EP1142196A2 - Method and apparatus for session reconstruction - Google Patents

Method and apparatus for session reconstruction

Info

Publication number
EP1142196A2
EP1142196A2 EP00944892A EP00944892A EP1142196A2 EP 1142196 A2 EP1142196 A2 EP 1142196A2 EP 00944892 A EP00944892 A EP 00944892A EP 00944892 A EP00944892 A EP 00944892A EP 1142196 A2 EP1142196 A2 EP 1142196A2
Authority
EP
European Patent Office
Prior art keywords
session
analyzer
application
packets
plurality
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Withdrawn
Application number
EP00944892A
Other languages
German (de)
French (fr)
Inventor
Damian Sean Black
Tal Givoly
Ory Baruch Kushnir
Limor Schweitzer
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Xacct Technologies Inc
Original Assignee
XACCT TECHNOLOGIES INC
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US14135199P priority Critical
Priority to US141351P priority
Priority to US09/552,818 priority patent/US6957255B1/en
Priority to US553261 priority
Priority to US09/553,261 priority patent/US6963912B1/en
Application filed by XACCT TECHNOLOGIES INC filed Critical XACCT TECHNOLOGIES INC
Priority to PCT/US2000/017583 priority patent/WO2001001726A2/en
Publication of EP1142196A2 publication Critical patent/EP1142196A2/en
Priority to US552818 priority
Application status is Withdrawn legal-status Critical

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Classifications

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    • H04L41/509Network service management, i.e. ensuring proper service fulfillment according to an agreement or contract between two parties, e.g. between an IT-provider and a customer based on type of value added network service under agreement wherein the managed service relates to media content delivery, e.g. audio / video / TV
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Abstract

A method and apparatus for reconstructing sessions on a network is described. The method allows for monitoring of quality of service at an application level as well as for understanding application specific events. This allows the method to be used to generate service detail records for usage based on application type for use in billing. It also allows the qualitative and quantitative analysis of quality of service based on application specific parameters. For example, for web applications, quality of service can be measured by the time from requesting a link till the close of the session by delivery of the whole page. Similarly, for voice over IP calls, application events like adding participants and removing participants can be detected and billed accordingly. Also, the quality of service can be measured. For example, the actual latency can be compared to a predetermined latency amount set by a provider for voice over IP calls. Additionally, service detail records can be generated based on application specific events instead of generic flows, so usage billing can be performed based on factors such as a price per minute per leg, etc., with application specific events generated each time a leg is added or dropped. Further, because the periodicity of the output can be controlled on a per application basis, output for voice over IP calls can be generated more often than for other applications. Additionally, embodiments of the invention can reconstruct sessions that are flowing across multiple network devices.

Description

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR SESSION RECONSTRUCTION

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Field of the Invention This invention relates to the field of network management. In particular, the invention relates to session reconstruction in a network environment. Description of the Related Art

The Internet protocol (IP) that is widely used on the Internet does not provide a committed quality of service. Several protocols have been developed to compliment standard implementations of IP to provide varying degrees of support for committed quality of service networks.

One set of extensions is the Differentiated Services (diffserv) specified by RFC 2474 and RFC 2475, that provides for using portions of the IP header information to store information about the types of service (TOS). Another approach is the resource reservation protocol (RSVP) specified by RFCs

2205-2210. In some instances, where appropriate, the two can be used together to provide a committed quality of service over an IP network.

The provision of a committed quality of service network is distinct from the monitoring the network and billing for usage of the network. Existing network monitoring processes such as RMON2, and RMON, specified by RFC 2074 and RFC 2021 are designed to report statistics based on information available in the packet headers, e.g. source and destination address. With RMON2, this can be broken down on a per port basis. The granularity of the reports depends on the sampling of the RMON trace. The returned statistics are basic measures of number of bytes and number of packets.

Netflow(TM), from Cisco Corporation, San Jose, California, adds to these abilities by providing measures based on the terms of service, e.g. diffserv style flag, and the IP port used. Similarly, Firewall- 1(TM) and Floodgate- 1(TM) from Check Point Software Technologies, Ramat Gan, Israel, offers a similar set of features to Netflow(TM). Both Netflow(TM) and Firewall- l(TM)/Floodgate-l(TM) focus on reporting per flow statistics. Previous techniques do not support quality of service related evaluation of network usage. Previous systems do not allow for reconstructing sessions, where each session may be comprised of multiple flows. Previous systems do not provide for application specific event monitoring. Previous systems to not handle large volumes of data received over different network devices well. Accordingly, what is needed is a session reconstruction system that supports measuring quality of service, reconstruction of sessions that include multiple flows, application specific event monitoring within flows, and distributed session reconstruction.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

