EP0208499A1 - Armour component - Google Patents

Armour component Download PDF

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Publication number
EP0208499A1
EP0208499A1 EP86305092A EP86305092A EP0208499A1 EP 0208499 A1 EP0208499 A1 EP 0208499A1 EP 86305092 A EP86305092 A EP 86305092A EP 86305092 A EP86305092 A EP 86305092A EP 0208499 A1 EP0208499 A1 EP 0208499A1
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EP
European Patent Office
Prior art keywords
beads
layers
layer
component
flexible
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Granted
Application number
EP86305092A
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German (de)
French (fr)
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EP0208499B1 (en
Inventor
Trevor K. Groves
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Trevor K. Groves
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Publication date
Priority to CA000486220A priority Critical patent/CA1233684A/en
Priority to CA486220 priority
Application filed by Trevor K. Groves filed Critical Trevor K. Groves
Publication of EP0208499A1 publication Critical patent/EP0208499A1/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of EP0208499B1 publication Critical patent/EP0208499B1/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Application status is Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical

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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B3/00Layered products comprising a layer with external or internal discontinuities or unevennesses, or a layer of non-planar form; Layered products having particular features of form
    • B32B3/10Layered products comprising a layer with external or internal discontinuities or unevennesses, or a layer of non-planar form; Layered products having particular features of form characterised by a discontinuous layer, i.e. formed of separate pieces of material
    • B32B3/18Layered products comprising a layer with external or internal discontinuities or unevennesses, or a layer of non-planar form; Layered products having particular features of form characterised by a discontinuous layer, i.e. formed of separate pieces of material characterised by an internal layer formed of separate pieces of material which are juxtaposed side-by-side
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B3/00Layered products comprising a layer with external or internal discontinuities or unevennesses, or a layer of non-planar form; Layered products having particular features of form
    • B32B3/10Layered products comprising a layer with external or internal discontinuities or unevennesses, or a layer of non-planar form; Layered products having particular features of form characterised by a discontinuous layer, i.e. formed of separate pieces of material
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B5/00Layered products characterised by the non- homogeneity or physical structure, i.e. comprising a fibrous, filamentary, particulate or foam layer; Layered products characterised by having a layer differing constitutionally or physically in different parts
    • B32B5/22Layered products characterised by the non- homogeneity or physical structure, i.e. comprising a fibrous, filamentary, particulate or foam layer; Layered products characterised by having a layer differing constitutionally or physically in different parts characterised by the presence of two or more layers which are next to each other and are fibrous, filamentary, formed of particles or foamed
    • B32B5/24Layered products characterised by the non- homogeneity or physical structure, i.e. comprising a fibrous, filamentary, particulate or foam layer; Layered products characterised by having a layer differing constitutionally or physically in different parts characterised by the presence of two or more layers which are next to each other and are fibrous, filamentary, formed of particles or foamed one layer being a fibrous or filamentary layer
    • B32B5/26Layered products characterised by the non- homogeneity or physical structure, i.e. comprising a fibrous, filamentary, particulate or foam layer; Layered products characterised by having a layer differing constitutionally or physically in different parts characterised by the presence of two or more layers which are next to each other and are fibrous, filamentary, formed of particles or foamed one layer being a fibrous or filamentary layer another layer next to it also being fibrous or filamentary
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B7/00Layered products characterised by the relation between layers; Layered products characterised by the relative orientation of features between layers, or by the relative values of a measurable parameter between layers, i.e. products comprising layers having different physical, chemical or physicochemical properties; Layered products characterised by the interconnection of layers
    • B32B7/04Interconnection of layers
    • B32B7/12Interconnection of layers using interposed adhesives or interposed materials with bonding properties
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41HARMOUR; ARMOURED TURRETS; ARMOURED OR ARMED VEHICLES; MEANS OF ATTACK OR DEFENCE, e.g. CAMOUFLAGE, IN GENERAL
    • F41H5/00Armour; Armour plates
    • F41H5/02Plate construction
    • F41H5/04Plate construction composed of more than one layer
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B2571/00Protective equipment
    • B32B2571/02Protective equipment defensive, e.g. armour plates, anti-ballistic clothing
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10S428/911Penetration resistant layer
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/23Sheet including cover or casing
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/23Sheet including cover or casing
    • Y10T428/239Complete cover or casing
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/24Structurally defined web or sheet [e.g., overall dimension, etc.]
    • Y10T428/24033Structurally defined web or sheet [e.g., overall dimension, etc.] including stitching and discrete fastener[s], coating or bond
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/24Structurally defined web or sheet [e.g., overall dimension, etc.]
    • Y10T428/24628Nonplanar uniform thickness material
    • Y10T428/24661Forming, or cooperating to form cells
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/25Web or sheet containing structurally defined element or component and including a second component containing structurally defined particles
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/25Web or sheet containing structurally defined element or component and including a second component containing structurally defined particles
    • Y10T428/252Glass or ceramic [i.e., fired or glazed clay, cement, etc.] [porcelain, quartz, etc.]
