EP0050751B1 - Optical arrangement for an infrared intrusion detector - Google Patents

Optical arrangement for an infrared intrusion detector Download PDF

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Publication number
EP0050751B1
EP0050751B1 EP81107844A EP81107844A EP0050751B1 EP 0050751 B1 EP0050751 B1 EP 0050751B1 EP 81107844 A EP81107844 A EP 81107844A EP 81107844 A EP81107844 A EP 81107844A EP 0050751 B1 EP0050751 B1 EP 0050751B1
Authority
EP
European Patent Office
Prior art keywords
optical arrangement
reflectors
radiation
characterized
sensor element
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired
Application number
EP81107844A
Other languages
German (de)
French (fr)
Other versions
EP0050751A1 (en
Inventor
Peter Wägli
Alois Zetting
Gustav Pfister
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Cerberus AG
Original Assignee
Cerberus AG
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Filing date
Publication date
Priority to CH7925/80 priority Critical
Priority to CH7925/80A priority patent/CH650604A5/en
Application filed by Cerberus AG filed Critical Cerberus AG
Publication of EP0050751A1 publication Critical patent/EP0050751A1/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of EP0050751B1 publication Critical patent/EP0050751B1/en
Expired legal-status Critical Current

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    • GPHYSICS
    • G08SIGNALLING
    • G08BSIGNALLING OR CALLING SYSTEMS; ORDER TELEGRAPHS; ALARM SYSTEMS
    • G08B13/00Burglar, theft or intruder alarms
    • G08B13/18Actuation by interference with heat, light or radiation of shorter wavelength; Actuation by intruding sources of heat, light or radiation of shorter wavelength
    • G08B13/189Actuation by interference with heat, light or radiation of shorter wavelength; Actuation by intruding sources of heat, light or radiation of shorter wavelength using passive radiation detection systems
    • G08B13/19Actuation by interference with heat, light or radiation of shorter wavelength; Actuation by intruding sources of heat, light or radiation of shorter wavelength using passive radiation detection systems using infra-red radiation detection systems
    • G08B13/193Actuation by interference with heat, light or radiation of shorter wavelength; Actuation by intruding sources of heat, light or radiation of shorter wavelength using passive radiation detection systems using infra-red radiation detection systems using focusing means
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S250/00Radiant energy
    • Y10S250/01Passive intrusion detectors