A method and apparatus for reconstructing sessions on a network is described. The method allows for monitoring of quality of service at an application level as well as for understanding application specific events. This allows the method to be used to generate service detail records for usage based on application type for use in billing. It also allows the qualitative and quantitative analysis of quality of service based on application specific parameters. For example, for web applications, quality of service can be measured by the time from requesting a link till the close of the session by delivery of the whole page. Similarly, for voice over IP calls, application events like adding participants and removing participants can be detected and billed accordingly. Also, the quality of service can be measured. For example, the actual latency can be compared to a predetermined latency amount set by a provider for voice over IP calls. Additionally, service detail records can be generated based on application specific events instead of generic flows, so usage billing can be performed based on factors such as a price per minute per leg, etc, with application specific events generated each time a leg is added or dropped. Further, because the periodicity of the output can be controlled on a per application basis, output for voice over IP calls can be generated more often than for other applications. Additionally, embodiments of the invention can reconstruct sessions that are flowing across multiple network devices.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES

Fig. 1 illustrates a system including one embodiment of the invention.

Fig. 2 illustrates the handling of packets that are not part of a recognized flow. Fig. 3 illustrates the handling of packets that are part of a recognized flow.

Fig. 4 illustrates the relationship between information about a flow and information about a session.

Fig. 5 illustrates information generated by some embodiments of the invention for from session information.

Fig. 6 illustrates a situation in which distributed session reconstruction may be desirable.

Fig. 7 illustrates a system including one embodiment of the invention configured to support distributed session reconstruction.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

A. System Overview

1. Terminology

The Internet protocol (IP) is a network layer protocol. The transmission control protocol (TCP) and the user datagram protocol (UDP) are two transport protocols used over IP networks. These transport mechanisms are in turn used by application layer protocols such as telnet, file transport protocol (ftp), hypertext transfer protocol (http), domain name service (DNS), simple mail transport protocol (SMTP), RealAudio(TM), NetMeeting(TM), etc. One common encapsulation of IP packets is within IEEE 802.3 Ethernet frames. In such an embodiment, the payload, or data, portion of the packet includes an IP datagram comprising headers and a text part. The text part in turn includes the transport layer protocol such as TCP or UDP. The transport layer portion has an additional transport layer specific header and then a data portion. This data portion is in turn comprised of data specific to the application layer protocol.

Thus, a given packet sent over an IP network may have several sets of addresses, including: a set of medium access (MAC) layer address; a set of network layer address; and a set of transport layer address. Additionally, there may be application specific addresses.

Most routing and flow detection/management software is limited to looking at the header addresses: MAC addresses, IP addresses, and TCP UDP ports. TCP UDP ports can be used for multiple purposes; therefore, unless the application data itself is examined, it may not be possible to provide accurate application based reporting. For example, port 80 is typically used for hypertext transfer protocol (HTTP) access. However, there is nothing to prevent a program from using that port for other data, e.g. online games. In fact, switching a protocol like RealAudio(TM), which sometimes exhibits poor behavior due to network congestion, to a port used by a well-known service such as DNS can provide huge speed improvements for an end user.

Comparison of TCP/IP Model with OSI Model

This specification uses terminology from the TCP/IP Model to describe networks. However, a brief description of the OSI Model is appropriate. The OSI model, or Open Systems Interconnection Reference Model, is a seven-layer model comprising the following layers: physical (1); data link (2); network (3); transport (4); session (5); presentation (6); and application (7).

The TCP/IP Model terminology used in this specification can be mapped onto the OSI Model as follows: host-to-network (1/2); Internet Protocol (IP) (3); Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) and/or User Datagram Protocol (UDP) (4); and application layer (7). The TCP/IP model does not include an analogous set of abstractions for layers five and six of the OSI Model. The application layer in the TCP/IP model is comprised of higher-level protocols such as file transfer protocol (FTP), hypertext transfer protocol (HTTP), etc.

Some embodiments of the invention may be adapted to work with OSI Model networks and may include appropriate detectors for operating at the presentation and/or session layers.

2. Application Identification and Sessions

Because of the ability of applications to use TCP and UDP ports arbitrarily, it is not adequate to rely on header information to determine what application a packet is being used for. For example, RealAudio(TM) packets could be sent over the ports normally used for DNS.

Limiting the review of packets to just headers would not allow applications that use multiple TCP/UDP flows for a single session to be tracked. Common examples of such applications include H.323 calls and ftp sessions. Thus, a voice over IP program can establish multiple TCP/UDP flows for a single call. Similarly, each file transferred during an ftp session can use a distinct TCP/UDP flow. Another limitation of scanning headers alone occurs in committed quality of service networks where it is important to be able to monitor and charge for usage based on relevant events for an application.