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/30Woven fabric [i.e., woven strand or strip material]
    • Y10T442/3472Woven fabric including an additional woven fabric layer
    • Y10T442/348Mechanically needled or hydroentangled
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/30Woven fabric [i.e., woven strand or strip material]
    • Y10T442/3472Woven fabric including an additional woven fabric layer
    • Y10T442/348Mechanically needled or hydroentangled
    • Y10T442/3488Four or more layers

Abstract

An armour component having a pair of layers (13,14) of flexible high impact-resistant material with at least two juxtaposed layers of hard beads (15,16) between the flexible layers. The beads (21,22) in the adjacent layers (15,16) are disposed with beads thereof inter-nested in the inter-bead spaces of each other, and the volume occupied by the layers of beads is substantially void of all other material. The beads of each layer may be arranged in a regular close-packed lattice pattern, i.e., a hexagonal or square so that each bead contacts its immediately adjacent neighbour beads. The component is designed for flattening and trapping a bullet and when used as a body armour provides the outer part of the garment. An inner component (12) is used in the garment for spreading the impact of the bullet striking the outer part. The inner component includes at least two layers of flexible material (27,28) having at least one layer of compressible material (30) confined therebetwen. The garment using the outer part (11) is light and flexible but is capable of trapping the bullet with little risk of spalling of the parts of the component. The inner component, which is also light in weight as the compressible material may be a plurality of hollow fracturable plastic balls (46) confined in compartments defined by tough plastic sheet material, is designed to soften and spread the impact on the body of the user to inhibit bruising or bone fracture.

Description

    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • This invention relates to an armour component and also to body armour of the type which can be worn to protect the wearer from a high speed projectile such as a bullet from a handgun or rifle.
  • BACKGROUND TO THE INVENTION
  • Armour must be capable of stopping passage of bullets of a variety of sizes and speeds, and when used in body armour, it must also reduce the damage caused by the impact resulting from the bullet being trapped within the armour. Moreover, to be acceptable as body armour, it must be flexible without gaps and of light weight.
  • In a commonly used type of body armour, the material used in an outer bullet-trap essentially consists of an array of multi-layered flexible slabs or platelets formed of hard material and joined by tough flexible cloth so as to provide a discontinuously flexible garment. Such body armour has the advantage of the immediate post-impact velocity of the platelet containing the bullet being predictable for a chosen platelet mass and an anticipated bullet threat because the collision of the bullet with a platelet is inelastic. On collision of the bullet with the platelet, the velocity of the platelet relative to the bullet velocity is simply proportional to the ratio of the bullet mass (m) to the post-collision mass of the platelet (M) plus the bullet mass, i.e., (M+m). It is apparent, therefore, that for a particular bullet threat that the post-collision velocity of the platelet, i.e., the maximum possible platelet velocity just before its collision with a backing component of the garment must be preset at an acceptable level, and this is done by choosing a sufficiently large platelet. In summary, in the platelet type of body armour, the trap portion of the device converts the penetration threat of a high- velocity, low-­mass, small-diameter soft bullet into the bruising impact threat of a low-velocity, high-mass, large diameter hard-­fronted rigid body. A pronounced rigid bulge occurs on the inner surface of the impacted platelet arising from it being hit with the bullet and its effect on any backing component of the garment is equivalent to a vigorous blow from a large hammer. It appears that known backing compo­nents are not capable of dealing with such a blow without the wearer suffering from bad bruising or bone fracture. Moreover, because flexibility is imperative, the closeness of the platelets is limited, and in sharply curved areas of the body, gaps between adjacent platelets may be suffi­ciently large to allow bullet penetration. Additionally, the required rigidity of each individual platelet can re­sult in spalling, that is the breaking of the platelet into massive, hard, jagged fragments which may penetrate the inner component because the velocity of the spall may approach that of the striking bullet.
  • The use of hard spheres has been suggested in the prior art. Canadian patent No. 797,509, October 29, 1968, to King, shows hard spheres embedded in rigid plastic plates. U.S. patent no. 4,186,643, February 5, 1980, to Clausen, also discloses a flat panel laminate and refers to the use of glass beads which are fixed in place for effectivley abrading a projectile. In U.S. patent No. 3,324,768, June 13, 1967, to Eichelberger, there are shown rigid panels of hard plates having a layer of glass balls or marbles. U.S. patent No. 4,179,979, December 25, 1979, discloses hard spheres supported by material of high tensile strength with the spheres being restrained in place by a material such as foam or a suitable resin intermixture.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • Contrary to the arrangements shown in the prior art, the present invention provides for an armour component which is completely flexible and utilizes a feature of the glass beads encountering unimpeded multiple impacts with each other and the bullet to accomplish bullet distortion and energy degradation.
  • According to one aspect of the present invention, there is provided an armour component which includes two layers of flexible material with at least two layers of beads tightly confined therebetween, the beads in one layer being disposed in most compact relation with the beads of an immediately adjacent layer so that the beads of the adjacent layers internest in the inter-bead spaces of each other. The volume occupied by the layers of beads is substantially void of all other material.