Description

  • The invention relates to an optical arrangement for an infrared intrusion detector.
  • Such arrangements pick up the infrared radiation emanating from a person in the monitored area and direct it to a sensor element. If the monitored area is divided into several separate reception areas with dark fields in between, each movement of a person causes a modulation of the infrared radiation received by the sensor element, which can be evaluated by means of a known upgrading circuit to indicate an intruder and to give an alarm signal.
  • To create the required separate reception areas, it is known, for example from US Pat. No. 3,703,718, US Pat. No. 4,058,726 or US Pat. No. 4,081,680, to provide a plurality of reflectors which are oriented in different directions and which focus the radiation arriving from different reception areas onto the same sensor element. Each reflector is assigned to a different reception area and only bundles radiation from this reception area onto the sensor element. The disadvantage here is that the entire reception area is divided into many small segments. Therefore, only a small amount of radiation is picked up from the individual reception areas, so that the sensitivity of such infrared intrusion detectors is often inadequate, especially if many reception areas are provided.
  • This disadvantage can be avoided with the arrangements described in US Pat. No. 3,760,399, US Pat. No. 3,829,693 or US Pat. No. 3958118, in which a single reflector is provided for all reception areas and the division into the individual areas takes place by means of a plurality of sensor elements arranged next to one another. This means that a common, relatively large reflector surface is available for all reception areas, but the many sensor elements require a complicated and fault-prone circuit, and the number of possible sensor elements and thus the reception areas is also greatly restricted.
  • Arrangements are already known from GB-A 2 012 045 and EP-A 0 014 825 in which the infrared radiation is focused on a common sensor element by multiple reflections. In this case, however, the first reflection again takes place at individual mirror segments, each of which is assigned to a different reception area. Such arrangements therefore also have the disadvantage that only a small amount of radiation is picked up from the individual reception areas and the sensitivity is therefore often inadequate. In order to achieve good sensitivity, it was therefore necessary to use relatively large mirror segments in such known infrared intrusion detectors, so that the dimensions of such detectors had to be selected to be relatively large, so that an inconspicuous attachment, as is often desired and desirable in intrusion protection devices is required was hardly possible.
  • US-A-4 052 616 shows an arrangement with a hemispherical reflector or a Fresnel lens for all reception areas and light guides which give the infrared radiation to a sensor. The number of light guides is limited by the size of the sensor surface, so that the amount of radiation incident on the sensor is insufficient. Furthermore, the attachment of the ends of the light guides on the focal surface and on the sensor surface is difficult.
  • US-A-3 702 937 describes a motion detector which, instead of reflectors, uses a lens arrangement which divides the image of the monitored area into two parts and places them on two photocells which are integrated in a bridge circuit. If the monitored area is illuminated differently, the electrical bridge circuit is imbalanced and an alarm is generated. The amount of radiation reaching a photocell is low.
  • The object of the invention is to eliminate the essential disadvantage of the prior art, which, despite the different lens and reflector arrangement, is the low absorption of the radiation amount, in order to increase the sensitivity of the intrusion detector. In addition, the intrusion detector should have small spatial dimensions so that it can be attached inconspicuously at its place of use. Another purpose of the invention is the simple construction of the optical arrangement.
  • The object of the invention is achieved by the features of patent claim 1.
  • The invention is described on the basis of the exemplary embodiments shown in the figures.
    • Figure 1 shows a first optical arrangement with a centrally attached sensor element.
    • Figure 2 shows a second optical arrangement with a peripherally attached sensor element.
    • FIG. 3 shows a further optical arrangement with a peripherally attached sensor element.
    • FIG. 4 shows an infrared intrusion detector with a linear reflector arrangement.
  • In the optical arrangement shown in FIG. 1, a collecting lens 1 is provided as the first focusing means, which is designed as a Fresnel lens.
  • Such stepped lenses can be easily produced from a suitable transparent material by pressing or casting. It is particularly expedient to choose a material, for example a suitable plastic material which is preferably transparent in the region of long-wave infrared radiation, for example polyethylene, or As 2 S 3 , Se, or As / Se glasses, these glasses also can be evaporated as a filter on the polyethylene lens.
  • A plurality of individual reflectors 2, 3,... 6 are arranged behind this Fresnel lens in the direction of irradiation. These reflectors can be concave or convex spherical, paraboloid or ellipsoid segments or be designed as a plane mirror inclined to one another. A detector element 7 is provided in the center of the Fresnel lens 1, the sensitivity of which is matched to the infrared radiation to be received, for example lithium tantalate (LiTaO a ). Polyvinyl difluoride (PVF 2 ), lead zirconate titanate (PZT) or another suitable pyroelectric sensor.
  • The focal length of the Fresnel lens 1, the curvature, the alignment and the spacing of the reflectors 2, 3,... 6 can be chosen so that the infrared radiation arriving from certain desired directions is imaged as well as possible. The individual reception areas become reception directions with a relatively small opening angle, which depends on the accuracy of the optical components and their adjustment, as well as on the dimensions of the sensor element. If a different shape of reception areas is desired, for example a rectangular or strip shape, the reflectors can be aspherical.
  • With the optical arrangement described it is achieved that incident infrared radiation from the first focusing means, i.e. is recorded by the Fresnel lens 1 with its full area and is only then fed to the individual mirror segments assigned to the different reception areas. Each mirror segment 2, 3,... 6 receives radiation from the full surface of the Fresnel lens 1 and then bundles this radiation onto the sensor element 7. Thus, the greatest possible amount of incident infrared radiation is detected and detected. The sensitivity of an infrared intrusion detector equipped with such an arrangement is therefore considerably increased. The dimensions of the reflectors do not play a decisive role, so that small device dimensions are possible even with a large number of reception areas.
  • Figure 2 shows a similar arrangement, which differs from the first embodiment in that the sensor element 7 peripherally, i. H. is arranged on the edge of the Fresnel lens 1. The entire opening of the Fresnel lens is thus available for receiving infrared radiation and there are no losses through the sensor element. In this example, it is expedient to design the reflectors 2 and 4 to be only slightly curved or flat in order to keep imaging errors due to oblique radiation incidence as small as possible.
  • FIG. 3 shows an infrared intrusion detector with a housing 10 which has a front plate 11 and a rear side 12. The front plate 11 carries a Fresnel lens 1 and below this a sensor element 7 on the edge, which is connected to an integrated evaluation circuit 8, which can be designed, for example, in accordance with US Pat. No. 4,179,691 or US Pat. No. 4,166,955. The output signal of this evaluation circuit 8 is taken from the output terminals 9. The rear side 12 carries a facet mirror 13, the individual facets of which correspond to the reflector 2, 3,... 6. The formation and alignment of the individual facets is such that, in cooperation with the Fresnel lens 1, a bundle of many reception directions or areas with a small opening angle is created.
  • In the expedient development, instead of a single sensor element, a plurality of sensor elements (7, 7 ', 7 ") arranged next to one another can be provided. Each element receives radiation from a plurality of reception areas. The number of possible reception areas can thus be multiplied according to the number of sensor elements , with no significant loss in intensity or sensitivity, since each sensor element receives a large part of the radiation from the common bundling means. It can be expedient to use a "sensor array" as sensor element, in which the individual elements are arranged in a line next to one another. The individual reception areas are each split into a bundle of several reception areas lying on one level, making it easy to create a number of radiation curtains to be passed by an intruder.
  • FIG. 4 shows a particularly flat embodiment of an infrared intrusion detector, in which the entire front side 11 is occupied by a segment of a Fresnel lens 1, in the center of which the sensor element 7 is attached. Individual reflectors 2, 3,... 6 are provided in a row on the rear side 12. The evaluation circuit 8 is attached to the base plate 14. With this arrangement, a fan of reception areas lying on one level or a protective curtain can be formed. Thanks to its flat design, the detector can be arranged inconspicuously in a narrow gap, the front surface 11 being optimally used for receiving infrared radiation from the reception areas.
  • In an advantageous development, one or more prisms can be provided in front of or behind parts of the converging lens 1, through which the individual reception beams can each be split into a plurality of beams. As a result, the number of radiation receiving areas can be multiplied if a certain intensity weakening of the individual areas can be accepted.
  • In the infrared intrusion detector shown in FIG. 4, prisms 15, 15 'can be arranged in front of both sides of the Fresnel lens, for example. These have the effect that the radiation impinging on the prisms is deflected by a certain angle, while the radiation impinging directly on the lens remains unaffected. Each reception area is therefore split into three separate areas.
  • The prism element can also be combined with and integrated into the converging lens in that it is designed as a multi-zone lens with zones of different optical axes. In Figure 4, for example, the sides of the Fresnel lens 1 has on its front or back the shape of wedges 16, 16 'which replace the prisms 15, 15' and show the same optical effect. Such an optical element is particularly easy to manufacture and requires no special adjustment.
  • Despite its flat, inconspicuous shape and small dimensions, the infrared intrusion detector shown has an optimal sensitivity and, moreover, has a particularly simple and interference-free construction. It is particularly suitable for applications where an infrared protective curtain with closely spaced reception areas is desired.

