EP0261200A1 - Vascular prostheses apparatus and method of manufacture - Google Patents

Vascular prostheses apparatus and method of manufacture

Info

Publication number
EP0261200A1
EP0261200A1 EP19870902220 EP87902220A EP0261200A1 EP 0261200 A1 EP0261200 A1 EP 0261200A1 EP 19870902220 EP19870902220 EP 19870902220 EP 87902220 A EP87902220 A EP 87902220A EP 0261200 A1 EP0261200 A1 EP 0261200A1
Authority
EP
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
vascular prosthesis
tubular segment
thin
accordance
line binder
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Withdrawn
Application number
EP19870902220
Other languages
German (de)
French (fr)
Inventor
Gabriel P. Lalor
Roger W. Snyder
Steven L. Weinberg
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
ADVANCED VASCULAR TECHNOLOGIES Inc
ADVANCED VASULAR TECHNOLOGIES
Original Assignee
ADVANCED VASCULAR TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
ADVANCED VASULAR TECHNOLOGIES
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/02Prostheses implantable into the body
    • A61F2/04Hollow or tubular parts of organs, e.g. bladders, tracheae, bronchi or bile ducts
    • A61F2/06Blood vessels
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61LMETHODS OR APPARATUS FOR STERILISING MATERIALS OR OBJECTS IN GENERAL; DISINFECTION, STERILISATION, OR DEODORISATION OF AIR; CHEMICAL ASPECTS OF BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES; MATERIALS FOR BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES
    • A61L27/00Materials for grafts or prostheses or for coating grafts or prostheses
    • A61L27/28Materials for coating prostheses
    • A61L27/34Macromolecular materials
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C08ORGANIC MACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS; THEIR PREPARATION OR CHEMICAL WORKING-UP; COMPOSITIONS BASED THEREON
    • C08LCOMPOSITIONS OF MACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS
    • C08L23/00Compositions of homopolymers or copolymers of unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbons having only one carbon-to-carbon double bond; Compositions of derivatives of such polymers
    • C08L23/02Compositions of homopolymers or copolymers of unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbons having only one carbon-to-carbon double bond; Compositions of derivatives of such polymers not modified by chemical after-treatment
    • C08L23/10Homopolymers or copolymers of propene
    • C08L23/12Polypropene
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C08ORGANIC MACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS; THEIR PREPARATION OR CHEMICAL WORKING-UP; COMPOSITIONS BASED THEREON
    • C08LCOMPOSITIONS OF MACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS
    • C08L67/00Compositions of polyesters obtained by reactions forming a carboxylic ester link in the main chain; Compositions of derivatives of such polymers

Abstract

On protège une prothèse vasculaire comprenant un segment en matériau tubulaire contre l'effilochage, le déchirement des bords de la suture ou sa dilatation en y incorporant un élément de liaison à filament fin fusionnant avec la surface des fibres filées ou y adhérant. It protects a vascular prosthesis including a tubular material segment against fraying, tearing of the edges of the suture or its expansion by incorporating a filament connecting element end merging with the surface of spun fibers or adhering. Généralement, les tubes sont en polyester ou en polytétrafluoroéthylène et l'élément de liaison à filament fin est constitué d'un monofilament en polypropylène recouvert de façon appropriée avant d'être fondu ou ramolli sur place. Generally, the tubes are polyester or polytetrafluoroethylene and the thin filament connecting element consists of a monofilament polypropylene coated appropriately before being melted or softened locally. Dans une structure à surface ondulée en spirale (10), qui s'applique à de nombreuses structures tissées ou à mailles, le monofilament (20) est déposé dans le creux de l'ondulation (12). In a corrugated surface structure spiral (10), which applies to many woven or knitted structures, the monofilament (20) is deposited in the bottom of the wave (12). La dimension de l'ondulation (12) depuis son creux jusqu'à sa crête dépasse l'épaisseur du monofilament (20) ou de tout autre élément de liaison à filament fin, ce qui permet d'éviter pratiquement tout changement apparent ou sensible de la structure (10) ou toute modification de la porosité. The dimension of the corrugation (12) from its trough to its crest exceeds the thickness of the monofilament (20) or other thin filament binding member, thereby substantially avoiding any apparent or significant change in the structure (10) or modification of porosity. En ce qui concerne les substrats tubulaires à mailles ou autres dont la surface n'est pas ondulée en spirale, l'élément de liaison à filament fin est recouvert et fixé selon une configuration hélicoïdale, bihélicoïdale ou axiale, de préférence avant l'ondulation de la surface. As regards the tubular mesh substrates or others whose surface is not corrugated spiral, the thin filament linkage member is covered and fixed in a helical configuration, bihélicoïdale or axial, preferably before the ripple the surface. La configuration à surface ondulée et la configuration de revêtement sont en l'occurence indépendantes. The undulating surface configuration and the coating configuration are the independent occurrence. La stabilisation par un élément de liaison à filament fin approprié d'une structure tubulaire à surface non ondulée est également possible. Stabilization by a filament connecting element appropriate end of a tubular structure to non-corrugated surface is also possible.