  • In the specific embodiment of the invention described herein, the two juxtaposed layers are hard beads disposed in a regular close-packed lattice pattern so that each bead contacts each immediate neighbour bead in the pattern.
  • According to an aspect of the invention, there is provided a body armour structure which has an outer component for trapping a bullet, and a separate inner backing component for spreading the impact of the bullet striking the outer component, the outer component including two layers of flexible material and at least two layers of hard beads tightly confined between the layers of flexible material, the inner component including at least two layers of flexible material with at least one layer of compres­sible material confined therebetween.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • In the accompanying drawings, which illustrate em­bodiments of the invention, as examples,
    • Figure 1 is a cross section on an enlarged scale through a garment showing both an outer component and an inner component according to the present invention;
    • Figure 2 is a plan view of the two layers of beads of the outer component of Figure 1;
    • Figure 3 is a side view of the beads shown in Figure 2;
    • Figure 4 is a plan view of the two layers of beads as shown in Figure 2 but even further enlarged;
    • Figure 5, which appears on the same sheet as Figure 1, is a cross section through the outer component and showing an alternative embodiment; and
    • Figure 6 is a cross sectional view as seen from the line 6--6 of Figure 2 and shows two layers of beads of the outer component of another alternative embodiment.
  • In Figure 1, the reference number 10 generally denotes the wall of a garment formed by an outer component 11 and an inner component 12.
  • It should be understood that the outer component 11, which forms the bullet trap may be used separate from the particular disclosed inner component and may be designed on any scale of size for use in protecting various things, such as motor vehicles, ships, aircraft, buildings, etc., but it will become apparent from the description of the manner in which the outer component functions, the effectiveness of the outer component is enhanced when used in conjunction with an inner component, and further, it is important that in use, the outer component is not located flat against a hard surface or the body it is protecting.
  • The embodiment of the outer component of the invention shown in Figure 1 to 4 includes inner and outer flexible layers 13 and 14 with two layers of beads 15 and 16 tightly confined therebetween. The outer layer 13 includes a sheet of high impact-resistant material, and in the particular embodiment illustrated, it includes at least two such sheets 17, which may be a cloth sold under the trade mark KEVLAR. The inner layer 14 may also consist of a number of sheets, at least one of which has flexible, tough and elastic characteristics. The inner layer 14 is shown as including a plurality of high impact-resistant sheets 18, such as KEVLAR cloth, with two sheets 20 of the flexible, tough and elastic material, which may be a foil sold under the trade mark LEXAN, the foil sheets 20 being interleaved between the sheets 18 of high impact-resistant material. Although the sheets making up the outer and inner flexible layers are shown as being slightly separated for the sake of clarity, it should be appreciated that they would normally be in intimate contact throughout.
  • Although two layers 15 and 16 of beads are shown, more layers may be utilized. It is believed, however, that better results are obtainable by utilizing an even number of layers, and it would seem that when using two layers, a simpler approach may be taken in ensuring that the beads are retained in a preselected pattern. The upper or outer layer 15 consists of a plurality of hard spherical members 21, which may be formed of glass. The spheres or beads 21 are shown as being of uniform diameter arranged in a regular close-packed lattice pattern. The two alternative close-packed patterns available are a square and a triangle, these being patterns wherein each bead is in contact with all of its immediate neighbour beads. As is most apparent from Figure 4, the triangular pattern results in a centre bead of a selected cluster being in contact with six surrounding beads and, accordingly, throughout this description reference will be made to a hexagonal pattern instead of a triangular pattern. It is believed, for reasons which will become apparent below that a regular pattern, and likely a hexagonal regular lattice pattern, will provide optimum results. Although it is important that the volume occupied by the layer 15 be substantially void of all other material, it is possible to provide beads of a smaller diameter in the interstices of the main beads of the two layers as long as the close-packed pattern of the main beads is not disrupted. Beads 22 which form the inner layer 16 are shown as being of the same diameter and having the same close-packed lattice pattern as the outer layer 15, and the two layers 15 and 16 are disposed in a most compact relation with the beads of the two layers internesting in the inter-bead spaces of each other. This internesting relationship of the two layers is most apparent in the area 25 shown in Figure 3. Looking at Figure 2, it can be seen that the placement of the pat­terns of the two layers are staggered to accomplish the most compact relation of the two layers, i.e., the beads of the two layers are not aligned as viewed from the top in Figure 2. As in the case of the beads of the outer layer 15, there is nothing in the bead interstices, so that in the embodiment shown, the entire volume occupied by the two bead layers 15 and 16 is completely void of any other material.
