EP0220275A1 - Capacitance-type switch - Google Patents

Capacitance-type switch

Info

Publication number
EP0220275A1
EP0220275A1 EP19860903010 EP86903010A EP0220275A1 EP 0220275 A1 EP0220275 A1 EP 0220275A1 EP 19860903010 EP19860903010 EP 19860903010 EP 86903010 A EP86903010 A EP 86903010A EP 0220275 A1 EP0220275 A1 EP 0220275A1
Authority
EP
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
capacitance
film
conductive
surface
material
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Withdrawn
Application number
EP19860903010
Other languages
German (de)
French (fr)
Inventor
Rao Mallikarjuna Chalasani
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
AT&T Corp
Original Assignee
AT&T Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01HELECTRIC SWITCHES; RELAYS; SELECTORS; EMERGENCY PROTECTIVE DEVICES
    • H01H13/00Switches having rectilinearly-movable operating part or parts adapted for pushing or pulling in one direction only, e.g. push-button switch
    • H01H13/70Switches having rectilinearly-movable operating part or parts adapted for pushing or pulling in one direction only, e.g. push-button switch having a plurality of operating members associated with different sets of contacts, e.g. keyboard
    • H01H13/702Switches having rectilinearly-movable operating part or parts adapted for pushing or pulling in one direction only, e.g. push-button switch having a plurality of operating members associated with different sets of contacts, e.g. keyboard with contacts carried by or formed from layers in a multilayer structure, e.g. membrane switches
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H03BASIC ELECTRONIC CIRCUITRY
    • H03KPULSE TECHNIQUE
    • H03K17/00Electronic switching or gating, i.e. not by contact-making or -braking
    • H03K17/94Electronic switching or gating, i.e. not by contact-making or -braking characterised by the way in which the control signal is generated
    • H03K17/965Switches controlled by moving an element forming part of the switch
    • H03K17/975Switches controlled by moving an element forming part of the switch using a capacitive movable element
    • H03K17/98Switches controlled by moving an element forming part of the switch using a capacitive movable element having a plurality of control members, e.g. keyboard
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01HELECTRIC SWITCHES; RELAYS; SELECTORS; EMERGENCY PROTECTIVE DEVICES
    • H01H2203/00Form of contacts
    • H01H2203/032Metal foil
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01HELECTRIC SWITCHES; RELAYS; SELECTORS; EMERGENCY PROTECTIVE DEVICES
    • H01H2207/00Connections
    • H01H2207/002Conductive rubber; Zebra
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01HELECTRIC SWITCHES; RELAYS; SELECTORS; EMERGENCY PROTECTIVE DEVICES
    • H01H2229/00Manufacturing
    • H01H2229/008Die stamping
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01HELECTRIC SWITCHES; RELAYS; SELECTORS; EMERGENCY PROTECTIVE DEVICES
    • H01H2239/00Miscellaneous
    • H01H2239/006Containing a capacitive switch or usable as such

Abstract

Un commutateur du type à capacitance comprend une paire d'organes à capacitance, comprenant chacun premièrement un matériau isolant (10, 11), deuxièmement un élément conducteur (14, 16) sur une surface du matériau isolant, et troisièmement un film diélectrique (15, 17) sur l'élément conducteur. A switch capacitance-type includes a pair of capacitance elements each comprising first insulating material (10, 11), a second conductive member (14, 16) on a surface of insulating material, and thirdly a dielectric film (15 , 17) on the conductive element. Au moins l'un des organes à capacitance est mobile. At least one of the organs capacitance is mobile. En outre, les organes à capacitance sont supportés en alignement espacé généralement parallèle. In addition, the capacitance members are supported in spaced generally parallel alignment. Les éléments conducteurs (14, 16) se font face et sont en alignement général les uns avec les autres, et les films diélectriques (15, 17) sont mutuellement adjacents mais espacés les uns des autres. The conductive elements (14, 16) face one another and are generally aligned with each other, and dielectric films (15, 17) are mutually adjacent but spaced from each other. Le mouvement de l'organe à capacitance mobile pour s'engager dans l'autre organe à capacitance amène le film diélectrique (15) sur l'organe à capacitance mobile à s'engager dans l'autre film diélectrique (17) de l'autre organe à capacitance, provoquant une augmentation dans la capacitance entre les éléments conducteurs des organes à capacitance. The movement of the movable capacitance member to engage in the other capacitance member causes the dielectric film (15) on the movable capacitance element to engage in the other dielectric film (17) of the other body capacitance, causing an increase in the capacitance between the conductive elements of the bodies to capacitance.