Description

VASCULAR PROSTHESES APPARATUS AND METHOD OF MANUFACTURE

Background of the Invention

This invention pertains to vascular prostheses and particularly to stabilizing vascular prostheses to render them non-fraying, resistant to suture pullout and resistant to dilation, all without otherwise damaging their other properties.

Description of the Prior Art

Vascular prostheses or grafts have been employed in vascular surgery for the replacement and by-pass of arteries for about 30 years. Such prostheses are generally tubular in shape; made of polyester, especially polyethylene terephthalate (e.g., DacrorP) or TeflorP, especially polytetrafluoroethylene, material; are either woven or knitted; and are crimped to provide resistance to kinking and to permit some elongation or stretching by the surgeon at the critical time of performing the surgery. Such tubular prostheses are constructed in several shapes, typically straight, bifurcated and tapered.

A comprehensive review of vascular prostheses on the market is set forth in an article entitled "Designing Polyester Vascular Prostheses for the Future", M. W. King, R. G. Guidoin, K. R. Gunasekera and C. Gosselin, appearing in the Spring 1983 issue of Medical Progress Through Technology, pages 217-226, which article is incorporated herein for all purposes.

Typical fabric constructions that are employed include a plain warp/weft interlaced weave, a plush weave known as a velour weave (wherein an extra thread or filament is included which is interlaced or "floats" over a plurality of threads in the opposite orientation or direction to add plushness to one or both the internal and external surface of the graft) and a knit (wherein single or multiple threads are interlaced with respect to themselves in a regular interlocking pattern) . The threads or filaments used in the construction of vascu¬ lar prostheses have been flat, texturized and single or multiple ply and have been round and trilobal in cross- section.

Tube sizes for textile based artificial vascular grafts vary from about 4 mm internal diameter to about 35 mm. They vary in "porosity" (actually, in water permeability) from about 50-1500 ml/min/cm2 for woven grafts and from about 1000-4000 ml/min/cm2 for knitted grafts. The nominal wall thickness of the materials vary from about 0.5 mm to about 1.5 mm. Crimping dimension varies from about 2.0 mm for some knit grafts to a dimension under 0.5 mm for some woven grafts. Crimping is normally provided in a helix or spiral pattern or a circular pattern.

The above is not necessarily all-inclusive, but covers a great percentage of the textile based artificial graft products currently on the market.

Some vascular prostheses in the past have also included reinforcement spiral and circular rings or loops, particularly at locations where the anticipated use indicates a bend or turn in the tubular material, thereby subjecting the material to the danger of possible kinking or compression. Such rings or loops are slipped over the outside of the tube. They are usually of an appreciable dimension, on the order of 0.6-1.2 mm in diameter, and are applied as individual rings spaced along the length or as loops of a spiral wrap. They may or may not be permanently fixedly secured to the tube. The number of rings or spiral loops employed has no relation to the number of crimpings, there usually being only two or three rings or loops per linear inch of tube, whereas there may be a dozen or more crimps per linear inch. Such rings or loops employed in the past have been employed with respect to both crimped and uncrimped prostheses.

The vascular prostheses employed in the past have had three related shortcomings. In use, the stock, which comes in relatively long lengths, are cut and trimmed for a particular application. When this is done, particularly when the end of the tubular material is cut on a bias, the end frequently frays. Related to this propensity to fraying just due to handling, is the particularly aggravating propensity to fray or pullout when the material is sutured near the cut end of the tube. Because of this propensity, surgeons do not suture as near to the ends as they would otherwise prefer. Finally, knitted grafts in the past have had a propensity to diliate or gradually open up or expand in one or more directions over a period of time. Such propensity can even result in hemorrhaging.