Therefore, the term "session" refers to a group of related flows within a definite time bound relating to an end user experience, each of the flows may share one or more common packet header elements. Thus, for the ftp application, a session is comprised of the flows containing the commands as well as of the flows used for transferring files. For a voice over IP call, the control flows as well as all of the flows containing voice and/or video data would be part of a single session.

Additionally, sessions can hierarchically be comprised of other sessions. For example, the process of accessing a single web page may be comprised of multiple HTTP sessions. Thus a "WWW session" might be considered to comprise all web activity by a user in a definite time bound, e.g. times out after X minutes without further activity. A WWW session could be comprised of page sessions for each retrieved page. The page sessions in turn could be comprised of one or more HTTP sessions, e.g. one or more flows for retrieving an object using the HTTP protocol.

Continuing the example of the voice over IP call, a provider might provide guarantees about average latency to customers. For example, the provider might promise that the average latency would not exceed Z ms. If the entire voice over IP call is treated as a single session, the latency can be measured and the appropriate compensation can be given if the latency guarantee was not met. Further, because application specific events can be monitored, addition and removal of call legs can be tracked and appropriate service detail records generated. Also, different application protocols may have different usage billing requirements. For example, voice over IP calls for a prepaid calling card must be checked every minute to ensure that a user does not exceed the minutes available to them.

3. System Setup

Figure 1 illustrates a system including one embodiment of the invention. This could be used in conjunction with a corporate Intranet to provide policy based session management and monitoring. A provider of voice could use this over IP telephony to meter and monitor usage and provide a committed quality of service.

This paragraph lists the elements of Figure 1 and describes their interconnections. Figure 1 includes the packet sources lOOa-e, a filter 102, an analyzer 104, a data collector 106, a policy 114. The analyzer 104 includes a flow manager 108, an application recognizer 110, and a session streamer 112. The packet sources lOOa-e are coupled in communication with the filter 102. The filter 102 is coupled in communication with the analyzer 104. The analyzer 104 is coupled in communication with the data collector 106. The filter 102, the analyzer 104, and the data collector 106 are capable of accessing the policy 114.

The following describes the uses of the elements of Figure 1. The packet sources lOOa-e could be network connections, local computers, network computers, the Internet, and/or some other type of packet source. The packet sources lOOa-e are sources of packets such as IP packets, IPX packets, and/or some other type of packets.

In some embodiments the filter 102 is provided to filter out packets. In other embodiments, no filter 102 is used. The filter 102 can be set to remove local traffic from further analysis, e.g. packets not leaving the corporate Intranet, or packets not travelling over a particular backbone. Additionally, if multiple analyzers like the analyzer 104 are being used, then multiple filters like the filter 102 can be used to segment the analysis. For example, all voice over IP calls might be filtered out by one filter but be the only thing passed through by another. This allows for tremendous flexibility in providing distributed analysis and meaningful analysis. In some embodiments, a standard packet capture (pcap) language is used to define the filter, e.g. "tcp and port 80 or dst net 192.168.0.0 mask 255.255.0.0", etc.

Only those packets that meet the tests of the filter 102 are passed to the analyzer 104. In some embodiments, the filter 102 and the analyzer 104 are hosted on separate computers. For example, the filter 102 might have two Ethernet interfaces, one for receiving packets from the packet sources lOOa-e and the other for sending matching packets to the analyzer 104. Packets are analyzed by the analyzer 104 to be assigned to flows and then to sessions. The analyzer 104 can gather statistics about flows and sessions for use by the data collector 106. Each of the components of the analyzer 104 can be performed on a single computer and/or multiple computers to support distributed processing.

The policy 114 controls how the system operates. For example, the policy might specify the ability of certain users or groups to perform certain tasks. The policy might control how much bandwidth certain users or groups get. The policy might control how users or groups are billed for usage. The policy may also control how different application events are treated, e.g. for voice over IP request minute by minute service detail records, etc. Other options include controlling when sessions, flows and/or packets are dropped, the contents of output from the data collector 106, what application specific headers and statistics are being collected, and/or other options. For example, for HTTP, the time from click to first reply and time from click till last TCP thread finished might be recorded as well as the base uniform resource indicator (URI). In some embodiments, the policy can include a series of pcap language style expressions together with output selectors as shown by the example in Table 1.

