scope of the invention.

The present invention further provides a vector comprising a CAR encoding nucleic acid molecule. In one aspect, a CAR vector can be directly transduced into a cell, e.g., a T cell. In one aspect, the vector is a cloning or expression vector, e.g., a vector including, but not limited to, one or more plasmids (e.g., expression plasmids, cloning vectors, minicircles, minivectors, double minute chromosomes), retroviral and lentiviral vector constructs. In one aspect, the vector is capable of expressing the CAR construct in mammalian T cells. In one aspect, the mammalian T cell is a human T cell.

Sources of T cells

Prior to expansion and genetic modification, a source of T cells is obtained from a subject. The term "subject" is intended to include living organisms in which an immune response can be elicited (e.g., mammals). Examples of subjects include humans, dogs, cats, mice, rats, and transgenic species thereof. T cells can be obtained from a number of sources, including peripheral blood mononuclear cells, bone marrow, lymph node tissue, cord blood, thymus tissue, tissue from a site of infection, ascites, pleural effusion, spleen tissue, and tumors. In certain aspects of the present invention, any number of T cell lines available in the art, may be used. In certain aspects of the present invention, T cells can be obtained from a unit of blood collected from a subject using any number of techniques known to the skilled artisan, such as Ficoll™ separation. In one preferred aspect, cells from the circulating blood of an individual are obtained by apheresis. The apheresis product typically contains lymphocytes, including T cells, monocytes, granulocytes, B cells, other nucleated white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets. In one aspect, the cells collected by apheresis may be washed to remove the plasma fraction and to place the cells in an appropriate buffer or media for subsequent processing steps. In one aspect of the invention, the cells are washed with phosphate buffered saline (PBS). In an alternative aspect, the wash solution lacks calcium and may lack magnesium or may lack many if not all divalent cations. Initial activation steps in the absence of calcium can lead to magnified activation. As those of ordinary skill in the art would readily appreciate a washing step may be accomplished by methods known to those in the art, such as by using a semi- automated "flow-through" centrifuge (for example, the Cobe 2991 cell processor, the Baxter CytoMate, or the Haemonetics Cell Saver 5) according to the manufacturer's instructions. After washing, the cells may be resuspended in a variety of biocompatible buffers, such as, for example, Ca-free, Mg-free PBS, PlasmaLyte A, or other saline solution with or without buffer. Alternatively, the undesirable components of the apheresis sample may be removed and the cells directly resuspended in culture media.

In another aspect, T cells are isolated from peripheral blood lymphocytes by lysing the red blood cells and depleting the monocytes, for example, by centrifugation through a PERCOLL™ gradient or by counterflow centrifugal elutriation. A specific subpopulation of T cells, such as CD3+, CD28+, CD4+, CD8+, CD45RA+, and

CD45RO+T cells, can be further isolated by positive or negative selection techniques. For example, in one aspect, T cells are isolated by incubation with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 (e.g. , 3x28)-conjugated beads, such as DYNABEADS® M-450 CD3/CD28 T, for a time period sufficient for positive selection of the desired T cells. In one aspect, the time period is about 30 minutes. In a further aspect, the time period ranges from 30 minutes to 36 hours or longer and all integer values there between. In a further aspect, the time period is at least 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6 hours. In yet another aspect, the time period is 10 to 24 hours. In one aspect, the incubation time period is 24 hours. Longer incubation times may be used to isolate T cells in any situation where there are few T cells as compared to other cell types, such in isolating tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) from tumor tissue or from immunocompromised individuals. Further, use of longer incubation times can increase the efficiency of capture of CD8+ T cells. Thus, by simply shortening or lengthening the time T cells are allowed to bind to the CD3/CD28 beads and/or by increasing or decreasing the ratio of beads to T cells (as described further herein), subpopulations of T cells can be preferentially selected for or against at culture initiation or at other time points during the process. Additionally, by increasing or decreasing the ratio of anti-CD3 and/or anti-CD28 antibodies on the beads or other surface,

subpopulations of T cells can be preferentially selected for or against at culture initiation or at other desired time points. The skilled artisan would recognize that multiple rounds of selection can also be used in the context of this invention. In certain aspects, it may be desirable to perform the selection procedure and use the "unselected" cells in the activation and expansion process. "Unselected" cells can also be subjected to further rounds of selection.

Enrichment of a T cell population by negative selection can be accomplished with a combination of antibodies directed to surface markers unique to the negatively selected cells. One method is cell sorting and/or selection via negative magnetic

immunoadherence or flow cytometry that uses a cocktail of monoclonal antibodies directed to cell surface markers present on the cells negatively selected. For example, to enrich for CD4+ cells by negative selection, a monoclonal antibody cocktail typically includes antibodies to CD14, CD20, CDl lb, CD16, HLA-DR, and CD8. In certain aspects, it may be desirable to enrich for or positively select for regulatory T cells which typically express CD4+, CD25+, CD62Lhi, GrfR+, and FoxP3+. Alternatively, in certain aspects, T regulatory cells are depleted by anti-C25 conjugated beads or other similar method of selection.

In one embodiment, a T cell population can be selected that expresses one or more of IFN-?, TNFa, IL- 17A, IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, GM-CSF, IL-10, IL- 13, granzyme B, and perforin. Methods for screening for cell expression can be determined, e.g., by the methods described in PCT Publication No.: WO 2013/126712.

For isolation of a desired population of cells by positive or negative selection, the concentration of cells and surface (e.g., particles such as beads) can be varied. In certain aspects, it may be desirable to significantly decrease the volume in which beads and cells are mixed together (e.g. , increase the concentration of cells), to ensure maximum contact of cells and beads. For example, in one aspect, a concentration of 2 billion cells/ml is used. In one aspect, a concentration of 1 billion cells/ml is used. In a further aspect, greater than 100 million cells/ml is used. In a further aspect, a concentration of cells of 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, or 50 million cells/ml is used. In yet another aspect, a concentration of cells from 75, 80, 85, 90, 95, or 100 million cells/ml is used. In further aspects, concentrations of 125 or 150 million cells/ml can be used. Using high

concentrations can result in increased cell yield, cell activation, and cell expansion.

Further, use of high cell concentrations allows more efficient capture of cells that may weakly express target antigens of interest, such as CD28-negative T cells, or from samples where there are many tumor cells present (e.g. , leukemic blood, tumor tissue, etc.). Such populations of cells may have therapeutic value and would be desirable to obtain. For example, using high concentration of cells allows more efficient selection of CD8+ T cells that normally have weaker CD28 expression.

In a related aspect, it may be desirable to use lower concentrations of cells. By significantly diluting the mixture of T cells and surface (e.g., particles such as beads), interactions between the particles and cells is minimized. This selects for cells that express high amounts of desired antigens to be bound to the particles. For example, CD4+ T cells express higher levels of CD28 and are more efficiently captured than CD8+ T cells in dilute concentrations. In one aspect, the concentration of cells used is 5 X 106/ml. In other aspects, the concentration used can be from about 1 X 105/ml to 1 X 106/ml, and any integer value in between.

In other aspects, the cells may be incubated on a rotator for varying lengths of time at varying speeds at either 2- 10°C or at room temperature.

T cells for stimulation can also be frozen after a washing step. Wishing not to be bound by theory, the freeze and subsequent thaw step provides a more uniform product by removing granulocytes and to some extent monocytes in the cell population. After the washing step that removes plasma and platelets, the cells may be suspended in a freezing solution. While many freezing solutions and parameters are known in the art and will be useful in this context, one method involves using PBS containing 20% DMSO and 8% human serum albumin, or culture media containing 10% Dextran 40 and 5% Dextrose, 20% Human Serum Albumin and 7.5% DMSO, or 31.25% Plasmalyte-A, 31.25% Dextrose 5%, 0.45% NaCl, 10% Dextran 40 and 5% Dextrose, 20% Human Serum Albumin, and 7.5% DMSO or other suitable cell freezing media containing for example, Hespan and PlasmaLyte A, the cells then are frozen to -80°C at a rate of 1° per minute and stored in the vapor phase of a liquid nitrogen storage tank. Other methods of controlled freezing may be used as well as uncontrolled freezing immediately at -20° C or in liquid nitrogen.

In certain aspects, cryopreserved cells are thawed and washed as described herein and allowed to rest for one hour at room temperature prior to activation using the methods of the present invention.

Also contemplated in the context of the invention is the collection of blood samples or apheresis product from a subject at a time period prior to when the expanded cells as described herein might be needed. As such, the source of the cells to be expanded can be collected at any time point necessary, and desired cells, such as T cells, isolated and frozen for later use in T cell therapy for any number of diseases or conditions that would benefit from T cell therapy, such as those described herein. In one aspect a blood sample or an apheresis is taken from a generally healthy subject. In certain aspects, a blood sample or an apheresis is taken from a generally healthy subject who is at risk of developing a disease, but who has not yet developed a disease, and the cells of interest are isolated and frozen for later use. In certain aspects, the T cells may be expanded, frozen, and used at a later time. In certain aspects, samples are collected from a patient shortly after diagnosis of a particular disease as described herein but prior to any treatments. In a further aspect, the cells are isolated from a blood sample or an apheresis from a subject prior to any number of relevant treatment modalities, including but not limited to treatment with agents such as natalizumab, efalizumab, antiviral agents, chemotherapy, radiation, immunosuppressive agents, such as cyclosporin, azathioprine, methotrexate, mycophenolate, and FK506, antibodies, or other immunoablative agents such as CAMPATH, anti-CD3 antibodies, Cytoxan, fludarabine, cyclosporin, FK506, rapamycin, mycophenolic acid, steroids, FR901228, and irradiation.

In a further aspect of the present invention, T cells are obtained from a patient directly following treatment. In this regard, it has been observed that following certain cancer treatments, in particular treatments with drugs that damage the immune system, shortly after treatment during the period when patients would normally be recovering from the treatment, the quality of T cells obtained may be optimal or improved for their ability to expand ex vivo. Likewise, following ex vivo manipulation using the methods described herein, these cells may be in a preferred state for enhanced engraftment and in vivo expansion. Thus, it is contemplated within the context of the present invention to collect blood cells, including T cells, dendritic cells, or other cells of the hematopoietic lineage, during this recovery phase. Further, in certain aspects, mobilization (for example, mobilization with GM-CSF) and conditioning regimens can be used to create a condition in a subject wherein repopulation, recirculation, regeneration, and/or expansion of particular cell types is favored, especially during a defined window of time following therapy. Illustrative cell types include T cells, B cells, dendritic cells, and other cells of the immune system.

Activation and Expansion of T Cells

T cells may be activated and expanded generally using methods as described, for example, in U.S. Patents 6,352,694; 6,534,055; 6,905,680; 6,692,964; 5,858,358;

6,887,466; 6,905,681; 7,144,575; 7,067,318; 7,172,869; 7,232,566; 7,175,843; 5,883,223; 6,905,874; 6,797,514; 6,867,041; and U.S. Patent Application Publication No.

20060121005.

Generally, the T cells of the invention may be expanded by contact with a surface having attached thereto an agent that stimulates a CD3/TCR complex associated signal and a ligand that stimulates a co-stimulatory molecule on the surface of the T cells. In particular, T cell populations may be stimulated as described herein, such as by contact with an anti-CD3 antibody, or antigen-binding fragment thereof, or an anti-CD2 antibody immobilized on a surface, or by contact with a protein kinase C activator (e.g., bryostatin) in conjunction with a calcium ionophore. For co- stimulation of an accessory molecule on the surface of the T cells, a ligand that binds the accessory molecule is used. For example, a population of T cells can be contacted with an anti-CD3 antibody and an anti- CD28 antibody, under conditions appropriate for stimulating proliferation of the T cells. To stimulate proliferation of either CD4+ T cells or CD8+ T cells, an anti-CD3 antibody and an anti-CD28 antibody. Examples of an anti-CD28 antibody include 9.3, B-T3, XR- CD28 (Diaclone, Besancon, France) can be used as can other methods commonly known in the art (Berg et al., Transplant Proc. 30(8):3975-3977, 1998; Haanen et al, J. Exp. Med. 190(9): 13191328, 1999; Garland et al, J. Immunol Meth. 227(l-2):53-63, 1999). In certain aspects, the primary stimulatory signal and the co- stimulatory signal for the T cell may be provided by different protocols. For example, the agents providing each signal may be in solution or coupled to a surface. When coupled to a surface, the agents may be coupled to the same surface (i.e., in "cis" formation) or to separate surfaces (i.e., in "trans" formation). Alternatively, one agent may be coupled to a surface and the other agent in solution. In one aspect, the agent providing the co-stimulatory signal is bound to a cell surface and the agent providing the primary activation signal is in solution or coupled to a surface. In certain aspects, both agents can be in solution. In another aspect, the agents may be in soluble form, and then cross-linked to a surface, such as a cell expressing Fc receptors or an antibody or other binding agent which will bind to the agents. In this regard, see for example, U.S. Patent Application Publication Nos.

20040101519 and 20060034810 for artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPCs) that are contemplated for use in activating and expanding T cells in the present invention.

In one aspect, the two agents are immobilized on beads, either on the same bead, i.e., "cis," or to separate beads, i.e., "trans." By way of example, the agent providing the primary activation signal is an anti-CD3 antibody or an antigen-binding fragment thereof and the agent providing the co- stimulatory signal is an anti-CD28 antibody or antigen- binding fragment thereof; and both agents are co-immobilized to the same bead in equivalent molecular amounts. In one aspect, a 1 : 1 ratio of each antibody bound to the beads for CD4+ T cell expansion and T cell growth is used. In certain aspects of the present invention, a ratio of anti CD3:CD28 antibodies bound to the beads is used such that an increase in T cell expansion is observed as compared to the expansion observed using a ratio of 1 : 1. In one aspect an increase of from about 1 to about 3 fold is observed as compared to the expansion observed using a ratio of 1 : 1. In one aspect, the ratio of CD3:CD28 antibody bound to the beads ranges from 100: 1 to 1 : 100 and all integer values there between. In one aspect of the present invention, more anti-CD28 antibody is bound to the particles than anti-CD3 antibody, e.g. , the ratio of CD3:CD28 is less than one. In certain aspects of the invention, the ratio of anti CD28 antibody to anti CD3 antibody bound to the beads is greater than 2: 1. In one particular aspect, a 1 : 100 CD3:CD28 ratio of antibody bound to beads is used. In another aspect, a 1 :75 CD3:CD28 ratio of antibody bound to beads is used. In a further aspect, a 1 :50 CD3:CD28 ratio of antibody bound to beads is used. In another aspect, a 1:30 CD3:CD28 ratio of antibody bound to beads is used. In one aspect, a 1: 10 CD3:CD28 ratio of antibody bound to beads is used. In another aspect, a 1:3 CD3:CD28 ratio of antibody bound to the beads is used. In yet another aspect, a 3: 1 CD3:CD28 ratio of antibody bound to the beads is used.

Ratios of particles to cells from 1:500 to 500: 1 and any integer values in between may be used to stimulate T cells or other target cells. As those of ordinary skill in the art can readily appreciate, the ratio of particles to cells may depend on particle size relative to the target cell. For example, small sized beads could only bind a few cells, while larger beads could bind many. In certain aspects the ratio of cells to particles ranges from 1: 100 to 100: 1 and any integer values in-between and in further aspects the ratio comprises 1:9 to 9: 1 and any integer values in between, can also be used to stimulate T cells. The ratio of anti-CD3- and anti-CD28-coupled particles to T cells that result in T cell stimulation can vary as noted above, however certain preferred values include 1: 100, 1:50, 1:40, 1:30, 1:20, 1: 10, 1:9, 1:8, 1:7, 1:6, 1:5, 1:4, 1:3, 1:2, 1: 1, 2: 1, 3: 1, 4: 1, 5: 1, 6: 1, 7: 1, 8: 1, 9: 1, 10: 1, and 15: 1 with one preferred ratio being at least 1: 1 particles per T cell. In one aspect, a ratio of particles to cells of 1: 1 or less is used. In one particular aspect, an advantageous particle to cell ratio is 1:5. In further aspects, the ratio of particles to cells can be varied depending on the day of stimulation. For example, in one aspect, the ratio of particles to cells is from 1: 1 to 10: 1 on the first day and additional particles are added to the cells every day or every other day thereafter for up to 10 days, at final ratios of from 1: 1 to 1: 10 (based on cell counts on the day of addition). In one particular aspect, the ratio of particles to cells is 1: 1 on the first day of stimulation and adjusted to 1:5 on the third and fifth days of stimulation. In another aspect, particles are added on a daily or every other day basis to a final ratio of 1: 1 on the first day, and 1:5 on the third and fifth days of stimulation. In another aspect, the ratio of particles to cells is 2: 1 on the first day of stimulation and adjusted to 1: 10 on the third and fifth days of stimulation. In another aspect, particles are added on a daily or every other day basis to a final ratio of 1 : 1 on the first day, and 1: 10 on the third and fifth days of stimulation. One of skill in the art will appreciate that a variety of other ratios may be suitable for use in the present invention. In particular, ratios will vary depending on particle size and on cell size and type. In one aspect, the most typical ratios for use are about 1: 1, 2: 1 or 3: 1 on the first day. In further aspects of the present invention, the cells, such as T cells, are combined with agent-coated beads, the beads and the cells are subsequently separated, and then the cells are cultured. In an alternative aspect, prior to culture, the agent-coated beads and cells are not separated but are cultured together. In a further aspect, the beads and cells are first concentrated by application of a force, such as a magnetic force, resulting in increased ligation of cell surface markers, thereby inducing cell stimulation.

By way of example, cell surface proteins may be ligated by allowing

paramagnetic beads to which anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 are attached (3x28 beads) to contact the T cells. In one aspect the cells (for example, 104 to 109 T cells) and beads (for example, DYNABEADS® M-450 CD3/CD28 T paramagnetic beads at a ratio of 1 : 1) are combined in a buffer, for example PBS (without divalent cations such as, calcium and magnesium). Again, those of ordinary skill in the art can readily appreciate any cell concentration may be used. For example, the target cell may be very rare in the sample and comprise only 0.01% of the sample or the entire sample (i.e., 100%) may comprise the target cell of interest. Accordingly, any cell number is within the context of the present invention. In certain aspects, it may be desirable to significantly decrease the volume in which particles and cells are mixed together (e.g. , increase the concentration of cells), to ensure maximum contact of cells and particles. For example, in one aspect, a concentration of about 2 billion cells/ml is used. In another aspect, greater than 100 million cells/ml is used. In a further aspect, a concentration of cells of 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, or 50 million cells/ml is used. In yet another aspect, a concentration of cells from 75, 80, 85, 90, 95, or 100 million cells/ml is used. In further aspects, concentrations of 125 or 150 million cells/ml can be used. Using high concentrations can result in increased cell yield, cell activation, and cell expansion. Further, use of high cell concentrations allows more efficient capture of cells that may weakly express target antigens of interest, such as CD28-negative T cells. Such populations of cells may have therapeutic value and would be desirable to obtain in certain aspects. For example, using high concentration of cells allows more efficient selection of CD8+ T cells that normally have weaker CD28 expression.

In one aspect of the present invention, the mixture may be cultured for several hours (about 3 hours) to about 14 days or any hourly integer value in between. In another aspect, the mixture may be cultured for 21 days. In one aspect of the invention the beads and the T cells are cultured together for about eight days. In another aspect, the beads and T cells are cultured together for 2-3 days. Several cycles of stimulation may also be desired such that culture time of T cells can be 60 days or more. Conditions appropriate for T cell culture include an appropriate media (e.g., Minimal Essential Media or RPMI Media 1640 or, X-vivo 15, (Lonza)) that may contain factors necessary for proliferation and viability, including serum (e.g., fetal bovine or human serum), interleukin-2 (IL-2), insulin, IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-7, GM-CSF, IL-10, IL- 12, IL- 15, TGFp, and TNF-a or any other additives for the growth of cells known to the skilled artisan. Other additives for the growth of cells include, but are not limited to, surfactant, plasmanate, and reducing agents such as N-acetyl-cysteine and 2-mercaptoethanol. Media can include RPMI 1640, AIM-V, DMEM, MEM, a-MEM, F-12, X-Vivo 15, and X- Vivo 20, Optimizer, with added amino acids, sodium pyruvate, and vitamins, either serum-free or supplemented with an appropriate amount of serum (or plasma) or a defined set of hormones, and/or an amount of cytokine(s) sufficient for the growth and expansion of T cells. Antibiotics, e.g., penicillin and streptomycin, are included only in experimental cultures, not in cultures of cells that are to be infused into a subject. The target cells are maintained under conditions necessary to support growth, for example, an appropriate temperature (e.g. , 37° C) and atmosphere (e.g., air plus 5% C02).

T cells that have been exposed to varied stimulation times may exhibit different characteristics. For example, typical blood or apheresed peripheral blood mononuclear cell products have a helper T cell population (TH, CD4+) that is greater than the cytotoxic or suppressor T cell population (Tc, CD8+). Ex vivo expansion of T cells by stimulating CD3 and CD28 receptors produces a population of T cells that prior to about days 8-9 consists predominately of TH cells, while after about days 8-9, the population of T cells comprises an increasingly greater population of Tc cells. Accordingly, depending on the purpose of treatment, infusing a subject with a T cell population comprising

predominately of TH cells may be advantageous. Similarly, if an antigen- specific subset of Tc cells has been isolated it may be beneficial to expand this subset to a greater degree. Further, in addition to CD4 and CD8 markers, other phenotypic markers vary

significantly, but in large part, reproducibly during the course of the cell expansion process. Thus, such reproducibility enables the ability to tailor an activated T cell product for specific purposes.

Once an anti-CD 123 CAR is constructed, various assays can be used to evaluate the activity of the molecule, such as but not limited to, the ability to expand T cells following antigen stimulation, sustain T cell expansion in the absence of re- stimulation, and anti-cancer activities in appropriate animal models. Assays to evaluate the effects of a CD 123 CAR are described in further detail below:

Therapeutic Application for Diseases and Disorders

Hematological cancer conditions are the types of cancer such as leukemia and malignant lymphoproliferative conditions that affect blood, bone marrow and the lymphatic system.

Leukemia can be classified as acute leukemia and chronic leukemia. Acute leukemia can be further classified as acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL). Chronic leukemia includes chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and chronic lymphoid leukemia (CLL). Other related conditions include myelodysplasia syndromes (MDS, formerly known as "preleukemia") which are a diverse collection of hematological conditions united by ineffective production (or dysplasia) of myeloid blood cells and risk of transformation to AML.

In AML, malignant transformation and uncontrolled proliferation of an abnormally differentiated, long-lived myeloid progenitor cell results in high circulating numbers of immature blood forms and replacement of normal marrow by malignant cells. Symptoms include fatigue, pallor, easy bruising and bleeding, fever, and infection;

symptoms of leukemic infiltration are present in only about 5% of patients (often as skin manifestations). Examination of peripheral blood smear and bone marrow is diagnostic. Existing treatment includes induction chemotherapy to achieve remission and post- remission chemotherapy (with or without stem cell transplantation) to avoid relapse.

AML has a number of subtypes that are distinguished from each other by morphology, immunophenotype, and cytochemistry. Five classes are described, based on predominant cell type, including myeloid, myeloid-monocytic, monocytic, erythroid, and megakaryocyte. Remission induction rates range from 50 to 85%. Long-term disease-free survival reportedly occurs in 20 to 40% of patients and increases to 40 to 50% in younger patients treated with stem cell transplantation.

Prognostic factors help determine treatment protocol and intensity; patients with strongly negative prognostic features are usually given more intense forms of therapy, because the potential benefits are thought to justify the increased treatment toxicity. The most important prognostic factor is the leukemia cell karyotype; favorable karyotypes include t(15;17), t(8;21), and invl6 (pl3;q22). Negative factors include increasing age, a preceding myelodysplasia phase, secondary leukemia, high WBC count, and absence of Auer rods.

Initial therapy attempts to induce remission and differs most from ALL in that AML responds to fewer drugs. The basic induction regimen includes cytarabine by continuous IV infusion or high doses for 5 to 7 days; daunorubicin or idarubicin is given IV for 3 days during this time. Some regimens include 6-thioguanine, etoposide, vincristine, and prednisone, but their contribution is unclear. Treatment usually results in significant myelosuppression, with infection or bleeding; there is significant latency before marrow recovery. During this time, meticulous preventive and supportive care is vital.

The present invention provides, among other things, compositions and methods for treating cancer. In one aspect, the cancer is a hematologic cancer including but is not limited to leukemia (such as acute myelogenous leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, acute lymphoid leukemia, chronic lymphoid leukemia and myelodysplasia syndrome) and malignant lymphoproliferative conditions, including lymphoma (such as multiple myeloma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, Burkitt's lymphoma, and small cell- and large cell-follicular lymphoma).

The present invention also provides compositions and methods for inhibiting the proliferation or reducing a CD123-expressing cell population. An exemplary method includes contacting a population of cells comprising a CD123-expressing cell with a CD 123 CART cell of the invention that binds to the CD123-expressing cell. In a specific aspect, the present invention provides methods for inhibiting the proliferation or reducing the population of cancer cells expressing CD 123, the methods comprising contacting the CD123-expressing cancer cell population with a CD 123 CART cell of the invention that binds to the CD123-expressing cell. In another aspect, the present invention provides methods for inhibiting the proliferation or reducing the population of cancer cells expressing CD 123, the methods comprising contacting the CD123-expressing cancer cell population with a CD 123 CART cell of the invention that binds to the CD123-expressing cell. In certain aspects, the CD 123 CART cell of the invention reduces the quantity, number, amount or percentage of cells and/or cancer cells by at least 25%, at least 30%, at least 40%, at least 50%, at least 65%, at least 75%, at least 85%, at least 95%, or at least 99% in a subject with or animal model for myeloid leukemia or another cancer associated with CD123-expressing cells relative to a negative control. In one aspect, the subject is a human.

The present invention also provides methods for preventing, treating and/or managing a disorder associated with CD123-expressing cells (e.g., a hematologic cancer), the methods comprising administering to a subject in need a CD 123 CART cell of the invention that binds to the CD123-expressing cell. In one aspect, the subject is a human. Non-limiting examples of disorders associated with CD123-expressing cells include autoimmune disorders (such as lupus), inflammatory disorders (such as allergies and asthma) and cancers (such as hematological cancers).

The present invention also provides methods for preventing, treating and/or managing a disease associated with CD123-expressing cells, the methods comprising administering to a subject in need a CD 123 CART cell of the invention that binds to the CD123-expressing cell. In one aspect, the subject is a human. Non-limiting examples of diseases associated with CD123-expressing cells include Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML), myelodysplasia, B-cell Acute Lymphoid Leukemia, T-cell Acute Lymphoid Leukemia, hairy cell leukemia, blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm, chronic myeloid leukemia, hodgkin lymphoma, and the like.

The present invention provides methods for preventing relapse of cancer associated with CD123-expressing cells, the methods comprising administering to a subject in need thereof a CD 123 CART cell of the invention that binds to the CD 123- expressing cell. In another aspect, the methods comprise administering to the subject in need thereof an effective amount of a CD 123 CART cell of the invention that binds to the CD123-expressing cell in combination with an effective amount of another therapy.

In one aspect, CD 123 is considered to be a "cancer stem cell" marker in AML. Therefore, a CD 123 CART cell of the invention can prevent relapse of AML, or even treat AML that is mostly CD 123-negative but with a "stem" population of CD 123- expressing cells.

In one aspect, the invention provides compositions and methods for treating a disease or disorder that is negative for CD19 and positive for CD123. In another aspect, the invention provides compositions and methods for treating a disease or disorder wherein part of the tumor is negative for CD19 and positive for CD123. For example, a CART123 cell comprising a CAR of the invention may be useful for treating subjects that have undergone treatment for a disease or disorder associated with elevated expression levels of CD 19, wherein the subject that has undergone treatment for elevated levels of CD19 exhibits a disease or disorder associated with elevated levels of CD123.

In one aspect, B-cell acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) is an example of serial targeting using CART cells comprising a CAR. For example, treatment with CART 19 can sometimes result in CD19-negative relapse, which can be treated with CART123 cells of the invention. Alternatively, the present invention includes dual targeting of B- ALL using CART cells comprising an anti-CD 19 CAR and an anti-CD 123 CAR.

Bone Marrow Ablation

In one aspect, the present invention provides compositions and methods for bone marrow ablation. For example, in one aspect, the invention provides compositions and methods for eradication of at least a portion of existing bone marrow in a subject. It is described herein that, in certain instances, the CART 123 cells comprising a CD 123 CAR of the present invention eradicates CD 123 positive bone marrow myeloid progenitor cells.

In one aspect, the invention provides a method of bone marrow ablation comprising administering a CD 123 CAR T cell of the invention to a subject in need of bone marrow ablation. For example, the present method may be used to eradicate some or all of the existing bone marrow of a subject having a disease or disorder in which bone marrow transplantation or bone marrow reconditioning is a beneficial treatment strategy. In one aspect, the bone marrow ablation method of the invention, comprising the administration of a CD 123 CAR T cell described elsewhere herein, is performed in a subject prior to bone marrow transplantation. Thus, in one aspect, the method of the invention provides a cellular conditioning regimen prior to bone marrow or stem cell transplantation. In one aspect, bone marrow transplantation comprises transplantation of a stem cell. The bone marrow transplantation may comprise transplantation of autologous or allogeneic cells.

The present invention provides a method of treating a disease or disorder comprising administering a CD 123 CAR T cell of the invention to eradicate at least a portion of existing bone marrow. The method may be used as at least a portion of a treatment regimen for treating any disease or disorder where bone marrow transplantation is beneficial. That is, the present method may be used in any subject in need of a bone marrow transplant. In one aspect, bone marrow ablation comprising administration of a CD123 CAR T cell is useful in the treatment of AML. In certain aspects, bone marrow ablation by way of the present method is useful in treating a hematological cancer, a solid tumor, a hematologic disease, a metabolic disorder, HIV, HTLV, a lysosomal storage disorder, and an immunodeficiency.

Compositions and methods disclosed herein may be used to eradicate at least a portion of existing bone marrow to treat hematological cancers including, but not limited to, leukemia, lymphoma, myeloma, ALL, AML, CLL, CML, Hodgkin's disease, Non- Hodgkin's lymphoma, and multiple myeloma.

Compositions and methods disclosed herein may be used to treat hematologic diseases including, but not limited to myelodysplasia, anemia, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, aplastic anemia, acquired pure red cell anemia, Diamon-Blackfan anemia, Fanconi anemia, cytopenia, amegakaryotic thrombocytopenia, myeloproliferative disorders, polycythemia vera, essential thrombocytosis, myelofibrosis,

hemoglobinopathies, sickle cell disease, β thalassemia major, among others.