  • In forming the outer component 11, the beads are confined tightly between the outer flexible layers 13 and 14 by the flexible layers being tightly stitched together, such as by the stitching shown at seam 24, and in this type of the fastening of the layers together, it would be desir­able to utilize two of the outer components 11 with the seams staggered so as not to leave any lines which would not provide a bullet trap. Alternatively, the component 11 could be formed in narrow strips which are then formed into a continuous outer body by joining the strips in a woven fashion. Figure 5 illustrates another alternative embod­iment in which a thin layer of adhesive 25 is provided between the outer layer of beads 15 and the adjacent outer flexible layer 13. If the outer flexible layers 13 and 14 are otherwise tightly drawn toward each other by stitching (not shown in Figure 5) the interengagement between the beads of the two layers 15 and 16 would also maintain the beads 16 of the inner layer in their predetermined pattern as well, or as is shown, a layer of adhesive 26 could also be used between the inner layer 16 of beads and the adja­cent inner flexible layer 14. Yet another method of en­suring that the beads remain in a preselected close-packed pattern would be that of threading the beads in each layer together and possibly using the same thread to attach the layer to its adjacent flexible layer. In any event it will become apparent from the description of the movement of the beads when struck by a bullet, it is desirable to have the volume occupied by the beads as free as possible of other material and to leave the beads substantially unhindered from movement when struck. Although it appears that best results are obtained when the beads are in a close-packed lattice pattern when struck, it is believed that some random arrangement will not necessarily defeat the bullet trapping ability which will be described in more detail below.
  • Figure 6 illustrates an alternative design in which the volumes occupied by each of the layers 15 and 16 of the beads are void, but a thin barrier 26 is provided between the layers 15 and 16. The barrier 26 is a thin flexible sheet of high impact- resistant material, such as KEVLAR, and although the presence of this barrier may provide some advantages under certain conditions, it may also deleteri­ously affect the movement of the beads as well.
  • The selection of the size and material for the spheres or beads 21 and 22 will depend on the use of the component 11. It is believed that the optimum diameter of the bead is approximately 1/3 to 1/2 the diameter of the bullet likely to be encountered. When the component is to form an outer garment of bullet-proof clothing, an optimum size appears to be about 3 to 5 mm. in diameter, a small glass bead of this size weighing about 0.036 to 0.17 grams. If, as previously suggested, small beads are provided in the interstices of the larger beads in the outer layer 15, the larger beads may be about 6mm. in diameter with the smaller being about 3 mm. in diameter. Tests have shown that glass is a desirable material in that it eliminates any danger of spalling.
  • The inner and outer components 11 and 12 are separate and in fact may be provided in completely different gar­ments so that under certain conditions they can be worn separately. Alternatively, it might be advisable to wear two of the garments containing the outer component 11 in a particular circumstance.
  • The separate inner component 12 is provided for spreading the impact of the bullet being trapped in the outer component 11, and it includes an outer flexible layer 27, an inner flexible layer 28 and at least one layer or core 30 of compressible material confined between layers 27 and 28. In the arrangement which is shown, the outer layer 27 includes a plurality of sheets of material consisting of two outer layers 31 of flexible high impact-­resistant material, such as KEVLAR cloth, and a liner of a resilient, tough plastic material, such as LEXAN foil 32. The inner layer 28 is also shown as consisting of a plurality of sheets of material, such as four sheets 33 of a high impact-resistant material, such as KEVLAR cloth. The compressible intermediate material or core 30 is shown as including in itself two layers 34 and 35 each of which includes a plurality of closely packed chambers or compart­ments. More specifically, there is provided an interme­diate flexible layer 36 consisting of a couple of sheets 37 of high impact-resistant material, such as KEVLAR cloth with an outer liner 38 of a fexible, tough and elastic material, such as a LEXAN foil. In between the intermediate layer 36 and the outer layer 27 and in between the inner layer 28 and the intermediate layer 36 there are formed by separate sheets 40 and 41 of flexible, tough elastic material, such as LEXAN foil, a plurality of closely spaced domes 42 and 43, with the domes in the two separate layers being aligned. As shown, the domes 42 have their bases fixed to the intermediate layer 36 and their tops in contact with the outer layer 27 while the domes 43 have their domes 43 fixed to the inner layer 28 and their tops in contact with the intermediate layer 36. The domes of each layer provide one series of compartments while the interstices of the domes provide other confinements or chambers. The outer domes 42 contain a plurality of small particles 46, which are preferrably very light, rigid, fracturable spheroidal beads, such as hollow plastic spheres. In the interstices of the inner layer of domes 43, a deformable filler, such as a plurality of fracturable hollow plastic beads, is also provided. As is apparent from Figure 1 the permanently deformable material provided in the two layers of domes is staggered because the domes are aligned and the hollow plastic beads are located within the domes in one layer and between the domes in the other so that there are no gaps without the material capable of spreading the impact of a bullet being trapped in the outer component.
  • The function of the outer component of the present invention is entirely different than that of the platelet type now used in body armour in that the disclosed design is light and flexible, is capable of providing continuity of coverage and has no possibility of damage due to spall. The flexible nature of the lattice bead pattern which is void of any filler material in the bead interstices allows for comfortable molding to the contours of the body without leaving gaps. The spherical shape of the beads, together with the lattice geometry and the very small area of contact between the beads results in spall which is very small in size and which will normally be confined to the rear surface of the outer layer of spheres. The observed spall in testing indicates that the spall is usually in the form of a small quantity of powdered glass, somewhat finer than table salt, and all contained within the flexible cover layers of the outer component.