Therefore, it is a feature of the present invention to provide an improved vascular prosthesis including a thin in-line binder secured to the interstices of the tubular segment to reduce the propensity, of the tubular segment from fraying, to increase the suture holding capability of the prosthesis and to virtually eliminate harmful dilation, all without appreciable loss in porosity handling.

It is another feature of the present invention to provide an improved vascular prosthesis including an integrated external surface structure that reduces the fraying propensity of the tubular material without changing its external appearance or feel.

It is still another feature of the present invention to provide an improved vascular prosthesis having a non-fraying structure over an appreciable length, usually over its entire length, so that the tubular material can be cut and trimmed at any location without resulting in end fraying.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

A woven and spirally or helically crimped vascular prosthesis is provided in a preferred manufactur¬ ing procedure with a very thin polypropylene monofilament which is wrapped in the root of the crimps. The monofila¬ ment has a diameter less than the root-to-crest diameter of the material. It is heated at a temperature that is just enough to soften the monofilament without melting or burning the substrate or base tubular material,, the softened monofilament material fusing with the external surface fibers of the tubular material. Hence, the monofilament becomes an overlaid or integral thin-line binder. The external feel of the tube does not change since the monofilament is entirely confined within the helical groove of the crimp. Furthermore, the addition of the softened monofilament does not interfere with the elongation or the elasticity provided by the crimping nor does it appreciably affect the porosity. Alterna¬ tive means to a melted monofilament are also available to provide a similar non-fraying overlaid and involved structure, such as by spraying and by gluing.

Other embodiments of the invention employ a thin-line binder that is not related to the crimping structure, which is particularly useful for tubular vascular grafts that are circularly crimped, rather than spirally crimped, which is often employed with knit grafts. Thin-line binders can be laid axially, helically or in a double helical pattern prior to crimping or with respect to a graft that is left uncrimped. In either of such cases the added thin-line binder is not confined to a crimp groove at all, but the dimension is small enough not to appreciably change the feel or appearance of the knitted surface. It should be noted that knitted and velour surfaces are usually more textured and porous than a woven surface, and, therefore, more forgiving in this regard.

The monofilament can also be included as an integral part of the textile fabric. That is, one or more plys of the monofilament can be included in the plys of the yarn in weaving or knitting the material. In a woven structure, such ply or plys can be included in either or both the warp or weft (fill) yarn. Subse¬ quent heating will soften the onofilaments to cause them to bind to the substrate material, as described above with respect to an overlaid monofilament.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

So that the manner in which the above-recited features, advantages and objects of the invention, as well as others which will become apparent, are attained and can be understood in detail, more particular descrip¬ tion of the invention briefly summarized above may be had by reference to the embodiments thereof which are illustrated in the drawings, which drawings form a part of this specification. It is to be noted, however, that the appended drawings illustrate only preferred embodi¬ ments of the invention and are, therefore, not to be considered limiting of its scope for the invention may admit to other equally effective embodiments. In the Drawinσs:

Fig. 1 is a side view of a straight tubular vascular prosthesis in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

Fig. 2 is a side view of the embodiment shown in Fig. 1 showing a bend.

Fig. 3 is an oblique view of a tubular vascular prosthesis in accordance with the present invention being sutured.

Fig. 4 is a close up view of a typical woven construction of a vascular prosthesis in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention prior to overlay¬ ing with a thin-line binder.

Fig. 5 is a close up view of the vascular prosthesis shown in Fig. 4 following overlaying with a thin-line binder.

Fig. 6 is a pictorial view showing a helical pattern for overlaying a thin-line binder on a vascular prosthesis in accordance with the present invention;

Fig. 7 is a pictorial view showing a double helical pattern for overlaying a thin-line binder on a vascular prosthesis in accordance with the present invention.

Fig. 8 is a pictorial view showing an axial pattern for overlaying a thin-line binder on a vascular prosthesis in accordance with the present invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Now referring to the drawings and first to Fig. 1, a tubular segment of a typical vascular prosthe¬ sis or graft 10 is shown. Such a segment can be part of a standard long tubular stock or can be a part of a more complex structure, such as a bifurcated or branched structure. When a tube or tubular segment, is referred to herein, it refers to any of such structures. The structure is crimped typically in a spiral fashion in connection with a woven structure at crimps 12, as shown. Although not critical to the invention, it is usual for there to be a dozen or so crimps per inch, which provides the tubular structure with the ability to be selectively elongated and bent, as required.