Table 1

This allows a set of actions to be flexibly defined. A separate table could provide the information for the filter 102. The policy 114 can also contain user and group based restrictions and evaluations. B. Handling Unrecognized Flows

Figure 2 illustrates the handling of packets that are not part of a recognized flow. As users begin new activities, each flow is initially not recognized. For example, starting to access a web page. Figure 2 shows how unrecognized flows are handled according to some embodiments of the invention.

In this example, a filtered packet 200 is passed to the flow manager 108 within the analyzer 104 by the filter 102. Because the flow manager 108 does not recognize the packet as belonging to an existing flow, it is added to a queue of unrecognized flows 202A-B as unrecognized flow 202C and the packets are placed in content 204C. If additional packets for the flow arrive before the flow is recognized, they can be associated with the flow by adding the packet to the respective content 204A-C.

The application recognizer 110 examines each of the flows in the queue and identifies whether the content of the flow matches a known application. This is based on the packet content itself. The application recognizer 110 can use the application tests 206 to perform matching.

In some embodiments, the application tests 206 include tests for CuSeeMe, http, ftp, RealAudio(TM), post office protocol version 3 (POP3), SMTP, NetMeeting(TM), Quicktime(TM), H.323 calls, telnet, and/or other applications. The application tests for a particular application protocol describe how to identify a particular application protocol from the data content of packets.

In this example, three sessions 210A-C have already been identified. If the application recognizer finds a matching application, the unrecognized flow 202A will be assigned to a new session, session 210D. The session streamer 112 is used to alert the flow manager 108 to new flows that are part of an existing session in some embodiments of the invention. Therefore, unrecognized flows will be assigned to new sessions while new flows for an existing session will be treated as recognized flows.

Some flows may not be recognized as belonging to any application. For example, if a new protocol is developed for streaming media, then none of the application tests 206 may be able to recognize the flow. In that case, some embodiments of the invention treat the unrecognized flow as a self-contained session after more than two kilobytes (KB) have been sent or if a predetermined amount of time passes without additional packets. Because the application tests 206 are modular, additional tests can be added, modified, and/or removed easily. The tests can, if appropriately designed, detect specific application protocols, e.g. RealAudio(TM) type Y encoding, etc.

C. Handling Existing Flows

Figure 3 illustrates the handling of packets that are part of a recognized flow once a session is underway (For example, ongoing packets in a voice over IP call). Additionally, the session streamer 112 can provide information to the flow manager 108 to allow new flows for an existing session to be recognized without the application recognizer 110 being used. Figure 3 shows how recognized flows are handled according to some embodiments of the invention. Filtered packets 300 flow into the flow manager 108. Because the packet belongs to a recognized flow, e.g. the recognized flow 3202A, it is associated with the respective content, e.g. the content 304A.

The session streamer 112 uses the application streamers 306 to detect application specific events, e.g. add leg, etc., and assign the content to respective sessions. The application streamers 306 are similar to the application tests 206. However, the application streamers 306 contain tests for matching additional packets from the same application session.

The session streamer 112 in conjunction with the application streamers 306 may also be able to detect the request for additional channels or ports and provide that information to the flow manager 108. Thus, new flows for an existing session will not be treated as unrecognized flows, but rather will be recognized and handled by the session streamer 112. For example, the application streamers 306 might include NetMeeting(TM) specific streamers for detecting add leg and drop leg events and providing the addressing information to the flow manager 108. The policy 114 can assign significance and actions relative to certain application events identified by the application streamers 306. The session streamer 112 assigns the packets from the flows to the respective sessions based on the results of the application streamers 306. Here, the recognized flow 302 A and the content 304 A is matched with the session 210B.

P. Statistics Generation

Figure 4 illustrates the relationship between information about a flow and information about a session. Figure 4 includes three flows 400A-C with respective packet time-stamps 402A-C. Each flow 400A-C is associated with a corresponding session 210A-D. Here, the flows 400 A-B are both associated with session 210D while flow 400C is associated with session 210 A. The packet time-stamps 402A-C are used to generate the statistics 404A-D corresponding to each of the sessions.

If reporting is performed solely on a per flow basis, it does not capture the overall performance of the session. Nor does it capture the performance from an application specific fashion. For example, an H.323 call is may be comprised of at three or more flows. For example, for a call from John to Jane, there might be two flows for audio and a third flow for control. Per flow monitoring alone could suggest that one flow for the call, e.g. John to Jane, is meeting the committed quality of service. But, nothing would connect that information with the fact that the other flow, Jane to John, is not.

