EP0167569B1 - Deoxygenation process and apparatus - Google Patents

Deoxygenation process and apparatus

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Publication number
EP0167569B1
EP0167569B1 EP19850900419 EP85900419A EP0167569B1 EP 0167569 B1 EP0167569 B1 EP 0167569B1 EP 19850900419 EP19850900419 EP 19850900419 EP 85900419 A EP85900419 A EP 85900419A EP 0167569 B1 EP0167569 B1 EP 0167569B1
Authority
EP
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
hydrazine
carbon
liquid
amount
oxygen
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
EP19850900419
Other languages
German (de)
French (fr)
Other versions
EP0167569A4 (en )
EP0167569A1 (en )
Inventor
Richard C. Dickerson
William S. Miller
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
GE Mobile Water Inc
Original Assignee
GE Mobile Water Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date
Family has litigation

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    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C02TREATMENT OF WATER, WASTE WATER, SEWAGE, OR SLUDGE
    • C02FTREATMENT OF WATER, WASTE WATER, SEWAGE, OR SLUDGE
    • C02F1/00Treatment of water, waste water, or sewage
    • C02F1/20Treatment of water, waste water, or sewage by degassing, i.e. liberation of dissolved gases
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01JCHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL PROCESSES, e.g. CATALYSIS OR COLLOID CHEMISTRY; THEIR RELEVANT APPARATUS
    • B01J47/00Ion-exchange processes in general; Apparatus therefor
    • B01J47/02Column or bed processes
    • B01J47/04Mixed-bed processes

Abstract

A deoxygenation process includes the steps of adding hydrazine to a liquid containing dissolved oxygen, passing the liquid through a bed of activated carbon to catalyze a reaction between the dissolved oxygen and hydrazine whereby carbon contaminants are added to the liquid, and removing the contaminants. In another embodiment, unreacted hydrazine that remains in the liquid following the catalysis is removed by passing the liquid through an ion exchange resin. In still another embodiment, an activated carbon-catalyzed deoxygenation process employing hydrazine is practiced on a mobile platform and the process further includes the steps of transporting the apparatus to a regenerating station for regeneration. The invention also includes apparatus for carrying out the process.

Description

    Background of the Invention 1) Field of the Invention
  • [0001]
    This invention pertains to a process for removing dissolved oxygen from liquids.
  • 2) Background of the Invention
  • [0002]
    Processes for the removal of dissolved oxygen from liquids have applications in many diverse fields. In a number of industries, including those of beverage making, electronics, aerospace, deep well injection, and power generation, water is used in great quantities and the presence of unsatisfactory levels of dissolved oxygen can present numerous problems, including inferior product quality and damaged process equipment. As one example, dissolved oxygen contained in hot water that is circulated through power generating equipment and the like is a major cause of corrosion. Because of the enormous costs of replacing corroded power generating equipment parts, unsatisfactory levels of dissolved oxygen cannot be tolerated.
  • [0003]
    In prior art deoxygenation processes, hydrazine has been used as a strong reducing agent to prevent corrosion and other problems associated with oxygenated water. A small amount of hydrazine is added to the water to react with the dissolved oxygen to form nitrogen and water. In the field of power generation, a small amount of hydrazine is also provided in the deoxygenated water as it circulates in the power generating equipment. The circulating hydrazine and water mixture is said to cause the formation of magnetite on metal surfaces of the equipment by the reaction of hydrazine with iron, and the magnetite in turn helps protect against corrosion. Hydrazine also reduces red iron oxide deposits that typically form in power generating equipment and impede heat transfer and cause tubes to rupture. The product of this reduction reaction is magnetite which will settle to the bottom of a water stream and which can thereby be effectively and economically removed from generating equipment.