Now referring to Fig. 2, the vascular prosthesis shown in Fig. 1 is illustrated in a bent configuration. Please note that the bending of prosthesis 10 does not result in kinking due to the crimping of the tubular material.

Reference now is made to Fig. 4, which illustrates a typical woven pattern. The illustration is a magnified illustration of the actual filaments or individual plys employed in the respective thread bundles. It will be seen that each of warp thread bundle 14 comprises a plurality of individual thread filaments. The thread filaments are typically polyester threads, most notably polyethylene terephthalate, such as Dacron® . Other polymers have also been employed, such as Teflon® , especially polytetrafluoroethylene. Interlaced with the warp thread bundles just described are weft (i.e., fill) thread bundles 16 and overlapping bundles 18 similarly bundled from a plurality of indivi¬ dual filaments or plys.

It should be noted that the thread structure illustrated in Fig. 4 is representative of structures used for vascular prostheses in general. Other common structures are plain woven structures (without an overlap thread bundle) and knitted structures, which utilize a single multiple thread bundle which interlaces on itself in a locking pattern. The knitted structures are not limited to one particular knit pattern, however.

It should be further noted that the illustration of Fig. 4 is highly magnified. The mean filament diameter of a typical thread bundle used in the woven structure shown in Fig. 4 is 12-13 micrometers. Now referring to Fig. 1 again, it will be noted that the spiral crimp which is shown provides a root-to-crest dimension on the order of 0.5-2.0 milli¬ meters for a thickness of material of 0.35 millimeters. A very thin line monofilament of polypropylene 20 is laid into the root of the crimp of vascular prosthesis 10. The diameter of the monofilament is less than the root-to-crest dimension of the crimp so that to the feel there is no appreciable change in texture to the texture before the monofilament was added.

The monofilament is fused into the interstices of the tube by applying a controlled amount of heat to the monofilament. Such heat is obviously less than enough to melt or scorch the surface of the substrate or base material, but adequate to soften the binder. As is shown in Fig. 5, monofilament 20 fuses with all of the substrate threads it crosses, including the warp threads, the weft threads and the overlap threads wherever contact between the monofilament and these threads occurs.

Although the structure which has just been described utilizes a monofilament thin-line binder and heat for causing attachment of the thin-line binder to the overall material, the thin-line binder may be connected by gluing the binder to the surface. Alter¬ natively to heat sealing or gluing a polypropylene monofilament in place, it is possible to provide a thin-line binder to the surface by spraying polypropylene or other suitable material in a fine jet spray to accomplish this same structure shown in Fig. 5.

The above description pertains to a vascular prosthesis which includes a spiral crimp prior to securing a thin-line binder to the external surface thereof. As mentioned in the prior art section above, knitted or woven vascular prosthesis tubes can be crimped in a circular manner rather than in a spiral manner or left uncrimped. It is not necessary to wrap each circular crimp root in order to obtain the benefits of the thin-line binder attached structure as described above. In such a construction, the alternatives illus¬ trated in Figs. 6, 7 and 8 are available.

The substrate or base tube shown in Figs. 6 and 7 are knitted tubes 22. The tube is wrapped in a helical pattern with an appropriate monofilament 24 in Fig. 6 and in a double helical pattern with an appropri¬ ate monofilament 26 and 28 in Fig. 7. Monofilament 26 is wrapped in a first direction and monofilament 28 is wrapped in the opposite direction, which may be conven¬ iently done by wrapping the tube with the same monofilament thread running first in one direction and then in the return direction.

Following the wrapping which is shown in Fig. 6 or Fig. 7, the tube is crimped in the manner which is well known in the art for crimping such tubes. Also, such technique could be applied to tubes that are not crimped at all.

It should be noted that the location of the thin-line binder of Figs. 6 and 7 are unrelated to the location of the crimping and therefore it is expected that in some cases- the overlaid monofilament line runs up and over a crest portion of the crimp. The textured surface of the overall tube is such that such a construct¬ ed overlaid and attached thin-line binder will not be appreciable noticed either by feel or by appearance.

Now referring to Fig. 8, a structure is shown wherein a monofilament line 30 is overlaid in an axial direction with respect to the vascular prosthesis tube. Additional monofilament lines 32 can be overlaid at different locations around the periphery, if desired. The overlaying may be done prior to crimping or after crimping, as desired.

