EP2293742A1 - Intersomatic cage - Google Patents

Intersomatic cage

Info

Publication number
EP2293742A1
EP2293742A1 EP09754190A EP09754190A EP2293742A1 EP 2293742 A1 EP2293742 A1 EP 2293742A1 EP 09754190 A EP09754190 A EP 09754190A EP 09754190 A EP09754190 A EP 09754190A EP 2293742 A1 EP2293742 A1 EP 2293742A1
Authority
EP
European Patent Office
Prior art keywords
cage
body
intersomatic
characterized
according
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Withdrawn
Application number
EP09754190A
Other languages
German (de)
French (fr)
Inventor
Michael Perisic
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
CARPE CONSULTANTS SARL
Original Assignee
MEDTECH RES
Medtech Research
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to CH7952008 priority Critical
Priority to CH7942008 priority
Priority to CH8632008 priority
Priority to CH4222009 priority
Application filed by MEDTECH RES, Medtech Research filed Critical MEDTECH RES
Priority to PCT/IB2009/005721 priority patent/WO2009144562A1/en
Publication of EP2293742A1 publication Critical patent/EP2293742A1/en
Application status is Withdrawn legal-status Critical

Links

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, e.g. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/02Prostheses implantable into the body
    • A61F2/30Joints
    • A61F2/44Joints for the spine, e.g. vertebrae, spinal discs
    • A61F2/4455Joints for the spine, e.g. vertebrae, spinal discs for the fusion of spinal bodies, e.g. intervertebral fusion of adjacent spinal bodies, e.g. fusion cages
    • A61F2/447Joints for the spine, e.g. vertebrae, spinal discs for the fusion of spinal bodies, e.g. intervertebral fusion of adjacent spinal bodies, e.g. fusion cages substantially parallelepipedal, e.g. having a rectangular or trapezoidal cross-section
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/02Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for holding wounds open; Tractors
    • A61B17/025Joint distractors
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, e.g. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/02Prostheses implantable into the body
    • A61F2/30Joints
    • A61F2/44Joints for the spine, e.g. vertebrae, spinal discs
    • A61F2/4455Joints for the spine, e.g. vertebrae, spinal discs for the fusion of spinal bodies, e.g. intervertebral fusion of adjacent spinal bodies, e.g. fusion cages
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, e.g. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/02Prostheses implantable into the body
    • A61F2/30Joints
    • A61F2/46Special tools or methods for implanting or extracting artificial joints, accessories, bone grafts or substitutes, or particular adaptations therefor
    • A61F2/4603Special tools or methods for implanting or extracting artificial joints, accessories, bone grafts or substitutes, or particular adaptations therefor for insertion or extraction of endoprosthetic joints or of accessories thereof
    • A61F2/4611Special tools or methods for implanting or extracting artificial joints, accessories, bone grafts or substitutes, or particular adaptations therefor for insertion or extraction of endoprosthetic joints or of accessories thereof of spinal prostheses
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/02Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for holding wounds open; Tractors
    • A61B17/025Joint distractors
    • A61B2017/0256Joint distractors for the spine
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, e.g. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/02Prostheses implantable into the body
    • A61F2/28Bones
    • A61F2002/2835Bone graft implants for filling a bony defect or an endoprosthesis cavity
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, e.g. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/02Prostheses implantable into the body
    • A61F2/30Joints
    • A61F2002/30001Additional features of subject-matter classified in A61F2/28, A61F2/30 and subgroups thereof
    • A61F2002/30108Shapes
    • A61F2002/30199Three-dimensional shapes
    • A61F2002/30289Three-dimensional shapes helically-coiled
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, e.g. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/02Prostheses implantable into the body
    • A61F2/30Joints
    • A61F2/30767Special external or bone-contacting surfaces, e.g. coating for improving bone ingrowth
    • A61F2/30771Special external or bone-contacting surfaces, e.g. coating for improving bone ingrowth applied in original prostheses, e.g. holes or grooves
    • A61F2002/30772Apertures or holes, e.g. of circular cross section
    • A61F2002/30784Plurality of holes
    • A61F2002/30785Plurality of holes parallel
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, e.g. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/02Prostheses implantable into the body
    • A61F2/30Joints
    • A61F2/30767Special external or bone-contacting surfaces, e.g. coating for improving bone ingrowth
    • A61F2/30771Special external or bone-contacting surfaces, e.g. coating for improving bone ingrowth applied in original prostheses, e.g. holes or grooves
    • A61F2002/3082Grooves
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, e.g. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/02Prostheses implantable into the body
    • A61F2/30Joints
    • A61F2/30767Special external or bone-contacting surfaces, e.g. coating for improving bone ingrowth
    • A61F2/30771Special external or bone-contacting surfaces, e.g. coating for improving bone ingrowth applied in original prostheses, e.g. holes or grooves
    • A61F2002/30841Sharp anchoring protrusions for impaction into the bone, e.g. sharp pins, spikes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, e.g. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/02Prostheses implantable into the body
    • A61F2/30Joints
    • A61F2/44Joints for the spine, e.g. vertebrae, spinal discs
    • A61F2002/4475Joints for the spine, e.g. vertebrae, spinal discs hollow
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, e.g. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/02Prostheses implantable into the body
    • A61F2/30Joints
    • A61F2/46Special tools or methods for implanting or extracting artificial joints, accessories, bone grafts or substitutes, or particular adaptations therefor
    • A61F2/4603Special tools or methods for implanting or extracting artificial joints, accessories, bone grafts or substitutes, or particular adaptations therefor for insertion or extraction of endoprosthetic joints or of accessories thereof
    • A61F2002/4623Special tools or methods for implanting or extracting artificial joints, accessories, bone grafts or substitutes, or particular adaptations therefor for insertion or extraction of endoprosthetic joints or of accessories thereof having a handle portion, e.g. integral with the implanting tool
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, e.g. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/02Prostheses implantable into the body
    • A61F2/30Joints
    • A61F2/46Special tools or methods for implanting or extracting artificial joints, accessories, bone grafts or substitutes, or particular adaptations therefor
    • A61F2/4603Special tools or methods for implanting or extracting artificial joints, accessories, bone grafts or substitutes, or particular adaptations therefor for insertion or extraction of endoprosthetic joints or of accessories thereof
    • A61F2002/4623Special tools or methods for implanting or extracting artificial joints, accessories, bone grafts or substitutes, or particular adaptations therefor for insertion or extraction of endoprosthetic joints or of accessories thereof having a handle portion, e.g. integral with the implanting tool
    • A61F2002/4624Special tools or methods for implanting or extracting artificial joints, accessories, bone grafts or substitutes, or particular adaptations therefor for insertion or extraction of endoprosthetic joints or of accessories thereof having a handle portion, e.g. integral with the implanting tool releasable from the implanting tool
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, e.g. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/02Prostheses implantable into the body
    • A61F2/30Joints
    • A61F2/46Special tools or methods for implanting or extracting artificial joints, accessories, bone grafts or substitutes, or particular adaptations therefor
    • A61F2/4603Special tools or methods for implanting or extracting artificial joints, accessories, bone grafts or substitutes, or particular adaptations therefor for insertion or extraction of endoprosthetic joints or of accessories thereof
    • A61F2002/4629Special tools or methods for implanting or extracting artificial joints, accessories, bone grafts or substitutes, or particular adaptations therefor for insertion or extraction of endoprosthetic joints or of accessories thereof connected to the endoprosthesis or implant via a threaded connection
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, e.g. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2230/00Geometry of prostheses classified in groups A61F2/00 - A61F2/26 or A61F2/82 or A61F9/00 or A61F11/00 or subgroups thereof
    • A61F2230/0063Three-dimensional shapes
    • A61F2230/0091Three-dimensional shapes helically-coiled or spirally-coiled, i.e. having a 2-D spiral cross-section
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, e.g. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2250/00Special features of prostheses classified in groups A61F2/00 - A61F2/26 or A61F2/82 or A61F9/00 or A61F11/00 or subgroups thereof
    • A61F2250/0004Special features of prostheses classified in groups A61F2/00 - A61F2/26 or A61F2/82 or A61F9/00 or A61F11/00 or subgroups thereof adjustable
    • A61F2250/0006Special features of prostheses classified in groups A61F2/00 - A61F2/26 or A61F2/82 or A61F9/00 or A61F11/00 or subgroups thereof adjustable for adjusting angular orientation

Abstract

The invention relates to an intersomatic cage comprising a body (3) and a part (2) that is designed to dilate the intersomatic space between two vertebrae (8, 8') by rotating the cage so that the cage (1) can be inserted into the space. The body (3) has a prism shape with a substantially planar upper surface (6) which can bear against the superior vertebral endplate (8) and a substantially planar lower surface (6') which can bear against the inferior vertebral endplate (8').