  • [0004]
    It is known that the reaction of hydrazine with dissolved oxygen can be catalyzed by passing the hydrazine and water mixture through a bed of activated carbon. Such a catalyzed deoxygenation process is described in F. R. Houghton, et al."'The Use of Activated Carbon with Hydrazine in the Treatment of Boiler Feedwater", International Water Conference, Bournemouth, England (1957) on pages 54-58, wherein boiler feedwater containing between 5 and 7 parts per million of dissolved oxygen is dosed with hydrazine in an amount of from 30 to 70% over the stoichiometric amount necessary to react with the dissolved oxygen. The dosed water is subsequently passed through a bed of activated carbon and then fed directly into a boiler.
  • [0005]
    Despite the advantages that one skilled in the art might expect from the catalyzation of a deoxygenation reaction, the prior art teachings of activated carbon catalysis of hydrazine deoxygenation have been almost completely ignored by the art due to a number of disadvantageous inherent in the prior art processes.
  • [0006]
    A first disadvantage of the catalyzed deoxygenation processes of the prior art arises from the introduction of impurities, such as unreacted hydrazine and carbon contaminants, to the deoxygenated liquid. In the process of removing dissolved oxygen, the prior art system leave levels of unreacted hydrazine that cannot be tolerated when a liquid such as water is used in certain sophisticated equipment or for the production of refined products. Among other unsatisfactory effects, unreacted hydrazine can raise the conductivity of the pH of the deoxygenated water to unsatisfactory levels. The processes of the prior art also introduce carbon contaminants into the deoxygenated liquid in the presence of these contaminants likewise is intolerable when a deoxygenated liquid of high purity is required. In the field of power generation, for example, such impurities render the prior art processes useless in high pressure equipment and, as a result, the significant benefits of carbon-catalyzed water deoxygenation have been unavailable to the art.
  • [0007]
    Even when a certain amount of unreated hydrazine is desirable in the deoxygenated water for the purpose of inhibiting corrosion during circulation in power generating apparatus, the prior art processes are inadequate in that no provisions are made for effectively adjusting the amount of unreated hydrazine remaining after deoxygenation in order to provide the optimum amount of hydrazine in the circulating water. Thus, in selecting an optimum amount of hydrazine to be reacted during the deoxygenation stage, a residual amount of unreated hydrazine can result which will be either higher or lower than the optimum amount for the circulating stage. If the amount during the circulating stage is too low, the anti-corrosive effects of the hydrazine are lost, and if the amount during the circulating stage is too high, the pH and conductivity of the circulating water can be raised to unacceptable levels. Some prior art processes have attempted to remedy this defect when the residual amount of unreacted hydrazine is too low by simply providing a means for adding hydrazine before the circulating stage. However, this type of arrangement fails to remedy the defect when the amount is too high and, further, completely fails to allow the flexibility needed to enable one to use a different anti-corrosive agent than hydrazine in the circulating stage.
  • [0008]
    Still another shortcoming of the prior art is the failure to fully appreciate and address the hazards associated with hydrazine. Not only does hydrazine present a severe explosion hazard, especially when exposed -to heat or oxidizing materials, but it is also highly toxic by ingestion, inhalation, and even skin absorption, and is a strong irritant to skin and eyes. Unconfirmed reports link hydrazine to cancer. In the prior art, no special precautions have been suggested for the handling of hydrazine used in deoxygenation processes nor for the handling of material beds that contain hydrazine.
  • [0009]
    Thus, there is a long-felt and unresolved need for an improved carbon-catalyzed deoxygenation process employing hydrazine that can be used commercially in a variety of applications. Ideally, the process would secure for the art all of the advantages that catalyzation of a reaction normally provides without prohibiting its use due to all of the incumbent disadvantages discussed hereinabove. To the fulfillment of this need and to other objectives that will become apparent from the following, the present invention is directed.
  • Summary of the Invention
  • [0010]
    This invention is a deoxygenation process that includes essentially the steps as confirmed in claims 1, 16 and 17.
  • [0011]
    This invention also includes a deoxygenation apparatus for deoxygenating a liquid, comprising essentially the means defined in claim 18.
  • Brief Description of the Drawings
  • [0012]
    • Figure 1 is a schematic diagram depicting an apparatus in accordance with the invention.