Now referring again to Fig. 4, as an alternative to overlaying the tube in any fashion, a thread bundle used for one or more of a warp bundle, weft (fill) bundle, or overlap bundle for a woven tube or the knit bundle for a knitted tube can include one or more filaments of plys 15 of polypropylene or other suitable thin-line binder material. With the subsequent applica¬ tion of controlled heat, such a thin-line binder will adhere to the substrate or base material in the same fashion as described above.

Referring to Fig. 3, it will be seen that a vascular prosthesis 10 with fraying protection provided by a thin-line binder in any of the manners previously discussed is shown in use. A surgical tool 34 is shown inserting a suture near the end thereof in order to make the stitching of the vascular prosthesis in place as the surgeon desires. It is very important that the suture be located as close to the end as possible so that an excess amount of material will not be unnecessarily involved with the part of the anatomy to which the prosthesis is attached. By having the fraying and suture holding protection provided by a thin-line binder, this location can be quite near the end, as illustrated, without pulling out. In fact, such thin- line binder protection makes it possible to trim the prosthesis on a bias and to handle the prosthesis extensively without causing fraying just by the manual manipulation thereof. Furthermore, its presence does not interfere with its suturability, its elongation properties, or its flexibility, only in reducing its propensity to fray, in enhancing its resistance to suture pullout and its resistance to dilation. The term "stability" is used herein to refer to enhancing a tube in the manner described above to provide one or more of these enhanced properties. Because of the very thin nature of the overlaid thin-line binder with respect to the materials which are involved, the appearance and texture or feel of the overall suture is not materially changed. In addition to increasing the stability of the material, the porosity or water permeability of the material is not materially reduced by processing in any of the above manners, probably well less than 10%-15%, even with the double helical wrap shown in Fig. 7.

It should be apparent that the securing of a thin-line binder, either by employing a monofilament or otherwise as discussed above, may readily be automated. Although it is normal to provide an entire tubular stock with non-fraying protection in the above manner, only a portion or segment thereof may be so protected, if desired. In any event, the results are an integrated and substantially similar structure to the structure prior to treatment, only with stability added to the structure.

While particular embodiments of the invention have been shown and described, and modifications or alternatives have been discussed, it will be understood that the invention is not limited thereto since modifica¬ tions can be made and will become apparent to those skilled in the art.