Description


  INTERSOMATIC CAGE

  
The present invention relates to the medical field and more particularly to an inter-somatic cage including insertion tab.

  
Technical area

  
Certain pathologies of the spine, including degenerative disc and facet diseases and dislocations of vertebrae, compromise the support capacity of the spine and the distribution of the load.

  
The treatment of these pathologies in their advanced stages uses different stabilization systems by intra-discal implants such as intersomatic cages, coupled or not with extra-discal implants, which notably combine the use of vertebral screws and plates or stems. .

  
These intradiscal implant systems have significantly improved the treatment of pathologies of the spine, by restoring the intervertebral space, which leads to the decompression of nerve roots and the acceleration of bone fusion of vertebrae. adjacent to each other.

  
These intersomatic cages are of several types: the first category includes threaded cages, which are essentially cylindrical in shape, and which are screwed into the intervertebral space. WO 03/009786 describes for example a cage of this type comprising an insertion tab of rectangular shape, elliptical or oval, located at the front of the cage. The cross section of this tongue progressively increases along the longitudinal axis of the cage from its end to the threaded part of said cage, so as to allow the insertion of the latter into the inter-somatic space and then the expansion of this space by screwing the cage. The main disadvantage of this type of threaded cages lies in the fact that they do not reproduce a lordosis angle close to the natural angle of the segment.

  
Impaction cages constitute the second category, where the cage of mainly parallelepiped shape, is introduced between the vertebrae by the application of impacts. The disadvantage of these cages, is the difficulty of introducing into the intersomatic space, by posterior approach, after laminectomies and partial facectomies, or by transforaminal or lateral approaches, cages having a cross section of high height, to treat the vertebral segments where the natural sagittal position is substantially lordotic, especially when the natural angle to be restored is greater than 10 [deg.]. Expandable cage systems in situ have been developed to allow such heights to be obtained in the front part of the cages, but often at the expense of reduced strength, strength and stability.

  
The object of the present invention is therefore to provide an intersomatic cage in a single homogeneous body whose geometry has the merit of remedying these disadvantages.

  
Another object of the present invention is to provide a device for introducing the intervertebral cage into the intervertebral space.

  
According to the invention, this object is achieved thanks to an intersomatic cage comprising a body and a part intended to dilate the intersomatic space between two vertebrae by rotation of the cage in order to be able to introduce said cage through the effect of a thrust. The prism-shaped body having a substantially planar upper surface adapted to abut against the upper vertebrae plate and a substantially planar lower surface adapted to abut against the lower vertebrae plate.

   The advantage of the present invention lies in the fact that it allows the insertion of cages having a cross section of high height and whose upper and lower faces are inclined, particularly in the direction of the rear of the cage, to offer a lordosis angle close to the natural angle of the segment which may be substantially greater than 10 [deg.], which is not possible for threaded cages inserted by posterior approach as described in WO03 / 009786.

  
In addition, compared with the state of the art, the invention also makes it possible to introduce a cage in parallelepiped shape or of trapezoidal cross-section in the intervertebral space without necessarily having to use impaction to introduce the body of the cage. , enough pressure to insert it.

  
The characteristics of the invention will emerge more clearly on reading a description of several embodiments given solely by way of examples, in no way limiting with reference to the schematic figures, in which:

  
Figure 1 shows a front perspective view of a cage having an insertion tongue oriented along a plane inclined at approximately 45 [deg.] With respect to the horizontal plane of the cage according to a first embodiment;

  
Figure 1a shows a front view of Figure 1, when the tongue is introduced into the intersomatic space slightly dilated;

  
Figure 1b shows a front view of Figure 1, after rotation of the cage of approximately 45 [deg.] And complete dilation of the intersomatic space;

  
FIG. 2 represents a front perspective view of a side asymmetric cage for unilateral, transforaminal or lateral approaches, with an oblique central insertion tongue parallel to the upper surface of the cage according to a second embodiment; FIG. 2a shows a front view of a cage in lateral asymmetry according to an alternative embodiment with the insertion tongue introduced into the slightly expanded intersomatic space; Figure 2b shows a front view of the cage according to this variant, after rotation of said cage by an angle less than 45 [deg.];

  
Figure 3 shows a perspective view of a cage having two insertion rods according to a third embodiment; Figure 4 shows a perspective view of a lateral asymmetric cage for trans-foraminal or lateral approaches with two insertion rods according to a fourth embodiment;

  
Figure 5 shows a perspective view of a cage with an insertion tongue whose side flanks are beyond the lateral sides of the cage body according to a fifth embodiment;

  
Figure 5a shows a front view of Figure 5, when the insertion tab is introduced into the slightly expanded intersomatic space;

  
Figure 5b shows a front view of Figure 5, after rotation of the cage of an angle [beta]; Figure 6 shows a side view of two adjacent vertebrae and a side asymmetric cage adapted for trans-foraminal or lateral approaches according to a sixth embodiment;

  
Figure 7 shows a perspective view of a cage with two flaps according to a seventh embodiment; Figure 7a shows a perspective view of a cage with two bent rods according to an alternative embodiment;

  
Figure 8 shows a front perspective view of a cage having an oblique plane insertion tab and lateral fins on a portion of the body of the cage according to a ninth embodiment; Figure 8a shows a view similar to Figure 8 but with curved fins in a first embodiment;

  
Figure 8b is a perspective view of a cage with two opposed flaps projecting from the lateral sides of the body and extending along said sides according to a second alternative embodiment; FIG. 9a represents a front perspective view of a cage whose end comprises two surfaces having a helical gradient slope according to a 9 <em> execution mode; Figure 9b shows a front view of Figure 9a, when the cage is in its final position, with filigree, the position of the cage at the time of engagement of its end in the intersomatic space;

  
Figure 9c shows a front view of a cage according to a first embodiment, when the cage is in its final position, with filigree, the position of the cage at the moment of engagement of its end in the intersomatic space

  
9d shows a front view of a cage according to a second variant of execution, when the cage is in its final position, with filigree, the position of the cage at the time of engagement of its end in the intersomatic space;

  
Figure 10a shows a front right perspective view of a hybrid cage according to a <eme> execution mode;

  
Figure 10b shows the same cage as in Figure 10a but in front left perspective;

  
Figure 10c shows a front view of Figure 10a;

  
Figure 11a shows a perspective view of an intersomatic cage with two removable insertion rods according to an 11 <eme> execution mode;

  
Figure 11b shows a perspective view of an intersomatic cage according to a first embodiment;

  
Figure 11c is a perspective view of a hybrid intersomatic cage according to a second alternative embodiment;

  
FIG. 12 represents a perspective view of a cage with lamellae forming an integral part of an anchoring tool according to a - »2 <eme> execution mode;

  
Figure 12a shows a top view of the cage and ancillary laying in a first position;

  
Figure 12b shows a top view of a similar cage and a similar posture ancillary in a second position; Figures 12c and 12d show a top view of an arcuate form cage according to an alternative embodiment in two successive positions; Figure 13 shows a perspective view of a cage according to an I3 <eme> execution mode;

  
Figure 14 shows a perspective view of a roller cage according to a <em> execution mode; Figures 14a and 14b show a front view of the cage with removable flaps in a retracted and extended position. Figure 14c is a detailed perspective view of Figure 14a.