Further, if there is billing taking place, then it is important that the billing be aggregated on a per session basis with meaningful service detail billing. For voice over IP telephony, that might be a charge per minute per leg. For HTTP, that might be a charge per megabyte. A service detail record can include a billing identifier, e.g. user name, calling card number, phone number, and/or some other identifier. The service detail record also can include the usage within the interval covered by the service detail record. For example, a service detail record for a voice over IP call might include the phone number and the usage, e.g. "650/555-1212, 5 legs, 3007 sec ttl", etc. For an Internet backbone provider, service detail records generated might be at the ISP level and measured in megabytes in a fixed interval, e.g. "ispl 300.7 MB". Some statistics computed by embodiments of the invention include: flow-level statistics, start time, end time, time since last output, number of packets, number of bytes, average time between packets, moving average, latency, throughput, jitter, and/or other statistics. The jitter is the standard deviation of the latency and throughput. When appropriate, the statistics can be further subdivided between input and output information. Latency is an application specific computation in some embodiments of the invention. For example, with TCP packets, latency can be determined by looking at the time between sequential acknowledgements. In contrast, for a real-time protocol, the latency might be calculated as the difference between the end of communication in a control flow and the start of communication in a data flow.

E. Output Generation

Figure 5 illustrates information generated by some embodiments of the invention for from session information. As Figure 5 shows, the generated statistics, e.g. the statistics 404A-D, for sessions can be provided to the data collector 106. The policy 114 can be used to define the output of the data collector 116.

Outputs include usage reports 500 that describe application usage in application specific terms, e.g. 700 minutes of voice over IP calls, maximum of 10 simultaneous calls, etc. Service detail records 502 are another output of the data collector 106. These could be output at application specific intervals, six seconds for voice over IP, every hour for web usage, etc. The service detail records 502 can be used for billing purposes and also to limit access if the paid for usage is exceeded. For example if a user purchases twenty minutes of voice over IP calls, when she/he reaches that limit, systems monitoring the service detail records

502 can terminate the call, etc.

Another output can include quality of service reports 504. These may specify, on an application level, the performance for the session, as appropriate, this can be presented in application specific terms. For example, if a voice over

IP call should have no more than a Z ms latency to avoid echo, the report might specify how many calls exceeded that latency and by how much. Another output might include router commands 506 to control a router, e.g. to limit further usage or re-prioritize usage of bandwidth relative to performance and committed quality of service. For example, if RealAudio(TM) sessions consume too much bandwidth relative to the priority set in the policy 114, the router commands 506 could block the routing of RealAudio(TM), or reduce its priority further to allow higher priority sessions to proceed at the committed quality of service.

In some embodiments, aspects of the different reports are combined. For example, the service detail report 502 might include the quality of service of a voice over IP call and if the committed quality of service is not delivered, the usage charge might be waived.

F. Distributed Session Reconstruction

1. Description of the Problem

The foregoing discussion has focused on a setting in which all packets are visible to a single session reconstruction system. However, in many configurations it may not be possible, or desirable, to provide all packet data to a single point.

Figure 6 illustrates a situation in which distributed session reconstruction may be desirable. A client computer 600 and a host computer 602 are coupled in communication over a packet switched network including two routers, the router 604 and the router 606. Two examples will be considered, one involving the file transfer protocol and the other involving asymmetric routing.

In the first example, the flows from a simple FTP session are shown as a dotted path between the client computer 600 and the host computer 602. Here, a flow 608 is the control flow for the FTP session and is established across the router 606. Meanwhile, the flow 610 is a transfer flow in the FTP session and is established across the router 604.

Assume, for the sake of argument, that the packets flowing through the router 606 are sent to a session reconstruction system of the type described above as the packet source 100a, but that packets flowing through the router 604 are provided to a different session reconstruction system. The session reconstruction system monitoring the packets from the router 606 will be able to detect the FTP session and the control flow 608. The other session reconstruction system, monitoring the packets from the router 604, may be able to detect the transfer flow 610, but may not be able to identify the protocol or the appropriate application session.

In the next example, the flow 608 and the flow 610 represent two halves of a single communication. This occurs when the traffic from the client computer 600 to the host computer 602 traverse a different set of network devices than packets sent in the other direction, e.g. asymmetric routing. Again, as in the example above, if the two routers are supplying their traffic data to different session reconstruction systems, it may not be possible to monitor even a single flow from one session reconstruction system.

In these instances, neither session reconstruction system would be able to provide a complete description of the session. As networks become more heavily meshed and redundant, situations like the one depicted in Figure 6 are likely to occur more frequently.