Description

CAPACITANCE-TYPE SWITCH

1. Field--ιof_the^Invention

This invention relates to electrical switches and more particularly to a capacitance type switch. 2. Desc i£tion_of_the_Prior_Art

An example of such a switch embodied in a keypad is disclosed in U.S. Patent No. 4,367,385. A copper pad on the underside of a membrane is in capacitive relationship with a closely spaced underlying first aluminum film. The first aluminum film is in fixed capacitive relationship with a second aluminum film underlying and closely spaced from the first aluminum film. When the membrane flexes downward, the copper pad comes into contact with the first aluminum film, short circuiting the capacitance between them and thereby producing a large change in the capacitance between the copper pad and the second aluminum film. This permits detection of the key closure condition without requiring intermediate signal amplification. However, since this design involves contact of exposed metallic films, it is susceptible to faulty operation due to environmental contamination of the metallic films. In addition, since key operation is signified by a sudden increase in current flow at the instant contact occurs between the metallic films, it is necessary that the metallic film on the flexible membrane be sufficiently thick and/or of sufficiently high conductivity so that the resulting current is adequate for detection of that condition. A further problem with this design is that the sudden transition or jump in capacitance which occurs when the metallic films come into contact produces a transient current surge in the signal detecting circuit unless compensated by additional circuit features, known as "debounce" circuitry. This, of course, adds t.o the expense of the keypad. The debounce problem is described in some detail in ϋ. S. Patent No. 3,699,294. Summary,_.gf_the..Invention The foregoing problems are solved according the the invention by a switch characterized in that it includes a pair of capacitive members, each comprising 1) insulating material, 2) a conductive element on one surface of the insulating material, and 3) a dielectric film on the conductive element. At least one of the capacitive members is movable. In addition, the capacitive members are supported in spaced generally parallel alignment.

The conductive elements face and are in general registration with one another, and the dielectric films are adjacent to but spaced from one another. Movement of the movable capacitive member into engagement with the other capacitive member causes the dielectric film on the movable capacitive member to move into engagement with the dielectric film of the other capacitive member, resulting in a detectable increase in the capacitance between the conductive elements of the capacitive members.

Since the facing conductive elements never come into contact, no sudden transition in capacitance occurs. Therefore, debounce circuitry is typically not required in the circuit to which the conductive elements are connected for detecting the change in capacitance between them. In addition, by providing extremely thin dielectric coatings on the conductive elements, there is only a minute separation between the conductive elements when full switch closure occurs. Therefore, the change in capacitance between them is sufficient to be detected without intermediate signal amplification.

A further advantage of the conductive elements not coming into contact is that no continuous current flow occurs between them. Consquently, the conductivity of the elements is not a critical factor in attenuation of the switch closure signal. This permits use of aluminum rather than more expensive high conductivity metals, such as silver. Furthermore, since the conductive elements are completely coated with dielectric material, they are totally protected from environmental contamination.

A feature of a capacitance switch in accordance with the invention is that capacitive elements, comprising the combination of dielectric coating and conductive elements, may be formed from metallic foil by a hot stamping process. Metallic foil is both economical and well suited to use in continuous production. It has been used, for example, for forming decorative metallic patterns on automotive parts. However, it has not heretofore been considered for the manufacture of capacitive switches.. The metallic films of such .foils are extremely thin, of the order of 100 to 1000 Angstroms, and the film resistance is therefor too high to permit sufficient current for reliable and economical signal detection if switch closure is signified by a sudden increase in current upon contact between metallic films. In the instant invention, however, there is no such contact and no sudden increase in current through the metallic films. Consequently, the film resistance does not significantly affect detection of the switch closure condition.