  
Realization of the invention

  
In the description of the different intersomatic cages that follows, reference will be made in particular to the horizontal plane of the cage that will be assumed in a plane parallel to the axial or transverse plane of the human body, this horizontal plane corresponding to the position of the cage in its length when it is found in its final position between two vertebrae.

  
According to the first embodiment of the invention, FIG. 1 illustrates an intersomatic cage for posterior / posterolateral approaches. This cage comprises a body 3 of a conventional form of impact cage, is essentially parallelepiped or a body 3 having a longitudinal section of trapezoidal shape. This body 3 has an upper and lower surface 6, 6 'intended to come into contact with the respective upper and lower vertebral trays. These two surfaces 6, 6 'are inclined with respect to a horizontal plane so as to obtain a body 3 whose height of the anterior side 7 is greater than the height of the posterior (not visible) side.

   These two surfaces 6, 6 'have between them an angle [delta] typically ranging from 4 [deg.] To 15 [deg.], Or even higher, to allow a lordosis of the vertebrae of the segment. These surfaces 6, 6 'can be covered with crenellations to prevent migration in front of or behind the cage. Furthermore, the body 3 of the cage may include a through-going recess 4 in the direction of the height so as to allow graft stuffing to promote bone fusion between the two adjacent vertebrae.

  
This cage further comprises a portion 2 for expanding the intersomatic space between two vertebrae for the introduction of the intervertebral cage. Part 2, which we will here more commonly call insertion tab, has a substantially oblong cross-section of height H 'and width W. This part 2 is arranged perpendicular to the front side 7 of the cage body 3 and in a inclined plane forming an angle of approximately 45 [deg.] with the horizontal plane of the cage so that said portion 2 extends in the direction of its height H 'along the diagonal of the front side 7 of the body of cage 3.

  
It goes without saying that the inclination of the tongue 2 may vary in an oblique plane having an angle preferably between 40 [deg.] And 60 [deg.] With respect to the horizontal plane of the cage. According to FIG. 1, the height H 'of the tongue 2 is greater than the height of the highest section H of the body 3. According to FIGS. 1a and 1b, it can be seen that the dimensions of the tongue 2 make it possible to reduce significantly the angle of rotation necessary to expand the intersomatic space between the vertebrae 8, 8 'to introduce the entire cage body 3. Indeed, from Figure 1 b, the intersomatic space of height H "which is greater than the height H of the body 3 in its anterior part is obtained by a rotation of an angle [beta] close to 45 [deg.].

   This makes it possible to significantly reduce the forces of shear stresses F, F 'exerted between them by the two vertebrae 8, 8' of the segment. The angle of rotation can also be greater than that required to obtain the height H ", in particular to pass cages having high crenellated surfaces The lateral flanks of the tongue 2 allow to insert and guide the body 3 in support against the two respective vertebral plates 8, 8 'along an inclined plane of the angle [beta] in the intersomatic space before said body 3 reaches its final position and makes a slight counter-rotation under the effect of the compression of the vertebrae 8, 8 'For the introduction of the cage, an instrument can be fixed by screwing on the posterior side of the body 3.

   After the extraction of all or part of the intervertebral disk, and possibly after application of dilatation candles in the intersomatic space and then separation of the nerve roots, the cage is implanted in five steps namely: introduction of the cage into the spinal canal ; rotation; introduction / pressure of the insertion tongue 2 in the intervertebral space; counter-rotation; thrust of the cage in the intervertebral space. More specifically, the implantation steps are as follows: introduction of the cage into the spinal canal with its insert tongue 2 vertically.

   In contact with the front of the insertion tongue 2 with the vertebrae, the cage is turned at an angle substantially less than 90 [deg.] To tilt the insertion tongue 2 to the horizontal which allows its introduction in the intervertebral space slightly dilated. The cage is then rotated an angle less than 90 [deg.], But in the opposite direction of the second step, which has the effect of expanding the intervertebral space by a height close to the height H <1> of the insertion tab 2 of the cage. This is then pushed, or, if necessary, impacted, within the intervertebral space, to its final position.

   The insertion tongue may be in a material different from that of the body, for example a resorbable material intended to disappear to give way to bone growth, or an osteoconductive material, responsible for promoting said bone growth.

  
FIG. 2, according to the second embodiment of the invention, represents an intersomatic cage for unilateral, trans-foraminal or lateral approaches, that is to say a cage which is inserted posterolaterally or laterally, and whose final position is situated in the anterior part of the intersomatic space, perpendicular to the sagittal plane. The instrumentation of an intervertebral segment with such a cage does not in principle require the introduction of a second cage. The particularity of this cage lies in the fact that it comprises a cage body 3 which is asymmetrical not in the sense of its length (as described in the first embodiment) but in that of its width.

   The angle of lordosis [delta] <1> sought for the final position of the vertebrae of the segment, is given, in this case, by the angle obtained by the extension of the upper and lower surfaces 6, 6 <1> in the direction of their width. According to Figure 2, the cage comprises an insertion tongue 2 which is in a plane P parallel to a plane P 'in which is the upper surface 6 of the cage body 3. The tongue 2 is eccentric in a parallel plane at a horizontal plane halfway up the cage body 3.

  
In a variant shown in Figures 2a and 2b, the tongue 2 is in an oblique plane relative to the plane in which is the upper or lower surface of the body 3. This allows to extend the height H <1> of the insertion tongue 2, which, in turn, reduces the angle of rotation [beta] necessary for the sufficient expansion of the intersomatic space H "to pass the body 3 of the cage. This angle reduces all the shear stress forces exerted by the vertebrae 8, 8 'of the segment between them, which can favor the maintenance of the trajectories of the implant in the intersomatic space.

  
At the first contact of the insertion tongue 2 against the vertebrae 8, 8 ', (Figure 2a) the tongue is, if appropriate, directly introduced without prior rotation into the pre-expanded intersomatic space or, if necessary, after a slight rotation printed at the cage to align the tongue 2 in the plane of the intersomatic space. After complete insertion of the tongue 2, a rotation of approximately 45 [deg.] Is performed (FIG. 2b), which has the effect of expanding the space by a height H "which is sufficient to make the body 3 pass to its highest cross-section between the upper and lower faces 6, 6 ', the cage is then pushed or, if necessary, impacted, until the body 3 penetrates fully into the intersomatic space and is pushed into its final position , in the front part of said space.

   Although according to Figure 2b the angle of rotation [beta] is approximately 45 [deg.], It can be lower or higher depending on the ratio between the height and the width of the cage (for example between 30 [ deg.] and 60 [deg.]). This cage can also be arched with respect to its longitudinal axis, in order to marry the anatomy of the vertebral body in its anterior part. According to a third embodiment of the invention, Figure 3 shows an intersomatic cage which comprises a cage body 3 of geometric shape similar to the cage body of the first two embodiments. Two rods 13, 13 'are mounted on the front side 7 of the body 3 in two opposite corners along a diagonal.