2. Solution to the Distributed Case

Solutions to this problem could include providing all of the raw data to a single session reconstruction system. This approach does not scale well. As the number of packet sources increases, the bandwidth and computation power required for session reconstruction goes up. For example, consider a session reconstruction system coupled to an ATM switch, that system might be working at capacity. Adding packets from three or four additional ATM switches for analysis may not be a viable option computationally or in terms of bandwidth. Accordingly, some embodiments of the invention operate in a semi- hierarchical fashion. This allows session reconstruction to be distributed over several systems of the type described above. Figure 7 illustrates a system including one embodiment of the invention configured to support distributed session reconstruction. Figure 7 does not show the policy 114, however such a policy can control the filters 102a-c, analyzers 104a-d and data collector 106a. Additionally, the policy 114 can have different rules for different modules, if appropriate. For example, filter 102a and filter 102b might have different rules in the policy 114 to filter out local traffic.

As seen in Figure 7, the basic configuration of each session reconstruction system is according to the manner described above. A packet source (e.g. the packet source lOOf) flows into a filter (e.g. the filter 102a) and then to an analyzer (e.g. the analyzer 104a). The difference lies in the disposition of results from the initial analysis - including unrecognized flows. In the system of Figure 7, results from the analyzers 104a-d can be passed to other analyzers (e.g. the analyzer 104d). This approach can be further nested with the analyzer 104d coupled to other analyzers higher in the hierarchy, not shown. Additionally, when appropriate, data can be transferred directly from an analyzer (e.g. the analyzer 104c) to a data collector (e.g. the data collector 106a) as shown by the dotted line in Figure 7. This would be appropriate if a session has been fully re-constructed by an analyzer (e.g. the analyzer 104c). The messages between analyzer levels can now be considered in more detail. There are two basic cases to consider: when the analyzer (e.g. the analyzer 104a) has complete session information and when the analyzer does not have complete session information.

When a given analyzer (e.g. the analyzer 104a) can determine complete session information, the session data, together with statistics, can be sent to a higher level analyzer (e.g. the analyzer 104d) or directly to the data collector (e.g. the data collector 106a).

When it is not possible for a given analyzer (e.g. the analyzer 104a) to determine complete session information, there are a number of approaches for providing information to higher level analyzers in the hierarchy. Three primary approaches will be considered: packet forwarding, hints together with forwarded packets, hints together with summary of packets. It is possible to use combinations of these approaches in a single system. Additionally, other approaches can be used.

a. Packet Forwarding

In many respects, this is the simplest of the three approaches; however, it is also inefficient from a bandwidth perspective. In this approach, packets that can not be constructed into sessions are forwarded as raw packet data - together with time stamps - to higher level analyzers.

At the higher level analyzer, the raw packet data from the different lower level analyzers can be integrated and considered. In many instances, e.g. the example of Figure 6, this will allow for session reconstruction. Thus, if the analyzer 104a was handling the data from the router 606 and the analyzer 104b was handling the data from the router 604, both analyzers would forward the raw packet data to the analyzer 104d which would now be able to recognize the entire FTP session.

b. Hints Plus Packet Forwarding

This approach reduces some of the computational complexity of the first approach, e.g. the need for the higher level analyzers to reprocess all packet data. In this approach, hints are extracted by the lower level session analyzer and provided to higher level analyzers. Additionally, as in the first approach, the raw packet data is forwarded - together with time stamps - to higher level analyzers.

Turning again to the example of Figure 6. If the analyzer 104a is handling the data from the router 606, the application streamer might detect the request to establish a file transfer over certain ports within the control flow 608. This information can be provided to the higher level organizer as a hint.

Additional, a second hint could be provided that identifies the packets being forwarded by the analyzer 104a as an FTP control flow. The hints reduce the amount of processing required by the higher level analyzer.

For example, the higher level analyzer could use the second hint to identify the forwarded packets as belonging to an FTP session and use the first hint to prime the application streamer to recognize the transfer flow packets when they are forwarded from another analyzer.

c. Hints Plus Summary of Packets

This approach is the most complex, but also the most bandwidth efficient. In this approach, as above, hints are generated at lower level analyzers. Additionally, incomplete data is aggregated into a summary whenever possible. The summary can include information from packet headers as well as attributes and metrics. Examples of data that would be included in summaries are: source address, destination address, source port, destination port, terms of service (TOS), protocol quality of service (QOS), number of packets, number of bytes, latency, etc.

Using this approach, the control flow 608 could be reduced to a summary together with a hint for recognizing the transfer flow 610. The transfer flow 610 might be reduced to a summary by another analyzer and the hint would allow a higher level analyzer to group the summary information about the transfer flow 610 as part of a single FTP session with the control flow 608 summary information.

In some instances, it may not be possible to summarize a group of packets. In that case, it may be necessary to forward the raw packet data. In some embodiments, small flows and/or packets are sent rather than generating a summary. This is efficient because the cost of sending a summary about a small packet or an extremely short flow may exceed the cost of re-transmitting the small packet or extremely short flow.