    • Figure 2 is a schematic diagram depicting an apparatus in accordance with a second embodiment of the invention, wherein a bypass is provided around one or more vessels.
    • Figure 3 is a schematic diagram depicting an apparatus in accordance with a third embodiment of the invention, wherein the invention includes an enclosed, mobile platform.
    Description of the Preferred Embodiments
  • [0013]
    As depicted in Figure 1, the invention includes a conduit 12 that has an inlet 14 for receiving a stream of liquid containing dissolved oxygen and an outlet 16 for discharging liquid that has been deoxygenated. The conduit communicates with vessels 18 connected in parallel and containing activated carbon 20, so that liquid flowing through conduit 12 passes through the carbon as indicated by the arrows adjacent to the vessels. The conduit also communicates with vessels 22 that are connected in parallel and contain ion exchange resin 24, so that liquid flowing through the conduit also passes through the ion exchange resin. Before liquid passing through the conduit contacts the activated carbon, hydrazine 26 is pumped into the liquid from hydrazine tank 28 by means of hydrazine pump 30.
  • [0014]
    The liquid that is introduced into inlet 14 is demineralized or undemineralized and has a dissolved oxygen content of up to the saturation point of oxygen in the liquid for the prevailing temperature and pressure conditions. The liquid temperature can vary widely from just above the liquid's freezing point to a temperature that is just below the temperature at which the ion exchange resin would be damaged.
  • [0015]
    Hydrazine can be added through hydrazine pump 30 in a pure form or in an aqueous solution, but a solution is preferred in order to reduce or eliminate the explosion and fire hazards associated with concentrated hydrazine. Catalyzed or uncatalyzed hyrazine can be employed with beneficial results. Preferably, uncatalyzed hydrazine is used because of its lesser cost. Also, in the case of certain sophisticated power generating apparatus such as nuclear power generators, catalyzed hydrazine can cause residual catalysts such as cobalt to remain in the deoxygenated water and such catalysts can damage the generating apparatus. In a preferred embodiment, Scav-ox, a 35% aqueous solution of uncatalyzed hydrazine distributed by Olin Chemical Company, is used.
  • [0016]
    Hydrazine pump 30 is any conventional means for dispensing a measured amount of fluid. The interior surfaces of the pump, as well as conduits 32 and 34 which are contacted by the hydrazine solution, are selected from materials such as stainless steel that are not damaged by the strong reducing property of the hydrazine.
  • [0017]
    It is necessary only to use enough hydrazine to completely react with the dissolved oxygen contained in the liquid. It has been found, in the present invention, that hydrazine in an amount of only about 10 to 20% more than a stoichiometric amount is needed to completely react with the oxygen. By reducing the amount of hydrazine necessary to practice the invention, relative to prior art processes, a significant advantage is realized in that the cost of the hydrazine is reduced and less hydrazine needs to be handled so that the dangers associated therewith are reduced.
  • [0018]
    It is important that no processing apparatus that would eliminate the hydrazine is disposed between the point 36 at which hydrazine is added to conduit 12 and activated carbon beds 18. The mixture of hydrazine and liquid is passed through activated carbon 20 to catalyze the reaction between the dissolved oxygen and hydrazine. The activated carbon can be any commercially available activated carbon and in a preferred embodiment WV-G activated carbon distributed by Westvaco of Covington, Virginia is used.
  • [0019]
    As a result of the mixing of the liquid with hydrazine and the subsequent contact with the carbon beds, the deoxygenated liquid leaving vessels 18 typically contains an amount of unreacted hydrazine and carbon contaminants. The unreated hydrazine is present because an excess over the stoichiometric amount of hydrazine is beneficially reacted with the liquid, as indicated above. Also, because the dissolved oxygen content of the incoming liquid may vary, as when the liquid is water from a storage tank or utility source, the amount of unreacted hydrazine will vary when a fixed amount of hydrazine, unresponsive to the varying dissolved oxygen content, is added at point 36.