   These two rods 13, 13 'are oriented along an axis perpendicular to the front side 7 and have a length sufficient to be inserted sufficiently forward between two adjacent vertebrae and serve as a lever to expand the space by a rotational movement . Preferably, this length is between 6 and 7mm. The arrangement of these rods 13, 13 'makes it possible to obtain a technical effect similar to that obtained by the insertion tongue 2 according to the first embodiment when the cage is inserted into the intervertebral space.

  
This cage is introduced through the spinal canal in a horizontal plane of the body 3, or, if it is desired that the rods 13, 13 'are found in a vertical plane (for example to bypass nerve roots) the body will have to to be tilted in a plane between 40 [deg.] and 60 [deg.] according to the height-width ratio of the anterior side 7 of the cage body 3. As soon as the rods 13, 13 'touch one or the vertebrae of a segment, the cage is then tilted until the rods 13, 13 'are found in a horizontal plane (the body of the cage then being in an oblique plane between 40 [deg.] and 60 [deg.]) according to the height-width ratio of the anterior side 7 of the body).

  
According to one variant, the two rods may be arranged relative to one another so as to be in a vertical, horizontal plane or in an oblique plane forming an angle with the horizontal plane of the cage other than 45 [ deg.]. The plane will be chosen according to the desire to limit or increase the angle of rotation and the force necessary for the sufficient expansion of the intersomatic space for the introduction of the body 3. The plane can pass on the median axis longitudinal of the body of the cage, or be located next to said axis, to increase or attenuate the cam effect of the body at the time of its rotation, one or the other of its sides. One or more median stems between the two stems may be added. The cross section of the stems can obviously be of any shape, including square, oval, or obiongue.

  
According to a fourth embodiment of the invention, FIG. 4 represents a cage which differs from the cage according to the preceding embodiment by the geometric shape of the body 3 which is adapted for trans-foraminal or lateral approaches, that is to say that it is a cage intended to be positioned laterally in the intersomatic space. The body 3 of this cage is of geometric shape similar to that of the second embodiment (FIG. 2) and therefore has a lateral side 3 "higher than the other (3 '), whereas its front side 7 and posterior The rods 13, 13 'are mounted on the anterior side 7 of the cage body 3. These rods 13, 13' may form an integral part of the body, or they may be nested, crimped or screwed together. in said body by one of their ends.

   These rods may be in a material different from that of the body, for example a resorbable material intended to disappear to give way to bone growth, or an osteo-conductive material, responsible for promoting said bone growth.

  
According to a fifth embodiment, FIG. 5 represents an interbody caging for posterior / posterolateral approaches, which comprises, on the one hand, a cage body 3 of geometric shape that is preferably identical or similar to the cage body according to the first embodiment execution and other part, part 2, intended to expand the intersomatic space. This part 2, which will also be called insertion tongue, is arranged on the front side 7 of the body 3 of the cage. This tongue 2 extends beyond the lateral sides of this body 3 ', 3 ", so that the height H <b [iota] s> of the tongue 2 is greater than the diagonal of the front side 7. The increased dimensions of this tongue 2 can reduce the angle of rotation necessary for the expansion of the intersomatic space.

   In other words, this tongue 2 reduces the necessary torsional force and the cam effect of the body. The lateral edges of the tongue 2 are not necessarily parallel, but preferably they do not protrude from the upper and lower faces 6, 6 'of the cage body 3, once the cage is in its final position, so that not disrupt contact touching faces with their respective vertebral plateau.

  
Figure 5a shows the intersomatic cage just before a rotation is printed to the body 3 when the insertion tongue 2 is horizontal in the intersomatic space between the vertebrae 8, 8 '. Figure 5b illustrates the end of the rotation of the cage of an angle [beta], with the intersomatic space dilated by a height H ", sufficient to push the entire body 3 of the cage into space intersomatic, without the surfaces 6, 6 'rub the trays vertebrae 8, 8.' Indeed, the height H of the cage at its highest cross section is well below the height H "of the intervertebral space necessary for the passage of the body 3.

   This difference in height makes it possible to reduce the angle [beta] as much as possible, and consequently the effect of the shear stress forces F, F ', the distraction force necessary for expansion, as well as the cam effect of the body at the moment of rotation. Figure 5b shows that the expansion of the intervertebral space was obtained by a rotation of an angle [beta] close to 45 [deg.], Even though the height of the body 3 is significantly larger than its width. This figure also shows that it is possible to apply significant crenellations profiles on the surfaces 6, 6 'without these impede the insertion of the cage.

  
According to a sixth embodiment, FIG. 6 represents a cage, for unilateral, transforaminal or lateral approaches, said cage being in its final position between two vertebrae 8, 8 '. This cage comprises an insertion tongue 2 arranged on the front side 7 of a cage body 3 of geometric shape similar to the cage body of the second embodiment. The particularity of this cage lies in the fact that, unlike the second embodiment, the tongue 2 extends beyond the lateral sides of the body 3, so as to obtain the advantages described in the fifth embodiment not for posterior / posterolateral approaches but for unilateral, transforaminal, and lateral approaches.

   According to a seventh embodiment, FIG. 7 represents an interbody cage for posterior / posterolateral approaches comprising a cage body 3 of geometric shape that is preferably identical or similar to the cage body according to the first embodiment and two flaps. , 19 'of trapezoidal cross section disposed on the front side 7 of the body 3 and oriented in a plane corresponding to that of the insertion tongue according to the preceding embodiment. The flaps 19, 19 'are respectively arranged close to a first and second corner of the front side 7 opposite along a diagonal. These flaps 19, 19 'comprise lateral flanks 20, 20' protruding beyond the edges of the anterior side 7 of the cage body 3.

   A variant as illustrated by Figure 7a consists of replacing the flaps two rods 13, 13 'having a first oblique segment with respect to the longitudinal axis of the body 3, and a second rectilinear segment oriented along another axis so that part of the rods 13, 13 'are situated outside the vertical plane coinciding with the two lateral sides of the body 3.

  
According to an eighth embodiment, FIG. 8 illustrates an intersomatic cage similar to the cage described in the fifth embodiment, except that this cage further comprises, in the extension of the tongue 2, a fin 9, 9 arranged along each of the two lateral sides 3 ', 3 "of the cage body 3. The height H <b [iota] s> of the tongue 2 is substantially greater than the height of the body 3 at its highest section, namely at its anterior side 7. It goes without saying that the shape of the fins 9, 9 'and their dimensions can be any. For example, the width of the fins 9, 9 'can increase or decrease along the longitudinal axis of the cage and / or extend over the entire length of the lateral sides 3', 3 "of the body 3.

   The fins may also be non-continuous, and thus consist of several segments along the lateral sides.

  
Another example is illustrated in Figure 8a which shows a cage having curved fins 9, 9 'so as to promote changes in trajectory in the intersomatic space and thus improve the final positioning of said cage. According to a variant not shown, these fins 9, 9 <1> may also display a rectilinear shape inclined at any angle along the lateral sides, different from the plane constituted by the tongue 2.

  
According to another example as represented by FIG. 8b, the cage comprises an insertion tongue combining certain characteristics of the intersomatic cages illustrated in FIGS. 7 and 8a.

  
According to a ninth embodiment of the invention, FIG. 9a represents an interbody cage for posterior / posterolateral approach, comprising a body 3 and a part 2 <b [iota] s> for expanding the interbody space between two vertebrae for the introduction of the cage. The upper and lower faces 6, 6 'of the body 3 are not parallel, but positioned in a [delta] angle. This angle varies according to the cages, and is adapted to the desired lordotic angle as a function of the instrumented vertebral segment. This angle can typically range from 4 [deg.] To 15 [deg.], Or even larger. The body may also have parallel upper and lower surfaces.