Brief Description of the Drawing

Other features and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following detailed description and accompanying drawings, wherein: FIGS. 1 and 2 are greatly enlarged cross- sectional views of the open and closed condition, respectively, of a switch in a capacitance-type membrane keypad in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 3 is a graph showing the change in capacitance which occur upon operation of the switch shown in FIGS. 1 and 2; FIG. 4 is a perspective view showing the capacitive elements of a capacitance—type membrane keypad in accordance with the invention, the capacitive elements in combination with the supporting insulating sheet comprising capacitive members;

FIGS. 5 and 6 are greatly enlarged cross- sectional view of the open and closed condition, respectively, of a switch in a prior art capacitance-type membrane keypad; FIGS. 7 and 8 are schematic views of the electrical capacitance provided by the switch in FIGS. 4 an '5 respectively;

FIG. 9 is a cross-sectional drawing showing how the capacitive elements may be fabricated from metallic foil by a hot stamping process;

FIG. 10 is a cross-section of the capacitive elements;

FIG. 11 shows a metallic foil for use in fabricating the capacitive elements. Detailed .Descrietipn

The invention may be best understood by first referring to FIG. 5 shoving one of the switches in a prior art capacitance-type membrane keypad. On the lower surface of a five mil thick flexible membrane 1 of polyester insulating material there is a vacuum deposited pad 2 of copper of the order of 1000 Angstroms thick. Membrane 1 is supported on the upper surface of a one mil thick layer 3 of insulating material which has apertures therein dimensioned and arrayed in correspondence with the pattern of the switch positions of the keypad. Adhered to the lower surface of layer 3 is a capacitive element comprising a 1/4 mil thick layer 4 of polyester insulating material having aluminum films 5 and 6, of the order of 1000 Angstroms thick, respectively vacuum deposited of its upper and lower surfaces. This capacitive element is supported on another layer 7 of polyester material about 5 mils thick. Electrical connection (not shown) is provided to pad 2 and to . aluminum film 6 on the lower surface of insulating layer 4. This serves to connect the pad 2 and film 6 to a detecting circuit (not shown) in which a change in the capacitance between the pad 2 and film 6 produces a detectable signal.

FIG. 7 is the schematic circuit equivalent of FIG. 5, the capacitance C_ representing the capacitance between pad 2 and aluminum film 5 on the upper surface of insulating layer 4. Capacitance C . is in series with a fixed capacitance C-, the latter representing the capacitance between aluminum films 5 and 6. When, as depicted in FIG. 5, the switch is in the undepressed or open state, capacitance C. is typically about 30 picoforads. Fixed capacitance C_ is typically about 10,000 picoforads. Since the resultant series capacitance is given by ~ C71C-2, the value thereof is then

1 L2 essentially just that of C_. or about 30 picoforads.

FIG. 6 shows the closed state of the switch in

FIG. 5, as when depressed by pressure exerted by an operator's finger. Membrane 1 flexes down through the aperture in insulating layer 3, and copper pad 2 thereon contacts aluminum film 5. As shown schematically in FIG. 8, the capacitance C. between pad 2 and upper aluminum film 5 is thereby short circuited, and the resultant capacitance between pad 2 and lower aluminum film 6 becomes just that of C , i.e., about 10,000 picoforads. The change from the open to the closed state of the switch thus produces a change in capacitance of more than 300:1. The resulting current pulse or signal is detected in the detecting circuit connected to pad 2 and film 6 without requiring additional amplification.

However, inasmuch as the drastic change from open state capacitance Dή to closed state capacitance C essentially occurs just at the instant that copper pad 2 comes into contact with upper aluminum film 5, a series of spurious current pulses or "ringing" will be produced in the detecting circuit. Consequently, spurious circuit operation occurs unless the circuit includes compensating debounce circuitry.