Compositions and methods disclosed herein may be used to treat lysosomal storage disorders including, but not limited to lipidoses, sphigolipodeses,

leukodystrophies, mucopolysaccharidoses, glycoproteinoses, infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, Jansky-Bielschowsky disease, Niemann-Pick disease, Gaucher disease, adrenoleukodystrophy, metachromatic leukodystrophy, Krabbe disease, Hurler syndrome, Scheie syndrome, Hurler-Scheie syndrome, hunter syndrome, Sanfilippo syndrome, Morquio syndrome, Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome, Sly syndrome, mucolipidosis, fucolipidosis, aspartylglucosaminuria, alpha-mannosidoses, and Wolman disease.

Compositions and methods disclosed herein may be used to treat

immunodeficiencies including, but not limited to, T-cell deficiencies, combined T-cell and B-cell deficiencies, phagocyte disorders, immune dysregulation diseases, innate immune deficiencies, ataxia telangiectasia, DiGeorge syndrome, severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, Kostmann syndrome,

Shwachman-Diamond syndrome, Griscelli syndrome, and NF-Kappa-B Essential Modulator (NEMO) deficiency.

In one aspect, the present invention provides a method of treating cancer comprising bone marrow conditioning, where at least a portion of bone marrow of the subject is eradicated by the CD123 CAR T cell of the invention. For example, in certain instances, the bone marrow of the subject comprises a malignant precursor cell that can be targeted and eliminated by the activity of the CD 123 CAR T cell. In one aspect, a bone marrow conditioning therapy comprises administering a bone marrow or stem cell transplant to the subject following the eradication of native bone marrow. In one aspect, the bone marrow reconditioning therapy is combined with one or more other anti-cancer therapies, including, but not limited to anti-tumor CAR therapies, chemotherapy, radiation, and the like.

In one aspect, eradication of the administered CD 123 CART cells may be required prior to infusion of bone marrow or stem cell transplant. Eradication of the CD 123 CAR T cells may be accomplished using any suitable strategy or treatment, including, but not limited to, use of a suicide gene, limited CAR persistence using RNA encoded CARs, or anti-T cell modalities including antibodies or chemotherapy.

Therapeutic Application

In one aspect, the invention pertains to a vector comprising a CD 123 CAR operably linked to promoter for expression in mammalian T cells. In one aspect, the invention provides a recombinant T cell expressing the CD 123 CAR for use in treating CD123-expressing tumors, wherein the recombinant T cell expressing the CD 123 CAR is termed a CD 123 CART. In one aspect, the CD 123 CART of the invention is capable of contacting a tumor cell with at least one CD 123 CAR of the invention expressed on its surface such that the CD 123 CART is activated in response to the antigen and the CART targets the tumor cell and growth of the tumor is inhibited.

In one aspect, the invention pertains to a method of inhibiting growth of a CD 123- expressing tumor cell, comprising contacting the tumor cell with an anti-CD 123 CAR T cell described herein such that the CART is activated in response to the antigen and targets the cancer cell, wherein the growth of the tumor is inhibited.

In another aspect, the invention pertains to a method of treating cancer in a subject. The method comprises administering to the subject an anti-CD 123 CAR T cell of the present invention such that the cancer is treated in the subject. An example of a cancer that is treatable by the anti-CD 123 CAR T cell of the invention includes but is not limited to AML, myelodysplasia syndrome, ALL, hairy cell leukemia, Prolymphocyte leukemia, Chronic myeloid leukemia, Hodgkin lymphoma, Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm, and the like.

The present invention includes a type of cellular therapy where T cells are genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) and the CAR T cell is infused to a recipient in need thereof. The infused cell is able to kill tumor cells in the recipient. In some embodiments, the CAR-modified T cells are able to replicate in vivo resulting in long-term persistence that can lead to sustained tumor control. In various aspects, the T cells administered to the patient, or their progeny, persist in the patient for at least four months, five months, six months, seven months, eight months, nine months, ten months, eleven months, twelve months, thirteen months, fourteen month, fifteen months, sixteen months, seventeen months, eighteen months, nineteen months, twenty months, twenty-one months, twenty-two months, twenty-three months, two years, three years, four years, or five years after administration of the T cell to the patient.

[001] The invention also includes a type of cellular therapy where T cells are modified, e.g., by in vitro transcribed RNA, to transiently express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) and the CAR T cell is infused to a recipient in need thereof. The infused cell is able to kill tumor cells in the recipient. Thus, in various aspects, the T cells administered to the patient, is present for less than one month, e.g., three weeks, two weeks, one week, after administration of the T cell to the patient.

Without wishing to be bound by any particular theory, the anti-tumor immunity response elicited by the CAR-modified T cells may be an active or a passive immune response. In another aspect, the CAR transduced T cells exhibit specific proinflammatory cytokine secretion and potent cytolytic activity in response to human cancer cells expressing the CD 123, resist soluble CD 123 inhibition, mediate bystander killing and mediate regression of an established human tumor. For example, antigen-less tumor cells within a heterogeneous field of CD123-expressing tumor may be susceptible to indirect destruction by CD 123 -redirected T cells that has previously reacted against adjacent antigen-positive cancer cells.

In one aspect, the method of the invention provides for eradication of at least a portion of existing bone marrow of a subject. As described herein, in certain instances, the CD 123 CAR T cell of the invention eradicates the CD 123 expressing bone marrow myeloid progenitor cells. Thus, the present invention may be used as a cellular conditioning regimen for the ablation of at least a portion of existing bone marrow prior to bone marrow transplantation. The method can be used to treat any disease or disorder where bone marrow transplantation is beneficial or necessary, including, but not limited a hematological cancer, a solid tumor, a hematologic disease, a metabolic disorder, HIV, HTLV, a lysosomal storage disorder, and an immunodeficiency.

In one aspect, the fully-human CAR-modified T cells of the invention may be a type of vaccine for ex vivo immunization and/or in vivo therapy in a mammal. In one aspect, the mammal is a human.

With respect to ex vivo immunization, at least one of the following occurs in vitro prior to administering the cell into a mammal: i) expansion of the cells, ii) introducing a nucleic acid encoding a CAR to the cells or iii) cryopreservation of the cells.

Ex vivo procedures are well known in the art and are discussed more fully below. Briefly, cells are isolated from a mammal (e.g., a human) and genetically modified (e.g., transduced or transfected in vitro) with a vector expressing a CAR disclosed herein. The CAR-modified cell can be administered to a mammalian recipient to provide a therapeutic benefit. The mammalian recipient may be a human and the CAR-modified cell can be autologous with respect to the recipient. Alternatively, the cells can be allogeneic, syngeneic or xenogeneic with respect to the recipient.

The procedure for ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells is described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,199,942, incorporated herein by reference, can be applied to the cells of the present invention. Other suitable methods are known in the art, therefore the present invention is not limited to any particular method of ex vivo expansion of the cells. Briefly, ex vivo culture and expansion of T cells comprises: (1) collecting CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from a mammal from peripheral blood harvest or bone marrow explants; and (2) expanding such cells ex vivo. In addition to the cellular growth factors described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,199,942, other factors such as flt3-L, IL-1, IL-3 and c-kit ligand, can be used for culturing and expansion of the cells.

In addition to using a cell-based vaccine in terms of ex vivo immunization, the present invention also provides compositions and methods for in vivo immunization to elicit an immune response directed against an antigen in a patient.

Generally, the cells activated and expanded as described herein may be utilized in the treatment and prevention of diseases that arise in individuals who are

immunocompromised. In particular, the CAR-modified T cells of the invention are used in the treatment of diseases, disorders and conditions associated with expression of

CD 123. In certain aspects, the cells of the invention are used in the treatment of patients at risk for developing diseases, disorders and conditions associated with expression of CD 123. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the treatment or prevention of diseases, disorders and conditions associated with expression of CD 123 comprising administering to a subject in need thereof, a therapeutically effective amount of the CAR- modified T cells of the invention. An example of a diseases, disorders and conditions associated with expression of CD 123 includes but is not limited to AML,

myelodysplasia syndrome, ALL, hairy cell leukemia, Prolymphocytic leukemia, Chronic myeloid leukemia, Hodgkin lymphoma, Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm, and the like. A CAR-modified T cell of the present invention may be administered either alone, or as a pharmaceutical composition in combination with diluents and/or with other components such as IL-2 or other cytokines or cell populations.

The present invention also provides methods for inhibiting the proliferation or reducing a CD123-expressing cell population, the methods comprising contacting a population of cells comprising an CD123-expressing cell with an CD123CART cell described herein that binds to the CD123-expressing cell. In a specific aspect, the present invention provides methods for inhibiting the proliferation or reducing the population of cancer cells expressing CD 123, the methods comprising contacting the CD 123- expressing cancer cell population with an CD123CART cell described herein that binds to the CD123-expressing cell. In one aspect, the present invention provides methods for inhibiting the proliferation or reducing the population of cancer cells expressing CD 123, the methods comprising contacting the CD123-expressing cancer cell population with an CD123CART cell described herein that binds to the CD123-expressing cell. In certain aspects, the CD123CART cell of the invention reduces the quantity, number, amount or percentage of cells and/or cancer cells by at least 25%, at least 30%, at least 40%, at least 50%, at least 65%, at least 75%, at least 85%, at least 95%, or at least 99% in a subject with or animal model for a cancer associated with CD123-expressing cells relative to a negative control. In one aspect, the subject is a human. The present invention also provides methods for preventing, treating and/or managing a disease associated with CD123-expressing cells (e.g., AML, myelodysplastic syndrome, ALL, hairy cell leukemia, Prolymphocytic leukemia, Chronic myeloid leukemia, Hodgkin lymphoma, Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm, among others), the methods comprising administering to a subject in need a CD123CART cell described herein that binds to the CD123-expressing cell. In one aspect, the subject is a human.

The present invention provides methods for preventing relapse of cancer associated with CD123-expressing cells, the methods comprising administering to a subject in need thereof an CD123CART cell described herein that binds to the CD 123- expressing cell. In one aspect, the methods comprise administering to the subject in need thereof an effective amount of an CD123CART cell described herein that binds to the CD123-expressing cell in combination with an effective amount of another therapy. In one aspect, the subject suffers from or is susceptible to relapse after CD19 therapy, e.g., therapy with a CD 19 CART.

Combination Therapies

A CAR-expressing cell described herein may be used in combination with other known agents and therapies. Administered "in combination", as used herein, means that two (or more) different treatments are delivered to the subject during the course of the subject's affliction with the disorder, e.g., the two or more treatments are delivered after the subject has been diagnosed with the disorder and before the disorder has been cured or eliminated or treatment has ceased for other reasons. In some embodiments, the delivery of one treatment is still occurring when the delivery of the second begins, so that there is overlap in terms of administration. This is sometimes referred to herein as "simultaneous" or "concurrent delivery". In other embodiments, the delivery of one treatment ends before the delivery of the other treatment begins. In some embodiments of either case, the treatment is more effective because of combined administration. For example, the second treatment is more effective, e.g., an equivalent effect is seen with less of the second treatment, or the second treatment reduces symptoms to a greater extent, than would be seen if the second treatment were administered in the absence of the first treatment, or the analogous situation is seen with the first treatment. In some embodiments, delivery is such that the reduction in a symptom, or other parameter related to the disorder is greater than what would be observed with one treatment delivered in the absence of the other. The effect of the two treatments can be partially additive, wholly additive, or greater than additive. The delivery can be such that an effect of the first treatment delivered is still detectable when the second is delivered.

A CAR-expressing cell described herein and the at least one additional therapeutic agent can be administered simultaneously, in the same or in separate compositions, or sequentially. For sequential administration, the CAR-expressing cell described herein can be administered first, and the additional agent can be administered second, or the order of administration can be reversed. In further aspects, a CAR-expressing cell described herein may be used in a treatment regimen in combination with surgery, chemotherapy, radiation,

immunosuppressive agents, such as cyclosporin, azathioprine, methotrexate,

mycophenolate, and FK506, antibodies, or other immunoablative agents such as

CAMPATH, anti-CD3 antibodies or other antibody therapies, cytoxin, fludarabine, cyclosporin, FK506, rapamycin, mycophenolic acid, steroids, FR901228, cytokines, and irradiation.

In one embodiment, a CAR-expressing cell described herein can be used in combination with a chemotherapeutic agent. General Chemotherapeutic agents considered for use in combination therapies include anastrozole (Arimidex®), bicalutamide (Casodex®), bleomycin sulfate (Blenoxane®), busulfan (Myleran®), busulfan injection (Busulfex®), capecitabine (Xeloda®), N4-pentoxycarbonyl-5-deoxy-5-fluorocytidine, carboplatin (Paraplatin®), carmustine (BiCNU®), chlorambucil (Leukeran®), cisplatin (Platinol®), cladribine (Leustatin®), cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan® or Neosar®), cytarabine, cytosine arabinoside (Cytosar-U®), cytarabine liposome injection (DepoCyt®), dacarbazine

(DTIC-Dome®), dactinomycin (Actinomycin D, Cosmegan), daunorubicin hydrochloride (Cerubidine®), daunorubicin citrate liposome injection (DaunoXome®), dexamethasone, docetaxel (Taxotere®), doxorubicin hydrochloride (Adriamycin®, Rubex®), etoposide (Vepesid®), fludarabine phosphate (Fludara®), 5-fluorouracil (Adrucil®, Efudex®), flutamide (Eulexin®), tezacitibine, Gemcitabine (difluorodeoxycitidine), hydroxyurea (Hydrea®), Idarubicin (Idamycin®), ifosfamide (IFEX®), irinotecan (Camptosar®), L- asparaginase (ELSPAR®), leucovorin calcium, melphalan (Alkeran®), 6-mercaptopurine (Purinethol®), methotrexate (Folex®), mitoxantrone (Novantrone®), mylotarg, paclitaxel (Taxol®), phoenix (Yttrium90/MX-DTPA), pentostatin, polifeprosan 20 with carmustine implant (Gliadel®), tamoxifen citrate (Nolvadex®), teniposide (Vumon®), 6- thioguanine, thiotepa, tirapazamine (Tirazone®), topotecan hydrochloride for injection (Hycamptin®), vinblastine (Velban®), vincristine (Oncovin®), and vinorelbine

(Navelbine®).

Exemplary chemotherapeutic agents include an anthracycline, an antimetabolite and targeted antibodies, e.g., an anti-CD33 antibody such as gemtuzumab. Exemplary antimetabolites include, without limitation, folic acid antagonists (also referred to herein as antifolates), pyrimidine analogs, purine analogs and adenosine deaminase inhibitors): methotrexate (Rheumatrex®, Trexall®), 5-fluorouracil (Adrucil®, Efudex®, Fluoroplex®), floxuridine (FUDF®), cytarabine (Cytosar-U®, Tarabine PFS), 6-mercaptopurine (Puri-Nethol®)), 6-thioguanine (Thioguanine Tabloid®), fludarabine phosphate (Fludara®), pentostatin (Nipent®), pemetrexed (Alimta®), raltitrexed

(Tomudex®), cladribine (Leustatin®), clofarabine (Clofarex®, Clolar®), mercaptopurine (Puri-Nethol®), capecitabine (Xeloda®), nelarabine (Arranon®), azacitidine (Vidaza®) and gemcitabine (Gemzar®). Preferred antimetabolites include, e.g., 5-fluorouracil (Adrucil®, Efudex®, Fluoroplex®), floxuridine (FUDF®), capecitabine (Xeloda®), pemetrexed (Alimta®), raltitrexed (Tomudex®) and gemcitabine (Gemzar®).

Exemplary anthracyclines include, without limitation, daunorubicin

(Cerubidine®, Rubidomycin®), doxorubicin (Adriamycin®), epirubicin (Ellence®), idarubicin (Idamycin®), mitoxantrone (Novantrone®), valrubicin (Valstar®). Preferred anthracyclines include daunorubicin (Cerubidine®, Rubidomycin®) and doxorubicin (Adriamycin®).

Drugs that inhibit either the calcium dependent phosphatase calcineurin

(cyclosporine and FK506) or inhibit the p70S6 kinase that is important for growth factor induced signaling (rapamycin). (Liu et al., Cell 66:807-815, 1991; Henderson et al.,

Immun. 73:316-321, 1991; Bierer et al., Curr. Opin. Immun. 5:763-773, 1993) can also be used. In a further aspect, the cell compositions of the present invention may be administered to a patient in conjunction with (e.g., before, simultaneously or following) bone marrow transplantation, T cell ablative therapy using chemotherapy agents such as, fludarabine, external-beam radiation therapy (XRT), cyclophosphamide, and/or antibodies such as OKT3 or CAMPATH. In one aspect, the cell compositions of the present invention are administered following B-cell ablative therapy such as agents that react with CD20, e.g., Rituxan. For example, in one embodiment, subjects may undergo standard treatment with high dose chemotherapy followed by peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. In certain embodiments, following the transplant, subjects receive an infusion of the expanded immune cells of the present invention. In an additional embodiment, expanded cells are administered before or following surgery.

In one embodiment, the subject can be administered an agent which reduces or ameliorates a side effect associated with the administration of a CAR-expressing cell. Side effects associated with the administration of a CAR-expressing cell include, but are not limited to CRS, and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), also termed Macrophage Activation Syndrome (MAS). Symptoms of CRS include high fevers, nausea, transient hypotension, hypoxia, and the like. Accordingly, the methods described herein can comprise administering a CAR-expressing cell described herein to a subject and further administering an agent to manage elevated levels of a soluble factor resulting from treatment with a CAR-expressing cell. In one embodiment, the soluble factor elevated in the subject is one or more of IFN-γ, TNFa, IL-2 and IL-6. Therefore, an agent administered to treat this side effect can be an agent which neutralizes one or more of these soluble factors. Such agents include, but are not limited to a steroid, an inhibitor of TNFa, and an inhibitor of IL-6. An example of a TNFa inhibitor is entanercept. An example of an IL-6 inhibitor is Tocilizumab (toe).

In one embodiment, the subject can be administered an agent which enhances the activity of a CAR-expressing cell. For example, in one embodiment, the agent can be an agent which inhibits an inhibitory molecule. Inhibitory molecules, e.g., Programmed Death 1 (PD1), can, in some embodiments, decrease the ability of a CAR-expressing cell to mount an immune effector response. Examples of inhibitory molecules include PD1, PD-L1, CTLA4, TIM3, LAG3, VISTA, BTLA, TIGIT, LAIR1, CD160, 2B4 and TGFR beta. Inhibition of an inhibitory molecule, e.g., by inhibition at the DNA, RNA or protein level, can optimize a CAR-expressing cell performance. In embodiments, an inhibitory nucleic acid, e.g., an inhibitory nucleic acid, e.g., a dsRNA, e.g., an siRNA or shRNA, can be used to inhibit expression of an inhibitory molecule in the CAR- expressing cell. In an embodiment the inhibitor is an shRNA. In an embodiment, the inhibitory molecule is inhibited within a CAR-expressing cell. In these embodiments, a dsRNA molecule that inhibits expression of the inhibitory molecule is linked to the nucleic acid that encodes a component, e.g., all of the components, of the CAR. In one embodiment, the inhibitor of an inhibitory signal can be, e.g., an antibody or antibody fragment that binds to an inhibitory molecule. For example, the agent can be an antibody or antibody fragment that binds to PD1 , PD-L1, PD-L2 or CTLA4 (e.g., ipilimumab (also referred to as MDX-010 and MDX-101, CAS No. 477202-00-9 and marketed as Yervoy®; Bristol-Myers Squibb; Tremelimumab (IgG2 monoclonal antibody available from Pfizer, formerly known as ticilimumab, CP-675,206).

PD1 is an inhibitory member of the CD28 family of receptors that also includes CD28, CTLA-4, ICOS, and BTLA. PD-1 is expressed on activated B cells, T cells and myeloid cells (Agata et al. 1996 Int. Immunol 8:765-75). Two ligands for PD1, PD-L1 and PD-L2 have been shown to downregulate T cell activation upon binding to PD1

(Freeman et a. 2000 J Exp Med 192: 1027-34; Latchman et al. 2001 Nat Immunol 2:261- 8; Carter et al. 2002 Eur J Immunol 32:634-43). PD-L1 is abundant in human cancers (Dong et al. 2003 J Mol Med 81:281-7; Blank et al. 2005 Cancer Immunol. Immunother 54:307-314; Konishi et al. 2004 Clin Cancer Res 10:5094). Immune suppression can be reversed by inhibiting the local interaction of PD1 with PD-L1. Antibodies, antibody fragments, and other inhibitors of PD1, PD-L1 and PD-L2 are available in the art and may be used combination with a CD 123 CAR described herein. For example, nivolumab (also referred to as BMS-936558 or MDX1106; Bristol-Myers Squibb) is a fully human IgG4 monoclonal antibody which specifically blocks PD-1. Nivolumab (clone 5C4) and other human monoclonal antibodies that specifically bind to PD-1 are disclosed in US 8,008,449 and WO2006/121168. Pidilizumab (CT-011; Cure Tech) is a humanized IgGlk monoclonal antibody that binds to PD-1 Pidilizumab and other humanized anti- PD1 monoclonal antibodies are disclosed in WO2009/101611. Lambrolizumab (also referred to as MK03475; Merck) is a humanized IgG4 monoclonal antibody that binds to PD1. Lambrolizumab and other humanized anti-PDl antibodies are disclosed in US 8,354,509 and WO2009/114335. MDPL3280A (Genentech / Roche) is a human Fc optimized IgGl monoclonal antibody that binds to PD-L1. MDPL3280A and other human monoclonal antibodies to PD-L1 are disclosed in U.S. Patent No.: 7,943,743 and U.S Publication No.: 20120039906. Other anti-PD-Ll binding agents include

YW243.55.S70 (heavy and light chain variable regions are shown in SEQ ID NOs 20 and 21 in WO2010/077634) and MDX-1 105 (also referred to as BMS-936559, and, e.g.,

I l l anti-PD-Ll binding agents disclosed in WO2007/005874). AMP-224 (B7-DCIg;

Amplimmune; e.g., disclosed in WO2010/027827 and WO2011/066342), is a PD-L2 Fc fusion soluble receptor that blocks the interaction between PD1 and B7-H1. Other anti- PD1 antibodies include AMP 514 (Amplimmune), among others, e.g., anti-PDl antibodies disclosed in US 8,609,089, US 2010028330, and/or US 20120114649. The agent which enhances the activity of a CAR-expressing cell can be, e.g., a fusion protein comprising a first domain and a second domain, wherein the first domain is an inhibitory molecule, or fragment thereof, and the second domain is a polypeptide that is associated with a positive signal, e.g., the polypeptide that is associated with a positive signal is CD28, ICOS, and fragments thereof, e.g., an intracellular signaling domain of CD28 and/or ICOS. In one embodiment, the fusion protein is expressed by the same cell that expressed the CAR. In another embodiment, the fusion protein is expressed by a cell, e.g., a T cell that does not express an anti-CD 123CD 123 CAR.

Pharmaceutical compositions and treatments

Pharmaceutical compositions of the present invention may comprise a CAR- expressing cell, e.g., a plurality of CAR-expressing cells, as described herein, in combination with one or more pharmaceutically or physiologically acceptable carriers, diluents or excipients. Such compositions may comprise a buffer such as neutral buffered saline, phosphate buffered saline and the like; carbohydrates such as glucose, mannose, sucrose or dextrans, mannitol; proteins; polypeptides or amino acids such as glycine; antioxidants; chelating agents such as EDTA or glutathione; adjuvants (e.g., aluminum hydroxide); and preservatives. Compositions of the present invention are in one aspect formulated for intravenous administration.

Pharmaceutical compositions of the present invention may be administered in a manner appropriate to the disease to be treated (or prevented). The quantity and frequency of administration will be determined by such factors as the condition of the patient, and the type and severity of the patient's disease, although appropriate dosages may be determined by clinical trials.

In one embodiment, the pharmaceutical composition is substantially free of, e.g., there are no detectable levels of a contaminant, e.g., selected from the group consisting of endotoxin, mycoplasma, replication competent lenti virus (RCL), p24, VSV-G nucleic acid, HIV gag, residual anti-CD3/anti-CD28 coated beads, mouse antibodies, pooled human serum, bovine serum albumin, bovine serum, culture media components, vector packaging cell or plasmid components, a bacterium and a fungus. In one embodiment, the bacterium is at least one selected from the group consisting of Alcaligenes faecalis, Candida albicans, Escherichia coli, Haemophilus influenza, Neisseria meningitides, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumonia, and

Streptococcus pyogenes group A.

When "an immunologically effective amount," "an anti-tumor effective amount," "an tumor-inhibiting effective amount," or "therapeutic amount" is indicated, the precise amount of the compositions of the present invention to be administered can be

determined by a physician with consideration of individual differences in age, weight, tumor size, extent of infection or metastasis, and condition of the patient (subject). It can generally be stated that a pharmaceutical composition comprising the T cells described herein may be administered at a dosage of 104 to 109 cells/kg body weight, in some instances 105 to 106 cells/kg body weight, including all integer values within those ranges. T cell compositions may also be administered multiple times at these dosages. The cells can be administered by using infusion techniques that are commonly known in immunotherapy (see, e.g., Rosenberg et al., New Eng. J. of Med. 319: 1676, 1988).

In certain aspects, it may be desired to administer activated T cells to a subject and then subsequently redraw blood (or have an apheresis performed), activate T cells therefrom according to the present invention, and reinfuse the patient with these activated and expanded T cells. This process can be carried out multiple times every few weeks. In certain aspects, T cells can be activated from blood draws of from lOcc to 400cc. In certain aspects, T cells are activated from blood draws of 20cc, 30cc, 40cc, 50cc, 60cc, 70cc, 80cc, 90cc, or lOOcc.

The administration of the subject compositions may be carried out in any convenient manner, including by aerosol inhalation, injection, ingestion, transfusion, implantation or transplantation. The compositions described herein may be administered to a patient transarterially, subcutaneously, intradermally, intratumorally, intranodally, intramedullary, intramuscularly, by intravenous (i.v.) injection, or intraperitoneally. In one aspect, the T cell compositions of the present invention are administered to a patient by intradermal or subcutaneous injection. In another aspect, the T cell compositions of the present invention are administered by i.v. injection. The compositions of T cells may be injected directly into a tumor, lymph node, or site of infection.

a particular exemplary aspect, subjects may undergo leukapheresis, wherein leukocytes are collected, enriched, or depleted ex vivo to select and/or isolate the cells of interest, e.g., T cells. These T cell isolates may be expanded by methods known in the art and treated such that one or more CAR constructs of the invention may be introduced, thereby creating a CAR T cell of the invention. Subjects in need thereof may subsequently undergo standard treatment with high dose chemotherapy followed by peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. In certain aspects, following or concurrent with the transplant, subjects receive an infusion of the expanded CAR T cells of the present invention. In an additional aspect, expanded cells are administered before or following surgery. The dosage of the above treatments to be administered to a patient will vary with the precise nature of the condition being treated and the recipient of the treatment. The scaling of dosages for human administration can be performed according to art-accepted practices.

EXPERIMENTAL EXAMPLES

The invention is further described in detail by reference to the following experimental examples. These examples are provided for purposes of illustration only, and are not intended to be limiting unless otherwise specified. Thus, the invention should in no way be construed as being limited to the following examples, but rather, should be construed to encompass any and all variations which become evident as a result of the teaching provided herein.

Example 1: Anti-CD 123 Chimeric Antigen Receptor Engineered T Cells For AML

Most patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are incurable with standard therapy. Without wishing to be bound by any particular theory, it is believed that successful CART cell therapy relies on a suitable cell-surface molecule. To date however, no AML- specific surface antigen has been found as many antigens are shared between immature myeloid cells and AML blasts.

CD 123, the transmembrane alpha chain of the IL-3 receptor, is expressed on the majority of primary AML specimens (Jordan, 2010, Science Translational

Medicine,2:31ps21; Jin et al, 2009, Cell Stem Cell,5:31-42; Munoz et al, 2001,

Haematologica, 86: 1261-1269), and high CD123 expression is associated with a poor prognosis (Testa et al, 2002, Blood,100:2980-8). Furthermore, AML stem cells can be eliminated in immunodeficient mice by treatment with anti-CD 123 antibody (Yalcintepe et al, 2006, Blood, 108:3530-7; Jin et al, 2009, Cell Stem Cell, 5:31-42). These observations implicate CD123 as a possible target for CAR T cell therapy. However,

CD 123 is also expressed on myeloid progenitors, plasmacytoid dendritic cells, mast cells, basophils, megakaryocytes and some B cells.

It is demonstrated herein that human CD 123 -redirected T cells (CART123) eradicate both primary AML and normal bone marrow in humanized immune system mice. Without wishing to be bound by a particular theory, as human AML is likely preceded by clonal evolution in normal or "pre-leukemic" hematopoietic stem cells (Weissman, 2005, JAMA, 294: 1359-66; Miyamoto et al., 2000, PNAS, 97:7521-6; Hong et al, 2008, Science, 319:336-9; Nilsson et al, 2002, Blood,100:259-67; Welch et al, 2012, Cell, 150:264-78; Walter et al, 2012, N Engl J Med, 366: 1090-8), the data presented herein support CART 123 as a viable strategy for the treatment of AML and as a novel cellular conditioning regimen prior to bone marrow transplantation.

Materials and Methods T cell transduction

Normal donor T cells were positively selected from leukapheresis packs, expanded in vitro with anti-CD3/CD28 beads (Invitrogen) and IL-2 (Chiron) and transduced with lentiviral supernatant from 293T cells transfected with pELNS anti- CD123-41BB-CD3zeta plasmid DNA.

Cells MOLM14 cell lines were obtained from the ATCC and maintained in RPMI media supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum, penicillin and streptomycin (RIO). To produce a bioluminescent model, MOLM14 cells were transduced with a luc2-gfp- lucif erase lentiviral construct and sorted twice to high purity.

Primary AML cells were obtained from the Stem Cell and Xenograft Core facility at the University of Pennsylvania, or directly from patient blood under an IRB-approved protocol. Cells were frozen in 90% fetal calf serum and 10% DMSO until required for use. For all functional studies, AML cells were thawed at least 12 hours before analysis and rested overnig ht at lxl06/ml in R10. For all xenograft studies, primary cells were thawed, washed once in PBS, and injected directly into mice.