Claims

WHAT IS CLAIMED IS:
1. A vascular prosthesis, comprising at least one tubular segment of interlaced threaded construction, and a thin-line binder secured to the interstices of said tubular segment at least near an end thereof to substantially increase the stability of said tubular segment.
2. A vascular prosthesis in accordance with claim 1, wherein said tubular segment is woven.
3. A vascular prosthesis in accordance with claim 1, wherein said tubular segment is a woven velour.
4. A vascular prosthesis in accordance with claim 1, wherein said tubular segment is knitted.
5. A vascular prosthesis in accordance with claim 1, wherein said thin-line binder is externally overlaid said tubular segment.
6. A vascular prosthesis in accordance with claim 5, wherein said thin-line binder is an overlaid polypro¬ pylene monofilament melted to fuse with the external surface fibers of said tubular segment.
7. A vascular prosthesis in accordance with claim
5, wherein said overlaid tubular segment is spirally crimped, and said overlaid thin-line binder is located in the root of the spiral crimp.
8. A vascular prosthesis in accordance with claim
6, wherein the root-to-crest dimension of said spiral crimp is greater than the thickness of said overlaid thin-line binder.
9. A vascular prosthesis in accordance with claim 5, wherein said overlaid tubular segment is uncrimped.
10. A vascular prosthesis in accordance with claim 1, wherein said overlaid thin-line binder is laid at least largely axially of said tubular segment.
11. A vascular prosthesis in accordance with claim 1, wherein said overlaid thin-line binder is laid helically of said tubular segment.
12. A vascular prosthesis in accordance with claim 1, wherein said overlaid thin-line binder is laid in a double helix with respect to said tubular segment.
13. A vascular prosthesis in accordance with claim 1, wherein said thin-line binder is assembled with the substrate during the making of the interlaced threaded construction.
14. A vascular prosthesis in accordance with claim 1, wherein said tubular segment is polyester.
15. A vascular prosthesis in accordance with claim 1, wherein said tubular segment is polyethylene terephtha- late.
16. A vascular prosthesis in accordance with claim 1, wherein tubular segment is polytetrafluoroethylene.
17. The method of making a vascular prosthesis, which comprises the steps of fabricating the vascular prosthesis to include at least one tubular segment of inter¬ laced threaded construction, spirally crimping said tubular segment, and securing .a thin-line binder into the root of said spiral crimp at least near the end thereof so that it adheres to the external surface fibers of said tubular segment.
18. The method of making a vascular prosthesis in accordance with claim 17, wherein said height of said thin-line binder is less than the root-to-crsst dimension of said spiral crimp.
19. The method of making a vascular prosthesis in accordance with claim 17, wherein said thin-line binder is a polypropylene thread, and said securing includes the steps of laying said polypropylene thread into the root of said spiral crimp, and heating said thread so that it fuses with the external fibers of said tubular segment.
20. The method of making a vascular prosthesis in accordance with claim 17, wherein said thin-line binder is adhered to the root of said spiral crimp.
21. The method of making a vascular prosthesis, which comprises the steps of fabricating the vascular prosthesis to include at least one tubular segment of inter¬ laced construction, securing a thin-line binder to adhere to the external surface fibers of said tubular segment at least near the end thereof, and crimping said tubular segment including said thin-line binder.
22. The method of making a vascular prosthesis in accordance with claim 21, wherein said thin-line binder is laid at least largely axially of said tubular segment.
23. The method of making a vascular prosthesis in accordance with claim 21, wherein said thin-line binder is laid helically of said tubular segment.
24. The method of making a vascular prosthesis in accordance with claim 21, wherein said overlaid thin- line binder is laid in a double helix with respect to said tubular segment.
25. The method of making a vascular prosthesis in accordance with claim 21, wherein said crimping is circular.
26. The method of making a vascular prosthesis, which comprises the steps of making up a bundle of plys including at least one ply of a thin-line binder material, fabricating the vascular prothesis to include at least one tubular segment of interlaced construction using said bundle for at least one of the interlacing components, and controllably heating the tubular segment to cause said thin-line binder materials to adhere to the fibers of the tubular segment.
EP19870902220 1986-03-27 1987-03-10 Vascular prostheses apparatus and method of manufacture Withdrawn EP0261200A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US84496186 true 1986-03-27 1986-03-27
US844961 1986-03-27

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
EP0261200A1 true true EP0261200A1 (en) 1988-03-30

Family

ID=25294062

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
EP19870902220 Withdrawn EP0261200A1 (en) 1986-03-27 1987-03-10 Vascular prostheses apparatus and method of manufacture

Country Status (5)

Country Link
EP (1) EP0261200A1 (en)
JP (1) JPS63502886A (en)
DK (1) DK620487D0 (en)
FI (1) FI875125A0 (en)
WO (1) WO1987005796A1 (en)

Families Citing this family (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5413601A (en) * 1990-03-26 1995-05-09 Keshelava; Viktor V. Tubular organ prosthesis
RU2007969C1 (en) * 1990-03-26 1994-02-28 Виктор Владимирович Кешелава Prosthesis for substitution of tubular organs
US5178630A (en) * 1990-08-28 1993-01-12 Meadox Medicals, Inc. Ravel-resistant, self-supporting woven graft
DE69114505T2 (en) * 1990-08-28 1996-04-18 Meadox Medicals Inc Self-supporting woven vascular graft.
LU87995A1 (en) * 1990-08-28 1992-03-11 Meadox Medicals Inc vascular grafts and their method of preparing
WO1992005747A1 (en) * 1990-10-09 1992-04-16 Moskovsky Institut Stali I Splavov Appliance for implantation in hollow organs and device for its introduction
JP2749447B2 (en) * 1991-03-25 1998-05-13 ミードックス メディカルズ インコーポレイテッド Artificial blood vessels
GB9116563D0 (en) * 1991-08-01 1991-09-18 Newtec Vascular Products Ltd Vascular prosthesis ii
US5269774A (en) * 1992-09-25 1993-12-14 Gray Michael W Implantive ostomy ring
US5527353A (en) 1993-12-02 1996-06-18 Meadox Medicals, Inc. Implantable tubular prosthesis
US5913894A (en) * 1994-12-05 1999-06-22 Meadox Medicals, Inc. Solid woven tubular prosthesis
US5741332A (en) * 1995-01-23 1998-04-21 Meadox Medicals, Inc. Three-dimensional braided soft tissue prosthesis
US5641373A (en) * 1995-04-17 1997-06-24 Baxter International Inc. Method of manufacturing a radially-enlargeable PTFE tape-reinforced vascular graft
US6863686B2 (en) 1995-04-17 2005-03-08 Donald Shannon Radially expandable tape-reinforced vascular grafts
DE69629679D1 (en) * 1995-06-07 2003-10-02 Edwards Lifesciences Corp Increased vascular implant with an externally supported tape
US5824047A (en) * 1996-10-11 1998-10-20 C. R. Bard, Inc. Vascular graft fabric
RU2128024C1 (en) * 1997-08-07 1999-03-27 Закрытое акционерное общество "Научно-производственный комплекс "Экофлон" Implanted hollow prosthesis and method of its manufacture
US7560006B2 (en) 2001-06-11 2009-07-14 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Pressure lamination method for forming composite ePTFE/textile and ePTFE/stent/textile prostheses
US20040019375A1 (en) 2002-07-26 2004-01-29 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Sectional crimped graft
US7879085B2 (en) * 2002-09-06 2011-02-01 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. ePTFE crimped graft
US8025693B2 (en) 2006-03-01 2011-09-27 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Stent-graft having flexible geometries and methods of producing the same
WO2009141715A3 (en) * 2008-05-21 2010-01-21 Universidade Do Minho Braided corrugated textile vascular prosthesis and process of producing same
CN101856280A (en) * 2010-06-08 2010-10-13 东华大学 A woven artificial blood vessel and the manufacturing method thereof