Referring now to FIG. 1 there is shown a switch of a capacitance-type membrane keypad in accordance with the present invention. The keypad includes an upper sheet 10 and lower sheet 11 separated by a spacing sheet 12. Upper sheet 10, which extends generally parallel to the lower sheet 11, is a membrane of flexible insulating material, such as the polyester sold under the trademark "Mylar" by E. I. Dupont de Nemours and Company, and is preferably 0.5 to 3 mils in thickness. Lower sheet 11 and spacing sheet 12 also comprise and insulating material, which may be the same material as in the upper sheet 10. Lower sheet 11 may have the same thickness as the upper sheet 10, while spacing sheet 12 is advantageously 3 to 5 mils in thickness.

Spacing sheet 12 has apertures 13 (only one of which is shown) that are dimensioned and arrayed in correspondence with a geometric pattern of switch positions of a desired keypad configuration. In each aperture 13, the lower surface of the upper insulating sheeet 10 has a conductive element 14. The conductive element 14 is typically aluminum, of the order of 100 Angstroms in thickness, and may be formed b -vacuum deposition. The surface of the conductive element 14 is coated with a film 15 of dielectric material, such as lacσuer, also of the order of 100 Angstroms thick to provide a capacitive element that in combination with the insulating sheet 10 comprises a capacitive member. Similarly, in each aperture 13, the upper surface of the lower insulating sheet 11 of the keypad has a conductive element 16, coated with a film 17 of dielectric material to provide a capacitive element that in combination with the insulating sheet 11 comprises a capacitive member that is located in registration with the overlying capacitive member. The conductive elements 14 and 16 are therefore in a capacitive relationship, the capacitance between them being dependent on the thickness of the spacing sheet 12 separating them when the sheet 10 is in an undeflected condition. With the thickness so mentioned above, this capacitance is typically of the order of 15 to 20 picoforads.

FIG. 2 shows the closed condition of the switch depicted in FIG. 1A. Flexible insulating sheet 10 has been depressed by pressure exerted thereon by the finger of an operator in the selected switch position. This results in sheet 10 flexing through the aperture 13 in spacing sheet 12 until dielectric film 15 contacts dielectric film 17. This eliminates the air space between them, and since the combined thickness of the dielectric films is advantageously of the order of a few hundred Angstroms, the capacitance between conductive elements 14 and 16 increases by an order of magnitude. In this "closed" or fully actuated condition of the illustrated switch, a typical value of the capacitance between the conductive elements is 200 picoforads. This is about ten times the capacitance in the open condition of the switch, a change which is sufficient to permit detection of the signal thereby produced without requiring signal amplification.

In addition, since the conductive elements 14 and 16 have no exposed surfaces, they are completely protected from environmental contamination and the erosion which would occur if they were brought into contact by switch actuation. The absence of such contact also precluses continuous current flow between the conductive element 14 and 16, so that the conductivity of the elements does not significantly affect the signal produced upon key actuation. Thus it is unnecessary to employ expensive high conductivity metals, such as silver, and aluminum can be used for both conductive elements 14 and 16.