  • As was previously stated, the two components 11 and 12 are preferably housed in separate garments but both garments would normally be worn together to obtain protec­tion against a bullet threat. The inner garment containing component 12 could be worn together to provide protection against bruising which could result from impact of mas­sive, slow moving objects, such as clubs or rocks, and even against penetration by sharp or pointed objects, such as knives. When worn together the garments, including one component 11 and one component 12, provide protection against a moderate threat such as handgun bullets, but the wearer could fortify against a higher bullet threat, such as from hard-nosed bullets or more massive, high velocity rifle bullets, by using a third garment similar containing a component such as component 11, but possibly using larger beads.
  • The continuous, flexible nature of the bead lattice tightly confined between the flexible layers for forming a bullet trap does not allow easy prediction of the collision velocity of the bullet-containing trap with the inner component 12. The analysis is complicated because of energy being dissipated through various modes of bead motion active throughout the component 11 impact on the inner component 12. Tests have shown, however, that at the time of collision of the outer component 11 with the inner component 12, the slug is within the innermost flexible layer 14 of the component 11, and it is only this soft-­fronted slug that presents any significant impression on the inner component 12. It is apparent that the outer component of the illustated design converts the penetration threat of a high velocity, low mass, low-diameter bullet into a bruising impact threat of a moderate velocity, flexible bead-bag containing the bullet, now flattened to a moderate diameter, which bruising impact threat can be readily handled by the inner component 12.
  • When a close-packed, hexagonal pattern is used as shown in Figure 4, and a bullet which has a diameter equal to about three of the beads makes a normal impact centered on bead 21a of the outer layer 15 of the beads, it is believed that in the collision seven of the beads in the outer layer 15 will become involved, namely bead 21a and its immediate neighbours, beads 21b, 21c, 21d, 21e, 21f and 21g. In this situation, the bullet strikes beads 21a-21g substantially simultaneously, thus initiating a strong com­pression wave in them while a compression wave of equal strength is reflected back to the bullet. If one considers the example where the bead diameter is 3mm, and the bullet speed is 0.4 mm/usec at impact with the wave front speeds in the lead bullet and in the glass spheres being taken to be roughly the sonic wave values, namely, 2.16 mm/usec and 5.5 mm/usec, respectively, it can be seen that in 0.55 usec, the compression wave front arrives at the opposite boundary of beads 21a-21g. At that instant, every bead surface is unsupported or free so that a tensile wave is reflected back into each of the outer beads of the group, and in view of local geometry, some spalling may occur at that time. However, at the three points supporting each outer bead from the inner level beads, the wave is weaker, and if the bead layers are in direct contact, the compres­sion wave is transmitted without change into the beads of the inner layer 16. The beads of the inner layer at this time experience strong rotational forces due to the off-set nature of the impact leading to irreversible energy loss due to friction. About one microsecond after the initial bullet impact, the transmitted compression wave arrives simultaneously at the innermost points of the inner bead layer which points are depicted with reference characters 22-1, 22-2, 22-3, 22-4, 22-5, 22-6, 22-7, 22-7, 22-8, 22-9, 22-10, 22-11 and 22-12 in Figure 4. The compression wave strength at these points at the inner surface of the beads of the inner layer, just before the wave is reflected, is in relative terms, three at points 22-1, 22-2 and 22-3, two at points 22-4, 22-5 and 22-6, and one at points 22-7, 22-­8, 22-9, 22-10, 22-11 and 22-12 because the beads concerned are respectively in contact with three, two, one of the bullet-impacted beads of the outer layer 15. The compression waves arrive at the twelve points 22-1 -- 22-12 simultaneously and constitute the first disturbance to arrive at the interface between beads and its inner flexi­ble layer 14. The performance of the outer component 11 or bullet trap is now determined by the response to this disturbance of the material immediately backing the layers of beads. As was previously indicated, the proper function of component 11 depends on the inner layer 14 not being in direct engagement with a solid body.