   Part 2 <b [iota] s> is in the extension of the body 3 and comprises on the one hand, an upper and lower face 10, 10 '(Figure 9b) intended to come into contact with the vertebra respectively upper and lower of the intersomatic space and secondly two lateral faces 11, 11 '. These faces 10 '10', 11 and 11 'converge from the respective edges of the front side of the body 3 to a flat face 2n centered at mid-height and mid-width of said front side. This central face 2n has a shape similar to an insertion tongue as described in some of the preceding embodiments but of dimensions much smaller than the dimensions of the cage body 3. This flat face 2n stretches in the direction of the diagonal of the anterior side so as to form an angle [beta] with the horizontal plane of the cage 3.

   The faces 10, 10 'are identical and are inclined and curved so as to reproduce the beginning of a helical gradient slope in order to be able to transmit a rotation to the body 3 by simple pressure exerted on the posterior part of said body 3 when the central part 2n is arranged in the intersomatic space. According to FIG. 9b, the illustrated watermark cage represents the latter when the plane surface 2n is arranged in correspondence with the intersomatic space just before the introduction of the end of the part 2. <b [iota] s> in the intersomatic space. At this time, the cage body 3 is inclined about 45 [deg.] With respect to the vertebral plates and the surfaces 10, 10 'are in contact therewith.

   When pressure is exerted at the rear of the body 3, it rotates through the profiles of the surfaces 10, 10 'until it is found in the horizontal plane of the cage.

  
According to a first variant embodiment, FIG. 9c illustrates a cage similar to that shown in FIGS. 9a and 9b but whose part 2 <b [iota] s> extends along an eccentric longitudinal axis of the median longitudinal axis of the body 3 so that the surface 2n stretches along a vertical axis. FIG. 9c shows in marked lines the final position of the cage, and in filigree its position of engagement of the cage 3. The insertion of the end of the part 2 <b [iota] s> in the intersomatic space will cause here an autorotation movement of the order of 90 [deg.].

  
According to a second variant embodiment, FIG. 9d shows a cage whose part 2 <b [iota] s> extends in a longitudinal axis eccentric from the median longitudinal axis of the body, so that the surface 2n stretches along an axis inclined by an angle [beta] corresponding to 45 [deg .]. Inserting the end of Part 2 <b [iota] s> will result in an autorotation movement of about 45 [deg.], but with a more pronounced cam effect on one side of the body 3 than on the other.

  
Moreover, it goes without saying that part 2 <b [iota] s> may be situated not on the anterior side but on one of the lateral sides of the cage body for transaminar or lateral approaches.

  
Figures 10a to 10c show an intersomatic cage according to a <eme> embodiment of the invention. This cage combines some characteristics of the previous execution mode including the first execution mode. More specifically, the cage comprises on the one hand, an insertion tongue 2 of depth Dp requiring a voluntary rotation gesture of the surgeon, and secondly, an intermediate portion of depth Dp 'and arranged between the insertion tongue 2 and the front side of the cage body 3. This intermediate portion comprises two lateral surfaces 11, 11 'shaped so as to orient the tongue 2 in a position inclined with respect to the horizontal plane of the cage of an angle [beta] (Figure 11c).

   On the other hand, the upper and lower surfaces 10, 10 "(FIG. 11b) of said intermediate portion are inclined and curved so as to reproduce the beginning of a helical gradient slope.The advantage of this cage is to obtain a partial expansion of the intersomatic space by a small rotation in order to then push the cage and cause the self-rotating effect through the intermediate part with a pressure much lower than the pressure that should be applied to a cage similar to 9a This combination also has the advantage, compared to a cage as described in the first embodiment, because of the presence of a tendril component, to be content with a weak rotation angle, which reduces the shear stress forces between the two adjacent vertebrae.

   Indeed, when these forces are too strong, they are likely to "skid" the cage at the time of the final push, and thus out of the desired path. Finally, the height of the insertion tongue 2 may be less than the height H of the cage body 3, which may be an advantage for dodging hard or soft tissue at the time of insertion through the spinal canal.

  
To introduce this cage, the insertion tongue 2 is oriented in correspondence with the intersomatic space, and is inserted between the vertebral plates. A rotation substantially less than 90 [deg.] Is printed by the surgeon in order to partially expand the intersomatic space, then, before this space is as high as the height of the body 3, the cage is pushed forward, and the intermediate part takes over and continues the dilation of the insensomatic space according to the self-rotating principle, without any other voluntary rotation is no longer necessary from the surgeon. In a variant (not shown), the part intended to expand the intersomatic space is located on one of the lateral sides of a side asymmetric cage body for trans-foraminal or lateral approaches.

  
Another variant (not shown) consists in combining the characteristics of the front part of a helical gradient pitch cage of the ninth embodiment, with, for example, the lateral fins of the eighth embodiment. This hybrid cage works in the opposite way to the hybrid cage of the io <eme> mode of execution, in that the cage is first inserted by pushing or impacting into the intersomatic space by its portion in helical gradient slopes, which initiates a self-rotation movement and expands slightly the inter-vertebral space, then, once the fins are engaged in the intersomatic space to a sufficient depth, the surgeon exerts a voluntary rotation to complete the dilation of a sufficient height to penetrate the body of the cage in his whole,

   by a simple push. An alternative embodiment consists in replacing the anterior portion with helical gradient slopes by an anterior face of the body having a rounded or ogival profile, favoring the initial thrust or impact.

  
According to an 11 <eme> embodiment as shown in Figure 11a, the expansion of the intersomatic space between two vertebrae is performed by two rods 13, 13 'forming part of an ancillary laying cage. The advantage of this embodiment with respect to the third embodiment is to eliminate the bulk formed by the rods in the intersomatic space. Two longitudinal rails 15, 15 'intended to receive the rods 13, 13' pass right through the cage body 3. More precisely, these slides 15, 15 'are arranged along two distinct longitudinal axes perpendicular to the side front 7 of said body 3 and located relative to each other in two opposite corners of said side 7 along a diagonal.

   The rods may also be oriented in an axis not parallel to one of the lateral sides of the body. In order to ensure the stability of these rods 13, 13 ', they can be fixed to the body 3 temporarily, for example at the height of the rear part of said body 3, or by a fixing (by screwing or other means of fastening) to the ancillary laying (not shown) of the cage. The rods 13, 13 'can already be in position, as shown in Figure 11a, or can be slid after the introduction of the cage and its passage in the spinal canal. The rods 13, 13 'can be removed after the rotation of the cage body 3 and before its thrust into the intersomatic space, or after said thrust, when the cage is in its final position.

   Figure 11b shows a variant where only one of the rods 13, 13 'is removable, the other being an integral part of the cage body 3. This variant can be advantageous for reducing the space requirement of the intersomatic space to only one single rod, while providing stability to the lever arm formed by the two rods 13, 13 '.

  
FIG. 11c introduces a second variant in which the cage comprises a cage body 3 and a part 11 arranged on the front side of the body 3. This part 11 has an upper surface 10 and a lower surface (not visible) which are inclined so as to reproduce the beginning of a helical gradient slope. This cage provides an effect comparable to that obtained by the cage according to the io <eme> mode of execution when it is introduced into the intersomatic space, namely a partial expansion of this space by a small rotation of the anchoring device (not shown) in order to then push the cage and provoke the self-rotating effect through the profile of the upper and lower surfaces of the portion 11. This cage here incorporates two movable rods 13, 13 'arranged in a horizontal plane parallel to a median plane of the cage body 3.

   One of the rods (13) is arranged in a longitudinal slide 15 so that its end protrudes in the extension of the portion 11 which has a truncated end 2 while the other rod 13 'is arranged in a slide or a longitudinal groove 16. After the rods 13, 13 'are introduced into the intervertebral space, a rotational movement is printed on the anchoring device so as to lift the rod 13.