FIG. 3 is a graph showing how the capacitance between conductive elements 14 and 16 typically changes in response to actuation of a switch. The solid curve is for actuation by finger pressure, and the broken line curve is for actuation by a mechanical impact key. The capacitance is C in the open state of the switch, and in the fully 0 closed state, the capacitance increases to C.« Although, as illustrated, the time in which this change occurs will depend on the switch actuating mechanism employed, the impact key producing a more sudden change than direct finger contact, it is apparent that in either case the change occurs without any sudden transition or jump. Consequently, no debounce circuitry is necessary in a detection circuit connected to conductive elements 14 and 16 and in which an electrical signal will be produced by the change in capaciitance. A particularly advantageous economic feature of a capacitance-type membrane keypad in accordance with the invention is that the upper and lower capacitive elements may each be formed using commmercially available metallic foil by a hot stamping process. FIG. 4 is a perspective view of such capacitive elements 19 on the upper insulating sheet 10 of the keypad in FIG.1. The keypad comprises the conductive elements 14 patterned in a 3 x 3 array of switch positions and the dielectric film 15 overlying the conductive elements. Conductive interconnecting paths 20 extend between conductive elements 14 in the same row, and conductive terminating paths 21 at the end of each row connect the conductive elements of each row to external circuits. Interconnecting paths 20 are simply narrow extensions of the associated conductive elements 14, and they advantageously have an overlying layer of dielectric film that is a narrow extension of the associated dielectric film 15. Terminating paths 21 similarly comprise narrow extensions of the associated conductive elements 14. However, in lieu of an overlying dielectric film, the conductive paths are coated with an overlying conductive protective material such as a carbon filled polyester. This permits use of commercially available low insertion force connectors to make electrical contact with the terminating paths 21.

The capacitive elements on the lower insulating sheet 11, are identical with the capacitive elements 19 as shown in FIG. 4. However, when the insulating sheets 10 and 11 are assembled with the spacing sheet 12 to form a complete keypad as shown in FIG. 1, the lower sheet 11 is positioned so that its rows of interconnected switch positions are orthogonal to those of upper sheet 10. This establishes an intersecting matrix whereby the change in capacitannce which occurs upon actuation of a switch is identified to a particular switch position.

FIG. 9 shows how each of the capacitive elements of a keypad in accordance with the invention may be formed by hot stamping of commercially available metallic foil. The foil sheet is shown in cross-section, and comprises a polyester carrier sheet 22, such as Mylar. Coated on carrier sheet 22 is a layer 23 of release material,such as a thermoplastic copolymer, which is adherent thereto but releases and shears cleanly when heated to an elevated temperature in a particular area. Release layer 23, is coated with a film 24 of dielectric material such as lacquer which will become the top surface of the stamped pattern. Dielectric film 24 is itself coated with a metallic layer 25, typically aluminum, formed thereon by vacuum deposition. The final layer 26 of the foil sheet is a thermoset adhesive material which remains nonadhesive until heated to an elevated temperature. The foil sheet is positioned so that thermoset adhesive layer 26 thereof is adjacent and facing a substrate 27 on which the capacitive elements, such as capacitive elements 19 in FIG. 4, are to be formed, substrate 27 being of a flexible insulating material such as Mylar. It is supported on the machine bed 28 of a stamping press which also includes an electrically heated stamping head 29. Attached to head 29 is a block or die 30 which is patterned, by engraving or embossing, in correspondence with the geometric pattern of the desired keypad, such as that depicted in FIG. 4.

Heated stamping head 29 may be pneumatically driven, and when lowered, subjects areas of the metallic foil to heat and pressure in the switch position pattern set by die 30. This causes release layer 23 to separate from carrier sheet 22 and shear from the adjacent unheated areas, and renders thermoset adhesive layer 26 adhesive to substrate 27. As a result, all of the coatings and films which are carried by carrier sheet 22, except release layer 23, are transferred to substrate 27 in accordance with the geometric pattern off the switch positions. When stamping head 29 is raised and carrier sheet 22 stripped off, there is left on substrate 27 capacitive elements such as that shown in FIG. 4. As shown in FIG. 10, each capacitive element comprises the metallic layer 25 adhered to substrate 27 by adhesive layer 26, and the top coat lacquer film 24 completely coating metallic layer 25. A cross-section of the conductive interconnecting paths 20 in FIG. 4 would be the same as, but narrower than, the cross-section of the capacitive elements as shown in FIG. 10.