  • Because the material of inner layer is composed of sheets which make it light, tough, flexible and extensible, the stress tansmitted to it by way of the shock wave reaching points 22-1 -- 22-12 transmits a moderate and tolerable stress to it. The compression waves encounter effectively a free surface at these points so that a tensile wave is reflected back towards the bullet and the material velocity behind this reflected wave front increases abruptly to nearly twice that of the incoming wave. When this reflected wave front reaches the interface between the two layers of beads, the twelve beads of the inner layer separate from the lattice pattern and move towards the inner flexible layer 14 at this enhanced velocity. With the hexagonal lattice pattern being considered, the 12 beads in the inner layer 16 are struck at about 35° off-normal and the resultant forces on the beads in the plane of the layer are equal in value for beads 22₄ to 22₁₂, while they are zero for beads 22₁ to 22₃, and these forces are entirely outwards in directions 60 degrees apart. In view of the low mass and smooth sphericity of the beads and the moderate stress transmitted to the flexible inner layer 14, its penetration effect can be controlled. The collision of a bead with the inner layer results in some irreversible loss of energy in stretching of the materials in the inner layer together with rebound of the bead at a reduced speed. The superior impact speed of beads 22₁ - 22₃, and, to some extent of beads 22₄ - 22₆, tends to produce a concave shape in layer 14, this having the effect of focussing rebound of the other beads towards the impact zone. After rebound, the twelve beads of the inner layer 16 collide at high speed with the oncoming beads of the outer layer 15. In the event the bullet is of a very hard type, the impacted beads in the outer layer will have separated from the bullet after the passage through them of a tensile wave in the manner described above in respect of the beads of the inner layer. Thus, in this situation, the collision of the beads of the outer layer 15 with the rebounding beads of the inner layer 16 could be at a very high approach velocity, theoretically as high as twice the bullet impact velocity. However, the most common bullet, which would be encountered is a lead bullet, and in the case of this softer bullet, the hard beads or spheres in the outer layer 15 are likely to become embedded in the bullet at first impact. Thus, after the above described rebound of the twelve beads of the inner layer 16, the twelve beads impact with the encrusted array of hard beads fronting the bullet, and in this situation, the collision velocity is less than in the case of the harder bullet, but the collision velocity could still approach 1.5 times that of the original bullet speed. In consequence of this collision, compression waves which are strong, localized and of short duration, about one microsecond, are transmitted, via the encrusted beads, into the bullet to thereby flatten it and further reduce its speed. After rebounding from the first layer beads embedded in the bullet, the twelve beads fo the second layer make a second collision with the flexible inner layer 14 and another cycle of the above described behavior is repeated. Thus, the primary motion of the affected beads 22 of the inner layer 16, after the first impact, is seen to be a high frequency series of energy dissipative collisions transferring energy from the bullet to the inner flexible layer 14 and to other beads in the lattice pattern of the inner layer as collisions become more disordered. Some motion in the inner layer of beads is initiated in that plane by the first compression wave in the twelve beads, and a lateral component results in a stress being transmitted through both layers of beads. Until the twelve beads 22₁ --22₁₂ move out off the lattice pattern, the neighbouring beads in the inner layer 16 are restrained to vibratory motion only, but some of the beads in the outer layer 15 may be ejected from their positions in the lattice pattern. When the twelve beads commence movement out of their lattice pattern, motion of the surrounding beads becomes more random.
  • When the embodiment shown in Figure 6 is used, i.e., the beads in the inner layer are separated from the beads in the outer layer by a thin cloth, the presence of the cloth interface appears to be a primary factor in causing a change in action of the beads from that described above. On impact of the bullet with the outer layer,the presence of the cloth reduces the compressive stress transmitted into the beads of the inner layer, it being estimated that a KEVLAR cloth could provide a reduction factor of about 4. This reduces the likelihood of spalling of the inner beads and weakens the strength of the tensile wave reflected back towards the bullet from the impact of beads 22₁ --22₁₂ with the inner flexible layer 14. In addition, the energy dissipation in stretching the cloth 26 wedged between the two layers 15 and 16 could be considerable. It would appear, however, that at least partially opposing these advantages is the fact that the presence of the cloth results in reduction of the off-­set impact angle between the beads of the two layers. Also, the reduction in stress transmitted to the beads 22₁ --22₁₂ implies a slower rebound of these beads from the flexible inner layer 14. This, in turn, would mean a reduction in the stress wave transmitted into the bullet from the active beads after every rebound so that less energy is dissipated in distorting the bullet. On the other hand, the presence of the cloth tends to restrain disorder of the beads in both layers so that divergence of beads from the primary zone involving impact after rebound is inhibited. In conclusion, this embodiment appears com­petitive for soft bullets, but possibly less desirable for hard bullets.
  • If the structure of the present invention is used with a rigid backing in place of the flexible inner layer 14 or so close to the inner layer that the inner layer is not flexible, rupture of the backing can only be prevented by a prohibitively thick backing. All of the energy-dissipative bead motion described in regard to events following the first rebound of beads from the flexible inner layer do not apply.
  • If the structure of the present invention is modified to present a design more similar to that suggested by the prior, i.e., to have the bead lattice pattern of the two layers immersed in a liquid resin which is left to harden so that every bead is surrounded by a low density plastic, the behavior of the first compression wave through the two layers of beads to the inner layer 14 would be the same as described above. However, the rota­tion, vibration and subsequent bead collision, which pro­vide the energy-dissipative mechanisms, are severly inhibited. The bead-rebound feature of the present invention is replaced by a large scale spall of the low tensile resistant resin material when the slower moving compression wave travelling through the resin is reflected back as a tensile wave from the inner layer 14.
  • The embodiment shown in Figure 1 has undergone numerous tests, and in those which will be described below, both layers of beads were 3mm. soda lime glass beads. Bullets were fired from a 357 Browning rifle with a 20 inch (0.508 m.) length barrel. All bullets were fired at the same range, about 4 m., in a firing tunnel built specially for the test. Most tests were carried out with a 0.38" (9.65 mm.) diameter "semi-wad cutter" bullet delivering a 158 grain (10.26 g.) slug at a mean calibrated velocity of 357 m/s. A slower bullet of the same diameter, same type and same slug weight, calibrated at 300 m/s, was used at an early stage, while a 0.357" (9.07 mm.) diameter bullet delivering a "jacketed soft point" (JSP) slug of the same weight at a calibrated velocity of 402 m/s was used at a later stage. Tests with the 357 m/s bullet and the 402 m/s bullet dominated the bullet testing leading to the particular design which is illustrated and which is one which is one capable of meeting a large-calibre magnum handgun bullet threat.