  • [0020]
    The carbon contaminants are present because the liquid washes them from the carbon bed as it passes through. The carbon contaminants can include a wide vareity of substances that are deterimental when a high quality deoxygenated liquid is required. Many carbonaceous raw materials, such as wood, coal, nutshells, and petroleum coke, are used for the manufacture of activated carbon and the contaminants vary depending upon the raw material used. Regardless of which raw material is used, the contaminants are likely also to include carbon fines.
  • [0021]
    When the end use of the deoxygenated liquid requires that the unreacted hydrazine be removed, ion exchange resin 24 is selected from the group consisting of mixed bed resin and cation resin. If a mixed bed resin is employed, it consists of any commercially available strong acid cation exchange resin, such as lonac C-249, and any commercially available strong base anion exchange resin, such as lonac ASB-1. The lonac resins are manufactured by Sybron Corporation of Birmingham, New Jersey. If a cation exchange resin alone is used, it is any commercially available strong acid cation exchange resin such as lonac C-249.
  • [0022]
    Ion exchange resin 24 typically does not filter out all of the carbon fines contained in the deoxygenated water. To effect their removal, filter 38 containing filter media 40 is disposed in communication with conduit 12 between vessels 22 and outlet 16. The size of the filter media particle is selected to prevent passage of the fines. In a preferred embodiment, at least some of the carbon fines are also removed by pre-washing the activated carbon. The activated carbon can be pre-washed with water that has not be demineralized, but the minerals of the water are typically absorbed by the carbon and can be released as contaminants when the deoxygenation process is practiced. Preferably, the pre-wash is undertaken with demineralized water to eliminate this problem.
  • [0023]
    From the foregoing, it will be appreciated that by selecting a mixed bed resin, both the unreacted hydrazine and certain of the carbon contaminants are removed. Thus, when the end use requires the removal of both hydrazine and contaminants, the use of a mixed bed resin is preferred. For similar reasons, another embodiment involves the use of a cation resin vessel and an anion resin vessel in a series of relationship and in communication with conduit 12 downstream of vessels 18.
  • [0024]
    In accordance with the invention depicted in Figure 1, both the unreacted hydrazine and carbon contaminants are economically and efficiently removed. Even in certain applications where a predetermined amount of unreacted hydrazine in the deoxygenated liquid is desirable, the complete removal of hydrazine in accordance with the present invention is beneficial because it is then possible to add the desired amount of hydrazine without the need for constantly monitoring the amount of residual hydrazine from the deoxygenation process and compensating therefore. In the field of power generation, the complete removal of hydrazine is also advantageous when it is desired to use an anti-corrosive agent for circulating through the generating apparatus that is different from hydrazine. Figure 2 depicts an embodiment which offers an alternative to first removing all of the unreated hydrazine and then adding back the desired amount. In this embodiment, hydrazine 42 is pumped by pump 44 into conduit 46 where it is mixed with water containing dissolved oxygen. The water and hydrazine are passed through vessels 48 which contain activated carbon 50, and the amount of hydrazine remaining in solution after leaving vessels 48 is measured by chemical analyzer 50. The analyzer regulates valve 52 such that, when the amount of unreacted hydrazine is greater than the amount ultimately desired in the effluent, the valve diverts at least a percentage of the water from bypass conduit 56 through ion exchange resin 54. The hydrazine in the percentage directed through resin 54, contrary to that in the percentage directed through conduit 56, is removed and by regulating the amounts of the two percentages, the amount of hydrazine remaining per unit volume of the effluent at point 58, where the two percentages are recombined, is efficiently and precisely regulated.
  • [0025]
    When the amount of unreacted hydrazine detected by analyzer 50 is less than the amount ultimately desired in the effluent, second hydrazine pump 60 can be energized by analyzer 50 to introduce a quantity of hydrazine 62 sufficient to arrive at the ultimately desired amount. However, the need for adding hydrazine is preferably eliminated by adding a sufficient amount of hydrazine 42 such that there will always be an amount detected by analyzer 50 that is equal to or greater than that ultimately desired.