In order to form the conductive terminating paths 21 in FIG. 4, a corresponding region of the metallic foil may be provided with an overlying conductive coating over metallic layer 25 in place of the dielectric lacquer film 24. As noted above, such a conductive topcoat may be a carbon filled polyester, and is preferably of the same thickness as the lacquer film 24. This is illustrated in FIG. 11, showing the configuration of the metallic foil shown in cross-section in FIG. 9 prior to stamping, but with the carrier sheet 22 and release layer 23 omitted for clarity. The metallic layer 25 and thermoset adhesive layer 26 extend over the entire area of the foil, but the lacquer dielectric film 24 does not extend into the terminating region of the capacitive element where the terminating paths 21 shown in FIG. 4 are to be formed. Instead, in that region the metallic layer 25 is coated with a layer 31 of carbon filled polyester of the same thickness or dielectric film 24. The aluminum layer in commercially available foils generally has a sheet resistance in the range of 1.5 to 2.5 ohms per square inch, but may also have significant levels of aluminum oxide which causes increased resistance. Lower sheet resistance, in the range of about 0.3 ohms per square inch, can be achieved by increasing the thickness of the deposited aluminum layer. Of course, a more conductive metal such as copper would also provide lower sheet resistance, and could be used if the additional cost is acceptable. However, in a keypad in accordance with the present invention, conductivity is of interest primarily in the interconnecting paths 20 and terminating paths 21 of each capacitive element thereof as shown in FIG. 4. As pointed out above, since the conductive elements in each key position- remain insulated from each other even when the key position is in the closed condition, no continuous current and little transient current flow occurs between them. Consequently, the conductivity of the conductive elements in the key positions does not materially effect detection of the key closure signal.

Stamping of metallic foil is well suited to continuous mass production of the capacitive elements of the keypad. A large roll of foil may be supported on a feed roller and intermittently advanced under the stamping press head, the successive capacitive elements stamped from the foil being successively advanced past the stamping head after each stamping operation and wound on a take-up roller.

Claims

Claims
1. A capacitance-type switch comprising: a pair of capacitive members, each of the capacitive members comprising insulating material, a conductive element on one surface of the insulating material and a dielectric film on the conductive element, at least one of the capacitive members being moved; the capacitive members being supported in spaced generally parallel alignment with the conductive elements facing and in general registration with one another and the dielectric films adjacent to but spaced from one another; whereby movement of the movable capacitive member into engagement with the others capacitive member causes the dielectric film of the movable capacitive member to move into engagement with the dielectric film of the other capacitive member.
2. A membrane keypad having a plurality of switches arrayed in a planar geometric pattern, each of such switches being adapted to be actuated by pressure exerted thereon, the keypad comprising: a first member of flexible insulating material havng a first surface in each switch position; a second member of insulating material having a first surface in each switch position, each first surface of the first member facing, being generally aligned with, and being normally spaced from a first surface of the second member; a first conductive element on each first surface of the first member; a second conductive element on each first surface of the second member; a first film of dielectric material coating each of the first conductive elements; and a second film of dielectric material coating each of the second conductive elements; whereby exertion of pressure on any of the switch positions of the first member moves the first film of dielectric material of that switch position into contact with the second film of dielectric material of the position.
3. A membrane keypad in accordance with claim 2 further including conductive paths for connecting the first and second conductive elements to a capacitance detecting circuit, the movement of the first film of dielectric material of a switch position into contact with the second film of dielectric material of that position enabling the detection of an increase in capacitance between the first and second conductive elements of that switch position.
4. A capacitance-type keypad having a plurality of switches arrayed in a planar geometric pattern, each of the switches being adapted to be actuated by pressure exerted thereon, the kaypad comprising; an upper sheet of flexible insulating 'material, the lower surface of the upper sheet having a first conductive element in each of the switch positions and the lower surface of each first conductive element having a film of dielectric material thereon, the upper sheet further having conductive paths for connecting the first conductive elements to a detecting circuit; and a lower sheet of insulating material, the upper surface of the lower sheet having a second conductive element in each switch position, each second conductive element underlying a first conductive element and the upper surface of each second conductive element having a film of dielectric material thereon, the lower sheet further having conductive paths for connecting the second conductive elements to the detecting circuit; the upper sheet being normally spaced from the lower sheet in each of the switch positions such that the first and second conductive elements of each switch position are spaced from one another a first distance, and the upper sheet being deflectable in each switch position to move the dielectric film on the associated first conductive element into engagement with the dielectric film on the underlying second conductive element such that the first and second conductive elements are spaced from one another a second distance that is significantly less than the first distance, the change in distance providing a change in capacitance that is readily detected by the detecting circuit.
5. A method of making an element of a capacitance-type membrane keypad having a plurality of switches arrayed in a selected geometric pattern, the element being formed by a process of hot stamping of a- foil, the foil comprising: a carrier sheet; a layer of release material on one surface of the carrier sheet, the release material being adherent to the surface but releasing therefrom when heated to an elevated temperature; a film of dielectric material on the release material; a conductive layer on the film of dielectric material; and a layer of adhesive material on the conductive layer, the adhesive material remaining nonadhesive until heated to an elevated temperature; the hot stamping process comprising the steps of: supporting a substrate of insulating material adjacent to and facing the adhesive layer of the foil; positioning a stamping die adjacent to and facing the surface of the carrier sheet opposite the surface thereof on which the layer of release material is located, areas of the stamping die being patterned in correspondence with the geometric pattern of the switch positions; pressing the stamping die against the surface of the carrier sheet adjacent thereto, whereby areas of the foil patterned in correspondence with the geometric pattern of the switch positions are pressed against the substrate; the stamping die being heated to an elevated temperature sufficient so that in each of the switch positions of the foil, the layer of release material releases from the carrier sheet and the layer of adhesive material adheres to the substrate.
EP19860903010 1985-04-26 1986-04-22 Capacitance-type switch Withdrawn EP0220275A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US72794585 true 1985-04-26 1985-04-26
US727945 1985-04-26