   This movement can be modest (less than 45 [deg.]) Because it must simply allow the engagement of the truncated end 2 of the part 11 in the semi-expanded intervertebral space (the body 3 being itself also in the same plane as the two rods 13, 13 ', being less than 45 [deg.]), before a thrust or impact on the rear part of the body 3 causes the additional rotation necessary for the expansion of the space intersomatic, of sufficient height to the introduction of the body in said intervertebral space. The advantage of this variant is that because of the low angle of rotation required for the lever effect, this reduces the cam effect induced by the rotation, which may be favorable in the presence of nerves or hard tissues nearby.

   It is obvious that the profile of the part 11, and mainly the upper surface 10 and lower (not visible) can vary, so as to ensure the most ergonomic connection to the upper and / or lower face of the body 3. Of course , the insert tongue portion 2 of depth Dp, can not only be in an oblique plane with respect to the horizontal plane in the horizontal plane of the cage, at any angle, but can also be in a horizontal plane, namely merged or parallel with the upper or lower surfaces of the body of the cage.

  
According to an I2 <eme> embodiment, Figure 12 shows a conventional cage consisting only of a body 3. This body 3 has on each of its lateral sides a groove 16, 16 'oriented in the direction of the longitudinal axis of the cage. These grooves 16, 16 'are intended to receive lamellae 21, 21' forming an integral part of an ancillary application, these lamellae having the function of expanding the intersomatic space between two vertebrae, according to the same principle as that described for the execution mode. To ensure the retention of the slats within the grooves, the latter preferably have a trapezoidal cross section.

   Of course, the slats may have a different section, in particular oval or oblong, if they can be held inside their grooves 16, 16 'by a mechanical means, for example at the level of the ancillary laying, or by a connecting member between the slats at their forward end projecting from the body 3. Note that the slats can be arranged not on the lateral sides of the body but on its upper and lower surfaces, or a configuration where a slat has its groove in the upper or lower surface of the body, and the other lamella, its groove in one of the lateral sides. Moreover, one of the slats may have a width greater than the other.

  
An alternative embodiment (not shown) consists in combining a removable lamella feature of this I2 <eme> execution mode with a fin characteristic of the ninth execution mode.

  
According to Figure 13a, the slats 21, 21 'are mounted on the body 3 at the time of introduction of the cage. The anchoring device comprises in particular a part 22, for example of rectangular shape, adapted to be embedded in, or otherwise secured to, the rear part of the body 3. This part 22 encloses the slats 21, 21 'and helps to maintain them in the grooves 16, 16 '. It also contributes to transmitting the rotational force applied to the handle 221 of the ancillary. The cage body 3 has on its rear side a screw thread 223 in order to be able to screw an instrument 222. This instrument 222 slides inside the workpiece 22 and allows the body 3 to be pushed after the rotation of the latter. this has been done.

   In an alternative embodiment (not shown), the body 3 is not pushed individually, but it is the slats 21, 21 'which are removed once the body 3 is in its desired position. Of course, any other installation system associating lamellae 21, 21 'to a body 3 may be used for expansion and insertion of the body 3.

  
The strips 21, 21 'can also be positioned in an intermediate position (FIG. 12b), or even at the periphery of the rear face of the body 3, particularly if it is desired to reduce the width of the cage at the time of its passage through the spinal canal. The depth of the grooves 16, 16 'is not necessarily constant and may decrease from the rear to the front of the body 3 (Figure 12b). Similarly, the strips 21, 21 'may not be aligned in two parallel axes (Figure 12b), and / or have a non-constant width, either increasing or decreasing.

  
Figures 12c and 12d show a cage variant having an arched body to better fit the vertebral body contour, whether for a posterior or transforaminal or lateral approach. Once the cage body 3 is close to its final position, the blade 21 on the concave side of the body 3 is removed and a pressure is applied to said body 3 by the instrument 222 in an oblique axis with respect to the longitudinal axis in order to be able to rotate it on an axial or sagittal plane (assuming that the lamellae are in the distraction position of the intersomatic space).

  
Figure 13 represents an I3 <ieme> mode of execution combining the characteristics of the insertion flaps of the ninth embodiment with the retractable slats of the I2 <eme> embodiment, namely, where the cage body 3 comprises on each of these lateral sides an arcuate longitudinal groove 16, 16 'in which are inserted blades 21, 21' arcuate which form an integral part of a ancillary pose. The variants are multiple, because the slats can also be straight or in a different plane of the plane of the flaps, and the slats can also be combined with an insertion tab of the fifth embodiment.

  
According to an I4 <eme> embodiment (Figure 14), a first and a second removable flap 22, 22 'is attached to the end respectively of a first and second rods 23, 23' arranged in a first and second grooves 16, 16 ' , said grooves being located along one and the other of the lateral sides, respectively in the upper and lower part of the body 3. The flaps 22, 22 'may be already in place at the time of introduction of the cage , or can be slid into the grooves 16, 16 'after the introduction of the body 3 in order to perform the rotation. The advantage of this cage is to be able to remove these flaps 22, 22 'after the exercise of rotation of the cage.

   The profile of the cross section of each groove 15, 15 'prevents the rotation of the flaps 22, 22' around their rod 23, 23 'at the time when the vertebrae exert a force "F" and "F1" against said flaps.

  
An alternative embodiment illustrated in Figures 14a, 14b and 14c is to introduce the flaps 22, 22 'in ducts 24, 24' through the body in the longitudinal direction and having a cross section corresponding to that of the flaps. Two rotational enclosures 25, 25 'arranged on the anterior side 7 of the body allow the flaps 22, 22' to achieve an arc of a circle up to the stop 23 (Figure 14c) in order to be able to deploy in their projecting position. situate to fulfill their function of lever arm. The cage is introduced with or without flaps through the spinal canal. In contact with the anterior side 7 of the body with the vertebrae, the flaps 22, 22 'are pushed by their respective rods 23, 23' inside the ducts 24, 24 'until they emerge in their rotating enclosures 25, 25 'respective.

   If the shutters were already in their ducts at the time of the introduction of the cage, they must simply be deployed. The deployment is effected by a rotation of the order of 190 [deg.] Of the rods which causes the flaps 22, 22 'to rotate to the stop 23. The flaps are then introduced into the intersomatic space, and body rotation is performed for dilation purposes. The stop resists the force "F" exerted by the vertebra. To further stabilize the lever arm, the rods can be fixed directly to the body 3, for example in its rear part, or on the contrary only to the insertion device of the body.

   Alternatively, the flaps can be immediately deployed at the time of introduction of the body through the spinal canal, and after the rotation of the body, the flaps are folded into their input position as shown in Figures 14a and 14b, then removed from the body along their duct. If the surface of the vertebra prevents such reverse rotation of the flaps, the flaps can be advanced to protrude from the end of the stop 23 and complete the rotation turn and be removed from the body. Such a device can also combine a movable flap and a fixed flap, or a movable flap and a rod.

   An alternative embodiment consists in lining the body with deployable and then semi-retractable flaps, ie. they are not removed with the delivery device after introduction of the body, but are retracted inside the body to limit the size of the intersomatic space.

  
It goes without saying that certain features of any embodiment may be substituted and / or added to certain features of one of the other embodiments. In particular, each of the features attached to the body of the cage, insertion tongue, flaps, insertion rods, fins, may be in a resorbable material intended to disappear to give way to bone growth, or osteoconductive material , responsible for promoting said bone growth.

  
All variants are also likely to apply to cages that are not intended to be introduced by a posterior approach, including cages for trans-foraminal or lateral approaches.

  
Moreover, the end of the portion intended to expand the intervertebral space has in some embodiments a bevelled profile. In addition, all sharp edges of the body can be dulled. Convex or concave surfaces can also be made on the side of the body 3 or is the part intended to expand the intersomatic space in order to facilitate the transition between this part and said body 3.