  • [0026]
    The hazards of hydrazine have been noted above and certain of these hazards remain even where hydrazine is present in a dilute aqueous solution. For example, when a hydrazine solution is passed through an activated carbon bed and ion exchange resin beds, a residue of unreacted hydrazine can remain in the beds and handling of the beds can cause health hazards. When such handling is done by inexperienced persons at the site where the deoxygenated liquid is needed, the health hazards are multiplied.
  • [0027]
    In the embodiment depicted in Figure 3, the hazards associated with the use of hydrazine in a dexoygenation process have been reduced or eliminated. In this embodiment, apparatus for deoxygenating water is disposed on a mobile, enclosed platform 64.
  • [0028]
    The apparatus contained on the mobile platform is similar to that depicted in Figure 1. In Figure 3, the apparatus includes a conduit 68 for carrying water that initially contains dissolved oxygen. The conduit has an inlet 70 which is releasably attached to a water supply and an outlet 72 which is releasably connected to a power generating apparatus 74. After being introduced into the conduit, feed water passes to one end of the platform and hydrazine 76 is pumped into conduit 68 by pump 78. The water and hydrazine mixture is then passed through vessel 80 which contains activated carbon 82. Then, the water passes through vessels 84 which contain carbon exchange resin beds 86 and through vessels 88 which contain anion exchange resin beds 90 to remove any unreacted hydrazine and carbon impurities and to demineralize the feed water. The water is then passed through vessel 92 which contains a polisher 94. Adjacent to outlet 72, hydrazine 96 contained in a second hydrazine container 98 can be added to the feed water by means of hydrazine pump 100. Since no unreacted hydrazine remains in the feed water at the point at which pump 100 communicates with conduit 68, apparatus for measuring the unreated hydrazine content is unnecessary and an amount of hydrazine can be uniformly added which is optimum for use in the circulation stage. Filter 108 removes carbon fines that pass through the ion exchange resin beds.
  • [0029]
    Numerous advantages flow from the arrangement of the parts of the invention depicted in Figure 3. To being with, the mobile, enclosed platform 64 allows the structure embodying the hydrazine and related apparatus to be set apart from the main structure that houses the power generating apparatus. In this fashion, hazards associated with the hydrazine are minimized.
  • [0030]
    Another important feature of the embodiment depicted in Figure 3 is that platform 64 is mobile. Thus, after an amount of water has been deoxygenated and the activated carbon and resins need to be regenerated or replaced, the trailer can be transported to a regeneration station, where specialized equipment and employees can regenerate the apparatus with minimal risks. In this way, employees at the power generating plant or other site of the use avoid contact with hydrazine fumes and hydrazine deposits remaining in the activated carbon and other resins.
  • [0031]
    The following examples specifically illustrate the practice of the present invention. Suitable vessels, valves, conduits and accessory equipment for practicing the present invention are described in U.S. Patent No. 4,383,920, and said patent is hereby incorporated by reference.
  • 1) Example 1
  • [0032]
    In accordance with the present invention, oxygen is removed from a two-step demineralizer effluent containing about 8 to 10 parts per million of dissoled oxygen. The effluent is introduced at a rate of 6.9 to 34.1 liters per second, usually 31.5 liters per second, into an apparatus comprising a hydrazine pump, six activated carbon tanks connected in parallel, and six mixed bed tanks connected in parallel.
  • [0033]
    A 35% solution of hydrazine is added to the effluent at a ratio of 1.5 liters per hour of hydrazine solution per 6.3 liters per second of effluent. During the first 3.5 hours, the system yields a product having less than 0.1 ppm dissolved oxygen and the feed rate of the hydrazine solution is gradually reduced to 0.2 GPH per 100 GPM effluent. After 36 hours of successful performance at this feed rate, the rate is gradually reduced to 0.57 liters per hour of hydrazine solution. In this example it has been found that, on average, the introduction of about 8.9 ppm of hydrazine to the effluent is sufficient.