Claims (5)

1. Optical arrangement for an infrared intrusion detector comprising
- a Fresnel lense (1) for focussing infrared radiation impinged from different regions of a surveillance area in different directions onto said lense into different regions being correlated to said regions,
- at least one sensor element (7; 7, 7'; 7") being sensible for infrared radiation,
- a plurality of radiation conducting elements (2-6; 13) being arranged rearwardly of said Fresnel lense for conducting the infrared radiation received from predetermined regions of the surveillance area being separated from each other onto each of the sensor elements, characterized in that
- the radiation conducting elements consist of reflectors (2-6; 13) and
- that each of the sensor elements (7; 7', 7") is formed by a pyroelectrical sensor element being arranged in the plane of the Fresnel lense (1).
2. Optical arrangement according to claim 1, characterized in that said reflectors (2-6) are structured as spherical mirror-segments.
3. Optical arrangement according to claim 1, characterized in that said reflectors (2-6) are structured as planar mirrors which are inclined relative to one another.
4. Optical arrangement according to claim 1, characterized in that said reflectors are combined to a faceted mirror (13).
5. Optical arrangement according to claim 1, characterized in that said reflectors (2-6) are arranged in a row adjacent to one another.
EP81107844A 1980-10-24 1981-10-02 Optical arrangement for an infrared intrusion detector Expired EP0050751B1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
CH7925/80 1980-10-24
CH7925/80A CH650604A5 (en) 1980-10-24 1980-10-24 Optical arrangement for an infrared burglar detector.

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
AT81107844T AT24786T (en) 1980-10-24 1981-10-02 Optical arrangement for an infrared burglar detector.

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
EP0050751A1 EP0050751A1 (en) 1982-05-05
EP0050751B1 true EP0050751B1 (en) 1987-01-07

Family

ID=4332472

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
EP81107844A Expired EP0050751B1 (en) 1980-10-24 1981-10-02 Optical arrangement for an infrared intrusion detector

Country Status (7)

Country Link
US (1) US4429224A (en)
EP (1) EP0050751B1 (en)
JP (1) JPS5797481A (en)
AT (1) AT24786T (en)
AU (1) AU542797B2 (en)
CH (1) CH650604A5 (en)
DE (1) DE3175818D1 (en)