Flow cytometry

Anti-human antibodies were purchased from Biolegend, Ebioscience, or Becton Dickinson. Cells were isolated from in vitro culture or from animals, washed once in PBS supplemented with 2% fetal calf serum, and stained on ice after blockade of Fc receptors. For quantitation, Invitrogen Countbright beads were used according to the manufacturer's instructions. In all analyses, the population of interest was gated based on forward vs side scatter characteristics, followed by singlet gating, and live cells were gated using Live Dead Aqua (Invitrogen). CD 107a degranulation assays and intracellular cytokine production assays were performed as previously described (Betts and Koup, 2004,

Methods Cell Bio, 75:497-512) Flow cytometry was performed on a four laser Fortessa (Becton-Dickinson) .

Proliferation

T cells were washed and resuspended at up to 1x10 /ml in ΙΟΟμΙ of PBS, and were stained with ΙΟΟμΙ of CFSE 2.5uM (Life Sciences) for a final concentration of 1.25μΜ for 5 minutes at 37 degrees. The reaction was quenched with cold R10 and the cells washed thrice. T cells were incubated at a 1: 1 ratio with target cells. Killing assay Killing assays were performed as previously described (Cao et al, 2010,

Cytometry A, 77:534-45) In brief, CFSE-labelled targets were incubated at the indicated ratios with effector T cells for 16 hours. Cells were then harvested, Countbright beads and 7-AAD added, and analysed on an Accuri C6 (Becton-Dickinson).

Cytokine secretion

Effector and target cells were incubated at a 1: 1 ratio in X-Vivo media with 10% human serum for 24 hours. Supernatant was analysed by 30-plex array according the manufacturer's instructions (Invitrogen).

RT-PCR

After cell sorting of primary cells, RNA was extracted (Qiagen), followed by reverse transcription and RTqPCR using primers for IL3RA (Life Sciences). Mice

NOD-SCID-y-chain /_ (NSG) mice or NSG-S (NSG mice transgenic for human IL-3, SCF and GM-CSF) were originally obtained from Jackson Labs.

In vivo models

Details of particular in vivo experiments are described elsewhere herein. The

MOLM14 AML cell line was injected in 200μ1 of PBS at a concentration of 5xl06/ml into the tail vein, followed by bioluminescent imaging on a Xenogen Spectra camera as previously described. Primary AML blasts were injected in 200μ1 of PBS at a concentration of 25-50x106/ml. T cells were injected in 200μ1 of PBS at a concentration of 5xl06/ml into the tail vein. Mice were sacrificed according to protocol when moribund or upon the development of early hind limb paralysis.

Humanized immune system (HIS) mice were created by injection of fetal liver CD34+ cells into newborn NSG mice. Engraftment of human hematopoiesis was confirmed at 5-6 weeks after injection and prior to release of the mice for downstream experiments. Methylcellulose colonies

Sorted CD34+ adult human bone marrow or cord blood was re-suspended in Methocult Optimum (Stemcell Technologies) according to the manufacturer' s instructions and plated in 6- well plates for 14 days. In some experiments, CD34+ cells were first cultured for four hours with CART123 or control T cells. After 14 days, colonies were read on an inverted microscope (Zeiss, 4X), followed by solubilisation of the colonies in RIO media overnight and harvest of single cell suspensions for flow cytometry. Results

Human AML expresses CD 123 and can be targeted with anti-CD 123 redirected T cells (CART 123)

The initial step in the design of a therapeutic chimeric- antigen receptor T cell (CAR T) was the selection of an appropriate target that is commonly and homogeneously expressed on the cell surface. The expression of the immature myeloid markers CD33 (Figure 1A, circles), CD 123 (Figure 1A, triangles) and CD34 (Figure 1A, squares) were compared in a panel of primary AML specimens. Consistent with previous reports, it was found CD 123 to be expressed in the majority of AML at high levels and more frequently than CD33 or CD34 (Jordan, 2010, Sci Transl Med, 31:31ps21; Munoz et al, 2001,

Haematologica, 86: 1261-1269; Testa et al., 2002, Blood, 100:2980-8)(Figure 1A). The minority of AML samples appeared to be CD 123 negative by strictly drawn gates but demonstrated a higher median fluorescence intensity of CD 123 than residual normal lymphocytes suggesting the presence of low-level CD 123 expression that is poorly detectable by antibodies; this was confirmed by RTqPCR of sorted CD123dim and bright populations (Figure IB and Figure 1C).

Furthermore, both CD123dim and CD123bright blasts could form colonies in semisolid media (Figure 5). Briefly, primary AML blasts were sorted into CD123dim and CD123bnght populations and plated in methylcellulose supplemented with human cytokines (Methocult Optimum, Stemcell Technologies). Fourteen days later, colonies derived from sorted cells were solubilized and stained for surface expression of CD45, CD34, CD38 and CD 123. Results are shown in Figure 5. Although there was no selective expression of CD 123 on the putative leukemic stem cell population in contrast with prior publications, (Figure 6), the uniform expression of CD 123 on blasts suggested that most AML would be susceptible to CART 123.

To evaluate the feasibility of targeting CD 123 via a CAR technology, single chain variable fragments for an anti-CD 123 antibody were cloned into a lenti viral CAR expression vector with the CD3zeta chain and the 4- IBB co- stimulatory molecule in four different configurations and the optimal construct was selected based on the quantity and quality of cytokine production of CD123 CAR transduced T cells (CART123 cells, also referred to as CD123 CART) in response to CD123+ targets. Two different anti-CD123 antibodies (32716 and 26292) are disclosed in SEQ ID NO:2 and SEQ ID NO: 101, respectively. In particular, eight different CAR- 123 constructs were developed based on the scFv sequence from these two different antibodies cloned into a lentiviral vector with the 4- IBB signalling molecule and the CD3zeta chain as shown in Figure 7. These eight CARs are referred to in Figure 7 and throughout as clone 72 (or "1172), clone 73 (or "1173), clone 74 (or "1174"), clone 75 (or "1175"), clone 76 (or "1176"), clone 77 (or "1177"), and clone 78 (or "1178"). Nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the eight different CAR-123 constructs are provided below and in SEQ ID NOs: 107-122. After transduction into primary T cells, the optimal construct was selected based on its ability to target a CD123-expressing AML cell line, MOLM14 (Figure 8). As shown in Figure 8, in the left graph, primary human T cells were transduced with the different CD 123 CAR constructs and exposed to MOLM14 (a human AML cell line that expresses CD123) in the presence of anti-CD 107a. After 2 hours, cells were stained for CD3 and analyzed by flow cytometry for degranulation as a measure of target recognition and cytotoxic potential. In the right graph, primary human T cells transduced with the different CD 123 CAR constructs were cultured with irradiated MOLM14 cells for 48 hours, followed by aspiration of the culture supernatant for multiplex cytokine analysis.

Robust effector functions required for the control of malignancy, including degranulation, cytokine production, proliferation and cytotoxicity were then

demonstrated to occur in a CD 123 -specific fashion, establishing the potential of

CART 123 as therapeutic agents for AML (Figure ID-Figure 1G). For example, using both degranulation and cytokine production assays, it was demonstrated that the engineered CART123 T cells specifically targeted CD123+ cells. Importantly, CART123 T cells responded much more robustly to primary AML than to normal marrow (Figure ID). Exposure of CART123 cells to media, a CD 123- cell line, normal bone marrow (NBM), primary AML specimens, or a CD123+ cell line in the presence of anti-CD107a revealed specific degranulation of the CAR+ cells (compared to the CAR- cells, left), with more robust degranulation to AML than to NBM (right). Furthermore, CART 123 cells produced a variety of effector and homeostatic cytokines and chemokines, underlining their ability to orchestrate a productive immune response (Figure 1H).

CART 123 cells eradicate AML in vivo and show a robust recall response

To test the ability of CART123 cells to eradicate AML in vivo, immunodeficient mice engrafted with the CD123+ AML cell line MOLM14 were treated with CART 123, control (a T cell expressing an anti-CD 19 CAR, termed a CART 19) or no T cells. It was observed that CART123 treatment led to long-term survival in this animal model. Briefly, immunodeficient NOD/SCID ychain /_ (NSG) mice were engrafted with MOLM14, followed by one administration of CART 123 cells or control CART 19 cells (Figure 2A). Immunodeficient mice were sub-lethally irradiated (200 cGy) on Day 0, then injected via tail vein with lxlO6 GFP/luciferase+ MOLM14 on Day 1. Bioluminescent imaging (BLI) was performed on Day 6 to quantify engraftment and randomize treatment groups.

Vehicle, CART 19 cells (lxlO6), or CART 123 (lxlO6) cells were injected IV on Day 7, and mice were followed with serial BLI. Quantification of BLI radiance was used as a surrogate measurement of AML burden. In comparison with control mice, tumor burden in mice receiving CART 123 began to diminish within one week, and was eradicated within two weeks with only rare late relapses (Figure 2B and Figure 2C), leading to long- term survival in the majority of mice (Figure 2D). Briefly, Figure 2D shows the survival analysis of MOLM14-bearing xenograft mice, which demonstrates significant survival of CART123-treated mice (squares) in comparison to vehicle-treated mice (circles) and CART19-treated mice (triangles). Attrition of CART 123 T cell-treated mice was primarily due to BLI-detectable AML progression in facial bones and subsequent anorexia and weight loss. Summary data are from four experiments. Use of luciferase- expressing MOLM14 cells allowed serial bioluminescent assessment of tumor burden, demonstrating the ability of CART 123 cells to eradicate tumor with equivalent kinetics, regardless of tumor burden Figure 2C is summary BLI data from three MOLM14 xenograft experiments, which demonstrate rapid leukemic progression in vehicle-treated (circles) and CART19-treated (triangles) mice, while AML eradication was observed in CART123-treated mice (squares). Mean radiance with standard error of the mean (whiskers) are depicted at each time point.

Despite successful initial treatment of leukemia, many patients experience relapse. In order to model this, the ability of mice "cured" of MOLM14 to reject a second infusion of the same leukemia was examined (Figure 2E). Briefly, immunodeficient mice were sub-lethally irradiated (200 cGy) on Day -8, then injected via tail vein with PBS (top row) or lxlO6 gfp/luciferase+ MOLM14 (bottom row) on Day -7. Bioluminescent imaging (BLI) was performed on Day - 1 to quantify engraftment and randomize treatment groups. CART123 cells (lxlO6) were injected IV on Day 0, and mice were followed with serial BLI until AML eradication (this occurred in all mice). Quantification of BLI radiance was used as a surrogate measurement of AML burden. Approximately two weeks after BLI-based assessment of AML eradication, all mice were challenged (top row) or re-challenged (bottom row) with lxlO6 gfp/luciferase+ MOLM14. Mice were then followed with weekly bleeds for T cell numbers and BLI for AML burden.

Animals that had previously cleared MOLM14 as well as those that had previously received CART123 cells with no MOLM14 were subsequently able to reject leukemia re-challenge with similar kinetics (Figure 2F). Mice previously exposed to leukemia showed a trend to higher proportion of central memory T cells and lower proportion of effector memory T cells prior to leukemia re-challenge (Figure 9). Despite lower baseline circulating CAR+ T cells in the previously leukemia-experienced group compared with the leukemia-naive group, upon (re)-challenge a more precipitous increase in CAR+ T cells was observed in the former group that was consistent with a recall response (Figure 2G). Briefly, mice were bled seven days before or after the injection of MOLM14 cells. CART 123 cells were live singlet human CD45+ CD3+ CAR+ cells and quantified using counting beads. Importantly, in occasional animals with poor initial CART123 response there was transient tumor escape (Figure 2F), that was then followed by a delayed increase in CART123 cells and subsequent AML elimination (Figure 2H).

Primary patient AML blasts are susceptible to CART 123 cells

An important disadvantage of tumor cell line models is their inability to recapitulate the true biological heterogeneity of the primary malignancy. AML in particular is a clonally heterogeneous disease (Walter et al, 2012, N Engl J Med, 366: 1090-8) and therefore potent CART cell-mediated targeting of a single antigen could lead to an antigen-loss relapse, as has already occurred in a patient with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with CART19 cells (Grupp and Kalos, 2013, N Engl J Med, 368: 1509- 18). To confirm the effectiveness of CART123 cells in the treatment of primary AML, a recently described model with prompt engraftment of AML was utilized (Wunderlich et al, 2010, Leukemia 1785-8). NOD-SCID-IL2RY_/" mice constitutively expressing human stem cell factor, GM-CSF and IL-3 were injected with patient specimens (Figure 10) and engrafted at approximately 2 weeks. They were then treated with CART123 or control T cells, and followed for eradication of AML and survival (Figure 3A). Briefly, NSGS mice were sublethally irradiated on D-l, and injected with 5- lOxlO6 primary AML blasts via the tail vein on DO. Engraftment was confirmed by the detection of live mouse CD45neg human CD45dim/pos CD123pos cells in the peripheral blood, usually occurring around D14. The following day, mice were injected with thawed CART 123 cells or control T cells (CART 19 or un-transduced T cells in some

experiments). Mice were then bled weekly and analyzed for AML burden.

Circulating blasts were eradicated in CART 123 recipients but not in controls (Figure 3B), leading to a survival advantage in the treatment group despite a considerable early attrition rate (Figure 3C). Note in Figure 3B that residual CD45bright T cells were poorly detectable in some CART 123 mice at this time point, correlating with the observation on the rapid rise and fall of PB T cells upon response to, and clearance of AML (as in Figure 2). Importantly, CART123 cells were effective even against CD123dim leukemia, likely related to up-regulation of CD 123 on CD123dim blasts over time (Figure 3D). Blast CD 123 expression level inversely correlated with proliferative capacity as shown by Ki67 staining (Figure 3E). Taken together with the demonstration that CD 123 im blasts up-regulate CD 123 in vitro and in vivo, without wishing to be bound by any particular theory, this may indicate that as CD123bnght blasts are eliminated, they are replaced by CD123dim blasts which then become a target for CART123 cells. CART 123 cells induce myeloablation

Having established that CART 123 cells can target and eradicate AML, it was sought to evaluate their effect on normal hematopoiesis. CD 123 expression has been noted on some normal hematopoietic cells, including myeloid progenitors, dendritic cells, some B cells and megakaryocytes, and IL-3 signalling plays an important role in myeloid differentiation (Pang et al, 2011, PNAS, 108:20012-20017) First, it was confirmed that CD 123 is expressed on the majority of lineage-negative hematopoietic progenitors (Figure 4A and Figure 11). Briefly, bone marrow from four normal donors was stained for CD 123 after gating on live singlet lineage-negative CD45dim cells, and with the indicated progenitor subpopulations identified using CD34, CD38, CD45RA and CD90 (gating strategy is shown in Figure 11). CD123 gating was based on normal lymphocytes and confirmed with fluorescence-minus-one (FMO) characteristics. Results are shown in Figure 4A.

Then, CD 123" and CD123+ were sorted from normal BM precursors and it was found that both populations were capable of producing hematopoietic colonies and that these colonies had equivalent expression of CD 123, demonstrating that CD 123 expression is a dynamic rather than deterministic process (Figure 4B). Briefly, CD123dim or CD123moderate CD34+ cells were sorted from normal BM (top panel) and allowed to differentiate during a 14 day culture in methylcellulose. The sorted cultured populations exhibited similar CD 123 expression and indistinguishable ability to form myeloid or erythroid colonies.

Furthermore, short-term exposure of cord blood CD34+ cells to CART123 cells led to marked reduction in myeloid colony formation, demonstrating a potent effect of CART 123 cells on myeloid progenitor function (Figure 4C). Briefly, CD34+ cells derived from cord blood were incubated at a 1: 10 T:E ratio with CART123 or untransduced T cells for 4 hours, followed by a 14 day culture in methylcellulose medium supplemented with recombinant human cytokines. Hematopoietic function was assessed by manual colony counts or precisely quantified by flow cytometry for the indicated cell populations using Countbright beads.

In any potential future clinical trials of CART123 cells for AML, patients would likely have received recent induction chemotherapy. To investigate the effect of post- chemotherapy marrow recovery on CD 123 expression in marrow progenitor cells, human bone marrow engrafted mice were treated with 5-fluorouracil. It was found that post- chemotherapy, recovery is associated with an increase in cycling cells as anticipated, and that CD 123 expression was higher in cycling cells (Figure 4D). Briefly, mice previously engrafted with human CD34+ cells were treated with 5-fluorouracil or vehicle. Fourteen days later, BM was harvested from these mice and analyzed for the intracellular proliferation marker Ki67 and CD 123, gating on live lineage-negative human cells.

Finally, mice previously engrafted with human CD34+ cells were treated with CART 123 cells or control un-transduced T cells (Figure 4E). Briefly, NSG mice were engrafted with human fetal liver CD34+ cells and bled for confirmation of engraftment after 6-8 weeks. On Day 0, mice received CART123, control un-transduced T cells, or vehicle. Weekly peripheral blood analysis for cell number was followed by harvesting of BM on Day 28 for analysis of residual human hematopoiesis. As anticipated from the baseline level of expression of CD 123 on normal circulating B cells and myeloid cells (Figure 12) a progressive decline in these cells in peripheral blood was observed (Figure 10F). After one month of in vivo exposure, mice receiving CART123 cells had virtually absent human hematopoeisis (Figure 4G and Figure 13), demonstrating the potent myeloablative potential of CART123 cells. Briefly, on Day 28 after T cell injection, BM was harvested and analyzed for human progenitor cell populations, gating on live singlet human CD45dim lineage" cells. Results are shown in Figure 4G. In another experiment, NSG mice were engrafted with human fetal liver CD34+ cells and treated with CART 123, untransduced T cells (UTD) or vehicle (CTRL) after 8 weeks. Four weeks later, bone marrow was harvested and stained for human CD45, human lineage cocktail, CD34, CD38, CD45RA, CD90 and CD123. Absolute cell count was derived using Countbright beads. Results are shown in Figure 13.

CART 123 eradicates AML and bone marrow It has been shown herein that CART 123 provides a potent means to eradicate AML along with residual normal bone marrow. This approach has human therapeutic applications due to its ability to eradicate malignant cells as well as the pre-malignant marrow precursors that likely exist in AML and in myelodysplasia syndrome (MDS). Furthermore, this approach provides a novel, non-chemotherapy based cellular conditioning regimen prior to bone marrow transplantation. These observations underscore a novel application of CAR-based cellular therapy, with CD 123 being a particularly attractive target due to the importance of IL-3 signalling in the developing marrow (Pang et al, 2011, PNAS, 108:20012-20017) In certain embodiments, this modality provides transient, rather than permanent anti-CD123 pressure, via the use of suicide switches or with "biodegradable" mRNA CAR technology, e.g., as disclosed herein, which has been shown to be practical and effective. In certain embodiments, CART123 may be used for targeting CD 123 to treat patients with high-risk AML. Example 2: Anti-CD 123 Chimeric Antigen Receptor Engineered T Cells For B-ALL Experiments were designed to evaluate the ability of CART123 to target B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (B-ALL) cells. It was observed that CART123 cells degranulate in response to or kill B-ALL blasts (Figures 15 and 16). CART123 cells selectively recognize B-ALL blasts (Figure 15). CART123 cells were cultured alone, with PMA/ionomycin as positive control, with known CD123+ tumor cells line, CD 123" cell line, or with the patient's B-ALL blasts and the results are presented in Figure 14. CART123 selectively responded to B-ALL using the CD107a degranulation assay. In addition., primary B-ALL blasts (targets) were incubated with CART123 cells (effectors) overnight, and the number of remaining live blast cells was evaluated the next day using a FACS-based cytotoxicity assay [REF: PMID: 20229499]. As shown in Figure 16, increasing the ratio of effectors to targets led to increased killing of the blasts.

Furthermore, CD 123 expression was demonstrated in ALL. In particular, flow- cytometry screening of a panel of 16 specimens from adults with relapsed or refractory ALL (RR-ALL) showed a high expression level of CD19 (a classical B cell marker), along with expression of CD 123 (Figure 17 A). Similar findings were found in pediatric specimens (Figure 17B). Expression was shown by flow cytometry of thawed banked patient specimens, gating on CD45 im SSC low blasts. CD 123 expression was also demonstrated in CD19-ve ALL relapsing after treatment with CTL019. For example, as shown in Figures 18 and 19, patients relapsing with CD 19- ALL after CART therapy was shown to retain expression of CD123. These results suggest that CART123 may be used to prevent CD 19 relapses resulting from CART 19 therapy.

Figures 20-24 demonstrate in vitro activity of CART 123 1172 against ALL blasts. Exposure to the B-ALL cell line induced robust proliferation in both CART 19 and CART 123 cells (Figure 20). CART 123 or CART 19 cells were stained with CFSE and incubated with the indicated targets for 120 hours, followed by FACS analysis for CFSE dilution. Histograms were gated on live CD3+ T cells. Exposure to primary B-cell ALL samples also induced robust proliferation in both CART 19 and CART 123 cells (Figure 21). CART123 cells degranulate robustly in response to NALM6 B-ALL as well as primary ALL, with no difference between primary ALL and AML (Figure 22). The indicated T cells were incubated with the indicated targets in the presence of anti- CD 107a, anti-CD49d, anti-CD28 and monensin for 4 hours, followed by FACS analysis gated on T cells. Exposure to primary ALL samples by coculture of CART123 or CART 19 cells with primary ALL samples led to the secretion of multiple effector cytokines at 24 hours (Figure 23). No difference was noted between CART19 and CART 123. Supernatant was collected from a 24 hour co-culture, followed by analysis in a 30-plex kit (selected cytokines are shown). CART123 and CART19 cells showed equivalent ability to kill NALM6 B-ALL cells in cytotoxicity assays at 4 hours (Figure 24).

Figure 25 demonstrates in vivo activity of CART123 in an ALL murine model. In particular, NSG mice were injected with lxlO6 Nalm6 click beetle green luciferase cells on DO. On D7, the mice were injected with UTD T cells, CART 19 cells, CART 123 cells, or a 50:50 mixed population of CART 19 and CART 123 to a total cell dose of lxlO6 (combo group). Mice were followed for survival. As shown in Figure 25, CART123 monotherapy was clearly superior to untransduced T cells (UTD) but not as effective as CART19 monotherapy at enhancing animal survival. The combination of CART123 and CART19 did not enhance survival compared with CART19 monotherapy. Nonetheless, combo CART 19+CART 123 therapy could prevent the occurrence of antigen-loss relapses as has already been noted to occur in patients, as illustrated in Fig 18 and Fig 19.

The results presented herein reconfirm the successful engineering of anti-CD 123 redirected T cells (CART123) and demonstrate potent and specific preclinical activity. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using CART123 for targeting CD 123 to treat patients with high-risk ALL. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that CD 123 is expressed at high levels in primary ALL specimens and that ALL patients relapsing with CD19- disease retain expression of CD123. CART123 show equivalent in vitro activity against primary ALL, compared with CART19. Combined infusion of CART 123 and CART19 could be used to prevent antigen loss relapses by broadening the number of antigens through which immune pressure is exerted on malignancy.

Example 3: CAR Sequences

The scFvs used in the CAR constructs were independently synthesized based on a published sequence (Du et al, 2007 Journal of Immunotherapy 30:607). The original antibodies in Du et al. were from hybridomas that Du et al. obtained from Stemline Therapeutics, NY, NY. The scFv sequences were derived from the heavy and light chain variable regions from these antibodies: 26292 and 32716 (Figure 7A). Each was cloned in a light-to-heavy chain or heavy-to-light chain direction, with a flexible linker connecting the VL and VH domains, into a vector backbone containing the CD8 or IgG4 hinge region along with the 4- IBB molecule and the CD3zeta molecule (Figure 7A and 7B).

The polypeptide sequence on the clone entitled CD 123 4-lBBCD3z-CAR is provided as the 496 aa polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: l. The leader sequence comprises amino acid residues 1 to 25 of SEQ ID NO: l, and is provided separately as SEQ ID NO:3. The scFv domain is provided separately as SEQ ID NO:2 and comprises a VL domain comprising amino acid resides 26 to 136 of SEQ ID NO: l, the linker sequence comprising amino acid resides 137 to 151 of SEQ ID NO: l, and the VH domain sequence comprising amino acid residues 152 to 269 of SEQ ID NO: l. The hinge region comprise amino acid residues 270 to 318 of SEQ ID NO: l, and is provided separately as SEQ ID NO:4. The transmembrane domain comprises amino acid residues 319 to 342 of SEQ ID NO: l, and is provided separately as SEQ ID NO:5 The 4- IBB intracellular domain comprises amino acid residues 343 to 384 of SEQ ID NO: l, and is provided separately as SEQ ID NO:6. The CD3 zeta domain comprises amino acid residues 385 to 496 of SEQ ID NO: l, is provided separately as SEQ ID NO:7.

The nucleotide encoding the polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 1 is provided as SEQ ID NO: 8. The nucleotide encoding the polypeptide of SEQ ID NO:2 is provided as SEQ ID NO:9. The nucleotide encoding the polypeptide of SEQ ID NO:3 is provided as SEQ ID NO: 10. The nucleotide encoding the polypeptide of SEQ ID NO:4 is provided as SEQ ID NO: 11. The nucleotide encoding the polypeptide of SEQ ID NO:5 is provided as SEQ ID NO: 12. The nucleotide encoding the polypeptide of SEQ ID NO:6 is provided as SEQ ID NO: 13. The nucleotide encoding the polypeptide of SEQ ID NO:7 is provided as SEQ ID NO: 14. The nucleotide encoding the polypeptide of SEQ ID NO:98 is provided as SEQ ID NO:99.

• CD123 4- IBB CD3z- CAR (amino acid sequence) (SEQ ID NO: 1)

(corresponding to 1172 in Figure 7A)

MALPVTALLLPLALLLHAARPGSDIVLTOSPASLAVSLGORATISCRASESVDNY GNTFMHWYOOKPGOPPKLLIYRASNLESGIPARFSGSGSRTDFTLTINPVEADDV ATYYCOOSNEDPPTFGAGTKLELKGGGGSGGGGSSGGGSOIOLVOSGPELKKPG ETVKISCKASGYIFTNYGMNWVKOAPGKSFKWMGWINTYTGESTYSADFKGRF AFSLETSASTAYLHINDLKNEDTATYFCARSGGYDPMDYWGOGTSVTVSSASSG TTTPAPRPPTPAPTIASQPLSLRPEACRPAAGGAVHTRGLDFACDIYr APLAGTC GVLLLSLVITLYCKRGRKKLLYIFKQPFMRPVQTTQEEDGCSCRFPEEEEGGCEL RVKFSRSADAPAYKQGQNQLYNELNLGRREEYDVLDKRRGRDPEMGGKPRRK NPQEGLYNELQKDKMAEAYSEIGMKGERRRGKGHDGLYQGLSTATKDTYDAL HMQALPPR

• CD123 scFv (amino acid sequence) (SEQ ID NO: 2)

DIVLTOSPASLAVSLGORATISCRASESVDNYGNTFMHWYOOKPGOPPKLLIYRA SNLESGIPARFSGSGSRTDFTLTINPVEADDVATYYCOOSNEDPPTFGAGTKLELK GGGGSGGGGSSGGGSOIOLVOSGPELKKPGETVKISCKASGYIFTNYGMNWVKQ APGKSFKWMGWINTYTGESTYSADFKGRFAFSLETSASTAYLHINDLKNEDTAT YFCARSGGYDPMDYWGOGTSVTVSS

• CD8 leader (amino acid sequence) (SEQ ID NO: 3)

MALPVTALLLPLALLLHAARP

• CD8 hinge (amino acid sequence) (SEQ ID NO: 4)

TTTPAPRPPTPAPTIASQPLSLRPEACRPAAGGAVHTRGLDFACD · CD8 transmembrane (amino acid sequence) (SEQ ID NO: 5)

IYIWAPLAGTCGVLLLSLVITLYC

• 4-1BB Intracellular domain (amino acid sequence) (SEQ ID NO: 6)

KRGRKKLLYIFKQPFMRPVQTTQEEDGCSCRFPEEEEGGCEL

• CD3 zeta (amino acid sequence) (SEQ ID NO: 7)

RVKFSRSADAPAYKQGQNQLYNELNLGRREEYDVLDKRRGRDPEMGGKPRRK NPQEGLYNELQKDKMAEAYSEIGMKGERRRGKGHDGLYQGLSTATKDTYDAL HMQALPPR

• CD3 zeta domain (amino acid sequence; NCBI Reference Sequence

NM_000734.3) (SEQ ID NO:98)

RVKFSRSADAPAYQQGQNQLYNELNLGRREEYDVLDKRRGRDPEMGGKPRRK NPQEGLYNELQKDKMAEAYSEIGMKGERRRGKGHDGLYQGLSTATKDTYDAL HMQALPPR

The nucleotide encoding the polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 11 is provided as SEQ ID

• CD123 4- IBB CD3z- CAR (nucleic acid sequence) (SEQ ID NO: 8)

ATGGCCCTGCCTGTGACAGCCCTGCTGCTGCCTCTGGCTCTGCTGCTGCATGC CGCTAGACCCGGATCCGACATCGTGCTGACACAGAGCCCTGCTTCCCTGGCC GTGTCCCTGGGACAGAGAGCCACAATCAGCTGCAGGGCCAGCGAGAGCGTG GACAACTACGGCAACACCTTCATGCACTGGTATCAGCAGAAGCCCGGCCAGC CCCCCAAGCTGCTGATCTACAGAGCCAGCAACCTGGAAAGCGGCATCCCCGC CAGATTTTCCGGCAGCGGCAGCAGAACCGACTTCACCCTGACCATCAACCCC GTGGAAGCCGACGACGTGGCCACCTACTACTGCCAGCAGAGCAACGAGGAC CCCCCCACATTTGGAGCCGGCACCAAGCTGGAACTGAAGGGCGGAGGCGGA TCTGGCGGCGGAGGATCTTCTGGGGGAGGCTCTCAGATTCAGCTGGTGCAGA GCGGCCCAGAGCTGAAGAAACCCGGCGAGACAGTGAAGATCTCCTGCAAGG CCTCCGGCTACATCTTCACCAATTACGGCATGAACTGGGTCAAGCAGGCCCC TGGCAAGAGCTTCAAGTGGATGGGCTGGATCAACACCTACACCGGCGAGAGC ACCTAC AGCGCCGACTTCAAGGGC AGATTCGCCTTCAGCCTGGAAACC AGCG CCAGCACCGCCTACCTGCACATCAACGACCTGAAGAACGAGGACACCGCCAC CTATTTCTGCGCCAGAAGCGGCGGCTACGACCCCATGGATTATTGGGGCCAG GGCACCAGCGTGACCGTGTCCTCTGCTAGCTCCGGAACCACGACGCCAGCGC CGCGACCACCAACACCGGCGCCCACCATCGCGTCGCAGCCCCTGTCCCTGCG CCCAGAGGCGTGCCGGCCAGCGGCGGGGGGCGC AGTGC ACACGAGGGGGCT GGACTTCGCCTGTGATATCTACATCTGGGCGCCCTTGGCCGGGACTTGTGGGG TCCTTCTCCTGTCACTGGTTATCACCCTTTACTGCAAACGGGGCAGAAAGAAA CTCCTGTATATATTCAAACAACCATTTATGAGACCAGTACAAACTACTCAAGA GGAAGATGGCTGTAGCTGCCGATTTCCAGAAGAAGAAGAAGGAGGATGTGA ACTGAGAGTGAAGTTCAGCAGGAGCGCAGACGCCCCCGCGTACAAGCAGGG CCAGAACCAGCTCTATAACGAGCTCAATCTAGGACGAAGAGAGGAGTACGAT GTTTTGGACAAGAGACGTGGCCGGGACCCTGAGATGGGGGGAAAGCCGAGA AGGAAGAACCCTCAGGAAGGCCTGTACAATGAACTGCAGAAAGATAAGATG GCGGAGGCCTACAGTGAGATTGGGATGAAAGGCGAGCGCCGGAGGGGCAAG GGGCACGATGGCCTTTACCAGGGTCTCAGTACAGCCACCAAGGACACCTACG ACGCCCTTCACATGCAGGCCCTGCCCCCTCGC