  • Tests were also conducted using a 38 calibre bullet delivering a 158 grain JSP slug at a calibrated velocity of 564 m/s against an arrangement having two of the com­ponents 11 and with the same inner component 12 in order to obtain some assessment of the problems involved in dealing with high velocity bullets. The illustrated design was also tested using 22 calibre bullets (5.59 mm. dia.) delivering a 40 grain slug at 380 m/s and a 32 grain slug at 488m/s in order to obtain evidence in relation to the possibility that these low calibre slugs might be more penetrating than those of larger diameter.
  • In the testing, the components were located immediate­ly in front of a 38 mm. thick, firwood block, and the main post-firing observations included the volume and depth of the of the cavity formed in the block, the diameter and penetration level of the trapped slug, and the immediate post-firing temperature of the slug which was measured by a thermocouple. It is believed that the volume (Vc)of the cavity in the wood is the most important simple indicator of the body-armour performance. It is related to the kinetic energy (Ec) transferred to the wood which simulates the body of the wearer, of course, after all the body-­armour dissipative means have been exhausted. For the fir batch used in the experiments, this residual, or cavity forming energy, was obtained from the relation:
    Ec(Joules) = 24.9{Vc(ml)}0.778
    This was determined using a least square fit to calibration cavity data obtained with a pendulum-supported impactor. In view of the strong effect of armour mass on the energy available for cavity formation, a measure of armour ef­fectiveness which is free from this complication is desir­able. One such measure is the apparent dissipated energy (Ei - Ec), where Ei is the residual energy after a hypo­thetical unrestrained inelastic collision of the bullet with the armour. This was used as a practical index of the relative effectiveness of a candidate armour for the pur­poses of design.
  • The embodiment of the invention illustrated herein using 3mm. soda lime glass beads, when mounted so as to simulate a full body armour garment, resisted a 357 m/s, 10.26 g, 38 calibre SWC slug to the extent that, in a typical test, the fir wood immediately behind the armour registered a barely perceptible bruise (about 0.5 mm. in depth and 0.01 ml. in volume), representing a residual impact energy of about 0.8 Joules, while its resistance to a 402 m/s, 10.26 g, 357 cal JSP slug was such that the fir wood immediately behind the armour registered a shallow bruise (about 1 mm. in depth and 0.43 ml. in volume), representing a residual impact energy of about 13 Joules. Resistance to the 22 calibre bullets was such that no bruise could be detected. The mass of armour involved per unit area was 1.15 g/cm² for the outer com­ponent and 1.06 g/cm²for the inner component, i.e., a total of 2.21 g/cm² (4.51 lb./ft²).
  • Tests were also carried out in order to assess the condition of the flexible inner layer 14 of the outer or bullet trapping component 11 before its impact with the inner component 12 of the body armour. The outer component was secured lightly without any inner component, and in­stead the outer component was brought to rest by a light bag filled with shaving foam to a thickness of about 30 cm. This arrangement ensured negligible distortion other than that resulting from the bullet impact. The slug was found to be fully contained within the inner flexible layer 14 in all cases. It is believed that these tests verify the bead action previously described.
  • To be able to compare the test results of the present invention with the two alternatives described above, other samples of armour were made for testing with the invention. More specifically, the invention was tested using 3 mm. soda lime glass spheres for both layers of beads in the outer component and the test results of this sample are shown under A below. The same outer component was also tested but using the single layer of cloth, and in this case KEVLAR was used, between the two layers of beads. The results of this sample are shown under D below. The same type of outer component (A) was used but with a rigid aluminium plate backing (0.79 mm. thick), and the results obtained here are given under B below. A fourth sample had the same bead structure as (A) except that the beads were immersed in a resin, and the results for this sample are given under C below. In all samples the component was 5 cm. x 5 cm. (nominal) and the backing was 14 layers of KEVLAR cloth 14 cm. x 14 cm. in area supported on a 38 mm. thick fir wood. The bullet tests used 357 m/s, 10.26 g slug, 38 cal bullet against each of the components identified as A (the present invention), B (same component as A but with rigid backing), C (beads surrounded in plastic), D (the present invention and including cloth layer between layers of beads).
    Figure imgb0001
  • The high slug temperature for sample B is believed due to the deformation of the bullet during exit from the inner layer of the component. Nevertheless, the tests illustrated the superior function of the present inven­tion in containing the bullet and while dissipating the energy.
  • Various modifications to the illustrated embodiments of the invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit of the invention as defined in the accompanying claims.