The different approaches are each backward compatible with the previous approaches. Thus, two hint methods can accept data in packet forwarding format, e.g. without hints. Similarly, the hint plus summary method can also accept hints together with forward packets, e.g. without summaries.

3. Additional Configurations

Some additional configurations used by some embodiments of the invention should be discussed. If desired, the filter, e.g. the filter 102, can be omitted. Similarly, when arranging a hierarchy of distributed session reconstruction modules, different streams can traverse different components. For example, in Figure 7, the analyzer 104c could be omitted in preference for allowing the packet source lOOh to be analyzed first by the analyzer 104d. These variant arrangements can reduce hardware and software costs associated with using embodiments of the invention while also increasing the flexibility with which embodiments of the invention can be deployed. G. Alternative Embodiments

In some embodiments, the filter 102, the analyzer 104, the flow manager 108, the application recognizer 110, the session streamer 112, the data collector 106, the policy 114, the application tests 206 and the application streamers 306 are included in hardware, software, and/or a combination of hardware and software.

In some embodiments, the filter 102, the analyzer 104, the flow manager 108, the application recognizer 110, the session streamer 112, the data collector 106, the policy 114, the application tests 206 and the application streamers 306 are included as one or more computer usable media such as CD-ROMs, floppy disks, and/or other media.

Some embodiments of the invention are included in an electromagnetic wave form. The electromagnetic wave form comprises information such as the flow manager 108, the application recognizer 110, the session streamer 112, the application tests 206, and/or the application streamers 306. For example, the application streamers 306 might include a database of application streamer data accessed over a network by the session streamer 112.

H Conclusion

The foregoing description of various embodiments of the invention has been presented for purposes of illustration and description. It is not intended to limit the invention to the precise forms disclosed. Many modifications and equivalent arrangements will be apparent.