• CD123 scFv (nucleic acid sequence) (SEQ ID NO: 9)

GACATCGTGCTGACACAGAGCCCTGCTTCCCTGGCCGTGTCCCTGGGACAGA GAGCCACAATCAGCTGCAGGGCCAGCGAGAGCGTGGACAACTACGGCAACA CCTTCATGCACTGGTATCAGCAGAAGCCCGGCCAGCCCCCCAAGCTGCTGAT CTACAGAGCCAGCAACCTGGAAAGCGGCATCCCCGCCAGATTTTCCGGCAGC GGCAGCAGAACCGACTTCACCCTGACCATCAACCCCGTGGAAGCCGACGACG TGGCCACCTACTACTGCCAGCAGAGCAACGAGGACCCCCCCACATTTGGAGC CGGCACCAAGCTGGAACTGAAGGGCGGAGGCGGATCTGGCGGCGGAGGATC TTCTGGGGGAGGCTCTCAGATTCAGCTGGTGCAGAGCGGCCCAGAGCTGAAG AAACCCGGCGAGACAGTGAAGATCTCCTGCAAGGCCTCCGGCTACATCTTCA CCAATTACGGCATGAACTGGGTCAAGCAGGCCCCTGGCAAGAGCTTCAAGTG GATGGGCTGGATCAACACCTACACCGGCGAGAGCACCTACAGCGCCGACTTC AAGGGCAGATTCGCCTTCAGCCTGGAAACCAGCGCCAGCACCGCCTACCTGC ACATCAACGACCTGAAGAACGAGGAC ACCGCCACCTATTTCTGCGCC AGAAG CGGCGGCTACGACCCCATGGATTATTGGGGCCAGGGCACCAGCGTGACCGTG TCCTCT

• leader (nucleic acid sequence) (SEQ ID NO: 10)

ATGGCCCTGCCTGTGAC AGCCCTGCTGCTGCCTCTGGCTCTGCTGCTGC ATGC CGCTAGACCC

• hinge (nucleic acid sequence) (SEQ ID NO: 11)

ACCACGACGCCAGCGCCGCGACCACCAACACCGGCGCCCACCATCGCGTCGC AGCCCCTGTCCCTGCGCCCAGAGGCGTGCCGGCCAGCGGCGGGGGGCGCAGT GCACACGAGGGGGCTGGACTTCGCCTGTGAT

• transmembrane (nucleic acid sequence) (SEQ ID NO: 12)

ATCTACATCTGGGCGCCCTTGGCCGGGACTTGTGGGGTCCTTCTCCTGTCACT GGTTATCACCCTTTACTGC

• 4-1BB Intracellular domain (nucleic acid sequence) (SEQ ID NO: 13)

AAACGGGGCAGAAAGAAACTCCTGTATATATTCAAACAACCATTTATGAGAC CAGTACAAACTACTCAAGAGGAAGATGGCTGTAGCTGCCGATTTCCAGAAGA AGAAGAAGGAGGATGTGAACTG • CD3 zeta (nucleic acid sequence) (SEQ ID NO: 14)

AGAGTGAAGTTCAGCAGGAGCGCAGACGCCCCCGCGTACAAGCAGGGCCAG AACCAGCTCTATAACGAGCTCAATCTAGGACGAAGAGAGGAGTACGATGTTT TGGACAAGAGACGTGGCCGGGACCCTGAGATGGGGGGAAAGCCGAGAAGGA AGAACCCTCAGGAAGGCCTGTACAATGAACTGCAGAAAGATAAGATGGCGG AGGCCTACAGTGAGATTGGGATGAAAGGCGAGCGCCGGAGGGGCAAGGGGC ACGATGGCCTTTACCAGGGTCTCAGTACAGCCACCAAGGACACCTACGACGC CCTTCACATGCAGGCCCTGCCCCCTCGC · CD3 zeta (nucleic acid sequence; NCBI Reference Sequence NM_000734.3);

(SEQ ID NO:99)

AGAGTGAAGTTCAGCAGGAGCGCAGACGCCCCCGCGTACCAGCAGGGCCAG AACCAGCTCTATAACGAGCTCAATCTAGGACGAAGAGAGGAGTACGATGTTT TGGACAAGAGACGTGGCCGGGACCCTGAGATGGGGGGAAAGCCGAGAAGGA AGAACCCTC AGGAAGGCCTGTAC AATGA ACTGCAGAAAGATA AGATGGCGG AGGCCTACAGTGAGATTGGGATGAAAGGCGAGCGCCGGAGGGGCAAGGGGC ACGATGGCCTTTACCAGGGTCTCAGTACAGCCACCAAGGACACCTACGACGC CCTTCACATGCAGGCCCTGCCCCCTCGC CD123 4- IBB CD3z- CAR (26292) (1176) (amino acid sequence) (SEQ ID NO:100)

MALPVTALLLPLALLLHAARPGSDVOITQSPSYLAASPGETITINCRASKSISKDLA WYOEKPGKTNKLLIYSGSTLOSGIPSRFSGSGSGTDFTLTISSLEPEDFAMYYCOO HNKYPYTFGGGTKLEIKGGGGSGGGGSSGGGSOVOLOOPGAELVRPGASVKLSC KASGYTFTSYWMNWVKORPDQGLEWIGRIDPYDSETHYNOKFKDKAILTVDKS SSTAYMQLSSLTSEDSAVYYCARGNWDDYWGOGTTLTVSSASSGTTTPAPRPPT PAPTIASQPLSLRPEACRPAAGGAVHTRGLDFACDIYIWAPLAGTCGVLLLSLVIT LYCKRGRKKLLYIFKQPFMRPVQTTQEEDGCSCRFPEEEEGGCELRVKFSRSADA PAYKQGQNQLYNELNLGRREEYDVLDKRRGRDPEMGGKPRRKNPQEGLYNEL QKDKMAEAYSEIGMKGERRRGKGHDGLYQGLSTATKDTYDALHMQALPPR

CD123 scFv (26292) (1176) (amino acid sequence) (SEQ ID NO:101) DVQITOSPSYLAASPGETITINCRASKSISKDLAWYOEKPGKTNKLLIYSGSTLOS GIPSRFSGSGSGTDFTLTISSLEPEDFAMYYCOOHNKYPYTFGGGTKLEIKGGGGS GGGGSSGGGSOVOLOOPGAELVRPGASVKLSCKASGYTFTSYWMNWVKORPD OGLEWIGRIDPYDSETHYNOKFKDKAILTVDKSSSTAYMOLSSLTSEDSAVYYCA RGNWDD YWGOGTTLT VS S

CD123 4- IBB CD3z- CAR (26292) (1176) (nucleotide sequence) (SEQ ID NO:102)

ATGGCCCTGCCTGTGACAGCCCTGCTGCTGCCTCTGGCTCTGCTGCTGCACGC CGCTAGACCCGGATCCGACGTGCAGATCACACAGAGCCCTAGCTACCTGGCC GCC AGCCCTGGCGAGAC AATC ACC ATC AACTGCCGGGCC AGCAAGAGC ATC A GCAAGGACCTGGCCTGGTATCAGGAAAAGCCCGGCAAGACCAACAAGCTGC TGATCTACAGCGGCAGCACCCTGCAGAGCGGCATCCCCAGCAGATTTTCCGG CAGCGGCTCCGGCACCGACTTCACCCTGACAATCAGCAGCCTGGAACCCGAG GACTTCGCCATGTACTACTGCCAGCAGCACAACAAGTACCCCTACACCTTCG GCGGAGGC ACC AAGCTGGAAATCAAGGGCGGAGGCGGATCTGGCGGCGGAG GAAGTTCTGGCGGAGGATCTCAGGTGCAGCTGCAGCAGCCAGGCGCTGAACT CGTGCGGCCTGGCGCTTCTGTGAAGCTGAGCTGTAAAGCCAGCGGCTACACC TTTACCAGCTACTGGATGAACTGGGTCAAGCAGCGGCCCGACCAGGGCCTGG AGTGGATCGGCAGAATCGACCCCTACGACAGCGAGACACACTACAACCAGA AGTTCAAGGACAAGGCCATCCTGACCGTGGACAAGAGCAGCTCCACCGCCTA CATGCAGCTGTCCAGCCTGACCAGCGAGGACAGCGCCGTGTACTATTGCGCC AGGGGCAACTGGGACGACTACTGGGGCCAGGGCACAACCCTGACAGTGTCCT CTGCTAGCTCCGGAACCACGACGCCAGCGCCGCGACCACCAACACCGGCGCC CACCATCGCGTCGCAGCCCCTGTCCCTGCGCCCAGAGGCGTGCCGGCCAGCG GCGGGGGGCGCAGTGCACACGAGGGGGCTGGACTTCGCCTGTGATATCTACA TCTGGGCGCCCTTGGCCGGGACTTGTGGGGTCCTTCTCCTGTCACTGGTTATC ACCCTTTACTGCAAACGGGGCAGAAAGAAACTCCTGTATATATTCAAACAAC CATTTATGAGACCAGTACAAACTACTCAAGAGGAAGATGGCTGTAGCTGCCG ATTTCCAGAAGAAGAAGAAGGAGGATGTGAACTGAGAGTGAAGTTCAGCAG GAGCGCAGACGCCCCCGCGTACAAGCAGGGCCAGAACCAGCTCTATAACGA GCTCAATCTAGGACGAAGAGAGGAGTACGATGTTTTGGACAAGAGACGTGGC CGGGACCCTGAGATGGGGGGAAAGCCGAGAAGGAAGAACCCTCAGGAAGGC CTGTACAATGAACTGCAGAAAGATAAGATGGCGGAGGCCTACAGTGAGATTG GGATGAAAGGCGAGCGCCGGAGGGGCAAGGGGCACGATGGCCTTTACCAGG GTCTCAGTACAGCCACCAAGGACACCTACGACGCCCTTCACATGCAGGCCCT GCCCCCTCGC

CD123 scFv (26292) (1176) (nucleotide sequence) (SEQ ID NO:103)

GACGTGCAGATCACACAGAGCCCTAGCTACCTGGCCGCCAGCCCTGGCGAGA CAATCACCATCAACTGCCGGGCCAGCAAGAGCATCAGCAAGGACCTGGCCTG GTATCAGGAA AAGCCCGGCAAGACCAAC AAGCTGCTGATCTAC AGCGGCAG CACCCTGCAGAGCGGCATCCCCAGCAGATTTTCCGGCAGCGGCTCCGGCACC GACTTCACCCTGACAATCAGCAGCCTGGAACCCGAGGACTTCGCCATGTACT ACTGCCAGCAGCACAACAAGTACCCCTACACCTTCGGCGGAGGCACCAAGCT GGAAATCAAGGGCGGAGGCGGATCTGGCGGCGGAGGAAGTTCTGGCGGAGG ATCTC AGGTGC AGCTGC AGCAGCCAGGCGCTGAACTCGTGCGGCCTGGCGCT TCTGTGAAGCTGAGCTGTAAAGCCAGCGGCTACACCTTTACCAGCTACTGGA TGAACTGGGTCAAGCAGCGGCCCGACCAGGGCCTGGAGTGGATCGGCAGAA TCGACCCCTACGACAGCGAGACACACTACAACCAGAAGTTCAAGGACAAGG CCATCCTGACCGTGGACAAGAGCAGCTCCACCGCCTACATGCAGCTGTCCAG CCTGACCAGCGAGGACAGCGCCGTGTACTATTGCGCCAGGGGCAACTGGGAC GACTACTGGGGCCAGGGCACAACCCTGACAGTGTCCTCT

IgG4 Hinge (amino acid sequence) (SEQ ID NO: 104)

ESKYGPPCPPCPAPEFLGGPSVFLFPPKPKDTLMISRTPEVTCVVVDVSQEDPEVQ FNWYVDGVEVHNAKTKPREEQFNSTYRVVSVLTVLHQDWLNGKEYKCKVSNK GLPS SIEKTIS KAKGQPREPQ V YTLPPS QEEMTKNQ VS LTCLVKGF YPSDIA VEWE SNGQPENNYKTTPPVLDSDGSFFLYSRLTVDKSRWQEGNVFSCSVMHEALHNHY TQKSLSLSLGKM IgG4 Hinge (nucleotide sequence) (SEQ ID NO:105) GAGAGCAAGTACGGCCCTCCCTGCCCCCCTTGCCCTGCCCCCGAGTTCCTGGG CGGACCCAGCGTGTTCCTGTTCCCCCCCAAGCCCAAGGACACCCTGATGATC AGCCGGACCCCCGAGGTGACCTGTGTGGTGGTGGACGTGTCCCAGGAGGACC CCGAGGTCCAGTTCAACTGGTACGTGGACGGCGTGGAGGTGCACAACGCCAA GACCAAGCCCCGGGAGGAGCAGTTCAATAGCACCTACCGGGTGGTGTCCGTG CTGACCGTGCTGCACCAGGACTGGCTGAACGGCAAGGAATACAAGTGTAAGG TGTCCAACAAGGGCCTGCCCAGCAGCATCGAGAAAACCATCAGCAAGGCCA AGGGCCAGCCTCGGGAGCCCCAGGTGTACACCCTGCCCCCTAGCCAAGAGGA GATGACCAAGAACCAGGTGTCCCTGACCTGCCTGGTGAAGGGCTTCTACCCC AGCGAC ATCGCCGTGGAGTGGGAGAGCAACGGCC AGCCCGAGAAC AACTAC AAGACCACCCCCCCTGTGCTGGACAGCGACGGCAGCTTCTTCCTGTACAGCC GGCTGACCGTGGACAAGAGCCGGTGGCAGGAGGGCAACGTCTTTAGCTGCTC CGTGATGCACGAGGCCCTGCACAACCACTACACCCAGAAGAGCCTGAGCCTG TCCCTGGGCAAGATG

EFla driving CD123 4-lBBCD3z-CAR (32716) (1172) (nucleotide sequence) (SEQ ID NO:106)

EF1 apromoter italicized

CGTGAGGCTCCGGTGCCCGTCAGTGGGCAGAGCGCACATCGCCCACAGTCCCCG AGAAGTTGGGGGGAGGGGTCGGCAATTGAACCGGTGCCTAGAGAAGGTGGCGCG

GGGAGAACCGTATATAAGTGCAGTAGTCGCCGTGAACGTTCTTTTTCGCAACGGGT TTGCCGCCAGAACACAGGTAAGTGCCGTGTGTGGTTCCCGCGGGCCTGGCCTCTT TACGGGTTATGGCCCTTGCGTGCCTTGAATTACTTCCACCTGGCTGCAGTACGTGA TTCTTGATCCCGAGCTTCGGGTTGGAAGTGGGTGGGAGAGTTCGAGGCCTTGCGC TTAAGGAGCCCCTTCGCCTCGTGCTTGAGTTGAGGCCTGGCCTGGGCGCTGGGG CCGCCGCGTGCGAA TCTGGTGGCA CCTTCGCGCCTGTCTCGCTGCTTTCGA TAA G TCTCTA GCCA TTTAAAA TTTTTGA TGA CCTGCTGCGA CGCTTTTTTTCTGGCAA GA TA GTCTTGTAAA TGCGGGCCAA GA TCTGCA CA CTGGTA TTTCGGTTTTTGGGGCCGCG GGCGGCGACGGGGCCCGTGCGTCCCAGCGCACATGTTCGGCGAGGCGGGGCCT GCGAGCGCGGCCACCGAGAATCGGACGGGGGTAGTCTCAAGCTGGCCGGCCTG CTCTGGTGCCTGGCCTCGCGCCGCCGTGTATCGCCCCGCCCTGGGCGGCAAGGC TGGCCCGGTCGGCA CCA GTTGCGTGA GCGGAAA GA TGGCCGCTTCCCGGCCCTG CTGCAGGGAGCTCAAAATGGAGGACGCGGCGCTCGGGAGAGCGGGCGGGTGAG TCA CCCA CA CAAAGGAAAAGGGCCTTTCCGTCCTCA GCCGTCGCTTCA TGTGA CTC CA CTGA GTA CCGGGCGCCGTCCA GGCA CCTCGA TTAGTTCTCGTGCTTTTGGA GT A CGTCGTCTTTA GGTTGGGGGGA GGGGTTTTA TGCGA TGGAGTTTCCCCA CA CTG AGTGGGTGGA GA CTGAAGTTA GGCCAGCTTGGCA CTTGA TGTAA TTCTCCTTGGAA TTTGCCCTTTTTGAGTTTGGATCTTGGTTCATTCTCAAGCCTCAGACAGTGGTTCAA AGTTTTTTTCTTCCATTTCAGGTGTCGTGAGCTAGCTCT AG AGCCACCATGGCCC TGCCTGTGAC AGCCCTGCTGCTGCCTCTGGCTCTGCTGCTGC ATGCCGCTAGA CCCGGATCCGACATCGTGCTGACACAGAGCCCTGCTTCCCTGGCCGTGTCCCT GGGACAGAGAGCCACAATCAGCTGCAGGGCCAGCGAGAGCGTGGACAACTA CGGCAACACCTTCATGCACTGGTATCAGCAGAAGCCCGGCCAGCCCCCCAAG CTGCTGATCTACAGAGCCAGCAACCTGGAAAGCGGCATCCCCGCCAGATTTT CCGGCAGCGGCAGC AGAACCGACTTC ACCCTGACC ATC AACCCCGTGGAAGC CGACGACGTGGCCACCTACTACTGCCAGCAGAGCAACGAGGACCCCCCCACA TTTGGAGCCGGCACCAAGCTGGAACTGAAGGGCGGAGGCGGATCTGGCGGC GGAGGATCTTCTGGGGGAGGCTCTCAGATTCAGCTGGTGCAGAGCGGCCCAG AGCTGAAGAAACCCGGCGAGACAGTGAAGATCTCCTGCAAGGCCTCCGGCTA CATCTTCACCAATTACGGCATGAACTGGGTCAAGCAGGCCCCTGGCAAGAGC TTCAAGTGGATGGGCTGGATCAACACCTACACCGGCGAGAGCACCTACAGCG CCGACTTCAAGGGCAGATTCGCCTTCAGCCTGGAAACCAGCGCCAGCACCGC CTACCTGCACATCAACGACCTGAAGAACGAGGACACCGCCACCTATTTCTGC GCCAGAAGCGGCGGCTACGACCCCATGGATTATTGGGGCCAGGGCACCAGC GTGACCGTGTCCTCTGCTAGCTCCGGAACCACGACGCCAGCGCCGCGACCAC CAACACCGGCGCCCACCATCGCGTCGCAGCCCCTGTCCCTGCGCCCAGAGGC GTGCCGGCCAGCGGCGGGGGGCGCAGTGCACACGAGGGGGCTGGACTTCGC CTGTGATATCTACATCTGGGCGCCCTTGGCCGGGACTTGTGGGGTCCTTCTCC TGTCACTGGTTATCACCCTTTACTGCAAACGGGGCAGAAAGAAACTCCTGTAT ATATTCAAACAACCATTTATGAGACCAGTACAAACTACTCAAGAGGAAGATG GCTGTAGCTGCCGATTTCCAGAAGAAGAAGAAGGAGGATGTGAACTGAGAG TGAAGTTCAGCAGGAGCGCAGACGCCCCCGCGTACAAGCAGGGCCAGAACC AGCTCTATAACGAGCTCAATCTAGGACGAAGAGAGGAGTACGATGTTTTGGA CAAGAGACGTGGCCGGGACCCTGAGATGGGGGGAAAGCCGAGAAGGAAGAA CCCTCAGGAAGGCCTGTACAATGAACTGCAGAAAGATAAGATGGCGGAGGC CTACAGTGAGATTGGGATGAAAGGCGAGCGCCGGAGGGGCAAGGGGCACGA TGGCCTTTACCAGGGTCTCAGTACAGCCACCAAGGACACCTACGACGCCCTT CACATGCAGGCCCTGCCCCCTCGC

CD123 CAR 1172 (amino acid sequence) (SEQ ID NO:107)

MALPVTALLLPLALLLHAARPGSDIVLTQSPASLAVSLGQRATISCRASES VDNY GNTFMHWYQQKPGQPPKLLIYRASNLESGIPARFSGSGSRTDFTLTINPVEADDV ATYYCQQSNEDPPTFGAGTKLELKGGGGSGGGGSSGGGSQIQLVQSGPELKKPG ETVKISCKASGYIFTNYGMNWVKQAPGKSFKWMGWINTYTGESTYSADFKGRF AFSLETSASTAYLHINDLKNEDTATYFCARSGGYDPMDYWGQGTSVTVSSASSG TTTPAPRPPTPAPTIASQPLSLRPEACRPAAGGAVHTRGLDFACDIYr APLAGTC GVLLLSLVITLYCKRGRKKLLYIFKQPFMRPVQTTQEEDGCSCRFPEEEEGGCEL RVKFSRSADAPAYKQGQNQLYNELNLGRREEYDVLDKRRGRDPEMGGKPRRK NPQEGLYNELQKDKMAEAYSEIGMKGERRRGKGHDGLYQGLSTATKDTYDAL HMQALPPR

CD123 CAR 1172 (nucleotide sequence) (SEQ ID NO:108)

ATGGCCCTGCCTGTGACAGCCCTGCTGCTGCCTCTGGCTCTGCTGCTGCATGC CGCTAGACCCGGATCCGACATCGTGCTGACACAGAGCCCTGCTTCCCTGGCC GTGTCCCTGGGACAGAGAGCCACAATCAGCTGCAGGGCCAGCGAGAGCGTG GACAACTACGGCAACACCTTCATGCACTGGTATCAGCAGAAGCCCGGCCAGC CCCCCAAGCTGCTGATCTACAGAGCCAGCAACCTGGAAAGCGGCATCCCCGC CAGATTTTCCGGCAGCGGCAGCAGAACCGACTTCACCCTGACCATCAACCCC GTGGAAGCCGACGACGTGGCCACCTACTACTGCCAGCAGAGCAACGAGGAC CCCCCCACATTTGGAGCCGGCACCAAGCTGGAACTGAAGGGCGGAGGCGGA TCTGGCGGCGGAGGATCTTCTGGGGGAGGCTCTCAGATTCAGCTGGTGCAGA GCGGCCCAGAGCTGAAGAAACCCGGCGAGACAGTGAAGATCTCCTGCAAGG CCTCCGGCTACATCTTCACCAATTACGGCATGAACTGGGTCAAGCAGGCCCC TGGCAAGAGCTTCAAGTGGATGGGCTGGATCAACACCTACACCGGCGAGAGC ACCTACAGCGCCGACTTCAAGGGCAGATTCGCCTTCAGCCTGGAAACCAGCG CCAGCACCGCCTACCTGCACATCAACGACCTGAAGAACGAGGACACCGCCAC CTATTTCTGCGCCAGAAGCGGCGGCTACGACCCCATGGATTATTGGGGCCAG GGCACCAGCGTGACCGTGTCCTCTGCTAGCTCCGGAACCACGACGCCAGCGC CGCGACCACCAACACCGGCGCCCACCATCGCGTCGCAGCCCCTGTCCCTGCG CCCAGAGGCGTGCCGGCCAGCGGCGGGGGGCGCAGTGCACACGAGGGGGCT GGACTTCGCCTGTGATATCTACATCTGGGCGCCCTTGGCCGGGACTTGTGGGG TCCTTCTCCTGTC ACTGGTTATCACCCTTTACTGC AAACGGGGC AGAAAG AAA CTCCTGTATATATTCAAACAACCATTTATGAGACCAGTACAAACTACTCAAGA GGAAGATGGCTGTAGCTGCCGATTTCCAGAAGAAGAAGAAGGAGGATGTGA ACTGAGAGTGAAGTTCAGCAGGAGCGCAGACGCCCCCGCGTACAAGCAGGG CCAGAACCAGCTCTATAACGAGCTCAATCTAGGACGAAGAGAGGAGTACGAT GTTTTGGACAAGAGACGTGGCCGGGACCCTGAGATGGGGGGA AAGCCGAGA AGGAAGAACCCTCAGGAAGGCCTGTACAATGAACTGCAGAAAGATAAGATG GCGGAGGCCTACAGTGAGATTGGGATGAAAGGCGAGCGCCGGAGGGGCAAG GGGCACGATGGCCTTTACCAGGGTCTCAGTACAGCCACCAAGGACACCTACG ACGCCCTTCACATGCAGGCCCTGCCCCCTCGC

CD123 CAR 1173 (amino acid sequence) (SEQ ID NO:109)

MALPVTALLLPLALLLHAARPGSDIVLTQSPASLAVSLGQRATISCRASESVDNY GNTFMHWYQQKPGQPPKLLIYRASNLESGIPARFSGSGSRTDFTLTINPVEADDV ATYYCQQSNEDPPTFGAGTKLELKGGGGSGGGGSSGGGSQIQLVQSGPELKKPG ETVKISCKASGYIFTNYGMNWVKQAPGKSFKWMGWINTYTGESTYSADFKGRF AFSLETSASTAYLHINDLKNEDTATYFCARSGGYDPMDYWGQGTSVTVSSASSG ESKYGPPCPPCPAPEFLGGPSVFLFPPKPKDTLMISRTPEVTCVVVDVSQEDPEVQ FNWYVDGVEVHNAKTKPREEQFNSTYRVVSVLTVLHQDWLNGKEYKCKVSNK GLPS SIEKTIS KAKGQPREPQ V YTLPPS QEEMTKNQ VS LTCLVKGF YPSDIA VEWE SNGQPENNYKTTPPVLDSDGSFFLYSRLTVDKSRWQEGNVFSCSVMHEALHNHY TQKSLSLSLGKMDIYIWAPLAGTCGVLLLSLVITLYCKRGRKKLLYIFKQPFMRP VQTTQEEDGCSCRFPEEEEGGCELRVKFSRSADAPAYKQGQNQLYNELNLGRRE

EYDVLDKRRGRDPEMGGKPRRKNPQEGLYNELQKDKMAEAYSEIGMKGERRR

GKGHDGLYQGLSTATKDTYDALHMQALPPR CD123 CAR 1173 (nucleotide sequence) (SEQ ID NO:110)

ATGGCCCTGCCTGTGACAGCCCTGCTGCTGCCTCTGGCTCTGCTGCTGCATGC CGCTAGACCCGGATCCGACATCGTGCTGACACAGAGCCCTGCTTCCCTGGCC GTGTCCCTGGGACAGAGAGCCACAATCAGCTGCAGGGCCAGCGAGAGCGTG GACAACTACGGCAACACCTTCATGCACTGGTATCAGCAGAAGCCCGGCCAGC CCCCCAAGCTGCTGATCTAC AGAGCC AGCAACCTGGAAAGCGGCATCCCCGC CAGATTTTCCGGCAGCGGCAGCAGAACCGACTTCACCCTGACCATCAACCCC GTGGAAGCCGACGACGTGGCCACCTACTACTGCCAGCAGAGCAACGAGGAC CCCCCCACATTTGGAGCCGGCACCAAGCTGGAACTGAAGGGCGGAGGCGGA TCTGGCGGCGGAGGATCTTCTGGGGGAGGCTCTCAGATTCAGCTGGTGCAGA GCGGCCC AGAGCTGAAGAAACCCGGCGAGAC AGTGAAGATCTCCTGC AAGG CCTCCGGCTACATCTTCACCAATTACGGCATGAACTGGGTCAAGCAGGCCCC TGGCAAGAGCTTCAAGTGGATGGGCTGGATCAACACCTACACCGGCGAGAGC ACCTACAGCGCCGACTTCAAGGGCAGATTCGCCTTCAGCCTGGAAACCAGCG CCAGCACCGCCTACCTGCACATCAACGACCTGAAGAACGAGGACACCGCCAC CTATTTCTGCGCCAGAAGCGGCGGCTACGACCCCATGGATTATTGGGGCCAG GGCACCAGCGTGACCGTGTCCTCTGCTAGCTCCGGAGAGAGCAAGTACGGCC CTCCCTGCCCCCCTTGCCCTGCCCCCGAGTTCCTGGGCGGACCCAGCGTGTTC CTGTTCCCCCCCAAGCCCAAGGACACCCTGATGATCAGCCGGACCCCCGAGG TGACCTGTGTGGTGGTGGACGTGTCCCAGGAGGACCCCGAGGTCCAGTTCAA CTGGTACGTGGACGGCGTGGAGGTGCACAACGCCAAGACCAAGCCCCGGGA GGAGCAGTTCAATAGCACCTACCGGGTGGTGTCCGTGCTGACCGTGCTGCAC CAGGACTGGCTGAACGGCAAGGAATACAAGTGTAAGGTGTCCAACAAGGGC CTGCCCAGCAGCATCGAGAAAACCATCAGCAAGGCCAAGGGCCAGCCTCGG GAGCCCCAGGTGTACACCCTGCCCCCTAGCCAAGAGGAGATGACCAAGAACC AGGTGTCCCTGACCTGCCTGGTGAAGGGCTTCTACCCCAGCGACATCGCCGT GGAGTGGGAGAGCAACGGCCAGCCCGAGAACAACTACAAGACCACCCCCCC TGTGCTGGACAGCGACGGCAGCTTCTTCCTGTACAGCCGGCTGACCGTGGAC AAGAGCCGGTGGCAGGAGGGCAACGTCTTTAGCTGCTCCGTGATGCACGAGG CCCTGCACAACCACTACACCCAGAAGAGCCTGAGCCTGTCCCTGGGCAAGAT GGATATCTACATCTGGGCGCCCTTGGCCGGGACTTGTGGGGTCCTTCTCCTGT CACTGGTTATCACCCTTTACTGCAAACGGGGCAGAAAGAAACTCCTGTATAT ATTCAAACAACCATTTATGAGACCAGTACAAACTACTCAAGAGGAAGATGGC TGTAGCTGCCGATTTCCAGAAGAAGAAGAAGGAGGATGTGAACTGAGAGTG AAGTTCAGCAGGAGCGCAGACGCCCCCGCGTACAAGCAGGGCCAGAACCAG CTCTATAACGAGCTCAATCTAGGACGAAGAGAGGAGTACGATGTTTTGGACA AGAGACGTGGCCGGGACCCTGAGATGGGGGGAAAGCCGAGAAGGAAGA ACC CTCAGGAAGGCCTGTACAATGAACTGCAGAAAGATAAGATGGCGGAGGCCT ACAGTGAGATTGGGATGAAAGGCGAGCGCCGGAGGGGCAAGGGGCACGATG GCCTTTACCAGGGTCTCAGTACAGCCACCAAGGACACCTACGACGCCCTTCA CATGCAGGCCCTGCCCCCTCGC