Claims (10)

1. An armour component comprising:
two layers of flexible material,
at least two juxtaposed layers of beads tightly confined between said two layers of flexible material,
the beads in one layer being disposed in most compact relation with the beads of an adjacent layer whereby the beads of the adjacent layers internest in the inter-bead spaces of each other,
the volume occupied by the layers of beads being substantially void of all other material.
2. The armour of claim 1, wherein said at least two juxtaposed layers are hard beads disposed in a regular close-packed lattice pattern whereby each bead contacts each immediate neighbour bead in the pattern, said beads preferably being of spherical configuration, the beads possibly being of the same diameter in each layer or in adjacent layers and ideally being glass beads of from 3 to 5 mm. in diameter, the lattice patterns of the adjacent layers of the beads preferably being the same, such as a hexagonal close-packed pattern, or a square close-packed pattern.
3. The armour component of claim 1 or claim 2, wherein said flexible material is a high impact-resistant cloth, for example KEVLAR, said two layers of flexible material preferably provide outer and inner layers of the component, preferably each layer includes a plurality of juxtaposed sheets, and, for example, at least one sheet in each of said outer and inner layers is a high impact-resistant cloth, such as a foil of material having flexible, tough and elastic characteristics, providing at least one of the sheets of the inner layer, the sheets of said outer layer ideally each being formed of KEVLAR cloth, the sheets of the inner layer ideally including sheets of KEVLAR cloth at least some of which have LEXAN foil interleaved therebetween.
4. A body armour structure comprising:
an outer component for flattening and trapping a bullet,
said outer component including two layers of flexible material and at least two layers of hard beads tightly confined between said layers of flexible material; and
a separate inner backing component for spreading the impact of the bullet striking the outer component,
said inner component including at least two outer layers of flexible material and at least one layer of compressible material confined between the outer layers thereof.
5. The structure of claim 4, wherein the layer between the two outer layers of the inner component includes a light-weight, permanently deformable material, and preferably the layer between the two outer layers of the inner component includes a sheet material forming a plurality of closely spaced compartments between the layers of flexible material, and a plurality of fracturable beads, for example hollow plastic spheres, occupying said compartments.
6. The structure of claim 4 or claim 5, wherein said outer layers of the inner component provide an inner­most layer and an outermost layer each including at least one sheet of high impact-resistant cloth, for example KEVLAR, and the sheet material forming the compartments is of flexible, tough and elastic material, for example LEXAN foil, and ideally said compartments are a plurality of immediately adjacent domes having the tops thereof in contact with the outermost layer, each dome being filled with a plurality of compressible, low density particles.
7. The structure of any one of claims 4, 5 or 6, further including an intermediate layer including at least one sheet of high impact-resistant cloth and at least one sheet of flexible, tough and elastic material, and a first layer of semi-spherical domes forming said compartments and arranged in close-packed pattern with the basis thereof attached to said intermediate layer and the tops thereof contacting the outermost layer, each semi-spherical compartment containing a plurality of low-density, deformable particles, and the interstices of the domes between the outermost layer and the intermediate layer being vacant, and ideally further comprising a second layer of domes forming another layer of compartments between the innermost layer and the intermediate layer, the domes in the second layer having the same pattern of the domes in the first layer and being aligned therewith and having the basis thereof attached to the innermost layer and the tops thereof contacting the intermediate layer, and preferably the interstices of the domes between the innermost layer and the intermediate layer contain a plurality of low-density, deformable particles and the domes in said second layer are vacant, the sheet material forming the domes of both layers ideally having flexible, tough and plastic characteristics.
8. The structure of any one of claims 4 to 7, wherein the beads in each layer have substantially void interstices therebetween, preferably a thin flexible barrier for example of KEVLAR cloth is disposed the adjacent layers of beads, and the two layers of flexible material in said outer component may include sheets of high impact-resistant cloth.
9. The structure of any one of claims 4 to 8, wherein the beads in adjacent layers are of the same diameter and disposed in the same close-packed lattice pattern with the beads in the layers being in the most compact relation, whereby the beads of the adjacent layers internest in the inter-bead spaces of each other.
10. The structure of any one of claims 4 to 9, wherein the inner of the two layers of flexible material in said outer component includes a plurality of said sheets of high impact-resistant cloth with at least one sheet of a flexible, tough and elastic material interleaved between the sheets of high impact-resistant cloth, the two layers of flexible material in said outer component may be seamed together at regular intervals whereby said seamed layers are pulled tightly together to hold said beads in said battern. A thin layer of adhesive may be provided between at least one layer of beads and an immediately adjacent layer of flexible material for holding said at least one layer of beads in said pattern, said beads in the body armour structure may be threaded to retain said beads in said pattern, and may have a diameter of from 3 mm to 5 mm, and the body armour structure ideally further including at least one intermediate component having substantially the structure of the outer component.
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Also Published As

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US5110661A (en) 1992-05-05
US5087516A (en) 1992-02-11
EP0208499B1 (en) 1991-04-03
CA1233684A (en) 1988-03-08
DE3678501D1 (en) 1991-05-08
CA1233684A1 (en)
AT62342T (en) 1991-04-15
US5364679A (en) 1994-11-15

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