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JPH0221755B2 (en) * 1983-08-26 1990-05-16 Matsushita Electric Works Ltd
EP0167883B1 (en) * 1984-06-29 1988-03-30 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft X-ray diagnostic apparatus with a regulating device for the x-ray tube high voltage supply
GB2165639B (en) * 1984-08-24 1988-01-27 Philips Electronic Associated Pyroelectric infra-red detector
JPS61126433A (en) * 1984-11-22 1986-06-13 Matsushita Electric Works Ltd Heat ray detector
US4644164A (en) * 1985-01-04 1987-02-17 Cerberus Ag Compact passive infrared intrusion sensor
EP0218055B1 (en) * 1985-09-02 1989-11-08 Heimann GmbH Infrared movement detector
JPH0613514Y2 (en) * 1985-12-23 1994-04-06 松下電工株式会社 Heat ray detector
US4757204A (en) * 1986-01-28 1988-07-12 Cerberus Ag Ceiling mounted passive infrared intrusion detector with dome shaped lens
GB2198842B (en) * 1986-12-19 1991-01-02 Philips Electronic Associated Movement sensing infra-red system
US4841284A (en) * 1987-10-19 1989-06-20 C & K Systems, Inc. Infrared intrusion detection system incorporating a fresnel lens and a mirror
GB2213927A (en) * 1987-12-18 1989-08-23 Philips Electronic Associated Pyroelectric infrared sensors
US4939359A (en) * 1988-06-17 1990-07-03 Pittway Corporation Intrusion detection system with zone location
DE9314604U1 (en) * 1993-09-27 1993-12-09 Siemens Ag Infrared motion detector
US5414255A (en) * 1993-11-08 1995-05-09 Scantronic Limited Intrusion detector having a generally planar fresnel lens provided on a planar mirror surface
US5442178A (en) * 1994-03-18 1995-08-15 Hubbell Incorporated Cross-over field-of-view composite Fresnel lens for an infrared detection system
IL112396A (en) * 1995-01-19 1999-05-09 Holo Or Ltd Intrusion detector
US5626417A (en) * 1996-04-16 1997-05-06 Heath Company Motion detector assembly for use with a decorative coach lamp
US5929445A (en) 1996-09-13 1999-07-27 Electro-Optic Technologies, Llc Passive infrared detector
US6037594A (en) * 1998-03-05 2000-03-14 Fresnel Technologies, Inc. Motion detector with non-diverging insensitive zones
US6690018B1 (en) 1998-10-30 2004-02-10 Electro-Optic Technologies, Llc Motion detectors and occupancy sensors with improved sensitivity, angular resolution and range
US6756595B2 (en) 2000-09-11 2004-06-29 Electro-Optic Technologies, Llc Effective quad-detector occupancy sensors and motion detectors
US7187505B2 (en) * 2002-10-07 2007-03-06 Fresnel Technologies, Inc. Imaging lens for infrared cameras
JP4250696B2 (en) * 2002-11-18 2009-04-08 オプテックス株式会社 Sensor
US8138478B2 (en) * 2005-03-21 2012-03-20 Visonic Ltd. Passive infra-red detectors
DE102005046019A1 (en) * 2005-09-26 2007-04-05 Hella Kgaa Hueck & Co. Monitoring device for the interior of a motor vehicle
US8211871B2 (en) 2005-10-31 2012-07-03 Coloplast A/S Topical skin barriers and methods of evaluation thereof
WO2008012805A2 (en) * 2006-07-27 2008-01-31 Visonic Ltd Passive infrared detectors
WO2013072916A1 (en) 2011-11-16 2013-05-23 Visonic Ltd. Motion detection systems and methodologies
US9123222B2 (en) 2012-03-15 2015-09-01 Ninve Jr. Inc. Apparatus and method for detecting tampering with an infra-red motion sensor
JP6508448B2 (en) * 2014-03-17 2019-05-08 株式会社リコー Detector, sensing device and control system

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US4179691A (en) * 1976-11-15 1979-12-18 Cerberus Ag Infrared intrusion detector circuit
EP0014825A2 (en) * 1979-02-07 1980-09-03 Heimann GmbH Optical apparatus for passive infrared movement detector

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US3703718B1 (en) * 1971-01-07 1982-04-13
US3760399A (en) * 1971-12-20 1973-09-18 Barnes Eng Co Intrusion detector
US3829693A (en) * 1973-10-03 1974-08-13 Barnes Eng Co Dual field of view intrusion detector
US4081680A (en) * 1976-06-21 1978-03-28 Cerberus Ag Infrared radiation-burglary detector
US4179691A (en) * 1976-11-15 1979-12-18 Cerberus Ag Infrared intrusion detector circuit
US4166955A (en) * 1977-06-24 1979-09-04 Cerberus Ag Radiation detector and method of operating the same
GB2012045A (en) * 1977-12-22 1979-07-18 Carbocraft Ltd Infrared surveillance systems
EP0014825A2 (en) * 1979-02-07 1980-09-03 Heimann GmbH Optical apparatus for passive infrared movement detector

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
JPS5797481A (en) 1982-06-17
AT24786T (en) 1987-01-15
AU7669481A (en) 1982-04-29
DE3175818D1 (en) 1987-02-12
EP0050751A1 (en) 1982-05-05
US4429224A (en) 1984-01-31
AU542797B2 (en) 1985-03-14
CH650604A5 (en) 1985-07-31

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