  
Finally, the subject of the present invention also relates to two methods of insertion of the cage into the intersomatic space. More particularly, the invention relates to a first method of inserting a cage as described in some of the preceding embodiments, said method comprising the following steps:

  
the cage is introduced into the spinal canal with its insertion tongue 2 vertically until the front of the insertion tongue 2 is in contact with the vertebrae; - The cage is then rotated a quarter of a turn or an angle substantially less than 90 [deg.] to tilt the insertion tab 2 to the horizontal which allows its introduction into the intervertebral space slightly dilated;

  
- The cage is then rotated a quarter of a turn or an angle substantially less than 90 [deg.], But in the opposite direction of the second step, which has the effect of expanding the intervertebral space d a height close to the height H <1> of the insertion tab 2 of the cage;

  
This is then pushed, or, if necessary, impacted, inside the intervertebral space, to its final position.

  
The invention also relates to a second method of inserting a cage as described in other modes of the preceding embodiments, said method comprising the following steps:

  
the cage is introduced into the spinal canal until the front of said cage is in contact with the vertebrae;

  
a pressure and / or impact and is exerted on the cage causing an autorotation movement thereof allowing the expansion of the intersomatic space; - An additional pressure is then exerted on the cage to introduce it into the intersdomatic space to its final position.

Claims

An intersomatic cage comprising a body (3) and a portion (2) for expanding the intersomatic space between two vertebrae (8, 8 ') by rotating the cage in order to introduce said cage (1), characterized in that the prism-shaped body (3) having a substantially planar upper surface (6) adapted to abut against the upper vertebra plate (8) and a substantially planar lower surface (6 1 ) adapted to press against the lower vertebrae plate (8 1 ).
2. Intersomatic cage according to claim 1, characterized in that the body (3) is a hexahedron whose upper and lower surfaces (6,
6 ') are inclined relative to each other by an angle between 2 ° and
20 ° from the anterior side (7) to its posterior side to allow adequate lordosis of the vertebrae (8, 8 ').
3. intersomatic cage according to claim 1 or 2, characterized in that the portion (2) for expanding the intersomatic space is arranged in a plane inclined at an angle β relative to the horizontal plane of the cage.
4. Intersomatic cage according to claim 3, characterized in that the angle β is between 40 ° and 60 °
5. intersomatic cage according to claim 1, 2, 3 or 4, characterized in that the portion (2) for expanding the intersomatic space is arranged on the front side (7) of the body (3) of the cage.
Intersomatic cage according to claim 1, 2, 3 or 4, characterized in that the portion (2) for expanding the intersomatic space is arranged on one of the lateral sides (3, 3 ') of the body (3). ) for unilateral, transforaminal or lateral approaches.
Intersomatic cage according to claim 5 or 6, characterized in that the portion (2) has a substantially oblong cross-section of height H 1 and width W, the portion (2) being oriented so as to extend the front side (7) or one of the lateral sides (3 ', 3 ") of the cage body (3) in a plane inclined with respect to the horizontal plane of the cage.
Intersomatic cage according to claim 5, characterized in that the lateral flanks of the substantially oblong cross-section portion (2) extend beyond the edges of the front side (7) or one of the lateral sides (3). ', 3 ") of the cage body (3) so as to be able to expand the intersomatic space by rotation of the cage so that the height of this space is substantially greater than the height of the body (3).
9. Intersomatic cage according to any one of the preceding claims, characterized in that the body (3) of said cage (1) comprises a fin (9, 9 ') arranged along each of the two lateral sides (3 \ 3 ") of the cage body (3).
Intersomatic cage according to one of claims 1 to 7, characterized in that the part (2, 2 bιs ) comprises an upper and lower face (10, 10 ') and two lateral faces (11, 11'), said faces (10, 10 ', 11, 11') converging from the respective edges of the front side (7) or one of the lateral sides (3 ', 3 ") of the body (3) to a face (2n ), the upper and lower face (10, 10 ') of the portion (2) having an inclined surface and curved so as to reproduce the beginning of a helical gradient slope.
11. Intersomatic cage according to claim 9, characterized in that the face (2n) lies in a plane substantially parallel to the anterior side (7) or of one of the lateral sides (3 \ 3 ") of cage body ( 3).
Intersomatic cage according to claim 10 or 11, characterized in that the face (2n) is centered at mid-height and half-width of the anterior side (7) or of one of the lateral sides (3 \ 3 ") of cage body (3).
Intersomatic cage according to claim 10 or 11, characterized in that the face (2n) is situated close to one of the lateral flanks of the anterior side (7) and at mid-height of said side (7) of the cage body. (3).
Intersomatic cage according to claim 10 or 11, characterized in that the face (2n) is located near one of the corners of the anterior side (7) of the cage body (3).
15. Intersomatic cage according to claim 10, characterized in that the two lateral faces (11, 11 ') are profiled so that a portion of the portion (2) has a cross-sectional shape. substantially oblong Hp height and width Wp, and secondly, that this portion extends in the direction of its height Hp in a plane inclined by an angle β relative to the horizontal plane of the cage.
16. Intersomatic cage according to claim 14, characterized in that the height Hp is constant over a depth Dp.
17. Intersomatic cage (1) according to one of claims 1 to 5, characterized in that the portion (2) for expanding the intersomatic space comprises at least two rods (13, 13 ').
18. Intersomatic cage (1) according to claim 16, characterized in that the rods (13, 13 ") are arranged on the anterior side (7) of the cage body (3) in two opposite corners along a diagonal, said rods ( 13, 13 ') being oriented along an axis perpendicular to said side (7).
19. Intersomatic cage (1) according to claim 16 and 17, characterized in that at least one of the rods (13, 13 ') is removable and is an integral part of an ancillary laying.
EP09754190A 2008-05-26 2009-05-26 Intersomatic cage Withdrawn EP2293742A1 (en)

Priority Applications (5)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
CH7952008 2008-05-26
CH7942008 2008-05-26
CH8632008 2008-06-06
CH4222009 2009-03-19
PCT/IB2009/005721 WO2009144562A1 (en) 2008-05-26 2009-05-26 Intersomatic cage

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
EP2293742A1 true EP2293742A1 (en) 2011-03-16

Family

ID=40984863

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
EP09754190A Withdrawn EP2293742A1 (en) 2008-05-26 2009-05-26 Intersomatic cage

Country Status (4)

Country Link
US (4) US9289314B2 (en)
EP (1) EP2293742A1 (en)
AU (1) AU2009252835A1 (en)
WO (1) WO2009144562A1 (en)