Claims

CLAIMSWhat is claimed is:
1. A method of reconstructing a session, the method comprising: receiving a plurality of packets over a network interface; analyzing the plurality of packets to identify at least a first flow; identifying an application for the at least a first flow; selecting a corresponding application flow identifier for the application; using the corresponding application flow identifier to identify a plurality of flows in the plurality of packets corresponding to the session.
2. The method of claim 1 further comprising generating a quality of service report for the session based on the application.
3. The method of claim 1 wherein the session is associated with an end user experience occurring within a definite time bound.
4. The method of claim 3 wherein the session is comprised of one or more additional sessions.
5. The method of claim 1 further comprising filtering the plurality of packets received over the network interface prior to the analyzing, the filtering comprising removing one or more packets from the plurality of packets according to one or more packet capture language rules.
6. The method of claim 1 further comprising outputting a plurality of service detail records at predetermined intervals for the application, each service detail record including a billing identifier and a usage information, the usage information derived from the number of packets in the session during the corresponding predetermined interval.
7. The method of claim 1 further comprising sending a command to a network device to control the session based on a policy, the policy defining a quality of service for the application.
8. The method of claim 1 further comprising sending a command to a network device to control the session based on a policy, the policy defining the amount of resources available to the session.
9. The method of claim 1 further comprising sending a command to a network device to stop the session based on a policy, the policy specifying a cost for use of resources and the policy triggering the transmission of the command upon the cost exceeding a predetermined amount.
10. A system for reconstructing a session, the system comprising: a packet source, the packet source generating a plurality of packets; a flow manager coupled to the packet source, the flow manager identifying at least one flow in the plurality of packets; an application recognizer coupled to the flow manager, the application recognizer identifying an application corresponding to the at least one flow; a session streamer coupled to the flow manager, the session streamer identifying a plurality of flows in the plurality of packets corresponding to the session based on the application.
11. The system of claim 10, wherein each of the plurality of packets includes a plurality of header elements and the at least one flow includes one or more packets with a common packet header element:
12. The system of claim 10, wherein the application recognizer can identify at least one of a file transfer protocol (FTP), a hypertext transfer protocol (HTTP), a simple mail transport protocol (SMTP), a domain name service (DNS), a telnet protocol, a post office protocol (POP), an Internet message access protocol (IMAP), a network time protocol (NTP), a Netbios protocol, a network news transport protocol (NNTP), a network time protocol (NTP), a simple network management protocol (SNMP), an Internet Relay Chat (IRC) protocol, a H.323 protocol, a voice over IP protocol, a NetMeeting(TM) protocol, a Quicktime(TM) protocol, a server message block (SMB) protocol, a RealAudio(TM) protocol, a real time streaming protocol (RTSP), and a real-time transport protocol (RTP).
13. The system of claim 10, wherein the application recognizer signals to the session streamer to treat the at least one flow as a session when the application recognizer cannot identify an application for the at least one flow:
14. The system of claim 10, further comprising a data collector coupled to the session streamer, the data collector for producing service detail records at predetermined intervals for the application corresponding to the session, each service detail record including a billing identifier and a usage information.
15. An apparatus for reconstructing a session, the apparatus comprising: means for receiving a plurality of packets; means for identifying at least a first flow in the plurality of packets; means for identifying an application for the at least a first flow; means for selecting a corresponding application flow identifier for the application; means for identifying a plurality of flows in the plurality of packets corresponding to the session using the corresponding application flow identifier.
16. The apparatus of claim 15, further comprising means for reporting application appropriate performance characteristics for the session.
17. The apparatus of claim 15, further comprising means for controlling a network device according to a policy, the policy defining the amount of resources available to the session.
18. The apparatus of claim 15, further comprising means for charging at least one account for resources used during the session.
19. A computer data signal embodied in a carrier wave comprising: a computer program for session reconstruction: a first set of instructions for identifying at least one flow in a plurality of packets; a second set of instructions for analyzing the at least one flow to identify an application corresponding to the flow; and a third set of instructions for identifying a plurality of flows in the plurality of packets corresponding to the session based on the application.
20. A method of reconstructing a session using a first analyzer coupled to a second analyzer and a data collector, the method comprising: performing session reconstruction analysis on packets received at the first analyzer; responsive to successful session reconstruction on the first analyzer, sending a first message to at least one of the second analyzer and the data collector, the first message corresponding to session data; and responsive to unsuccessful session reconstruction on the first analyzer, sending one or more messages to the second analyzer, the second analyzer also receiving one or more messages from a third analyzer.
21. The method of claim 1 , wherein the one or more messages from the first analyzer to the second analyzer comprise packets received by the first analyzer.
22. The method of claim 21 , wherein the one or more messages from the first analyzer to the second analyzer further comprise hints generated by the first analyzer.
23. The method of claim 22, wherein hints for a packet comprise a time the packet was received and an address information for the packet.
24. The method of claim 1, wherein the packets received at the first analyzer are output from a filter for controlling which packets in a plurality of packets flowing into the filter reach the first analyzer.
25. The method of claim 1, further comprising: performing session reconstruction analysis on the one or more messages received at the second analyzer; responsive to successful session reconstruction on the second analyzer, sending a first message to at least one of a fourth analyzer and the data collector, the first message corresponding to session data; and responsive to unsuccessful session reconstruction on the second analyzer, sending one or more messages to the fourth analyzer, the fourth analyzer also receiving one or more messages from a fifth analyzer.
26. the second analyzer comprise summary of packets received by the first analyzer and one or more hints generated by the first analyzer.
27. The method of claim 1, further comprising performing session reconstruction using the second analyzer on the one or more messages received from the first analyzer and the one or more messages received from the third analyzer.
28. The method of claim 27, further comprising sending a second message from the second analyzer to the data collector, the second message corresponding to session data.
29. A system for reconstructing a session, the system comprising: a plurality of packet sources, each of the plurality of packet sources generating a plurality of packets; a first analyzer; a plurality of analyzers, each of the plurality of analyzers coupled to a packet source in the plurality of packet sources, each of the plurality of analyzers for session reconstruction on respective packets in the corresponding packet source, each of the plurality of analyzers sending a first message corresponding to session data for reconstructed sessions to the first analyzer and a second message for unreconstructed session data in the respective packets to the first analyzer, and wherein the first analyzer responsive to receiving messages from the plurality of analyzers attempts session reconstruction using the messages.
30. The system of claim 29 wherein the second message comprises respective packets.
31. The system of claim 30 wherein the second message further comprises hints.
32. The system of claim 29 wherein the second message comprises summary of respective packets and hints.
EP00944892A 1999-06-28 2000-06-26 Method and apparatus for session reconstruction Withdrawn EP1142196A2 (en)

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US14135199P true 1999-06-28 1999-06-28
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US09/552,818 US6957255B1 (en) 1999-06-28 2000-04-20 Method and apparatus for session reconstruction and accounting involving VoIP calls
US553261 2000-04-20
US09/553,261 US6963912B1 (en) 1999-06-28 2000-04-20 Method and apparatus for session reconstruction
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US7162698B2 (en) 2001-07-17 2007-01-09 Mcafee, Inc. Sliding window packet management systems
US7296080B2 (en) 2001-07-17 2007-11-13 Mcafee, Inc. Method of simulating network communications
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