Publications (1)

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EP0220275A1 true true EP0220275A1 (en) 1987-05-06

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ID=24924757

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
EP19860903010 Withdrawn EP0220275A1 (en) 1985-04-26 1986-04-22 Capacitance-type switch

Country Status (2)

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EP (1) EP0220275A1 (en)
WO (1) WO1986006544A1 (en)

Cited By (1)

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US9694451B1 (en) 2010-03-04 2017-07-04 Amazon Technologies, Inc. Heat spreading chassis for rack-mounted computer system

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US7154481B2 (en) * 2002-06-25 2006-12-26 3M Innovative Properties Company Touch sensor
DE102004002825A1 (en) * 2004-01-12 2005-08-04 E.G.O. Elektro-Gerätebau GmbH Operating device with a capacitive sensor element, and electronic equipment having such a control device
DE102004005952A1 (en) 2004-02-02 2005-08-25 E.G.O. Elektro-Gerätebau GmbH Control device for an electrical appliance with a control field and a sensor element including, and methods of operation of the operating device
EP2388920A1 (en) * 2010-05-21 2011-11-23 RAFI GmbH & Co. KG Capacitative switch
DE102011054679B4 (en) * 2011-10-20 2013-06-06 Prettl Home Appliance Solutions Gmbh Control element and control unit for a household appliance and home appliance

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US3643041A (en) * 1970-12-30 1972-02-15 Unidynamics Phoenix Pushbutton diaphragm switch with improved dimple actuator and/or capacitance-type switch contact structure
US4081898A (en) * 1976-04-19 1978-04-04 Texas Instruments Incorporated Method of manufacturing an electronic calculator utilizing a flexible carrier
US4367385A (en) * 1981-01-26 1983-01-04 W. H. Brady Co. Capacitance switch
US4417294A (en) * 1981-08-28 1983-11-22 Illinois Tool Works Inc. Capacitive keyswitch

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9694451B1 (en) 2010-03-04 2017-07-04 Amazon Technologies, Inc. Heat spreading chassis for rack-mounted computer system

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
WO1986006544A1 (en) 1986-11-06 application

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Inventor name: CHALASANI, RAO, MALLIKARJUNA