Families Citing this family (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9402736B2 (en) * 2010-07-12 2016-08-02 Alphatec Spine, Inc. Interbody fusion implant and related methods
US9668882B2 (en) * 2009-10-02 2017-06-06 Amedica Corporation Biomedical implant inserters and related apparatus, systems, and methods
JP5710646B2 (en) 2010-01-13 2015-04-30 ジェーシービーディー,エルエルシー Sacroiliac joint fixation system
US9333090B2 (en) * 2010-01-13 2016-05-10 Jcbd, Llc Systems for and methods of fusing a sacroiliac joint
US9421109B2 (en) 2010-01-13 2016-08-23 Jcbd, Llc Systems and methods of fusing a sacroiliac joint
CA2793185C (en) 2010-03-16 2019-02-12 Pinnacle Spine Group, Llc Intervertebral implants and graft delivery systems and methods
US9380932B1 (en) 2011-11-02 2016-07-05 Pinnacle Spine Group, Llc Retractor devices for minimally invasive access to the spine
US9554909B2 (en) 2012-07-20 2017-01-31 Jcbd, Llc Orthopedic anchoring system and methods
US10070970B2 (en) 2013-03-14 2018-09-11 Pinnacle Spine Group, Llc Interbody implants and graft delivery systems
US10433880B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2019-10-08 Jcbd, Llc Systems and methods for fusing a sacroiliac joint and anchoring an orthopedic appliance
US10245087B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2019-04-02 Jcbd, Llc Systems and methods for fusing a sacroiliac joint and anchoring an orthopedic appliance
WO2014146018A1 (en) 2013-03-15 2014-09-18 Jcbd, Llc Systems and methods for fusing a sacroiliac joint and anchoring an orthopedic appliance
US9717539B2 (en) 2013-07-30 2017-08-01 Jcbd, Llc Implants, systems, and methods for fusing a sacroiliac joint
US9839529B2 (en) 2015-05-18 2017-12-12 Zavation Medical Products, Llc Method and system of installing a spinal fusion cage
WO2016207797A1 (en) 2015-06-25 2016-12-29 Changzhou Kanghui Medical Innovation Co., Ltd Assembly comprising a delivery system and an interbody cage
WO2016207798A1 (en) * 2015-06-25 2016-12-29 Changzhou Kanghui Medical Innovation Co., Ltd Interbody cage and method of insertion
WO2016207796A1 (en) 2015-06-25 2016-12-29 Changzhou Kanghui Medical Innovation Co., Ltd Delivery system and interbody cage assembly
CN105208269B (en) * 2015-09-17 2019-06-18 小米科技有限责任公司 Control the method, device and equipment of picture pick-up device positioning

Family Cites Families (26)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4834757A (en) * 1987-01-22 1989-05-30 Brantigan John W Prosthetic implant
US5425772A (en) * 1993-09-20 1995-06-20 Brantigan; John W. Prosthetic implant for intervertebral spinal fusion
US5443514A (en) * 1993-10-01 1995-08-22 Acromed Corporation Method for using spinal implants
US5397364A (en) * 1993-10-12 1995-03-14 Danek Medical, Inc. Anterior interbody fusion device
FR2715293B1 (en) * 1994-01-26 1996-03-22 Biomat Vertebral intersomatic cage.
US5895426A (en) * 1996-09-06 1999-04-20 Osteotech, Inc. Fusion implant device and method of use
US5968098A (en) * 1996-10-22 1999-10-19 Surgical Dynamics, Inc. Apparatus for fusing adjacent bone structures
FR2764795B1 (en) * 1997-06-19 1999-09-10 Sarl Sra The intersomatic cage of the spine immobilization and ancillary equipment associated
FR2767675B1 (en) * 1997-08-26 1999-12-03 Materiel Orthopedique En Abreg and ancillary interbody implant preparation adapted to allow its installation
WO1999060957A1 (en) * 1998-05-27 1999-12-02 Nuvasive, Inc. Methods and apparatus for separating and stabilizing adjacent vertebrae
US6368325B1 (en) * 1998-05-27 2002-04-09 Nuvasive, Inc. Bone blocks and methods for inserting bone blocks into intervertebral spaces
EP1100417B1 (en) * 1998-08-03 2004-04-07 SYNTHES AG Chur Intervertebral allograft spacer
US6099531A (en) * 1998-08-20 2000-08-08 Bonutti; Peter M. Changing relationship between bones
US6709458B2 (en) * 2000-02-04 2004-03-23 Gary Karlin Michelson Expandable push-in arcuate interbody spinal fusion implant with tapered configuration during insertion
US6814756B1 (en) * 2000-02-04 2004-11-09 Gary K. Michelson Expandable threaded arcuate interbody spinal fusion implant with lordotic configuration during insertion
US20020029082A1 (en) * 2000-08-29 2002-03-07 Muhanna Nabil L. Vertebral spacer and method of use
US7128760B2 (en) * 2001-03-27 2006-10-31 Warsaw Orthopedic, Inc. Radially expanding interbody spinal fusion implants, instrumentation, and methods of insertion
ITTO20010723A1 (en) * 2001-07-24 2003-01-24 Sulzer Orthopedics Italia S P Device for the stabilization interbody to mini-invasive approach.
US8025684B2 (en) * 2001-11-09 2011-09-27 Zimmer Spine, Inc. Instruments and methods for inserting a spinal implant
KR100474747B1 (en) * 2001-12-13 2005-03-08 주식회사 솔고 바이오메디칼 Spinal prosthetic implant and insertion instrument
US7753958B2 (en) * 2003-08-05 2010-07-13 Gordon Charles R Expandable intervertebral implant
US7195643B2 (en) * 2003-08-29 2007-03-27 Jackson Roger P Convex spinal fusion interbody spacer
US7749269B2 (en) * 2005-03-28 2010-07-06 Warsaw Orthopedic, Inc. Spinal system and method including lateral approach
TWM303719U (en) * 2006-05-30 2007-01-01 Kung-Chia Li Spine repositioning device capable of being placed medicament therein
US8747473B2 (en) * 2007-11-30 2014-06-10 Custom Spine, Inc. Modular lateral expansion device
FR2926213B1 (en) * 2008-01-15 2010-02-05 Henry Graf Intervertebral stabilization assembly comprising an impaction cage body and its ancillary installation

Non-Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
See references of WO2009144562A1 *

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
AU2009252835A1 (en) 2009-12-03
US20190000639A1 (en) 2019-01-03
US9289314B2 (en) 2016-03-22
US9421114B2 (en) 2016-08-23
US20170000620A1 (en) 2017-01-05
US20110230968A1 (en) 2011-09-22
WO2009144562A1 (en) 2009-12-03
US20150297358A1 (en) 2015-10-22

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
EP1720491B1 (en) Universal interference cleat for vertebral prosthesis
US8221502B2 (en) Expandable spinal implant
EP2208481B1 (en) Inter-Body Implantation System
US8328852B2 (en) Segmented insert for intervertebral support
CA2445387C (en) Intervertebral implant for transforaminal posterior lumbar interbody fusion procedure
EP1459711B1 (en) Expandable intervertebral spacers
AU2003207437B2 (en) Spinal fusion implant having deployable bone engaging projections
EP2378990B1 (en) Expandable interspinous process spacer
ES2225964T3 (en) Osteosynthesis expansive cage.
EP2047825B1 (en) Minimally invasive lateral intervertebral fixation system
JP4381798B2 (en) New banana cage
US5397364A (en) Anterior interbody fusion device
US9211196B2 (en) Expandable fusion device and method of installation thereof
US10413422B2 (en) Intervertebral implant
US7901458B2 (en) Intervertebral spacer and insertion tool
US6258125B1 (en) Intervertebral allograft spacer
US8882841B2 (en) Steerable interbody fusion cage
US8372149B2 (en) Artifical disc implant
US8591589B2 (en) Interbody fusion device
JP5452605B2 (en) Intervertebral spacer
US7655043B2 (en) Expandable spinal implant and associated instrumentation
US8043293B2 (en) Pivotable interbody spacer
US7776094B2 (en) Spinal implants and methods for inserting spinal implants into intervertebral spaces
US8029550B2 (en) Intervertebral prosthetic device for spinal stabilization and method of implanting same
US20070093897A1 (en) System and method for fusion cage implantation

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AX Request for extension of the european patent to:

Extension state: AL BA RS

17P Request for examination filed

Effective date: 20101222

AK Designated contracting states

Kind code of ref document: A1

Designated state(s): AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HR HU IE IS IT LI LT LU LV MC MK MT NL NO PL PT RO SE SI SK TR

DAX Request for extension of the european patent (to any country) (deleted)
17Q First examination report despatched

Effective date: 20131220

RAP1 Rights of an application transferred

Owner name: CARPE CONSULTANTS SARL

18D Application deemed to be withdrawn

Effective date: 20171201