CD123 CAR 1174 (amino acid sequence) (SEQ ID NOrlll)

MALPVTALLLPLALLLHAARPGSQIQLVQSGPELKKPGETVKISCKASGYIFTNY

GMNWVKQAPGKSFKWMGWINTYTGESTYSADFKGRFAFSLETSASTAYLHIND

LKNEDTATYFCARSGGYDPMDYWGQGTSVTVSSGGGGSGGGGSSGGGSDIVLT QSPASLAVSLGQRATISCRASESVDNYGNTFMHWYQQKPGQPPKLLIYRASNLES GIPARFSGSGSRTDFTLTINPVEADDVATYYCQQSNEDPPTFGAGTKLELKASSGT TTPAPRPPTPAPTIASQPLSLRPEACRPAAGGAVHTRGLDFACDIYIWAPLAGTCG VLLLSLVITLYCKRGRKKLLYIFKQPFMRPVQTTQEEDGCSCRFPEEEEGGCELR VKFSRSADAPAYKQGQNQLYNELNLGRREEYDVLDKRRGRDPEMGGKPRRKNP QEGLYNELQKDKMAEAYSEIGMKGERRRGKGHDGLYQGLSTATKDTYDALHM QALPPR

CD123 CAR 1174 (nucleotide sequence) (SEQ ID NO:112)

ATGGCCCTGCCTGTGACAGCCCTGCTGCTGCCTCTGGCTCTGCTGCTGCATGC CGCTAGACCCGGATCCCAGATCCAGCTGGTGCAGTCTGGCCCCGAGCTGAAG AAACCCGGCGAGACAGTGAAGATCAGCTGCAAGGCCAGCGGCTACATCTTCA CCAACTACGGCATGAACTGGGTCAAGCAGGCCCCTGGCAAGAGCTTCAAGTG GATGGGCTGGATCAACACCTACACCGGCGAGAGCACCTACAGCGCCGACTTC AAGGGCAGATTCGCCTTCAGCCTGGAAACCAGCGCCAGCACCGCCTACCTGC ACATCAACGACCTGAAGAACGAGGACACCGCCACCTACTTTTGCGCCAGAAG CGGCGGCTACGACCCCATGGATTATTGGGGCCAGGGCACCAGCGTGACCGTG TCTAGCGGAGGCGGAGGATCTGGCGGAGGGGGATCTTCTGGCGGCGGAAGC GATATCGTGCTGACCCAGTCTCCTGCCAGCCTGGCCGTGTCTCTGGGACAGA GAGCCACAATCAGCTGCCGGGCCTCTGAGAGCGTGGACAATTACGGCAACAC CTTCATGCACTGGTATCAGCAGAAGCCCGGCCAGCCCCCCAAGCTGCTGATC TAC AGAGCC AGCAACCTGGAAAGCGGCATCCCCGCCAGATTTTCCGGC AGCG GCAGCAGAACCGACTTCACCCTGACCATCAACCCCGTGGAAGCCGACGACGT GGCCACCTATTACTGCCAGCAGAGCAACGAGGACCCCCCTACCTTTGGAGCC GGCACCAAGCTGGAACTGAAGGCTAGCTCCGGAACCACGACGCCAGCGCCG CGACCACCAACACCGGCGCCCACCATCGCGTCGCAGCCCCTGTCCCTGCGCC CAGAGGCGTGCCGGCC AGCGGCGGGGGGCGCAGTGCAC ACGAGGGGGCTGG ACTTCGCCTGTGATATCTACATCTGGGCGCCCTTGGCCGGGACTTGTGGGGTC CTTCTCCTGTCACTGGTTATCACCCTTTACTGCAAACGGGGCAGAAAGAAACT CCTGTATATATTCAAACAACCATTTATGAGACCAGTACAAACTACTCAAGAG GAAGATGGCTGTAGCTGCCGATTTCCAGAAGAAGAAGAAGGAGGATGTGAA CTGAGAGTGAAGTTCAGCAGGAGCGCAGACGCCCCCGCGTACAAGCAGGGC CAGAACCAGCTCTATAACGAGCTCAATCTAGGACGAAGAGAGGAGTACGAT GTTTTGGACAAGAGACGTGGCCGGGACCCTGAGATGGGGGGAAAGCCGAGA AGGAAGAACCCTCAGGAAGGCCTGTACAATGAACTGCAGAAAGATAAGATG GCGGAGGCCTACAGTGAGATTGGGATGAAAGGCGAGCGCCGGAGGGGCAAG GGGCACGATGGCCTTTACCAGGGTCTCAGTACAGCCACCAAGGACACCTACG ACGCCCTTCACATGCAGGCCCTGCCCCCTCGC

CD123 CAR 1175 (amino acid sequence) (SEQ ID NO:113)

MALPVTALLLPLALLLHAARPGSQIQLVQSGPELKKPGETVKISCKASGYIFTNY GMNWVKQAPGKSFKWMGWINTYTGESTYSADFKGRFAFSLETSASTAYLHIND LKNEDTATYFCARSGGYDPMDYWGQGTSVTVSSGGGGSGGGGSSGGGSDIVLT QSPASLAVSLGQRATISCRASESVDNYGNTFMHWYQQKPGQPPKLLIYRASNLES GIPARFSGSGSRTDFTLTINPVEADDVATYYCQQSNEDPPTFGAGTKLELKASSGE SKYGPPCPPCPAPEFLGGPSVFLFPPKPKDTLMISRTPEVTCVVVDVSQEDPEVQF NWYVDGVEVHNAKTKPREEQFNSTYRVVSVLTVLHQDWLNGKEYKCKVSNKG LPSSIEKTISKAKGQPREPQVYTLPPSQEEMTKNQVSLTCLVKGFYPSDIAVEWES NGQPENNYKTTPPVLDSDGSFFLYSRLTVDKSRWQEGNVFSCSVMHEALHNHY TQKSLSLSLGKMDIYIWAPLAGTCGVLLLSLVITLYCKRGRKKLLYIFKQPFMRP VQTTQEEDGCSCRFPEEEEGGCELRVKFSRSADAPAYKQGQNQLYNELNLGRRE EYDVLDKRRGRDPEMGGKPRRKNPQEGLYNELQKDKMAEAYSEIGMKGERRR GKGHDGLYQGLSTATKDTYD ALHMQALPPR

CD123 CAR 1175 (nucleotide sequence) (SEQ ID NO:114)

ATGGCCCTGCCTGTGACAGCCCTGCTGCTGCCTCTGGCTCTGCTGCTGCATGC CGCTAGACCCGGATCCCAGATCCAGCTGGTGCAGTCTGGCCCCGAGCTGAAG AAACCCGGCGAGAC AGTGAAG ATC AGCTGC AAGGCC AGCGGCTACATCTTC A CCAACTACGGCATGAACTGGGTCAAGCAGGCCCCTGGCAAGAGCTTCAAGTG GATGGGCTGGATCAACACCTACACCGGCGAGAGCACCTACAGCGCCGACTTC AAGGGCAGATTCGCCTTCAGCCTGGAAACCAGCGCCAGCACCGCCTACCTGC ACATCAACGACCTGAAGAACGAGGACACCGCCACCTACTTTTGCGCCAGAAG CGGCGGCTACGACCCCATGGATTATTGGGGCCAGGGCACCAGCGTGACCGTG TCTAGCGGAGGCGGAGGATCTGGCGGAGGGGGATCTTCTGGCGGCGGAAGC GATATCGTGCTGACCCAGTCTCCTGCCAGCCTGGCCGTGTCTCTGGGACAGA GAGCCACAATCAGCTGCCGGGCCTCTGAGAGCGTGGACAATTACGGCAACAC CTTCATGCACTGGTATCAGCAGAAGCCCGGCCAGCCCCCCAAGCTGCTGATC TACAGAGCCAGCAACCTGGAAAGCGGCATCCCCGCCAGATTTTCCGGCAGCG GCAGCAGAACCGACTTCACCCTGACCATCAACCCCGTGGAAGCCGACGACGT GGCCACCTATTACTGCCAGCAGAGCAACGAGGACCCCCCTACCTTTGGAGCC GGCACCAAGCTGGAACTGAAGGCTAGCTCCGGAGAGAGCAAGTACGGCCCT CCCTGCCCCCCTTGCCCTGCCCCCGAGTTCCTGGGCGGACCCAGCGTGTTCCT GTTCCCCCCCAAGCCCAAGGACACCCTGATGATCAGCCGGACCCCCGAGGTG ACCTGTGTGGTGGTGGACGTGTCCCAGGAGGACCCCGAGGTCCAGTTCAACT GGTACGTGGACGGCGTGGAGGTGCACAACGCCAAGACCAAGCCCCGGGAGG AGCAGTTCAATAGCACCTACCGGGTGGTGTCCGTGCTGACCGTGCTGCACCA GGACTGGCTGAACGGCAAGGAATACAAGTGTAAGGTGTCCAACAAGGGCCT GCCCAGCAGCATCGAGAAAACCATCAGCAAGGCCAAGGGCCAGCCTCGGGA GCCCCAGGTGTACACCCTGCCCCCTAGCCAAGAGGAGATGACCAAGAACCAG GTGTCCCTGACCTGCCTGGTGAAGGGCTTCTACCCCAGCGACATCGCCGTGG AGTGGGAGAGCAACGGCCAGCCCGAGAACAACTACAAGACCACCCCCCCTG TGCTGGACAGCGACGGCAGCTTCTTCCTGTACAGCCGGCTGACCGTGGACAA GAGCCGGTGGCAGGAGGGCAACGTCTTTAGCTGCTCCGTGATGCACGAGGCC CTGCAC AACC ACTACACCCAGAAGAGCCTGAGCCTGTCCCTGGGCAAGATGG ATATCTACATCTGGGCGCCCTTGGCCGGGACTTGTGGGGTCCTTCTCCTGTCA CTGGTTATCACCCTTTACTGCAAACGGGGCAGAAAGAAACTCCTGTATATATT CAAACAACCATTTATGAGACCAGTACAAACTACTCAAGAGGAAGATGGCTGT AGCTGCCGATTTCCAGAAGAAGAAGAAGGAGGATGTGAACTGAGAGTGAAG TTCAGC AGGAGCGC AGACGCCCCCGCGTACAAGC AGGGCC AGAACCAGCTCT ATAACGAGCTCAATCTAGGACGAAGAGAGGAGTACGATGTTTTGGACAAGA GACGTGGCCGGGACCCTGAGATGGGGGGAAAGCCGAGAAGGAAGAACCCTC AGGAAGGCCTGTACAATGAACTGCAGAAAGATAAGATGGCGGAGGCCTACA GTGAGATTGGGATGAAAGGCGAGCGCCGGAGGGGCAAGGGGCACGATGGCC TTTACCAGGGTCTCAGTACAGCCACCAAGGACACCTACGACGCCCTTCACAT GCAGGCCCTGCCCCCTCGC

CD123 CAR 1176 (amino acid sequence) (SEQ ID NO:115)

MALPVTALLLPLALLLHAARPGSDVQITQSPSYLAASPGETITINCRASKSISKDLA WYQEKPGKTNKLLIYSGSTLQSGIPSRFSGSGSGTDFTLTISSLEPEDFAMYYCQQ HNKYPYTFGGGTKLEIKGGGGSGGGGSSGGGSQVQLQQPGAELVRPGASVKLSC KASGYTFTSYWMNWVKQRPDQGLEWIGRIDPYDSETHYNQKFKDKAILTVDKS SSTAYMQLSSLTSEDSAVYYCARGNWDDYWGQGTTLTVSSASSGTTTPAPRPPT PAPTIASQPLSLRPEACRPAAGGAVHTRGLDFACDIYIWAPLAGTCGVLLLSLVIT LYCKRGRKKLLYIFKQPFMRPVQTTQEEDGCSCRFPEEEEGGCELRVKFSRSADA PAYKQGQNQLYNELNLGRREEYDVLDKRRGRDPEMGGKPRRKNPQEGLYNEL QKDKMAEAYSEIGMKGERRRGKGHDGLYQGLSTATKDTYDALHMQALPPR

CD123 CAR 1176 (nucleotide sequence) (SEQ ID NO:116)

ATGGCCCTGCCTGTGACAGCCCTGCTGCTGCCTCTGGCTCTGCTGCTGCACGC CGCTAGACCCGGATCCGACGTGCAGATCACACAGAGCCCTAGCTACCTGGCC GCCAGCCCTGGCGAGACAATCACCATCAACTGCCGGGCCAGCAAGAGCATCA GCAAGGACCTGGCCTGGTATCAGGAAAAGCCCGGCAAGACCAACAAGCTGC TGATCTACAGCGGCAGCACCCTGCAGAGCGGCATCCCCAGCAGATTTTCCGG CAGCGGCTCCGGCACCGACTTCACCCTGACAATCAGC AGCCTGGAACCCGAG GACTTCGCCATGTACTACTGCCAGCAGCACAACAAGTACCCCTACACCTTCG GCGGAGGCACCAAGCTGGAAATCAAGGGCGGAGGCGGATCTGGCGGCGGAG GAAGTTCTGGCGGAGGATCTCAGGTGCAGCTGCAGCAGCCAGGCGCTGAACT CGTGCGGCCTGGCGCTTCTGTGAAGCTGAGCTGTAAAGCCAGCGGCTACACC TTTACCAGCTACTGG ATGAACTGGGTC AAGC AGCGGCCCGACCAGGGCCTGG AGTGGATCGGCAGAATCGACCCCTACGACAGCGAGACACACTACAACCAGA AGTTCAAGGACAAGGCCATCCTGACCGTGGACAAGAGCAGCTCCACCGCCTA CATGCAGCTGTCCAGCCTGACCAGCGAGGACAGCGCCGTGTACTATTGCGCC AGGGGCAACTGGGACGACTACTGGGGCCAGGGCACAACCCTGACAGTGTCCT CTGCTAGCTCCGGAACCACGACGCCAGCGCCGCGACCACCAACACCGGCGCC CACCATCGCGTCGCAGCCCCTGTCCCTGCGCCCAGAGGCGTGCCGGCCAGCG GCGGGGGGCGCAGTGCACACGAGGGGGCTGGACTTCGCCTGTGATATCTACA TCTGGGCGCCCTTGGCCGGGACTTGTGGGGTCCTTCTCCTGTCACTGGTTATC ACCCTTTACTGCAAACGGGGCAGAAAGAAACTCCTGTATATATTCAAACAAC CATTTATGAGACCAGTACAAACTACTCAAGAGGAAGATGGCTGTAGCTGCCG ATTTCCAGAAGAAGAAGAAGGAGGATGTGAACTGAGAGTGAAGTTCAGCAG GAGCGCAGACGCCCCCGCGTACAAGCAGGGCCAGAACCAGCTCTATAACGA GCTCAATCTAGGACGAAGAGAGGAGTACGATGTTTTGGACAAGAGACGTGGC CGGGACCCTGAGATGGGGGGAAAGCCGAGAAGGAAGAACCCTCAGGAAGGC CTGTACAATGAACTGCAGAAAGATAAGATGGCGGAGGCCTACAGTGAGATTG GGATGAAAGGCGAGCGCCGGAGGGGCAAGGGGCACGATGGCCTTTACCAGG GTCTCAGTACAGCCACCAAGGACACCTACGACGCCCTTCACATGCAGGCCCT GCCCCCTCGC

CD123 CAR 1177 (amino acid sequence) (SEQ ID NO:117)

MALPVTALLLPLALLLHAARPGSDVQITQSPSYLAASPGETITINCRASKSISKDLA WYQEKPGKTNKLLIYSGSTLQSGIPSRFSGSGSGTDFTLTISSLEPEDFAMYYCQQ HNKYPYTFGGGTKLEIKGGGGSGGGGSSGGGSQVQLQQPGAELVRPGASVKLSC KASGYTFTSYWMNWVKQRPDQGLEWIGRIDPYDSETHYNQKFKDKAILTVDKS SSTAYMQLSSLTSEDSAVYYCARGNWDDYWGQGTTLTVSSASSGESKYGPPCPP CPAPEFLGGPS VFLFPPKPKDTLMISRTPEVTCVVVDVSQEDPEVQFNWYVDGVE VHNAKTKPREEQFNSTYRVVSVLTVLHQDWLNGKEYKCKVSNKGLPSSIEKTIS KAKGQPREPQVYTLPPSQEEMTKNQVSLTCLVKGFYPSDIAVEWESNGQPENNY KTTPPVLDSDGSFFLYSRLTVDKSRWQEGNVFSCSVMHEALHNHYTQKSLSLSL GKMDIYRVAPLAGTCGVLLLSLVITLYCKRGRKKLLYIFKQPFMRPVQTTQEEDG CSCRFPEEEEGGCELRVKFSRS AD APA YKQGQNQLYNELNLGRREEYD VLDKRR GRDPEMGGKPRRKNPQEGLYNELQKDKMAEAYSEIGMKGERRRGKGHDGLYQ GLSTATKDTYDALHMQALPPR

CD123 CAR 1177 (nucleotide sequence) (SEQ ID NO:118)

ATGGCCCTGCCTGTGACAGCCCTGCTGCTGCCTCTGGCTCTGCTGCTGCACGC CGCTAGACCCGGATCCGACGTGCAGATCACACAGAGCCCTAGCTACCTGGCC GCCAGCCCTGGCGAGACAATCACCATCAACTGCCGGGCCAGCAAGAGCATCA GCAAGGACCTGGCCTGGTATCAGGAAAAGCCCGGCAAGACCAACAAGCTGC TGATCTACAGCGGCAGCACCCTGCAGAGCGGCATCCCCAGCAGATTTTCCGG CAGCGGCTCCGGCACCGACTTCACCCTGACAATCAGCAGCCTGGAACCCGAG GACTTCGCCATGTACTACTGCCAGCAGCACAACAAGTACCCCTACACCTTCG GCGGAGGCACCAAGCTGGAAATCAAGGGCGGAGGCGGATCTGGCGGCGGAG GAAGTTCTGGCGGAGGATCTCAGGTGCAGCTGCAGCAGCCAGGCGCTGAACT CGTGCGGCCTGGCGCTTCTGTGAAGCTGAGCTGTAAAGCCAGCGGCTACACC TTTACCAGCTACTGGATGAACTGGGTCAAGCAGCGGCCCGACCAGGGCCTGG AGTGGATCGGCAGAATCGACCCCTACGACAGCGAGACACACTACAACCAGA AGTTCAAGGACAAGGCCATCCTGACCGTGGACAAGAGCAGCTCCACCGCCTA CATGCAGCTGTCCAGCCTGACCAGCGAGGACAGCGCCGTGTACTATTGCGCC AGGGGCAACTGGGACGACTACTGGGGCCAGGGCACAACCCTGACAGTGTCCT CTGCTAGCTCCGGAGAGAGCAAGTACGGCCCTCCCTGCCCCCCTTGCCCTGCC CCCGAGTTCCTGGGCGGACCCAGCGTGTTCCTGTTCCCCCCCAAGCCCAAGG ACACCCTGATGATCAGCCGGACCCCCGAGGTGACCTGTGTGGTGGTGGACGT GTCCCAGGAGGACCCCGAGGTCCAGTTCAACTGGTACGTGGACGGCGTGGAG GTGCACAACGCCAAGACCAAGCCCCGGGAGGAGCAGTTCAATAGCACCTAC CGGGTGGTGTCCGTGCTGACCGTGCTGCACCAGGACTGGCTGAACGGCAAGG AATAC AAGTGTAAGGTGTCC AACAAGGGCCTGCCC AGCAGC ATCGAGAAAA CCATCAGCAAGGCCAAGGGCCAGCCTCGGGAGCCCCAGGTGTACACCCTGCC CCCTAGCCAAGAGGAGATGACCAAGAACCAGGTGTCCCTGACCTGCCTGGTG AAGGGCTTCTACCCCAGCGACATCGCCGTGGAGTGGGAGAGCAACGGCCAG CCCGAGAACAACTACAAGACCACCCCCCCTGTGCTGGACAGCGACGGCAGCT TCTTCCTGTACAGCCGGCTGACCGTGGAC AAGAGCCGGTGGC AGGAGGGC AA CGTCTTTAGCTGCTCCGTGATGCACGAGGCCCTGCACAACCACTACACCCAG AAGAGCCTGAGCCTGTCCCTGGGCAAGATGGATATCTACATCTGGGCGCCCT TGGCCGGGACTTGTGGGGTCCTTCTCCTGTCACTGGTTATCACCCTTTACTGC AAACGGGGCAGAAAGAAACTCCTGTATATATTCAAACAACCATTTATGAGAC CAGTACAAACTACTCAAGAGGAAGATGGCTGTAGCTGCCGATTTCCAGAAGA AGAAGAAGGAGGATGTGAACTGAGAGTGAAGTTCAGCAGGAGCGCAGACGC CCCCGCGTACAAGCAGGGCCAGAACCAGCTCTATAACGAGCTCAATCTAGGA CGAAGAGAGGAGTACGATGTTTTGGACAAGAGACGTGGCCGGGACCCTGAG ATGGGGGGAAAGCCGAGAAGGAAGAACCCTCAGGAAGGCCTGTACAATGAA CTGCAGAAAGATAAGATGGCGGAGGCCTACAGTGAGATTGGGATGAAAGGC GAGCGCCGGAGGGGCAAGGGGCACGATGGCCTTTACCAGGGTCTCAGTACA GCCACCAAGGACACCTACGACGCCCTTCACATGCAGGCCCTGCCCCCTCGC

CD123 CAR 1178 (amino acid sequence) (SEQ ID NO:119)

MALPVTALLLPLALLLHAARPGSQVQLQQPGAELVRPGASVKLSCKASGYTFTS YWMNWVKQRPDQGLEWIGRIDPYDSETHYNQKFKDKAILTVDKSSSTAYMQLS SLTSEDSAVYYCARGNWDDYWGQGTTLTVSSGGGGSGGGGSSGGGSDVQITQS PSYLAASPGETITINCRASKSISKDLAWYQEKPGKTNKLLIYSGSTLQSGIPSRFSG SGSGTDFTLTISSLEPEDFAMYYCQQHNKYPYTFGGGTKLEIKASSGTTTPAPRPP TPAPTIASQPLSLRPEACRPAAGGAVHTRGLDFACDIYr APLAGTCGVLLLSLVI TLYCKRGRKKLLYIFKQPFMRPVQTTQEEDGCSCRFPEEEEGGCELRVKFSRSAD APAYKQGQNQLYNELNLGRREEYDVLDKRRGRDPEMGGKPRRKNPQEGLYNE LQKDKMAEAYSEIGMKGERRRGKGHDGLYQGLSTATKDTYDALHMQALPPR

CD123 CAR 1178 (nucleotide sequence) (SEQ ID NO:120)

ATGGCCCTGCCTGTGAC AGCCCTGCTGCTGCCTCTGGCTCTGCTGCTGC ACGC CGCTAGACCTGGATCCCAGGTGCAGCTGCAGCAGCCTGGCGCTGAACTCGTG CGGCCAGGCGCTTCTGTGAAGCTGAGCTGTAAAGCCAGCGGCTACACCTTCA CCAGCTACTGGATGAACTGGGTCAAGCAGCGGCCCGACCAGGGCCTGGAGTG GATCGGCAGAATCGACCCCTACGACAGCGAGACACACTACAACCAGAAGTTC AAGGACAAGGCC ATCCTGACCGTGGAC AAGAGCAGC AGCACCGCCTAC ATG CAGCTGTCCAGCCTGACCAGCGAGGACAGCGCCGTGTACTACTGCGCCAGGG GCAACTGGGACGACTATTGGGGCCAGGGCACCACCCTGACAGTGTCTAGCGG AGGCGGAGGATCTGGCGGCGGAGGAAGTTCTGGCGGAGGCTCCGACGTGCA GATCACCCAGAGCCCTAGCTACCTGGCCGCCTCTCCTGGCGAGACAATCACC ATCAACTGCCGGGCCAGCAAGAGCATCTCCAAGGACCTGGCCTGGTATCAGG AAAAGCCCGGCAAGACCAACAAGCTGCTGATCTACAGCGGCAGCACCCTGC AGAGCGGCATCCCCAGCAGATTTTCCGGCAGCGGCTCCGGCACCGACTTCAC CCTGACCATCAGCTCCCTGGAACCCGAGGACTTTGCCATGTACTATTGCCAGC AGCACAACAAGTACCCTTACACCTTCGGCGGAGGCACCAAGCTGGAAATCAA GGCCAGCTCCGGAACCACGACGCCAGCGCCGCGACCACCAACACCGGCGCC CACCATCGCGTCGCAGCCCCTGTCCCTGCGCCCAGAGGCGTGCCGGCCAGCG GCGGGGGGCGCAGTGCACACGAGGGGGCTGGACTTCGCCTGTGATATCTACA TCTGGGCGCCCTTGGCCGGGACTTGTGGGGTCCTTCTCCTGTCACTGGTTATC ACCCTTTACTGCAAACGGGGCAGAAAGAAACTCCTGTATATATTCAAACAAC CATTTATGAGACCAGTACAAACTACTCAAGAGGAAGATGGCTGTAGCTGCCG ATTTCCAGAAGAAGAAGAAGGAGGATGTGAACTGAGAGTGAAGTTCAGCAG GAGCGCAGACGCCCCCGCGTACAAGCAGGGCCAGAACCAGCTCTATAACGA GCTCAATCTAGGACGAAGAGAGGAGTACGATGTTTTGGACAAGAGACGTGGC CGGGACCCTGAGATGGGGGGAAAGCCGAGAAGGAAGAACCCTCAGGAAGGC CTGTACAATGAACTGCAGAAAGATAAGATGGCGGAGGCCTACAGTGAGATTG GGATGAAAGGCGAGCGCCGGAGGGGCAAGGGGCACGATGGCCTTTACCAGG GTCTCAGTACAGCCACCAAGGACACCTACGACGCCCTTCACATGCAGGCCCT GCCCCCTCGC

CD123 CAR 1179 (amino acid sequence) (SEQ ID NO:121)

MALPVTALLLPLALLLHAARPGSQVQLQQPGAELVRPGAS VKLSCKASGYTFTS YWMNWVKQRPDQGLEWIGRIDPYDSETHYNQKFKDKAILTVDKSSSTAYMQLS SLTSEDSAVYYCARGNWDDYWGQGTTLTVSSGGGGSGGGGSSGGGSDVQITQS PSYLAASPGETITINCRASKSISKDLAWYQEKPGKTNKLLIYSGSTLQSGIPSRFSG SGSGTDFTLTISSLEPEDFAMYYCQQHNKYPYTFGGGTKLEIKASSGESKYGPPCP PCPAPEFLGGPS VFLFPPKPKDTLMISRTPEVTCVVVDVSQEDPEVQFNWYVDGV EVHNAKTKPREEQFNSTYRVVSVLTVLHQDWLNGKEYKCKVSNKGLPSSIEKTI SKAKGQPREPQVYTLPPSQEEMTKNQVSLTCLVKGFYPSDIAVEWESNGQPENN YKTTPPVLDSDGSFFLYSRLTVDKSRWQEGNVFSCSVMHEALHNHYTQKSLSLS LGKMDIYr APLAGTCGVLLLSLVITLYCKRGRKKLLYIFKQPFMRPVQTTQEED GCSCRFPEEEEGGCELRVKFSRSADAPAYKQGQNQLYNELNLGRREEYDVLDKR RGRDPEMGGKPRRKNPQEGLYNELQKDKMAEAYSEIGMKGERRRGKGHDGLY QGLSTATKDTYDALHMQALPPR

CD123 CAR 1179 (nucleotide sequence) (SEQ ID NO: 91)

ATGGCCCTGCCTGTGACAGCCCTGCTGCTGCCTCTGGCTCTGCTGCTGCACGC CGCTAGACCTGGATCCCAGGTGCAGCTGCAGCAGCCTGGCGCTGAACTCGTG CGGCCAGGCGCTTCTGTGAAGCTGAGCTGTAAAGCCAGCGGCTACACCTTCA CCAGCTACTGGATGAACTGGGTCAAGCAGCGGCCCGACCAGGGCCTGGAGTG GATCGGCAGAATCGACCCCTACGACAGCGAGACACACTACAACCAGAAGTTC AAGGACAAGGCCATCCTGACCGTGGACAAGAGCAGCAGCACCGCCTACATG CAGCTGTCCAGCCTGACCAGCGAGGACAGCGCCGTGTACTACTGCGCCAGGG GCAACTGGGACGACTATTGGGGCCAGGGCACCACCCTGACAGTGTCTAGCGG AGGCGGAGGATCTGGCGGCGGAGGAAGTTCTGGCGGAGGCTCCGACGTGCA GATCACCCAGAGCCCTAGCTACCTGGCCGCCTCTCCTGGCGAGACAATCACC ATCAACTGCCGGGCCAGCAAGAGCATCTCCAAGGACCTGGCCTGGTATCAGG AAAAGCCCGGCAAGACCAACAAGCTGCTGATCTACAGCGGCAGCACCCTGC AGAGCGGCATCCCCAGCAGATTTTCCGGCAGCGGCTCCGGCACCGACTTCAC CCTGACCATCAGCTCCCTGGAACCCGAGGACTTTGCCATGTACTATTGCCAGC AGCACAACAAGTACCCTTACACCTTCGGCGGAGGCACCAAGCTGGAAATCAA GGCCAGCTCCGGAGAGAGCAAGTACGGCCCTCCCTGCCCCCCTTGCCCTGCC CCCGAGTTCCTGGGCGGACCC AGCGTGTTCCTGTTCCCCCCCAAGCCC AAGG ACACCCTGATGATCAGCCGGACCCCCGAGGTGACCTGTGTGGTGGTGGACGT GTCCCAGGAGGACCCCGAGGTCCAGTTCAACTGGTACGTGGACGGCGTGGAG GTGCACAACGCCAAGACCAAGCCCCGGGAGGAGCAGTTCAATAGCACCTAC CGGGTGGTGTCCGTGCTGACCGTGCTGCACCAGGACTGGCTGAACGGCAAGG AATAC AAGTGTAAGGTGTCC AACAAGGGCCTGCCC AGCAGC ATCGAGAAAA CCATCAGCAAGGCCAAGGGCCAGCCTCGGGAGCCCCAGGTGTACACCCTGCC CCCTAGCCAAGAGGAGATGACCAAGAACCAGGTGTCCCTGACCTGCCTGGTG AAGGGCTTCTACCCCAGCGACATCGCCGTGGAGTGGGAGAGCAACGGCCAG CCCGAGAACAACTACAAGACCACCCCCCCTGTGCTGGACAGCGACGGCAGCT TCTTCCTGTACAGCCGGCTGACCGTGGACAAGAGCCGGTGGCAGGAGGGCAA CGTCTTTAGCTGCTCCGTGATGCACGAGGCCCTGCACAACCACTACACCCAG AAGAGCCTGAGCCTGTCCCTGGGCAAGATGGATATCTACATCTGGGCGCCCT TGGCCGGGACTTGTGGGGTCCTTCTCCTGTCACTGGTTATCACCCTTTACTGC AAACGGGGCAGAAAGAAACTCCTGTATATATTCAAACAACCATTTATGAGAC CAGTACAAACTACTCAAGAGGAAGATGGCTGTAGCTGCCGATTTCCAGAAGA AGAAGAAGGAGGATGTGAACTGAGAGTGAAGTTCAGCAGGAGCGCAGACGC CCCCGCGTACAAGCAGGGCCAGAACCAGCTCTATAACGAGCTCAATCTAGGA CGAAGAGAGGAGTACGATGTTTTGGACAAGAGACGTGGCCGGGACCCTGAG ATGGGGGGAAAGCCGAGAAGGAAGAACCCTCAGGAAGGCCTGTACAATGAA CTGCAGAAAGATAAGATGGCGGAGGCCTACAGTGAGATTGGGATGAAAGGC GAGCGCCGGAGGGGCAAGGGGCACGATGGCCTTTACCAGGGTCTCAGTACA GCCACCAAGGACACCTACGACGCCCTTCACATGCAGGCCCTGCCCCCTCGC

Example 4: Predicted CDR designations for the CD123CAR

The predicted CDR designations for the CD 123 CAR of SEQ ID NO: l, discussed in Example 3, under Kabat are as follows:

• VH:

QIQLVQSGPELKKPGETVKISCKASGYIFTNYGMNWVKQAPGKSFKWMGWINT YTGESTYSADFKGRFAFSLETSASTAYLHINDLKNEDTATYFCARSGGYDPMDY WGQGTSVTVSS (SEQ ID NO: 15);

wherein CDR1 is NYGMN (SEQ ID NO: 16), CDR2 is

WINTYTGESTYSADFKG (SEQ ID NO: 17), and CDR3 is SGGYDPMDY (SEQ ID NO: 18).