  • [0034]
    After introduction of the hydrazine solution, the effluent is then passed through the activated carbon tanks. Each tank contains a 1.7 cubic meter bed of activated carbon for a total of 10.2 cubic meters of carbon. The effluent is then passed through the mixed bed tanks, each of which contains 2.7 cubic meters of mixed bed resin for a total of 16.3 cubic meters.
  • [0035]
    The demineralized and deoxygenated product of Example 1 is found to contain less than 10 ppb dissolved oxygen and less than 1 ppb hydrazine. After a lengthy shutdown, dissolved oxygen content was found to be relatively high upon restart but this increased content was eliminated by temporarily increasing the feed rate of hydrazine.
  • 2) Example 2
  • [0036]
    In accordance with the present invention, oxygen is removed from either condensate or dimineralized makeup water containing from 0.5 ppb to 10 ppm dissolved oxygen and having a conductivity of 1 micromho. The influent is treated in an apparatus comprising a hydrazine pump, three activated carbon tanks connected in parallel, three mixed beds also connected in parallel, and a continuous oxygen monitor.
  • [0037]
    Influent is introduced into the apparatus at the rate of 8.2 to 29.6 liters per second. The oxygen level of the influent varies and is high (several ppm) when treating demineralized makeup water and low (less than 1 ppm) when treating condensate.
  • [0038]
    A 35% solution of hydrazine is pumped into the influent stream upon its introduction into the apparatus. The flow rate of hydrazine solution is 0.76 liters per hour per 6.3 liters per second of influent for the first 24 hours. Then, the flow rate is gradually diminished over the second 24 hour period to a minimum of 0.076 liters per hour per 6.3 liters per second of 1 ppm dissolved oxygen stream. The stoichiometric relationship is .064 liters per hour of hydrazine solution per 6.3 liters per second of an influent containing 1 ppm dissolved oxygen.
  • [0039]
    After hydrazine is introduced into the influent feed, the mixture is passed through the three activated carbon tanks. Each tank contains 1.7 cubic meters of activated carbon for a total of 5.1 cubic meters. The condensate is then passed through the three mixed beds, each of which contains 2.7 cubic meters of mixed bed resins for a total of 8.1 cubic meters. A continuous dissolved oxygen monitor measures the amount of dissolved oxygen in the treated effluent and the effluent is then transferred to a storage tank. The treated effluent is found to contain 2 to 19 ppb of dissolved oxygen. The conductivity of the influent, which is 6 micromhos following passage through the carbon tanks, is reduced to less than 1 micromho, typically 0.2 micromho, after passage through the mixed beds.
  • [0040]
    Having thus described the present invention in detail, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that modification and additions can be made which are within the scope of the invention.

Claims (22)

1. A deoxygenation process comprising a first step of contacting a liquid containing dissolved oxygen and hydrazine with a bed of activated carbon to catalyze a reaction between said dissolved oxygen and a portion of said hydrazine, resulting in a liquid containing an amount of dissolved carbon contaminants and an amount of unreacted hydrazine, and a second step of removing said contaminants and said unreated hydrazine that comprises passing said liquid through a strong acid cation exchange resin and a strong base anion exchange resin.
2. The process of claim 1, wherein said strong acid cation exchange resin and said strong base anion exchange resin form a mixed bed resin.
3. The process of claim 1 or 2, wherein said first step results in a liquid containing also an amount of undissolved carbon contaminants, and wherein said second step further comprises passing said liquid through a filter whereby said undissolved contaminants are filtered from said liquid.
4. The process of claim 3, wherein said resins act as said filter.
5. The process of any one of claims 1 to 4, further comprising a step of backwashing said activated carbon before said first step to reduce said amount of carbon contaminants.
6. The process of claim 5, wherein said backwashing step comprises backwashing with demineralized water.
7. The process of any one of claims 1 to 6, wherein said liquid is at a temperature ranging from just above the liquid's freezing point to just below the temperature at which said resins would be damaged.