Family Cites Families (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB962569A (en) * 1960-11-24 1964-07-01 Thuringisches Kunstfaserwerk W Method of producing vascular prostheses from synthetic fibrous materials
US3304557A (en) * 1965-09-28 1967-02-21 Ethicon Inc Surgical prosthesis
US3479670A (en) * 1966-10-19 1969-11-25 Ethicon Inc Tubular prosthetic implant having helical thermoplastic wrapping therearound
FR2333487B1 (en) * 1975-12-02 1978-05-19 Rhone Poulenc Ind

Non-Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
See references of WO8705796A1 *

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
DK620487D0 (en) 1987-11-26 grant
WO1987005796A1 (en) 1987-10-08 application
FI875125A0 (en) 1987-11-19 application
DK620487A (en) 1987-11-26 application
JPS63502886A (en) 1988-10-27 application
FI875125A (en) 1987-11-19 application
FI875125D0 (en) grant

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US5707386A (en) Stent and method of making a stent
US6159239A (en) Woven stent/graft structure
US5735871A (en) Self-expanding endoprosthesis
US4530113A (en) Vascular grafts with cross-weave patterns
US5507767A (en) Spiral stent
US7011676B2 (en) Flat knitted stent and method of making the same
US5824059A (en) Flexible stent
US20050075715A1 (en) Graft material attachment device and method
US20030144725A1 (en) Stent matrix
US5562697A (en) Self-expanding stent assembly and methods for the manufacture thereof
EP0923912A2 (en) Stent-graft with bioabsorbable structural support
US4095622A (en) Woven seam in fabric and method of making same
US4192020A (en) Heart valve prosthesis
US6814754B2 (en) Woven tubular graft with regions of varying flexibility
US5628788A (en) Self-expanding endoluminal stent-graft
US6099557A (en) Implantable tubular prosthesis
US7582108B2 (en) Tubular implant
US20050288767A1 (en) Implantable prosthesis having reinforced attachment sites
US6053938A (en) Textile vessel prosthesis, process for its production and apparatus for its production
US5413598A (en) Vascular graft
US20080228028A1 (en) Woven fabric with shape memory element strands
US4850999A (en) Flexible hollow organ
US7052513B2 (en) Three-dimensional braided covered stent
US5186992A (en) Braided product and method of making same
US6361637B2 (en) Method of making a kink resistant stent-graft

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
17P Request for examination filed

Effective date: 19871116

AK Designated contracting states:

Kind code of ref document: A1

Designated state(s): AT BE CH DE FR GB IT LI LU NL SE

17Q First examination report

Effective date: 19891113

18D Deemed to be withdrawn

Effective date: 19900324

RIN1 Inventor (correction)

Inventor name: LALOR, GABRIEL, P.

Inventor name: WEINBERG, STEVEN, L.

Inventor name: SNYDER, ROGER, W.