• VL:

DIVLTQSPASLAVSLGQRATISCRASESVDNYGNTFMHWYQQKPGQPPKLLIYRA SNLESGIPARFSGSGSRTDFTLTINPVEADDVATYYCQQSNEDPPTFGAGTKLELK

(SEQ ID NO: 19);

wherein CDR1 is RASES VDNYGNTFMH (SEQ ID NO: 20), CDR2 is

RASNLES (SEQ ID NO: 21), and CDR3 is QQSNEDPPT (SEQ ID NO: 22).

The predicted CDR designations for the CD 123 CAR under Chothia are as follows:

· VH:

QIQLVQSGPELKKPGETVKISCKASGYIFTNYGMNWVKQAPGKSFKWMGWINT YTGESTYSADFKGRFAFSLETSASTAYLHINDLKNEDTATYFCARSGGYDPMDY WGQGTSVTVSS (SEQ ID NO: 15);

wherein CDR1 is GYIFTNY (SEQ ID NO: 24), CDR2 is NTYTGE (SEQ ID NO: 25), and CDR3 is SGGYDPMDY (SEQ ID NO: 26). • VL:

DIVLTQSPASLAVSLGQRATISCRASESVDNYGNTFMHWYQQKPGQPPKLLIYRA SNLESGIPARFSGSGSRTDFTLTINPVEADDVATYYCQQSNEDPPTFGAGTKLELK

(SEQ ID NO: 19);

wherein CDR1 is SESVDNYGNTF (SEQ ID NO: 28), CDR2 is RAS (SEQ ID

NO: 29), and CDR3 is SNEDPP (SEQ ID NO: 30).

The predicted CDR designations for the CD123 CAR of SEQ ID NO: 100, disclosed in Example 3, under Kabat are as follows:

· VH CDR1 is SYWMN (SEP ID NO:84), CDR2 is RIDPYDSETHYNOKFKD

(SEP ID NO:85), and CDR3 is GNWDDY (SEP ID NO:86).

• VL CDR1 is RASKSISKDLA (SEP ID NP:87, CDR2 is SGSTLPS (SEP ID NP:88), and CDR3 is PPHNKYPYT (SEP ID NP:89). Example 5: Humanization of Murine Anti-CD 123 Antibody

Humanization of murine CD 123 antibody may be desired for the clinical setting, where the mouse- specific residues may induce a human-anti-mouse antigen (HAMA) response in patients who receive treatment with T cells transduced with the murine CAR construct. Humanization was accomplished by grafting CDR regions from the murine CD123 antibody of SEQ ID NP:2 onto human germline acceptor frameworks VHl_l-03 or VH7_7-4.1 as well as VK3_L6 or VK4_B3 (vBASE database). In addition to the CDR regions, several framework residues , i.e. VK3 #68, #83, VK4 #4, #68, VH1 #2, #71 and VH7 #2, thought to support the structural integrity of the CDR regions were retained from the murine sequence. Further, the human J elements JH6 and JK2 were used for the heavy and light chain, respectively. The resulting amino acid sequences of the humanized antibody were designated VK3_L6/Hzl (SEQ ID NP:31) and VK4_B3/Hzl (SEQ ID NP:32) for the light-chains and VHl_l-03/Hzl (SEQ ID NP:33), and VH7_4.1/Hzl (SEQ ID NP:34) for the heavy chains and are shown in Figures 26 and 27. The residue numbering follows Kabat (Kabat E.A. et al, 1991, supra). For CDR definitions, both Kabat as well as Chothia et al, 1987 supra) were used. Frame work residues retained from mouse CD 123 are shown shaded. CDR residues are underlined. PTM motif in framework VH7_7-4.1 at position 82a/82b (boxed, original framework sequence was CS) was mutated to NA in the final construct.

Based on the humanized light and heavy chain sequences as shown in Figures 26 and 27, a total of 8 framework combinations were used to generate soluble scFv's for further validation. The order in which the VL and VH domains appear in the scFv was varied (i.e., VL-VH, or VH-VL orientation), and four copies of the "G4S" (SEQ ID NO: 35) subunit, in which each subunit comprises the sequence GGGGS (SEQ ID NO:35) was used to connect the frameworks.

Cloning:

DNA sequences coding for mouse and humanized VL and VH domains were obtained, and the codons for the constructs were optimized for expression in human cells.

Sequences coding for VL and VH domain were subcloned into expression vectors suitable for secretion in mammalian cells. Elements of the expression vector include a promoter (Cytomegalovirus (CMV) enhancer-promoter), a signal sequence to facilitate secretion, a polyadenylation signal and transcription terminator (Bovine Growth

Hormone (BGH) gene), an element allowing episomal replication and replication in prokaryotes (e.g. SV40 origin and ColEl or others known in the art) and elements to allow selection (ampicillin resistance gene and zeocin marker).

Table 1.

actgggtgcgccaggctccgggacaggggctggagtggatgggatggatcaacacttacac cggggagtcaacttactcggctgactttaagggccggtttgtgttctccctcgacactagcgtga gcaccgcctatcttcaaatcaacgccctcaaggcggaagataccgccgtctactactgcgcaa gatccggtgggtacgatccgatggattattggggacagggaaccactgtcaccgtgagcagc

38 atggccctccctgtcaccgccctgctgcttccgctggctcttctgctccacgccgctcggcccg

CAR1 acatcgtgctgacccaatccccggacagcctcgcagtctcactcggagaacgcgccactatc Soluble aattgtagggcgtcggagtccgtggacaattacggaaacaccttcatgcactggtaccaacaa scFv - nt aaacctggtcagccacctaagctgctgatctaccgcgcctcgaatctggaatcaggagtgccg gacagattctcggggtccggctcccggacggatttcactttgaccatctcgtcacttcaagctga ggacgtcgcggtgtactactgccagcagagcaacgaagatccacccacgttcggacaaggc accaagctggagattaaaggaggcggaggctccggtggaggaggatcgggaggaggcgg ctccggcggaggtggatcgcagattcagctggtgcagtcgggttcagaattgaagaaaccag gagcctcggtgaaggtcagctgcaaggcatcagggtacatcttcactaactacggcatgaact gggtgcgccaggctccgggacaggggctggagtggatgggatggatcaacacttacaccg gggagtcaacttactcggctgactttaagggccggtttgtgttctccctcgacactagcgtgagc accgcctatcttcaaatcaacgccctcaaggcggaagataccgccgtctactactgcgcaaga tccggtgggtacgatccgatggattattggggacagggaaccactgtcaccgtgagcagcgg ctcgcaccaccatcaccatcatcatcaccac

39 malpvtalllplalllhaarpdivltqspdslavslgeratincrasesvdnygntfmhwyqq

CAR1 kpgqppklliyrasnlesgvpdrfsgsgsrtdftltisslqaedvavyycqqsnedpptfgqg Soluble tkleikggggsggggsggggsggggsqiqlvqsgselkkpgasvkvsckasgyiftnyg scFv - aa mnwvrqapgqglewmgwintytgestysadfkgrfvfsldtsvstaylqinalkaedtav yycarsggydpmdywgqgttvtvssgshhhhhhhhh

CAR 1 - atggccctccctgtcaccgccctgctgcttccgctggctcttctgctccacgccgctcggcccg Full - nt 40 acatcgtgctgacccaatccccggacagcctcgcagtctcactcggagaacgcgccactatc lenti virus aattgtagggcgtcggagtccgtggacaattacggaaacaccttcatgcactggtaccaacaa aaacctggtcagccacctaagctgctgatctaccgcgcctcgaatctggaatcaggagtgccg gacagattctcggggtccggctcccggacggatttcactttgaccatctcgtcacttcaagctga ggacgtcgcggtgtactactgccagcagagcaacgaagatccacccacgttcggacaaggc accaagctggagattaaaggaggcggaggctccggtggaggaggatcgggaggaggcgg ctccggcggaggtggatcgcagattcagctggtgcagtcgggttcagaattgaagaaaccag gagcctcggtgaaggtcagctgcaaggcatcagggtacatcttcactaactacggcatgaact gggtgcgccaggctccgggacaggggctggagtggatgggatggatcaacacttacaccg gggagtcaacttactcggctgactttaagggccggtttgtgttctccctcgacactagcgtgagc accgcctatcttcaaatcaacgccctcaaggcggaagataccgccgtctactactgcgcaaga tccggtgggtacgatccgatggattattggggacagggaaccactgtcaccgtgagcagcac cactaccccagcaccgaggccacccaccccggctcctaccatcgcctcccagcctctgtccc tgcgtccggaggcatgtagacccgcagctggtggggccgtgcatacccggggtcttgacttc gcctgcgatatctacatttgggcccctctggctggtacttgcggggtcctgctgctttcactcgtg atcactctttactgtaagcgcggtcggaagaagctgctgtacatctttaagcaacccttcatgag gcctgtgcagactactcaagaggaggacggctgttcatgccggttcccagaggaggaggaa ggcggctgcgaactgcgcgtgaaattcagccgcagcgcagatgctccagcctacaagcagg ggcagaaccagctctacaacgaactcaatcttggtcggagagaggagtacgacgtgctggac aagcggagaggacgggacccagaaatgggcgggaagccgcgcagaaagaatccccaag agggcctgtacaacgagctccaaaaggataagatggcagaagcctatagcgagattggtatg aaaggggaacgcagaagaggcaaaggccacgacggactgtaccagggactcagcaccgc caccaaggacacctatgacgctcttcacatgcaggccctgccgcctcgg

CAR 1 - 41 Malpvtalllplalllhaarpdivltqspdslavslseratincrasesvdnvsntfmhwvq Full - aa qkpsqppkllivrasnlesgvpdrfsssgsrtdftltisslqaedvavvvcQQsnedpDtfg qgtkleikggggsggggsggggsggggsqiqlvqsgselkkpgasvkvsckasgyiftnx smnwvrqapgqglewmgwintvtsestvsadfksrfvfsldtsvstaylqinalkaedt avvvcarsssvdpmdvwgqgttvtvsstttpaprpptpaptiasqplslrpeacrpaagga vhtrgldfacdiyiwaplagtcgvlllslvitlyckrgrkkllyifkqpfmrpvqttqeedgcs crfpeeeeggcelrvkfsrsadapaykqgqnqlynelnlgrreeydvldkrrgrdpemgg kprrknpqeglynelqkdkmaeayseigmkgerrrgkghdglyqglstatkdtydalhm qalppr

CAR 2

CAR2 42 divltqspdslavslgeratincrasesvdnygntfmhwyqqkpgqppklliyrasnlesgv scFv pdrfsgsgsrtdftltisslqaedvavyycqqsnedpptfgqgtkleikggggsggggsggg domain gsggggsqiqlvqsgaevkkpgasvkvsckasgyiftnygmnwvrqapgqrlewmg wintytgestysadfkgrvtitldtsastaymelsslrsedtavyycarsggydpmdywgq gttvtvss

CAR2 43 gatattgtcctcactcaatcgccggactcactggcggtgtccctcggagagagggcgacgatc scFv aattgccgggcttccgaatccgtcgataactacggaaacacctttatgcactggtaccaacaga domain - agccaggacagccaccaaagctgttgatctaccgcgcttcaaaccttgagtcgggtgtgccg nt gaccgcttcagcggcagcggttccagaaccgactttaccctcaccatcagctcgctgcaggc cgaagatgtcgccgtctattactgccaacagagcaacgaagatccgcctactttcggacaggg gactaaactggaaatcaagggcggaggaggctcgggtggaggaggatcgggaggaggcg ggtccggtggtggcggatcgcaaatccagctggtgcagtccggcgcagaagtgaagaagcc gggagcgtccgtgaaagtgagctgcaaggcctcagggtacatcttcaccaattacggcatga attgggtgcggcaggcacccggacagcgcctggagtggatgggctggatcaacacttacac cggggaaagcacgtactcggccgacttcaaaggacgggtgaccattaccctggatacctcgg cctcaaccgcttacatggagctctcatcacttagatccgaggacactgccgtctactactgtgca aggagcggaggctacgaccctatggactattggggacaaggcactactgtgactgtgtcgtc c

CAR2 - 44 atggccctccctgtcaccgccctgctgcttccgctggctcttctgctccacgccgctcggcccg Soluble atattgtcctcactcaatcgccggactcactggcggtgtccctcggagagagggcgacgatca scFv - nt attgccgggcttccgaatccgtcgataactacggaaacacctttatgcactggtaccaacagaa gccaggacagccaccaaagctgttgatctaccgcgcttcaaaccttgagtcgggtgtgccgg accgcttcagcggcagcggttccagaaccgactttaccctcaccatcagctcgctgcaggcc gaagatgtcgccgtctattactgccaacagagcaacgaagatccgcctactttcggacagggg actaaactggaaatcaagggcggaggaggctcgggtggaggaggatcgggaggaggcgg gtccggtggtggcggatcgcaaatccagctggtgcagtccggcgcagaagtgaagaagccg ggagcgtccgtgaaagtgagctgcaaggcctcagggtacatcttcaccaattacggcatgaat tgggtgcggcaggcacccggacagcgcctggagtggatgggctggatcaacacttacaccg gggaaagcacgtactcggccgacttcaaaggacgggtgaccattaccctggatacctcggcc tcaaccgcttacatggagctctcatcacttagatccgaggacactgccgtctactactgtgcaag gagcggaggctacgaccctatggactattggggacaaggcactactgtgactgtgtcgtccg gctcgcaccaccatcaccatcatcatcaccac

45 malpvtalllplalllhaarpdivltqspdslavslgeratincrasesvdnygntfmhwyqq

CAR2 - kpgqppklliyrasnlesgvpdrfsgsgsrtdftltisslqaedvavyycqqsnedpptfgqg Soluble tkleikggggsggggsggggsggggsqiqlvqsgaevkkpgasvkvsckasgyiftnyg scFv - aa mnwvrqapgqrlewmgwintytgestysadfkgrvtitldtsastaymelsslrsedtavy ycarsggydpmdywgqgttvtvssgshhhhhhhhh

CAR 2 - atggccctccctgtcaccgccctgctgcttccgctggctcttctgctccacgccgctcggcccg Full - nt 46 atattgtcctcactcaatcgccggactcactggcggtgtccctcggagagagggcgacgatca attgccgggcttccgaatccgtcgataactacggaaacacctttatgcactggtaccaacagaa gccaggacagccaccaaagctgttgatctaccgcgcttcaaaccttgagtcgggtgtgccgg accgcttcagcggcagcggttccagaaccgactttaccctcaccatcagctcgctgcaggcc gaagatgtcgccgtctattactgccaacagagcaacgaagatccgcctactttcggacagggg actaaactggaaatcaagggcggaggaggctcgggtggaggaggatcgggaggaggcgg gtccggtggtggcggatcgcaaatccagctggtgcagtccggcgcagaagtgaagaagccg ggagcgtccgtgaaagtgagctgcaaggcctcagggtacatcttcaccaattacggcatgaat tgggtgcggcaggcacccggacagcgcctggagtggatgggctggatcaacacttacaccg gggaaagcacgtactcggccgacttcaaaggacgggtgaccattaccctggatacctcggcc tcaaccgcttacatggagctctcatcacttagatccgaggacactgccgtctactactgtgcaag gagcggaggctacgaccctatggactattggggacaaggcactactgtgactgtgtcgtccac cactaccccagcaccgaggccacccaccccggctcctaccatcgcctcccagcctctgtccc tgcgtccggaggcatgtagacccgcagctggtggggccgtgcatacccggggtcttgacttc gcctgcgatatctacatttgggcccctctggctggtacttgcggggtcctgctgctttcactcgtg atcactctttactgtaagcgcggtcggaagaagctgctgtacatctttaagcaacccttcatgag gcctgtgcagactactcaagaggaggacggctgttcatgccggttcccagaggaggaggaa ggcggctgcgaactgcgcgtgaaattcagccgcagcgcagatgctccagcctacaagcagg ggcagaaccagctctacaacgaactcaatcttggtcggagagaggagtacgacgtgctggac aagcggagaggacgggacccagaaatgggcgggaagccgcgcagaaagaatccccaag agggcctgtacaacgagctccaaaaggataagatggcagaagcctatagcgagattggtatg aaaggggaacgcagaagaggcaaaggccacgacggactgtaccagggactcagcaccgc caccaaggacacctatgacgctcttcacatgcaggccctgccgcctcgg

CAR 2 - 47 Malpvtalllplalllhaarpdivltqspdslavslseratincrasesvdnvsntfmhwvq Full - aa qkpsqppkllivrasnlesgvpdrfsssgsrtdftltisslqaedvavvvcQQsnedpDtfg qgtkleikggggsggggsggggsggggsqiqlvqsgaevkkpgasvkvsckasgyiftn vsmnwvrq ap gqrlewmgwintvtsestvsadfksrvtitldtsastaymelsslrsedt avvvcarsssvdpmdvwgqgttvtvsstttpaprpptpaptiasqplslrpeacrpaagga vhtrgldfacdiyiwaplagtcgvlllslvitlyclfl-grldcllyifkqpfmrpvqttqeedgcs crfpeeeeggcelrvkfsrsadapaykqgqnqlynelnlgrreeydvldkrrgrdpemgg kprrknpqeglynelqkdkmaeayseigmkgerrrgkghdglyqglstatkdtydalhm qalppr

CAR 3

CAR3 48 Eivltqspatlslspgeratlscrasesvdnygntfmhwyqqkpgqaprlliyrasnlesgip scFv arfsgsgsrtdftltisslepedvavyycqqsnedpptfgqgtkleikggggsggggsgggg domain sggggsqiqlvqsgselkkpgasvkvsckasgyiftnygmnwvrqapgqglewmgwi ntytgestysadfkgrfvfsldtsvstaylqinalkaedtavyycarsggydpmdywgqgtt vtvss

CAR3 49 Gaaattgtgctcacgcaatcacccgccactctgtcgctttccccgggagagcgggccaccct scFv ctcctgccgcgcttcggaatcggtcgacaattacggaaatacttttatgcactggtaccaacag domain nt aagccagggcaggcgccaaggctgctgatctacagagcctcgaacctcgaaagcggcatcc ctgcgcggttcagcggtagcggaagccgcaccgatttcaccctgaccatctcatcactggagc cggaggatgtggcagtgtactattgtcagcagtcgaacgaggacccgccgactttcgggcag ggaaccaagctggaaatcaagggtggaggagggagcggcggaggaggatcgggaggag gaggcagcggaggcggaggatcgcaaatccaacttgtccagtcgggctccgaactcaaaaa gcctggcgcgtccgtgaaggtcagctgcaaagcatcaggatacatcttcactaactacggtat gaattgggtcagacaggctccgggtcagggtctggagtggatgggatggattaacacctaca ctggggaatcgacttactccgcggacttcaaagggcggttcgtgttttcactggacaccagcgt gtccaccgcttacttgcaaatcaacgccctcaaggccgaggacaccgccgtgtactactgcgc acgctcaggcggatacgatccaatggactactggggacagggcactacggtgactgtgtcct cc

CAR 3 - 50 atggccctccctgtcaccgccctgctgcttccgctggctcttctgctccacgccgctcggcccg Soluble aaattgtgctcacgcaatcacccgccactctgtcgctttccccgggagagcgggccaccctct scFv - nt cctgccgcgcttcggaatcggtcgacaattacggaaatacttttatgcactggtaccaacagaa gccagggcaggcgccaaggctgctgatctacagagcctcgaacctcgaaagcggcatccct gcgcggttcagcggtagcggaagccgcaccgatttcaccctgaccatctcatcactggagcc ggaggatgtggcagtgtactattgtcagcagtcgaacgaggacccgccgactttcgggcagg gaaccaagctggaaatcaagggtggaggagggagcggcggaggaggatcgggaggagg aggcagcggaggcggaggatcgcaaatccaacttgtccagtcgggctccgaactcaaaaag cctggcgcgtccgtgaaggtcagctgcaaagcatcaggatacatcttcactaactacggtatg aattgggtcagacaggctccgggtcagggtctggagtggatgggatggattaacacctacact ggggaatcgacttactccgcggacttcaaagggcggttcgtgttttcactggacaccagcgtgt ccaccgcttacttgcaaatcaacgccctcaaggccgaggacaccgccgtgtactactgcgca cgctcaggcggatacgatccaatggactactggggacagggcactacggtgactgtgtcctc cggctcgcaccaccatcaccatcatcatcaccac

CAR 3 - 51 malpvtalllplalllhaarpeivltqspatlslspgeratlscrasesvdnygntfmhwyqqk Soluble pgqaprlliyrasnlesgiparfsgsgsrtdftltisslepedvavyycqqsnedpptfgqgtkl scFv - aa eikggggsggggsggggsggggsqiqlvqsgselkkpgasvkvsckasgyiftnygmn wvrqapgqglewmgwintytgestysadfkgrfvfsldtsvstaylqinalkaedtavyyc ar sggydpmdy wgqgttvtvs sg shhhhhhhhh

CAR 3 - atggccctccctgtcaccgccctgctgcttccgctggctcttctgctccacgccgctcggcccg Full - nt 52 aaattgtgctcacgcaatcacccgccactctgtcgctttccccgggagagcgggccaccctct cctgccgcgcttcggaatcggtcgacaattacggaaatacttttatgcactggtaccaacagaa gccagggcaggcgccaaggctgctgatctacagagcctcgaacctcgaaagcggcatccct gcgcggttcagcggtagcggaagccgcaccgatttcaccctgaccatctcatcactggagcc ggaggatgtggcagtgtactattgtcagcagtcgaacgaggacccgccgactttcgggcagg gaaccaagctggaaatcaagggtggaggagggagcggcggaggaggatcgggaggagg aggcagcggaggcggaggatcgcaaatccaacttgtccagtcgggctccgaactcaaaaag cctggcgcgtccgtgaaggtcagctgcaaagcatcaggatacatcttcactaactacggtatg aattgggtcagacaggctccgggtcagggtctggagtggatgggatggattaacacctacact ggggaatcgacttactccgcggacttcaaagggcggttcgtgttttcactggacaccagcgtgt ccaccgcttacttgcaaatcaacgccctcaaggccgaggacaccgccgtgtactactgcgca cgctcaggcggatacgatccaatggactactggggacagggcactacggtgactgtgtcctc caccactaccccagcaccgaggccacccaccccggctcctaccatcgcctcccagcctctgt ccctgcgtccggaggcatgtagacccgcagctggtggggccgtgcatacccggggtcttga cttcgcctgcgatatctacatttgggcccctctggctggtacttgcggggtcctgctgctttcact cgtgatcactctttactgtaagcgcggtcggaagaagctgctgtacatctttaagcaacccttcat gaggcctgtgcagactactcaagaggaggacggctgttcatgccggttcccagaggaggag gaaggcggctgcgaactgcgcgtgaaattcagccgcagcgcagatgctccagcctacaagc aggggcagaaccagctctacaacgaactcaatcttggtcggagagaggagtacgacgtgct ggacaagcggagaggacgggacccagaaatgggcgggaagccgcgcagaaagaatccc caagagggcctgtacaacgagctccaaaaggataagatggcagaagcctatagcgagattg gtatgaaaggggaacgcagaagaggcaaaggccacgacggactgtaccagggactcagc accgccaccaaggacacctatgacgctcttcacatgcaggccctgccgcctcgg

CAR 3 - 53 Malpvtalllplalllhaarpeivltqspatlslspgeratlscrasesvdnysntfmhwyqq Full - aa kp sq aprlliyrasnles giparf s ss g srtdftltis slepedvav yyccj Q snedpptf gq g tkleikggggsggggsggggsggggsqiqlvqsgselkkpgasvkvsckasgyiftnyg mnwvrqapgqglewmgwintytsestysadfksrfvfsldtsvstaylqinalkaedta vyycarsssvdpmdywgqgttvtvsstttpaprpptpaptiasqplslrpeacrpaaggav htrgldfacdiyiwaplagtcgvlllslvitlyclfl-grldcllyifkqpfmrpvqttqeedgcscr fpeeeeggcelrvkfsrsadapaykqgqnqlynelnlgrreeydvldkrrgrdpemggkp rrknpqeglynelqkdkmaeayseigmkgerrrgkghdglyqglstatkdtydalhmqa lppr

CAR 4

CAR4 54 Eivltqspatlslspgeratlscrasesvdnygntfmhwyqqkpgqaprlliyrasnlesgip scFv arfsgsgsrtdftltisslepedvavyycqqsnedpptfgqgtkleikggggsggggsgggg domain sggggsqiqlvqsgaevkkpgasvkvsckasgyiftnygmnwvrqapgqrlewmgwi ntytgestysadfkgrvtitldtsastaymelsslrsedtavyycarsggydpmdywgqgtt vtvss

CAR4 55 Gagatcgtcttgacgcaatcgccagccaccctgtccctgagcccaggcgagcgcgccaccc scFv tcagctgtcgggcgagcgaaagcgtggacaattacggaaacacctttatgcactggtaccaac domain nt agaaaccggggcaggctccgcgcctcctcatctaccgcgcatccaatctggaatcaggaatc cccgcgaggttctccggtagcggatcgcggactgactttactctgaccatctcgtcccttgaac cggaggatgtggctgtgtattactgccagcagtcaaacgaggaccctccaactttcgggcagg gaaccaagctcgaaatcaagggcggtggcggaagcggaggaggaggatcaggcggagg cggctcaggcggtggaggttcacaaattcaactggtgcagtcgggagcggaggtcaagaag ccgggagcctcagtgaaagtgagctgcaaggcttcgggttacattttcactaattacggcatga actgggtgaggcaggcccctggccaacggttggaatggatgggatggatcaacacctacac cggggagtcgacttactccgcggacttcaaggggagagtcacgatcaccctggatacgtccg caagcactgcctacatggaactgtcctccctgcgctcggaagataccgcagtctactactgcg ccagatcgggcggatatgacccgatggactactggggacagggaactactgtcaccgtgtcc teg

CAR4 - 56 atggccctccctgtcaccgccctgctgcttccgctggctcttctgctccacgccgctcggcccg Soluble agatcgtcttgacgcaatcgccagccaccctgtccctgagcccaggcgagcgcgccaccctc scFv - nt agctgtcgggcgagcgaaagcgtggacaattacggaaacacctttatgcactggtaccaaca gaaaccggggcaggctccgcgcctcctcatctaccgcgcatccaatctggaatcaggaatcc ccgcgaggttctccggtagcggatcgcggactgactttactctgaccatctcgtcccttgaacc ggaggatgtggctgtgtattactgccagcagtcaaacgaggaccctccaactttcgggcagg gaaccaagctcgaaatcaagggcggtggcggaagcggaggaggaggatcaggcggagg cggctcaggcggtggaggttcacaaattcaactggtgcagtcgggagcggaggtcaagaag ccgggagcctcagtgaaagtgagctgcaaggcttcgggttacattttcactaattacggcatga actgggtgaggcaggcccctggccaacggttggaatggatgggatggatcaacacctacac cggggagtcgacttactccgcggacttcaaggggagagtcacgatcaccctggatacgtccg caagcactgcctacatggaactgtcctccctgcgctcggaagataccgcagtctactactgcg ccagatcgggcggatatgacccgatggactactggggacagggaactactgtcaccgtgtcc tcgggctcgcaccaccatcaccatcatcatcaccac

CAR4 - 57 malpvtalllplalllhaarpeivltqspatlslspgeratlscrasesvdnygntfm wyqqk Soluble pgqaprlliyrasnlesgiparfsgsgsrtdftltisslepedvavyycqqsnedpptfgqgtkl scFv -aa eikggggsggggsggggsggggsqiqlvqsgaevkkpgasvkvsckasgyiftnygmn wvrqapgqrlewmgwintytgestysadfkgrvtitldtsastaymelsslrsedtavyyca rsggydpmdywgqgttvtvssgshhhhhhhhh