8. The process of any one of claims 1 to 7, wherein said liquid is water.
9. The process of any one of claims 1 to 8, further comprising a step of circulating said deoxygenated water in a power generating apparatus after said second step, such that said contaminants and unreacted hydrazine are not circulated in said apparatus.
10. The process of any one of claims 1 to 9, wherein said hydrazine is uncatalyzed hydrazine.
11. The process of any one of claims 1 to 10, further comprising a step of adding said hydrazine to said liquid before said first step.
12. The process of claim 11, further comprising a step of demineralizing said liquid in a two-step demineralizer before said adding step.
13. The process of of any one of claims 1 to 12, further comprising the step of adding a predetermined amount of a corrosion-inhibiting substance to said liquid after said second step.
14. The process of claim 13, wherein said corrosion-inhibiting substance is hydrazine.
15. The process of any one of claims 1 to 14, further comprising a step of transporting an apparatus in which said first and second steps have been executed to a regeneration station, and a further step of regenerating said apparatus at said station.
16. A deoxygenation process comprising a first step of contacting a liquid containing dissolved oxygen and hdyrazine with a bed of activated carbon to catalyze a reaction between said dissolved oxygen and said hydrazine, resulting in a liquid containing an amount of dissolved activated carbon contaminants, and a second step of removing said dissolved contaminants by passing said liquid through a strong acid cation exchange resin and a strong base anion exchange resin.
17. A deoxygenation process comprising a first step of contacting a liquid containing dissolved oxygen and hydrazine with a bed of activated carbon to catalyze a reaction between said dissolved oxygen and a portion of said hydrazine, resulting in a liquid containing an amount of unreacted hydrazine, and a second step of removing said unreated hydrazine by passing said liquid through a strong acid cation exchange resin.
18. A deoxygenation apparatus for deoxygenating a liquid comprising a conduit for carrying said liquid, a hydrazine tank, a pump adapted to pump a measured amount of hydrazine from said tank to said conduit, a bed of activated carbon in communication with said conduit downstream of said pump, said bed of activated carbon being adapted to catalyze a reaction between said hydrazine and said dissolved oxygen, and a means for removing dissolved carbon contaminants and unreacted hydrazine from said liquid, said means for removing comprising a strong acid cation exchange resin and a strong base anion exchange resin and being in communication with said conduit downstream of said activated carbon bed.
19. The apparatus of claim 18, wherein said cation resin and said anion resin are in the form of a mixed bed resin.
20. The apparatus of claim 18, further comprising a filter for removing undissolved carbon contaminants.
21. The apparatus of claim 18, further comprising a mobile platform upon which is disposed at least said bed of activated carbon and said ion exchange resins.
22. The apparatus of claim 21, further comprising a filter for removing undissolved carbon contaminants, said filter being disposed on said mobile platform.
EP19850900419 1983-12-16 1984-12-11 Deoxygenation process and apparatus Expired - Lifetime EP0167569B1 (en)

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US06562001 US4556492A (en) 1983-12-16 1983-12-16 Deoxygenation process
US562001 1983-12-16

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EP0167569A1 true EP0167569A1 (en) 1986-01-15
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WO1985002605A1 (en) 1985-06-20 application
CA1248645A1 (en) grant
DK365285A (en) 1985-08-12 application
DK365285D0 (en) 1985-08-12 grant
EP0167569A4 (en) 1987-04-10 application
DK162936B (en) 1991-12-30 grant
DE3481605D1 (en) 1990-04-19 grant
FI89258B (en) 1993-05-31 application
JP5002399B (en) grant
FI853154A0 (en) 1985-08-16 application
JPH0502399B2 (en) 1993-01-12 grant
FI853154L (en) 1985-08-16 grant
EP0167569A1 (en) 1986-01-15 application
CA1248645A (en) 1989-01-10 grant
DK162936C (en) 1992-05-25 grant
US4556492A (en) 1985-12-03 grant
FI853154D0 (en) grant
JPS61500713A (en) 1986-04-17 application
FI89258C (en) 1993-09-10 grant
FI853154A (en) application

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