CAR 4 - atggccctccctgtcaccgccctgctgcttccgctggctcttctgctccacgccgctcggcccg Full - nt 58 agatcgtcttgacgcaatcgccagccaccctgtccctgagcccaggcgagcgcgccaccctc agctgtcgggcgagcgaaagcgtggacaattacggaaacacctttatgcactggtaccaaca gaaaccggggcaggctccgcgcctcctcatctaccgcgcatccaatctggaatcaggaatcc ccgcgaggttctccggtagcggatcgcggactgactttactctgaccatctcgtcccttgaacc ggaggatgtggctgtgtattactgccagcagtcaaacgaggaccctccaactttcgggcagg gaaccaagctcgaaatcaagggcggtggcggaagcggaggaggaggatcaggcggagg cggctcaggcggtggaggttcacaaattcaactggtgcagtcgggagcggaggtcaagaag ccgggagcctcagtgaaagtgagctgcaaggcttcgggttacattttcactaattacggcatga actgggtgaggcaggcccctggccaacggttggaatggatgggatggatcaacacctacac cggggagtcgacttactccgcggacttcaaggggagagtcacgatcaccctggatacgtccg caagcactgcctacatggaactgtcctccctgcgctcggaagataccgcagtctactactgcg ccagatcgggcggatatgacccgatggactactggggacagggaactactgtcaccgtgtcc tcgaccactaccccagcaccgaggccacccaccccggctcctaccatcgcctcccagcctct gtccctgcgtccggaggcatgtagacccgcagctggtggggccgtgcatacccggggtcttg acttcgcctgcgatatctacatttgggcccctctggctggtacttgcggggtcctgctgctttcac tcgtgatcactctttactgtaagcgcggtcggaagaagctgctgtacatctttaagcaacccttca tgaggcctgtgcagactactcaagaggaggacggctgttcatgccggttcccagaggagga ggaaggcggctgcgaactgcgcgtgaaattcagccgcagcgcagatgctccagcctacaag caggggcagaaccagctctacaacgaactcaatcttggtcggagagaggagtacgacgtgct ggacaagcggagaggacgggacccagaaatgggcgggaagccgcgcagaaagaatccc caagagggcctgtacaacgagctccaaaaggataagatggcagaagcctatagcgagattg gtatgaaaggggaacgcagaagaggcaaaggccacgacggactgtaccagggactcagc accgccaccaaggacacctatgacgctcttcacatgcaggccctgccgcctcgg

CAR 4 - 59 Malpvtalllplalllhaarpeivltqspatlslspgeratlscrasesvdnysntfmhwyqq Full - aa kp sq aprlliyrasnles giparf s ss g srtdftltis slepedvavyyca Q snedpptfgq g tkleikggggsggggsggggsggggsqiqlvqsgaevkkpgasvkvsckasgyiftn g mnwvrqapgqrlewmgwintytsestysadfksrvtitldtsastaymelsslrsedtav yycarsssvdpmdywgqgttvtvsstttpaprpptpaptiasqplslrpeacrpaaggavh trgldfacdiyiwaplagtcgvlllslvitlyckrgrldcllyifkqpfmrpvqttqeedgcscrf peeeeggcelrvkfsrsadapaykqgqnqlynelnlgrreeydvldkrrgrdpemggkpr rknpqeglynelqkdkmaeayseigmkgerrrgkghdglyqglstatkdtydalhmqal ppr

CAR 5

CAR5 60 Qiqlvqsgselkkpgasvkvsckasgyiftnygmnwvrqapgqglewmgwintytge scFv stysadfkgrfvfsldtsvstaylqinalkaedtavyycarsggydpmdywgqgttvtvssg domain gggsggggsggggsggggsdivltqspdslavslgeratincrasesvdnygntfmhwyq qkpgqppklliyrasnlesgvpdrfsgsgsrtdftltisslqaedvavyycqqsnedpptfgq gtkleik

CAR5 61 Cagatccagttggtccagtcaggctccgaactgaaaaagccgggtgcatccgtcaaggtgtc scFv gtgcaaagcctccggttacattttcaccaactacggcatgaactgggtccgccaggcccctgg domain nt gcagggactcgaatggatggggtggatcaacacttacaccggagagtcgacttactcggccg atttcaagggacggttcgtgttttccctggacacttcagtctcgaccgcatatctccaaatcaacg cgcttaaggcggaagatactgctgtctactactgcgccagatcaggaggttacgatccaatgg actactggggacagggcaccactgtgacggtgtcgtcgggaggaggaggatcgggcggag gcgggtccggcggtggagggagcggaggaggcggaagcgacatcgtgctgacccagtcg ccagatagcctggcggtgtccttgggtgagagggctaccatcaattgtcgcgcgtcagagtcc gtggacaattacgggaataccttcatgcactggtaccaacaaaagcccggacaaccgccgaa gctgctgatctacagagcaagcaacctcgaatcaggagtgccggaccgctttagcgggtcag gaagccggactgacttcaccctgactatctcctcgctccaggccgaggacgtggccgtgtatt actgccagcagagcaacgaagatcctccaacgttcggccaaggaaccaaactggagattaa g

CAR5 - 62 atggccctccctgtcaccgccctgctgcttccgctggctcttctgctccacgccgctcggcccc Soluble agatccagttggtccagtcaggctccgaactgaaaaagccgggtgcatccgtcaaggtgtcgt scFv - nt gcaaagcctccggttacattttcaccaactacggcatgaactgggtccgccaggcccctgggc agggactcgaatggatggggtggatcaacacttacaccggagagtcgacttactcggccgatt tcaagggacggttcgtgttttccctggacacttcagtctcgaccgcatatctccaaatcaacgcg cttaaggcggaagatactgctgtctactactgcgccagatcaggaggttacgatccaatggact actggggacagggcaccactgtgacggtgtcgtcgggaggaggaggatcgggcggaggc gggtccggcggtggagggagcggaggaggcggaagcgacatcgtgctgacccagtcgcc agatagcctggcggtgtccttgggtgagagggctaccatcaattgtcgcgcgtcagagtccgt ggacaattacgggaataccttcatgcactggtaccaacaaaagcccggacaaccgccgaag ctgctgatctacagagcaagcaacctcgaatcaggagtgccggaccgctttagcgggtcagg aagccggactgacttcaccctgactatctcctcgctccaggccgaggacgtggccgtgtatta ctgccagcagagcaacgaagatcctccaacgttcggccaaggaaccaaactggagattaag ggctcgcaccaccatcaccatcatcatcaccac

CAR5 - 63 malpvtalllplalllhaarpqiqlvqsgselkkpgasvkvsckasgyiftnygmnwvrqa Soluble pgqglewmgwintytgestysadfkgrfvfsldtsvstaylqinalkaedtavyycarsgg scFv -aa ydpmdywgqgttvtvssggggsggggsggggsggggsdivltqspdslavslgeratinc rasesvdnygntfmhwyqqkpgqppklliyrasnlesgvpdrfsgsgsrtdftltisslqae dvavyycqqsnedpptfgqgtkleikgshhhhhhhhh

CAR 5 - atggccctccctgtcaccgccctgctgcttccgctggctcttctgctccacgccgctcggcccc Full - nt 64 agatccagttggtccagtcaggctccgaactgaaaaagccgggtgcatccgtcaaggtgtcgt gcaaagcctccggttacattttcaccaactacggcatgaactgggtccgccaggcccctgggc agggactcgaatggatggggtggatcaacacttacaccggagagtcgacttactcggccgatt tcaagggacggttcgtgttttccctggacacttcagtctcgaccgcatatctccaaatcaacgcg cttaaggcggaagatactgctgtctactactgcgccagatcaggaggttacgatccaatggact actggggacagggcaccactgtgacggtgtcgtcgggaggaggaggatcgggcggaggc gggtccggcggtggagggagcggaggaggcggaagcgacatcgtgctgacccagtcgcc agatagcctggcggtgtccttgggtgagagggctaccatcaattgtcgcgcgtcagagtccgt ggacaattacgggaataccttcatgcactggtaccaacaaaagcccggacaaccgccgaag ctgctgatctacagagcaagcaacctcgaatcaggagtgccggaccgctttagcgggtcagg aagccggactgacttcaccctgactatctcctcgctccaggccgaggacgtggccgtgtatta ctgccagcagagcaacgaagatcctccaacgttcggccaaggaaccaaactggagattaag accactaccccagcaccgaggccacccaccccggctcctaccatcgcctcccagcctctgtc cctgcgtccggaggcatgtagacccgcagctggtggggccgtgcatacccggggtcttgact tcgcctgcgatatctacatttgggcccctctggctggtacttgcggggtcctgctgctttcactcg tgatcactctttactgtaagcgcggtcggaagaagctgctgtacatctttaagcaacccttcatga ggcctgtgcagactactcaagaggaggacggctgttcatgccggttcccagaggaggagga aggcggctgcgaactgcgcgtgaaattcagccgcagcgcagatgctccagcctacaagcag gggcagaaccagctctacaacgaactcaatcttggtcggagagaggagtacgacgtgctgg acaagcggagaggacgggacccagaaatgggcgggaagccgcgcagaaagaatcccca agagggcctgtacaacgagctccaaaaggataagatggcagaagcctatagcgagattggta tgaaaggggaacgcagaagaggcaaaggccacgacggactgtaccagggactcagcacc gccaccaaggacacctatgacgctcttcacatgcaggccctgccgcctcgg

CAR 5 - 65 Malpvtalllplalllhaarpqiqlvqssselkkpsasvkvsckassviftnvsitinwvrqa Full - aa psqslewmswintvtsestvsadfksrfvfsldtsvstaylqinalkaedtavvvcarsss vdDmdvwsqsttvtvssssssssssssssssssssssdivltqspdslavslseratin crasesvdny 2ntf mhw yq qkp gq ppklliyrasnles svpdrf s ss s srtdftltis slq aedvavyycQQsnedpDtfsqstkleiktttpaprpptpaptiasqplslrpeacrpaassa vhtrgldfacdiyiwaplagtcgvlllslvitlyclfl-grldcllyifkqpfmrpvqttqeedgcs crfpeeeeggcelrvkfsrsadapaykqgqnqlynelnlgrreeydvldkrrgrdpemgg kprrknpqeglynelqkdkmaeayseigmkgerrrgkghdglyqglstatkdtydalhm qalppr

CAR 6

CAR6 66 Qiqlvqsgselkkpgasvkvsckasgyiftnygmnwvrqapgqglewmgwintytge scFv stysadfkgrfvfsldtsvstaylqinalkaedtavyycarsggydpmdywgqgttvtvssg domain gggsggggsggggsggggseivltqspatlslspgeratlscrasesvdnygntfmhwyq qkpgqaprlliyrasnlesgiparfsgsgsrtdftltisslepedvavyycqqsnedpptfgqg tkleik

CAR6 67 cagatccaactggtgcaatcaggatcggagctgaagaagcctggggcttcagtgaaagtcag scFv ctgcaaagcctccggttacatcttcaccaactacggcatgaactgggtgcgccaggcccctgg domain nt acagggactcgaatggatggggtggatcaacacctataccggggaatccacgtactcagcag atttcaagggacgcttcgtcttttcgctggatacctccgtgtccactgcgtacctccaaatcaatg ccctcaaagccgaagatactgcggtctactactgcgcacggagcggaggctacgacccgat ggactactggggacagggaaccacggtgaccgtgtccagcggaggaggcggatcgggag gcggtggttcaggcggtggaggcagcggcggaggtggaagcgaaatcgtcttgactcaga gcccagcgactttgtccctgtcgcccggagagcgggcaactctgtcatgccgcgcttcggaat cggtggacaactatggaaacacctttatgcactggtaccaacagaagccgggacaagccccg agacttctgatctaccgggcctcgaatctcgaaagcggcatcccggctagattctcggggtcg ggatcaaggaccgacttcactcttactatttcctcactggagccagaagatgtggcggtgtacta ctgtcagcagtccaatgaggacccgccaactttcgggcagggcaccaagctggagattaag

CAR6 - 68 atggccctccctgtcaccgccctgctgcttccgctggctcttctgctccacgccgctcggcccc Soluble agatccaactggtgcaatcaggatcggagctgaagaagcctggggcttcagtgaaagtcagc scFv - nt tgcaaagcctccggttacatcttcaccaactacggcatgaactgggtgcgccaggcccctgga cagggactcgaatggatggggtggatcaacacctataccggggaatccacgtactcagcaga tttcaagggacgcttcgtcttttcgctggatacctccgtgtccactgcgtacctccaaatcaatgc cctcaaagccgaagatactgcggtctactactgcgcacggagcggaggctacgacccgatg gactactggggacagggaaccacggtgaccgtgtccagcggaggaggcggatcgggagg cggtggttcaggcggtggaggcagcggcggaggtggaagcgaaatcgtcttgactcagagc ccagcgactttgtccctgtcgcccggagagcgggcaactctgtcatgccgcgcttcggaatcg gtggacaactatggaaacacctttatgcactggtaccaacagaagccgggacaagccccgag acttctgatctaccgggcctcgaatctcgaaagcggcatcccggctagattctcggggtcggg atcaaggaccgacttcactcttactatttcctcactggagccagaagatgtggcggtgtactact gtcagcagtccaatgaggacccgccaactttcgggcagggcaccaagctggagattaaggg ctcgcaccaccatcaccatcatcatcaccac

CAR6 - 69 malpvtalllplalllhaarpqiqlvqsgselkkpgasvkvsckasgyiftnygmnwvrqa Soluble pgqglewmgwintytgestysadfkgrfvfsldtsvstaylqinalkaedtavyycarsgg scFv - aa ydpmdywgqgttvtvssggggsggggsggggsggggseivltqspatlslspgeratlscr asesvdnygntfm wyqqkpgqaprlliyrasnlesgiparfsgsgsrtdftltisslepedv avyycqqsnedpptfgqgtkleikgshhhhhhhhh

CAR6 - atggccctccctgtcaccgccctgctgcttccgctggctcttctgctccacgccgctcggcccc Full - nt 70 agatccaactggtgcaatcaggatcggagctgaagaagcctggggcttcagtgaaagtcagc tgcaaagcctccggttacatcttcaccaactacggcatgaactgggtgcgccaggcccctgga cagggactcgaatggatggggtggatcaacacctataccggggaatccacgtactcagcaga tttcaagggacgcttcgtcttttcgctggatacctccgtgtccactgcgtacctccaaatcaatgc cctcaaagccgaagatactgcggtctactactgcgcacggagcggaggctacgacccgatg gactactggggacagggaaccacggtgaccgtgtccagcggaggaggcggatcgggagg cggtggttcaggcggtggaggcagcggcggaggtggaagcgaaatcgtcttgactcagagc ccagcgactttgtccctgtcgcccggagagcgggcaactctgtcatgccgcgcttcggaatcg gtggacaactatggaaacacctttatgcactggtaccaacagaagccgggacaagccccgag acttctgatctaccgggcctcgaatctcgaaagcggcatcccggctagattctcggggtcggg atcaaggaccgacttcactcttactatttcctcactggagccagaagatgtggcggtgtactact gtcagcagtccaatgaggacccgccaactttcgggcagggcaccaagctggagattaagac cactaccccagcaccgaggccacccaccccggctcctaccatcgcctcccagcctctgtccc tgcgtccggaggcatgtagacccgcagctggtggggccgtgcatacccggggtcttgacttc gcctgcgatatctacatttgggcccctctggctggtacttgcggggtcctgctgctttcactcgtg atcactctttactgtaagcgcggtcggaagaagctgctgtacatctttaagcaacccttcatgag gcctgtgcagactactcaagaggaggacggctgttcatgccggttcccagaggaggaggaa ggcggctgcgaactgcgcgtgaaattcagccgcagcgcagatgctccagcctacaagcagg ggcagaaccagctctacaacgaactcaatcttggtcggagagaggagtacgacgtgctggac aagcggagaggacgggacccagaaatgggcgggaagccgcgcagaaagaatccccaag agggcctgtacaacgagctccaaaaggataagatggcagaagcctatagcgagattggtatg aaaggggaacgcagaagaggcaaaggccacgacggactgtaccagggactcagcaccgc caccaaggacacctatgacgctcttcacatgcaggccctgccgcctcgg

109375 71 Malpvtalllplalllhaarpqiqlvqssselkkpsasvkvsckassviftnv2itinwvrqa CAR6 - psqslewmswintvtsestvsadfksrfvfsldtsvstaylqinalkaedtavvvcarsss Full - aa vdDmdvwsqsttvtvsssssssssssssssssssssseivltqspatlslspseratlsc

rasesvdnysntfmhwyqqkpsqaprlliyrasnlessiparfsHSHsrtdftltisslepe dvavyycQQsnedpptfsqstkleiktttpaprpptpaptiasqplslrpeacrpaassav htrgldfacdiyiwaplagtcgvlllslvitlyckrgrkkllyifkqpfmrpvqttqeedgcscr fpeeeeggcelrvkfsrsadapaykqgqnqlynelnlgrreeydvldkrrgrdpemggkp rrknpqeglynelqkdkmaeayseigmkgerrrgkghdglyqglstatkdtydalhmqa lppr

CAR 7

CAR7 72 Qiqlvqsgaevkkpgasvkvsckasgyiftnygmnwvrqapgqrlewmgwintytge scFv stysadfkgrvtitldtsastaymelsslrsedtavyycarsggydpmdywgqgttvtvssg domain gggsggggsggggsggggsdivltqspdslavslgeratincrasesvdnygntfm wyq qkpgqppklliyrasnlesgvpdrfsgsgsrtdftltisslqaedvavyycqqsnedpptfgq

gtkleik

aaaactgctgatctaccgcgctagcaacctcgaatcgggcgtgccagataggttctcgggctc ggggagccggacggattttactctgactatttcgtccctccaagcagaggacgtcgccgtgtat tactgccagcaatcgaatgaggacccgccaactttcggacaggggaccaagctggagattaa gaccactaccccagcaccgaggccacccaccccggctcctaccatcgcctcccagcctctgt ccctgcgtccggaggcatgtagacccgcagctggtggggccgtgcatacccggggtcttga cttcgcctgcgatatctacatttgggcccctctggctggtacttgcggggtcctgctgctttcact cgtgatcactctttactgtaagcgcggtcggaagaagctgctgtacatctttaagcaacccttcat gaggcctgtgcagactactcaagaggaggacggctgttcatgccggttcccagaggaggag gaaggcggctgcgaactgcgcgtgaaattcagccgcagcgcagatgctccagcctacaagc aggggcagaaccagctctacaacgaactcaatcttggtcggagagaggagtacgacgtgct ggacaagcggagaggacgggacccagaaatgggcgggaagccgcgcagaaagaatccc caagagggcctgtacaacgagctccaaaaggataagatggcagaagcctatagcgagattg gtatgaaaggggaacgcagaagaggcaaaggccacgacggactgtaccagggactcagc accgccaccaaggacacctatgacgctcttcacatgcaggccctgccgcctcgg

CAR 7 77 Malpvtalllplalllhaarpqiqlvqssaevld psasvkvsckassviftnvsinnwvrq Full - aa apsqrlewmswintvtsestvsadfksrvtitldtsastaymelsslrsedtavvvcarsss dpjnd wgqgttvtvssggggsggggsggggsggggsdivltqspdslavslgeratin crasesvdny 2ntf mhw yq qkp gq ppklliyrasnles svpdrf s ss s srtdftltis slq aedvavyycQQsnedpDtfsqstkleiktttpaprpptpaptiasqplslrpeacrpaassa vhtrgldfacdiyiwaplagtcgvlllslvitlyclfl-grldcllyifkqpfmrpvqttqeedgcs crfpeeeeggcelrvkfsrsadapaykqgqnqlynelnlgrreeydvldkrrgrdpemgg kprrknpqeglynelqkdkmaeayseigmkgerrrgkghdglyqglstatkdtydalhm qalppr

CAR 8

CAR8 78 Qiqlvqsgaevkkpgasvkvsckasgyiftnygmnwvrqapgqrlewmgwintytge scFv stysadfkgrvtitldtsastaymelsslrsedtavyycarsggydpmdywgqgttvtvssg domain gggsggggsggggsggggseivltqspatlslspgeratlscrasesvdnygntfmhwyq qkpgqaprlliyrasnlesgiparfsgsgsrtdftltisslepedvavyycqqsnedpptfgqg tkleik

CAR8 79 Cagatccagctggtgcaatcgggagctgaagtgaagaagcccggagcttcagtcaaagtca scFv gctgcaaggcgtcgggctatatcttcaccaactacgggatgaactgggtgcggcaggcccct domain nt ggacaaagactggaatggatgggatggatcaacacttatactggcgagagcacgtactcagc cgactttaagggacgggtgactatcaccctcgatacctccgcctccactgcgtacatggaactc tcgtccttgcgctccgaggacactgccgtgtactactgcgccaggtcgggtggctacgatccg atggattactggggtcaaggaaccaccgtcactgtgtcgtccggcggaggcgggagcggag gtggtggttcgggaggaggagggtcaggcggaggaggcagcgaaatcgtgctgacccaaa gcccggcaactctgtcactcagcccaggggagagggcaaccctgtcatgtcgggctagcga atccgtggacaattacggaaacacgtttatgcactggtaccaacagaaaccaggacaggcgc ctagacttctcatctaccgcgcgagcaatttggaatccggcatcccagcccgcttctccgggtc ggggtcacgcaccgatttcactctgaccatttcctccctggaacccgaggacgtggcagtcta ctactgccagcagtcgaatgaggacccgccgaccttcggacagggcaccaagctggagatt aag

CAR8 - 80 atggccctccctgtcaccgccctgctgcttccgctggctcttctgctccacgccgctcggcccc Soluble agatccagctggtgcaatcgggagctgaagtgaagaagcccggagcttcagtcaaagtcag scFv - nt ctgcaaggcgtcgggctatatcttcaccaactacgggatgaactgggtgcggcaggcccctg gacaaagactggaatggatgggatggatcaacacttatactggcgagagcacgtactcagcc gactttaagggacgggtgactatcaccctcgatacctccgcctccactgcgtacatggaactct cgtccttgcgctccgaggacactgccgtgtactactgcgccaggtcgggtggctacgatccga tggattactggggtcaaggaaccaccgtcactgtgtcgtccggcggaggcgggagcggagg tggtggttcgggaggaggagggtcaggcggaggaggcagcgaaatcgtgctgacccaaag cccggcaactctgtcactcagcccaggggagagggcaaccctgtcatgtcgggctagcgaat ccgtggacaattacggaaacacgtttatgcactggtaccaacagaaaccaggacaggcgcct agacttctcatctaccgcgcgagcaatttggaatccggcatcccagcccgcttctccgggtcg gggtcacgcaccgatttcactctgaccatttcctccctggaacccgaggacgtggcagtctact actgccagcagtcgaatgaggacccgccgaccttcggacagggcaccaagctggagattaa gggctcgcaccaccatcaccatcatcatcaccac

CAR8 - 81 malpvtalllplalllhaarpqiqlvqsgaevkkpgasvkvsckasgyiftnygmnwvrqa Soluble pgqrlewmgwintytgestysadfkgrvtitldtsastaymelsslrsedtavyycarsggy scFv - aa dpmdywgqgttvtvssggggsggggsggggsggggseivltqspatlslspgeratlscra sesvdnygntfm wyqqkpgqaprlliyrasnlesgiparfsgsgsrtdftltisslepedva vyycqqsnedpptfgqgtkleikgshhhhhhhhh

Table 2. Exemplary CD 123 CAR sequences for in vitro transcription maeayseigmkgerrrgkghdglyqglstatkdtydalhmqalppr

pD-A(xs) 96 atggccctgcctgtgacagccctgctgctgcctctggctctgctgctgcacgccgc CD123 tagacctggatcccaggtgcagctgcagcagcctggcgctgaactcgtgcggccag gcgcttctgtgaagctgagctgtaaagccagcggctacaccttcaccagctactgg CAR 1176 atgaactgggtcaagcagcggcccgaccagggcctggagtggatcggcagaatcga - nt cccctacgacagcgagacacactacaaccagaagttcaaggacaaggccatcctga ccgtggacaagagcagcagcaccgcctacatgcagctgtccagcctgaccagcgag gacagcgccgtgtactactgcgccaggggcaactgggacgactattggggccaggg caccaccctgacagtgtctagcggaggcggaggatctggcggcggaggaagttctg gcggaggctccgacgtgcagatcacccagagccctagctacctggccgcctctcct ggcgagacaatcaccatcaactgccgggccagcaagagcatctccaaggacctggc ctggtatcaggaaaagcccggcaagaccaacaagctgctgatctacagcggcagca ccctgcagagcggcatccccagcagattttccggcagcggctccggcaccgacttc accctgaccatcagctccctggaacccgaggactttgccatgtactattgccagca gcacaacaagtacccttacaccttcggcggaggcaccaagctggaaatcaaggcca gctccggagagagcaagtacggccctccctgccccccttgccctgcccccgagttc ctgggcggacccagcgtgttcctgttcccccccaagcccaaggacaccctgatgat cagccggacccccgaggtgacctgtgtggtggtggacgtgtcccaggaggaccccg aggtccagttcaactggtacgtggacggcgtggaggtgcacaacgccaagaccaag ccccgggaggagcagttcaatagcacctaccgggtggtgtccgtgctgaccgtgct gcaccaggactggctgaacggcaaggaatacaagtgtaaggtgtccaacaagggcc tgcccagcagcatcgagaaaaccatcagcaaggccaagggccagcctcgggagccc caggtgtacaccctgccccctagccaagaggagatgaccaagaaccaggtgtccct gacctgcctggtgaagggcttctaccccagcgacatcgccgtggagtgggagagca acggccagcccgagaacaactacaagaccaccccccctgtgctggacagcgacggc agcttcttcctgtacagccggctgaccgtggacaagagccggtggcaggagggcaa cgtctttagctgctccgtgatgcacgaggccctgcacaaccactacacccagaaga gcctgagcctgtccctgggcaagatggatatctacatctgggcgcccttggccggg acttgtggggtccttctcctgtcactggttatcaccctttactgcaaacggggcag aaagaaactcctgtatatattcaaacaaccatttatgagaccagtacaaactactc aagaggaagatggctgtagctgccgatttccagaagaagaagaaggaggatgtgaa ctgagagtgaagttcagcaggagcgcagacgcccccgcgtacaagcagggccagaa ccagctctataacgagctcaatctaggacgaagagaggagtacgatgttttggaca agagacgtggccgggaccctgagatggggggaaagccgagaaggaagaaccctcag gaaggcctgtacaatgaactgcagaaagataagatggcggaggcctacagtgagat tgggatgaaaggcgagcgccggaggggcaaggggcacgatggcctttaccagggtc tcagtacagccaccaaggacacctacgacgcccttcacatgcaggccctgccccct cgc

pD-A(xs) 97 malpvtalllplalllhaarpgsqvqlqqpqaelvrpgasvklsckasgytftsyw CD123 mnwvkqrpdqglewigridpydsethynqkfkdkailtvdkssstaymqlssltse dsavyycargnwddywgqgttltvssggggsggggssgggsdvqitqspsylaasp CAR 1176 getitincrasksiskdlawyqekpgktnklliysgstlqsgipsrfsgsgsgtdf - aa tltisslepedfamyycqqhnkypytfgggtkleikassgeskygppcppcpapef lggpsvfIfppkpkdtlmisrtpevtcvvvdvsqedpevqfnwyvdgvevhnaktk preeqfnstyrvvsvltvlhqdwlngkeykckvsnkglpssiektiskakgqprep qvytlppsqeemtknqvsltclvkgfypsdiavewesngqpennykttppvldsdg sfflysrltvdksrwqegnvfscsvmhealhnhytqkslslslgkmdiyiwaplag tcgvlllslvitlyckrgrkkllyifkqpfmrpvqttqeedgcscrfpeeeeggce lrvkfsrsadapaykqgqnqlynelnlgrreeydvldkrrgrdpemggkprrknpq eglynelqkdkmaeayseigmkgerrrgkghdglyqglstatkdtydalhmqalpp r In SEQ ID NO:94, capitalized bolded residues correspond to the T2A region; underlined residues correspond to the CD 123 CAR region; and capitalized italicized residues correspond to the beta globulin UTR region.

The humanized anti-CD 123 scFv variants were transiently expressed in HEK293 cells and were purified to near homogeneity via the C-terminal 6xHis tag (SEQ ID NO: 128) (Figures 28 and 29). Expression levels of the variants were determined by UV280. Expression was compared to the mouse Ctrl scFv. Binding of the variants to the immobilized CD 123 was confirmed by ELISA, and the estimated EC50 ranged from 1 to 10 nM as compared to that of the parent mouse scFv (-1.1-2.6 nM; Figures 30a and b). Thermal stability of the variants determined as melting temperatures was measured using the differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF). As shown in Figure 31, the parent mouse scFv showed a melting temperature of 58.5°C, while the humanized anti-CD 123 scFv variants had decreased melting temperatures ranging from 44°C to 52°C (Figure 31).

Humanized sequence alignment with mouse sequences (SEQ ID NOS 92, 32, 31, 34, 33, and 93, respectively, in order of appearance):

VL

mouseVl DIVLTQSPASLAVSLGQRATISCRASESVDHYGnTFMHWYQQKPGQPPKLLIYlilllli A_VK4_B3 DIVLTQSPDSLAVSLGERATINCRASESVDNYGNTFMHWYQQKPGQPPKLLIYRASNLES

B_VK3_L6 EIVLTQSPATLSLSPGERATLSCRASESVDNYGNTFMHWYQQKPGQAPRLLIYRASNLES

mouseVl GIPARFSGSGSRTDFTLTINPVEADDVATYYCQQSUEDPPTFGAGTKLELK

A_VK4_B3 GVPDRFSGSGSRTDFTLTISSLQAEDVAVYYCQQSNEDPPTFGQGTKLEIK

B_VK3_L6 GIPARFSGSGSRTDFTLTISSLEPEDVAVYYCQQSNEDPPTFGQGTKLEIK

* . * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * .. . * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * . *

VH

C_VH7_7-4.1 QIQLVQSGSELKKPGASVKVSCKASGYIFTNYG HWVRQAPGQGLEWMGi|l|l|Il||l D_VHl_l-03 QIQLVQSGAEVKKPGASVKVSCKASGYIFTNYGMNWVRQAPGQRLEWMGWINTYTGESTY mouseVh QIQLVQSGPELKKPGETVKI SCKASGYIFTNYGMNWVKQAPGKSFKWMGWINTYTGESTY

******** *.**** .**.*****************.****. ..**************

C_VH7_7-4.1 |I|l|lRFVFSLDTSVSTAYLQINALKAEDTAVYYCAR i|||l||lwGQGTTV

D_VHl_l-03 SADFKGRVTITLDTSASTAYMELSSLRSEDTAVYYCARSGGYDPMDYWGQGTTVTVSS mouseVh SADFKGRFAFSLETSASTAYLHINDLKNEDTATYFCARSGGYDPMDYWGQGTSVTVSS

******* . * . * * * * * * . **** *.*****************.*****

Example 6: Characterization of Humanized CD 123 CAR

Humanized anti-CD 123 CAR constructs were generated based on the mouse anti- human CD123 scFv 32716 and inserted in a pELPS-41BB-CD3z backbone. Each plasmid was amplified by bacterial transformation using standard techniques in TOP 10 cells, followed by a Maxiprep using the Qiagen Plasmid Maxi kit. Lentiviral supernatant was produced in 293T cells using standard techniques. Normal donor T cells were transduced with lentiviral supernatant and expanded using anti-CD3/CD28 beads and interleukin-2. Fold expansion of T cells transduced with each construct, or with a control mouse anti-human CD 123 CAR (CI 172) is shown in the following Table 3:

Table 3. Virus Production and T cell expansion

To detect the transduction efficiency and level of expression of each construct, transduced T cells on day 10 of expansion were stained with (i) Alexa fluor 647 goat anti- mouse F(ab) reagent, (ii) FITC goat anti-human F(ab), or (iii) human CD123-Fc primary followed by anti-human Fc PE. Anti-mouse F(ab) and CD123-Fc were found to have good correlation, suggesting that where CAR was expressed on the surface, it would be able to bind the target (Figure 32). Anti-human F(ab) reagent did not detect CAR (data not shown).

Table 4.

MOLM14, a CD123-expression target cell line that had been previously transduced with firefly luciferase, was plated in a 96 well plate at 5xl04 cells per well. T cells transduced with the different humanized CAR constructs, or with control mouse anti-human CD123 CAR, were plated at 2: 1, 1: 1, and 0.5: 1 after correction for percent CAR expression. Specifically, all T cells were diluted to a CAR expression level of 40%, and therefore the effective E:T ratios were 2 x 0.4 = 0.8: 1 ; 1 x 0.4= 0.4: 1 ; 0.5 x 0.4 = 0.2: 1. Control wells contained MOLM14 cells alone (E:T = 0: 1), or MOLM14 cells killed with ETOH (MAX killing). After 16 hours, luciferin was added to each well and the plate was imaged for 10 seconds. Results are shown in Figure 33.

Results from a killing assay are presented in Figure 34.

All constructs with the exception of MW89-29GB showed similar surface expression and anti-tumor efficacy. These constructs also show similar efficacy to the CI 172 mouse anti-human CD123 construct.

Example 7: Anti-CD123 RNA CAR T Cell Therapy for AML and ALL Anti-CD123 CAR constructs CI 172 (scFv 32716) and CI 176 (scFv 26292) were cloned into a pDA vector. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences are provided in Table 2 as SEQ ID NOs: 94-97. The constructs were subjected to in vitro transcription, and the resultant mRNA was electroporated into normal donor T cells. Human T cells were rested overnight, followed by a 2 hour co-incubation with targets (see Figure 35), in the presence of anti-CD107a, anti-CD49d and anti-CD28, and monensin, in a standard degranulation assay. Controls were lentivirally transduced CART19, lentivirally transduced CART 123 (construct CI 172 based on the 32716 scFv), and anti-CD3/CD28 beads. Note CI 176 recognizes cynomolgus CD123 as well as human CD123, whereas CI 172 recognizes only human CD 123.

These results show that T cells can be successfully electroporated with functional anti-CD 123 CAR.

Normal donor T cells were expanded in vitro using anti-CD3/CD28 beads and rhIL2. Luciferase-expressing MOLM14 cells were injected iv (lxlO6 cells) into sublethally irradiated NSG mice on DO. Mice were imaged on D6 to confirm tumor engraftment (BLI). On D7, T cells were electroporated (EP) with RNA CD123 CAR or RNA CAR 19 plasmid, or subjected to mock EP ("no treatment"), rested for 4 hours at 37 degrees, and then mice were treated with 15xl06 engineered T cells. On D13, mice underwent BLI. On D14, thawed T cells were electroporated as above. On D14, mice were treated with cyclophosphamide 60mg/kg i.v. for lymphodepletion, followed by an injection of 5xl06 EP T cells iv. On D20, mice underwent BLI. On D21, thawed T cells were electroporated as above. On D21, mice were treated with cyclophosphamide 60mg/kg i.v. for lymphodepletion, followed by an injection of 5xl06 EP T cells i.v. Last imaging was performed on D34 to document the anti-tumor response. Bioluminescence on D21 and D28 post- T cell injection are shown in Figure 36. Data demonstrating the anti-tumor effect are shown in Figure 37.

These results show that RNA-electroporated CAR cells can be used to induce an anti-tumor response in vivo in immunodeficient animals. Example 8: In vivo Comparison of Anti-tumor Efficacy of Anti-CD 123 CAR T Cells T cells were transduced with the following constructs: CI 172 (anti-CD123 32716 light-to-heavy chain CD8H 4-1BB CD3z; CI 176 (anti-CD123 26292 light-to-heavy chain CD8H 4-1BB CD3z); 10 NSG mice were injected with MOLM14 Luc lxlO6 on DO. Animals were imaged for tumor burden on D7, followed by injection of lxlO6 T cells as follows: No T cells n = 2; CART123_C1172 n=4 (50% CAR+ T cells);

CART123_C1176 n=4 (50% CAR+ T cells). Tumor burden was followed serially by bioluminescent imaging (Figure 38). Tumor burden as shown by bioluminescence 7 days after injection of T cells was lower in both T cell groups than in the untreated group, and CART123_C1172 appeared to be somewhat more potent than CART123_C1176.

The disclosures of each and every patent, patent application, and publication cited herein are hereby incorporated herein by reference in their entirety. While this invention has been disclosed with reference to specific embodiments, it is apparent that other embodiments and variations of this invention may be devised by others skilled in the art without departing from the true spirit and scope of the invention. The appended claims are intended to be construed to include all such embodiments and equivalent variations.

Claims

CLAIMS What is claimed is:
1. An isolated nucleic acid molecule encoding a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), wherein said CAR comprises an anti-CD 123 binding domain, a transmembrane domain, and an intracellular signaling domain comprising a stimulatory domain, and wherein said anti-CD 123 binding domain comprises one or more of light chain complementary determining region 1 (LC CDRl), light chain complementary determining region 2 (LC CDR2), and light chain complementary determining region 3 (LC CDR3) of any anti- CD 123 light chain binding domain amino acid sequence listed in Table 1, SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101, and one or more of heavy chain complementary determining region 1 (HC CDRl), heavy chain complementary determining region 2 (HC CDR2), and heavy chain complementary determining region 3 (HC CDR3) of any anti-CD 123 heavy chain binding domain amino acid sequence listed in Table 1, SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID
NO: 101.
2. The isolated nucleic acid molecule of claim 1, comprising LC CDRl, LC CDR2 and LC CDR3 of any anti-CD 123 light chain binding domain amino acid sequence listed in Table 1, SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101.
3. The isolated nucleic acid molecule of claim 1, comprising HC CDRl, HC CDR2, and HC CDR3 of any anti-CD 123 heavy chain binding domain amino acid sequence listed in Table 1, SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101.
4. The isolated nucleic acid molecule of claim 1, comprising LC CDRl, LC CDR2 and LC CDR3 of any anti-CD 123 light chain binding domain amino acid sequence listed in Table 1, SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101, and HC CDRl, HC CDR2, and HC CDR3 of any anti-CD 123 heavy chain binding domain amino acid sequence listed in Table 1, SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101.
5. The isolated nucleic acid molecule of claim 1, comprising any light chain variable region listed in. Table 1, SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101.
6. The isolated nucleic acid molecule of claim 1, comprising any heavy chain variable region listed in Table 1, SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101.
7. The isolated nucleic acid molecule of claim 1, comprising any light chain variable region listed in Table 1, SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 10 land any heavy chain variable region listed Table 1, SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101.
8. The isolated nucleic acid molecule of any of the preceding claims, wherein the anti-CD 123 binding domain is a scFv.
9. The isolated nucleic acid molecule of any of the preceding claims, wherein the light chain variable region comprises an amino acid sequence having at least one, two or three modifications but not more than 30, 20 or 10 modifications of an amino acid sequence of a light chain variable region provided in Table 1, SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101, or a sequence with 95-99% identity to an amino acid sequence provided in Table 1, SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101.
10. The isolated nucleic acid molecule of any of the preceding claims, wherein the heavy chain variable region comprises an amino acid sequence having at least one, two or three modifications but not more than 30, 20 or 10 modifications of an amino acid sequence of a heavy chain variable region provided in Table 1, SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101, or a sequence with 95-99% identity to an amino acid sequence provided in Table 1, SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101.
11. The isolated nucleic acid molecule of any of the preceding claims, wherein the anti-CD 123 binding domain comprises a sequence selected from a group consisting of SEQ ID NO:36, SEQ ID NO:42, SEQ ID NO:48, SEQ ID NO:54, SEQ ID NO:60, SEQ ID NO:66, SEQ ID NO:72, and SEQ ID NO:78, or a sequence with 95-99% identify thereof.
12. The isolated nucleic acid molecule of any of the preceding claims, wherein the nucleic acid sequence encoding the anti-CD 123 binding domain comprises a sequence selected from a group consisting of SEQ ID NO:37, SEQ ID NO:43, SEQ ID NO:49, SEQ ID NO:55, SEQ ID NO:61, SEQ ID NO:67, SEQ ID NO:73, and SEQ ID NO:79, or a sequence with 95-99% identify thereof.
13. The isolated nucleic acid molecule of any of the preceding claims, wherein the encoded CAR includes a transmembrane domain that comprises a transmembrane domain of a protein selected from the group consisting of the alpha, beta or zeta chain of the T- cell receptor, CD28, CD3 epsilon, CD45, CD4, CD5, CD8, CD9, CD16, CD22, CD33, CD37, CD64, CD80, CD86, CD134, CD137 and CD154.
14. The isolated nucleic acid molecule of any of the preceding claims, wherein the encoded transmembrane domain comprises a sequence of SEQ ID NO: 5.
15. The isolated nucleic acid molecule of any of the preceding claims, wherein the encoded transmembrane domain comprises an amino acid sequence comprises at least one, two or three modifications but not more than 20, 10 or 5 modifications of an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:5, or a sequence with 95-99% identity to an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:5.
16. The isolated nucleic acid molecule of any of the preceding claims, wherein the nucleic acid sequence encoding the transmembrane domain comprises a sequence of SEQ ID NO: 12, or a sequence with 95-99% identify thereof.
17. The isolated nucleic acid molecule of any of the preceding claims, wherein the encoded anti-CD 123 binding domain is connected to the transmembrane domain by a hinge region.
18. The isolated nucleic acid molecule of claim 17, wherein the encoded hinge region comprises an amino acid sequence of any of SEQ ID NO:4, 104, 122 or 124, or a sequence with 95-99% identity thereof.
19. The isolated nucleic acid molecule of claim 17, wherein the nucleic acid sequence encoding the hinge region comprises a sequence of SEQ ID NO:7, or a sequence with 95- 99% identify thereof.
20. The isolated nucleic acid molecule of any of the preceding claims, further comprising a sequence encoding a costimulatory domain.
21. The isolated nucleic acid molecule of claim 20, wherein the encoded
costimulatory domain comprises a functional signaling domain of a protein selected from the group consisting of OX40, CD27, CD28, CDS, ICAM-1, LFA-1 (CDl la/CD18), ICOS (CD278), and 4-1BB (CD137).
22. The isolated nucleic acid molecule of claim 20 or 21, wherein the encoded costimulatory domain comprises a sequence of SEQ ID NO:6 or SEQ ID NO:23.
23. The isolated nucleic acid molecule of claim 20 or 21, wherein the encoded costimulatory domain comprises an amino acid sequence comprises at least one, two or three modifications (e.g., substitutions) but not more than 20, 10 or 5 modifications (e.g., substitutions) of an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:6 or SEQ ID NO:23, or a sequence with 95-99% identity to an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 6 or SEQ ID NO:23.
24. The isolated nucleic acid molecule of claim 20 or 21, wherein the nucleic acid sequence encoding the costimulatory domain comprises a sequence of SEQ ID NO: 13, SEQ ID NO:27, or a sequence with 95-99% identify thereof.
25. The isolated nucleic acid molecule of any of the preceding claims, further comprising a sequence encoding an intracellular signaling domain.
26. The isolated nucleic acid molecule of any of the preceding claims, wherein the encoded intracellular signaling domain comprises a functional signaling domain of 4- 1BB and/or a functional signaling domain of CD3 zeta.
27. The isolated nucleic acid molecule of any of the preceding claims, wherein the encoded intracellular signaling domain comprises the sequence of SEQ ID NO: 6 or SEQ ID NO:23 and/or the sequence of SEQ ID NO: 7 or SEQ ID NO:98.
28. The isolated nucleic acid molecule of any of the preceding claims, wherein the intracellular signaling domain comprises an amino acid sequence having at least one, two or three modifications but not more than 20, 10 or 5 modifications of an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 6 or SEQ ID NO:23 and/or an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 7 or SEQ ID NO:98, or a sequence with 95-99% identity to an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 6 or SEQ ID NO:23 and/or an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 7 or SEQ ID NO:98.
29. The isolated nucleic acid molecule of any of the preceding claims, wherein the encoded intracellular signaling domain comprises the sequence of SEQ ID NO: 6 or SEQ ID NO:23 and the sequence of SEQ ID NO: 7 or SEQ ID NO:98, wherein the sequences comprising the intracellular signaling domain are expressed in the same frame and as a single polypeptide chain.
30. The isolated nucleic acid molecule of any of the preceding claims, wherein the nucleic acid sequence encoding the intracellular signaling domain comprises a sequence of SEQ ID NO: 13 or SEQ ID NO:27, or a sequence with 95-99% identify thereof, and/or a sequence of SEQ ID NO: 14 or SEQ ID NO:99, or a sequence with 95-99% identity thereof.
31. The isolated nucleic acid molecule of any of the preceding claims, further comprising a leader sequence.
32. The isolated nucleic acid molecule of claim 31, wherein the leader sequence comprises SEQ ID NO: 3.
33. An isolated polypeptide molecule encoded by the nucleic acid molecule of any one of claims 1-32.
34. The isolated polypeptide molecule of claim 33 comprising a sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO:41, SEQ ID NO:47, SEQ ID NO:53, SEQ ID NO:59, SEQ ID NO:65, SEQ ID NO:71, SEQ ID NO:77, and SEQ ID NO:83, or a sequence with 95-99% identify thereof.
35. The isolated polypeptide molecule of claim 33 comprising a sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO: 1, SEQ ID NO: 109, SEQ ID NO: 111, SEQ ID NO: 113, SEQ ID NO: 100, SEQ ID NO: 117, SEQ ID NO: 119, and SEQ ID NO: 121, or a sequence with 95-99% identify thereof.
36. The isolated polypeptide molecule of claim 35 comprising a sequence of SEQ ID NO: l, SEQ ID NO: 100, or a sequence with 95-99% identify thereof.
37. An isolated chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) molecule comprising an anti-CD 123 binding domain, a transmembrane domain, and an intracellular signaling domain.
38. The isolated CAR molecule of claim 37, wherein the intracellular signaling domain comprises a costimulatory domain and/or a primary signaling domain.
39. The isolated CAR molecule of claim 37 or 38, wherein the anti-CD 123 binding domain comprises an antibody or antibody fragment which includes an anti-CD 123 binding domain.
40. The isolated CAR molecule of any of claims 37-39, wherein the anti-CD 123 binding domain comprises one or more light chain complementary determining region 1 (LC CDR1), light chain complementary determining region 2 (LC CDR2), and light chain complementary determining region 3 (LC CDR3) of any anti-CD 123 binding domain listed in Table 1, SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101, and one or more heavy chain complementary determining region 1 (HC CDR1), heavy chain complementary determining region 2 (HC CDR2), and heavy chain complementary determining region 3 (HC CDR3) of any anti-CD 123 binding domain listed in Table 1, SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101.
41. The isolated CAR molecule of any of claims 37-40, comprising LC CDR1, LC CDR2 and LC CDR3 of any anti-CD 123 light chain binding domain amino acid sequence listed in Table 1, SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101.
42. The isolated CAR molecule of any of claims 37-41, comprising HC CDR1, HC CDR2, and HC CDR3 of any anti-CD 123 heavy chain binding domain amino acid sequence listed in Table 1, SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101.
43. The isolated CAR molecule of any of claims 37-42, comprising LC CDR1, LC CDR2 and LC CDR3 of any anti-CD 123 light chain binding domain amino acid sequence listed in Table 1, SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101, and HC CDR1, HC CDR2, and HC CDR3 of any anti-CD 123 heavy chain binding domain amino acid sequence listed in Table 1, SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101.
44. The isolated CAR molecule of any of claims 37-43, wherein the anti-CD 1231 binding domain is a scFv.
45. The isolated CAR molecule of any of claims 37-44, wherein the anti-CD123 binding domain comprises a light chain and a heavy chain of an amino acid sequence listed in Table 1, SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101.
46. The isolated CAR molecule of any of claims 37-45, wherein the anti-CD 123 binding domain comprises: a light chain variable region comprising an amino acid sequence having at least one, two or three modifications but not more than 30, 20 or 10 modifications of an amino acid sequence of a light chain variable region provided in Table 1, SEQ ID NO;2 or SEQ ID NO: 101, or a sequence with 95-99% identity with an amino acid sequence provided in Table 1, SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101.
47. The isolated CAR molecule of any of claims 37-46, wherein the anti-CD123 binding domain comprises a heavy chain variable region comprising an amino acid sequence having at least one, two or three modifications but not more than 30, 20 or 10 modifications of an amino acid sequence of a heavy chain variable region provided in Table 1, SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101, or a sequence with 95-99% identity to an amino acid sequence provided in Table 1, SEQ ID NO:2 or SEQ ID NO: 101.
48. The isolated CAR molecule of any of claims 37-47, wherein the anti-CD123 binding domain comprises a sequence selected from a group consisting of SEQ ID NO:36, SEQ ID NO:42, SEQ ID NO:48, SEQ ID NO:54, SEQ ID NO:60, SEQ ID NO:66, SEQ ID NO:72, and SEQ ID NO:78, or a sequence with 95-99% identify thereof.
49. The isolated CAR molecule of any of claims 37-48, further comprising a transmembrane domain of a protein selected from the group consisting of the alpha, beta or zeta chain of the T-cell receptor, CD28, CD3 epsilon, CD45, CD4, CD5, CD8, CD9, CD16, CD22, CD33, CD37, CD64, CD80, CD86, CD134, CD137 and CD154.
50. The isolated CAR molecule of claim 49, wherein the transmembrane domain comprises a sequence of SEQ ID NO: 5.
51. The isolated CAR molecule of claim 49 or 50, wherein the transmembrane domain comprises an amino acid sequence having at least one, two or three modifications but not more than 20, 10 or 5 modifications of an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:5, or a sequence with 95-99% identity to an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:5.
52. The isolated CAR molecule of any of claims 37-51, wherein the anti-CD 123 binding domain is connected to the transmembrane domain by a hinge region.
53. The isolated CAR molecule of claim 52, wherein the encoded hinge region comprises SEQ ID NO: 4, SEQ ID NO: 104, SEQ ID NO: 122, SEQ ID NO: 124, or a sequence with 95-99% identity thereof.
54. The isolated CAR molecule of any of claims 37-53 further comprising a sequence encoding a co stimulatory domain.
55. The isolated CAR molecule of claim 54, wherein the costimulatory domain comprises a functional signaling domain of a protein selected from the group consisting of OX40, CD27, CD28, CDS, ICAM-1, LFA-1 (CDl la/CD18) and 4-1BB (CD137).
56. The isolated CAR molecule of claim 54 or 55, wherein the costimulatory domain comprises a sequence of SEQ ID NO:6 or SEQ ID NO:23.
57. The isolated CAR molecule of claim 54 or 55, wherein the costimulatory domain comprises an amino acid sequence having at least one, two or three modifications but not more than 20, 10 or 5 modifications of an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 6 or SEQ ID NO:23, or a sequence with 95-99% identity to an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:6 or SEQ ID NO:23.
58. The isolated CAR molecule of any of claims 37-57, further comprising a sequence encoding an intracellular signaling domain.
59. The isolated CAR molecule of claim 58, wherein the intracellular signaling domain comprises a functional signaling domain of 4- IBB and/or a functional signaling domain of CD3 zeta.
60. The isolated CAR molecule of claims 58 or 59, wherein the intracellular signaling domain comprises the sequence of SEQ ID NO: 6 or SEQ OD NO:23 and/or the sequence of SEQ ID NO:7.
61. The isolated CAR molecule of claims 58 or 59, wherein intracellular signaling domain comprises the sequence of SEQ ID NO: 6 or SEQ ID NO:23 and/or the sequence of SEQ ID NO:98.
62. The isolated CAR molecule of any of claims 58-61, wherein the intracellular signaling domain comprises an amino acid sequence having at least one, two or three modifications but not more than 20, 10 or 5 modifications of an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 6 or SEQ ID NO:23 and/or an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 7 or SEQ ID NO:98, or a sequence with 95-99% identity to an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 6 or SEQ ID NO:23 and/or an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 7 or SEQ ID NO:98.
63. The isolated CAR molecule of any of claims 58-61, wherein the intracellular signaling domain comprises the sequence of SEQ ID NO: 6 or SEQ ID NO:23 and the sequence of SEQ ID NO: 7 or SEQ ID NO:98, wherein the sequences comprising the intracellular signaling domain are expressed in the same frame and as a single polypeptide chain.
64. The isolated CAR molecule of any of claims 37-63, further comprising a leader sequence.
65. The isolated CAR molecule of claim 64, wherein the leader sequence comprises an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 3, or a sequence with 95-99% identity to an amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 3.
66. An anti-CD 123 binding domain comprising one or more light chain
complementary determining region 1 (LC CDR1), light chain complementary determining region 2 (LC CDR2), and light chain complementary determining region 3 (LC CDR3) of an anti-CD 123 binding domain in SEQ ID NO:36, 42, 48, 54, 60, 66, 72 or 78, and one or more heavy chain complementary determining region 1 (HC CDR1), heavy chain complementary determining region 2 (HC CDR2), and heavy chain complementary determining region 3 (HC CDR3) of an anti-CD 123 binding domain in SEQ ID NO:36, 42, 48, 54, 60, 66, 72 or 78.
67. The anti-CD123 binding domain of claim 66, comprising LC CDR1, LC CDR2 and LC CDR3 of an anti-CD 123 light chain binding domain amino acid sequence in SEQ ID NO:36, 42, 48, 54, 60, 66, 72 or 78.
68. The anti-CD123 binding domain of claim 66 or 67, comprising HC CDR1, HC CDR2, and HC CDR3 of an anti-CD 123 heavy chain binding domain amino acid sequence in SEQ ID NO:36, 42, 48, 54, 60, 66, 72 or 78.
69. The anti-CD123 binding domain of any of claims 66-68, comprising LC CDR1, LC CDR2 and LC CDR3 of an anti-CD 123 light chain binding domain amino acid sequence, in SEQ ID NO:36, 42, 48, 54, 60, 66, 72 or 78 and HC CDR1, HC CDR2, and HC CDR3 of an anti-CD 123 heavy chain binding domain amino acid sequence in SEQ ID NO:36, 42, 48, 54, 60, 66, 72 or 78.
70. The anti-CD 123 binding domain of any of claims 66-69, comprising a light chain variable region in Table 1 and a heavy chain variable region in SEQ ID NO:36, 42, 48, 54, 60, 66, 72 or 78.
71. The anti-CD 123 binding domain of any of claims 66-70, comprising an amino acid sequence having at least one, two or three modifications but not more than 30, 20 or 10 modifications of an amino acid sequence of a light chain variable region provided in SEQ ID NO:36, 42, 48, 54, 60, 66, 72 or 78, or a sequence with 95-99% identity with an amino acid sequence in SEQ ID NO:36, 42, 48, 54, 60, 66, 72 or 78; and/or a heavy chain variable region comprising an amino acid sequence having at least one, two or three modifications but not more than 30, 20 or 10 modifications of an amino acid sequence of a heavy chain variable region provided in SEQ ID NO: 36, 42, 48, 54, 60, 66, 72 or 78, or a sequence with 95-99% identity to an amino acid sequence in SEQ ID NO:36, 42, 48, 54, 60, 66, 72 or 78.
72. The anti-CD 123 binding domain of any of claims 66-71, comprising a sequence selected from a group consisting of SEQ ID NO:36, SEQ ID NO:42, SEQ ID NO:48, SEQ ID NO:54, SEQ ID NO:60, SEQ ID NO:66, SEQ ID NO:72 or SEQ ID NO:78, or a sequence with 95-99% identify thereof.
73. A vector comprising a nucleic acid molecule encoding a CAR of any of the preceding claims.
74. The vector of claim 73, where in the vector is selected from the group consisting of a DNA, a RNA, a plasmid, a lentivirus vector, adenoviral vector, or a retrovirus vector.
75. The vector of claim 73 or 74, further comprising a promoter.
76. The vector of claim 75, wherein the promoter is an EF-1 promoter.
77. The vector of claim 76, wherein the EF-1 promoter comprises a sequence of SEQ ID NO: 97.
78. The vector of any of claims 73-77, wherein the vector is an in vitro transcribed vector.
79. The vector of any of claims 73-78, wherein the nucleic acid sequence in the vector further comprises a poly(A) tail.
80. The vector of any of claims 73-79, wherein the nucleic acid sequence in the vector further comprises a 3'UTR..
81. A cell comprising the vector of any of claims 73-80.
82. The cell of claim 81, wherein the cell is a T cell.
83. The cell of claim 82, wherein the T cell is a CD8+ T cell.
84. The cell of claim 81 or 82, wherein the cell is a human cell.
85. A method of making a cell comprising transducing a T cell with a vector of claims 73-80.
86. A method of generating a population of RNA-engineered cells comprising introducing an in vitro transcribed RNA or synthetic RNA into a cell, where the RNA comprises a nucleic acid encoding a CAR molecule described herein.
87. A method of providing an anti-tumor immunity in a mammal comprising administering to the mammal an effective amount of a cell expressing a CAR molecule of claim 37-65.
88. The method of claim 87, wherein the cell is an autologous T cell.
89. The method of claim 87 or 88, wherein the cell is an allogeneic T cell.
90. The method of any of claims 87-89, wherein the mammal is a human.
91. A method of treating a mammal having a disease associated with expression of CD 123 comprising administering to the mammal an effective amount of cells expressing a CAR molecule of any of claims 37-65.
92. The method of claim 91, wherein the disease associated with CD 123 is acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL), myelodysplasia syndrome, hairy cell leukemia, prolymphocytic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphoid leukemia, Hodgkin lymphoma, blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm, and any combination thereof.
93. The method of claim 91, wherein the disease associated with CD 123 is a hematological cancer (e.g., leukemia).
94. The method of claim 93, wherein the hematological cancer is selected from the group consisting of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), chronic lymphoid leukemia (CLL), and any combination thereof, and metastases of any of the cancers.
95. The method of any of claims 91-94, wherein the cells expressing a CAR molecule are administered in combination with an agent that increases the efficacy of a cell expressing a CAR molecule.
96. The method of any of claims 91-94, wherein the cells expressing a CAR molecule are administered in combination with an agent that ameliorates one or more side effects associated with administration of a cell expressing a CAR molecule.
97. The method of any of claims 91-96, wherein the cells expressing a CAR molecule are administered in combination with an agent that treats the disease associated with CD123.
98. The method of any one of claims 91-97, wherein the mammal has previously received treatment with an anti-CD 19 therapy.
99. The method of claim 98, wherein the anti-CD19 therapy comprises CD19 CART therapy.
100. The method of claim 98 or claim 99, wherein the mammal experienced a relapse with the anti-CD 19 therapy.
101. The isolated nucleic acid molecule of any of claims 1-32, the isolated polypeptide molecule of any of claims 33-36, the isolated CAR of any of claims 37-65, the anti- CD 123 binding domain of any of claims 66-72, the vector of any of claims 73-80 or the cell of any of claims 81-84 for use as a medicament.
102. The isolated nucleic acid molecule of any of claims 1-32, the isolated polypeptide molecule of any of claims 33-36, the isolated CAR of any of claims 37-65, the anti- CD 123 binding domain of any of claims 66-72, the vector of any of claims 73-80 or the cell of any of claims 81-84 for use in the treatment of a disease expressing CD 123.
103. A method of eradicating at least a portion of existing bone marrow in a subject, the method comprising administering to the subject an effective amount of cells expressing a CAR molecule of any of claims 37-65.
104. The method of claim 103, wherein the subject is in need of a bone marrow transplant.
105. The method of any of claims 103 or 104, wherein the subject has a disease, disorder or condition that is treatable with a bone marrow transplant.
106. The method of claim 105, wherein the disease, disorder or condition is selected from the group consisting of a hematological cancer, a solid tumor, a hematological disease, a metabolic disorder, HIV, HTLV, a lysosomal storage disorder and an immunodeficiency.
107. The method of any of claims 103 to 106, wherein the method is a cellular conditioning method prior to bone marrow transplantation.
108. An in vitro transcribed vector encoding a CAR of any of claims 37-73.
109. The in vitro transcribed vector of claim 108, wherein the nucleic acid sequence in the vector comprises a poly(A) tail.
110. The in vitro transcribed vector of claim 108 or 109, wherein the nucleic acid sequence in the vector comprises a promoter.
111. The in vitro transcribed vector of claim 110, wherein the promoter is a T2A promoter.
112. The in vitro transcribed vector of any one of claims 108-111, wherein the nucleic acid sequence in the vector comprises a 3' UTR.
113. The in vitro transcribed vector of claim 112, wherein the 3 'UTR is derived from human beta-globulin.
114. The in vitro transcribed vector of any one of claims 108-113, wherein the vector comprises a nucleic acid molecule selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO:94 and SEQ ID NO:96, or a sequence with 95-99% identity thereof.
EP14711341.9A 2013-02-20 2014-02-20 Effective targeting of primary human leukemia using anti-cd123 chimeric antigen receptor engineered t cells Pending EP2958942A1 (en)

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