EA000244B1 - The cigarette and the heater for use in an electrical smoking system - Google Patents

The cigarette and the heater for use in an electrical smoking system Download PDF

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Publication number
EA000244B1
EA000244B1 EA199700332A EA199700332A EA000244B1 EA 000244 B1 EA000244 B1 EA 000244B1 EA 199700332 A EA199700332 A EA 199700332A EA 199700332 A EA199700332 A EA 199700332A EA 000244 B1 EA000244 B1 EA 000244B1
Authority
EA
Eurasian Patent Office
Prior art keywords
tobacco
cigarette
heater
characterized
tubular
Prior art date
Application number
EA199700332A
Other languages
Russian (ru)
Other versions
EA199700332A1 (en
Inventor
Джеймс Д. мл. Бэджит
Дэвид А. Кларк
Мэри Эллен Каунтс
Патрик С. Каулинг
Вилли Дж. мл. Хаук
Майкл А. Мур
Весли Дж. Сандерсон
Ричард Дж. Уль
Майкл Л. Ваткинс
Сьюзн Е. Ренн
Грир С. Флейшхауэр
Патрик Х. Хэйес
Констанс Х. Морган
Мохаммад Р. Хаджалигол
Вальтер А. Николс
Дэвид Е. Шарп
Original Assignee
Филип Моррис Продактс Инк.
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US08/425,166 priority Critical patent/US5692525A/en
Priority to US08/425,837 priority patent/US5499636A/en
Priority to US08/426,165 priority patent/US5591368A/en
Application filed by Филип Моррис Продактс Инк. filed Critical Филип Моррис Продактс Инк.
Priority to PCT/US1996/005417 priority patent/WO1996032854A2/en
Publication of EA199700332A1 publication Critical patent/EA199700332A1/en
Publication of EA000244B1 publication Critical patent/EA000244B1/en

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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A24TOBACCO; CIGARS; CIGARETTES; SMOKERS' REQUISITES
    • A24FSMOKERS' REQUISITES; MATCH BOXES
    • A24F47/00Smokers' requisites not provided for elsewhere, e.g. devices to assist in stopping or limiting smoking
    • A24F47/002Simulated smoking devices, e.g. imitation cigarettes
    • A24F47/004Simulated smoking devices, e.g. imitation cigarettes with heating means, e.g. carbon fuel
    • A24F47/008Simulated smoking devices, e.g. imitation cigarettes with heating means, e.g. carbon fuel with electrical heating means

Abstract

1. A cigarette (23) comprising a tobacco rod, said tobacco rod (60) comprising a tubular tobacco web (66) and a plug of tobacco (80) disposed within said tubular tobacco web, said tobacco rod having a free end (78) and an opposite end (72), said tubular tobacco web comprising a base web (68) and a layer (70) of tobacco flavour material supported by said base web, said base web adapted to transfer heat from an electrical heating element (37) to said tobacco flavour material, said tobacco rod (60) adapted to operatively receive an electrical heating element (37) alongside said tobacco rod (60) at a location between said free end (78) and said opposite end (72), said plug of tobacco (80) located adjacent said free end, said plug of tobacco being spaced apart from said opposite end so as to define an unfilled space (91) between said plug of tobacco and said opposite end. 2. The cigarette as claimed in Claim 1, wherein said location alongside said tobacco rod is such that said location overlaps at least a portion of said unfilled space (91) and overlaps at least a portion of said plug of tobacco (80). 3. The cigarette as claimed in Claim 1 or 2, wherein said tobacco rod includes a free-flow filter (74) adjacent said opposite end, said free-flow filter being spaced apart from said plug of tobacco (80) so as to define said unfilled space (91) between said free-flow filter and said plug of tobacco. 4. A cigarette and lighter adapted to cooperate as an electrical smoking system, said cigarette comprising a tube of tobacco web, partially filled with cut filler tobacco so as to define a filled tobacco rod portion and an unfilled tobacco rod portion (91), said cigarette (23) and said lighter (25) being mutually arranged so that an electrical heater element of the lighter at least partially superposes at least one of the filled and unfilled tobacco rod portions when the cigarette is in an operative position in said lighter. 5. The cigarette as claimed in Claim 4, wherein said filled tobacco rod portion includes a plug of tobacco, and said electrical heater superposes at lease a portion of said unfilled space and superposes at least a portion of said plug of tobacco when the cigarette is in said operative position in the lighter. 6. The cigarette as claimed in Claim 4 or 5, wherein said cigarette has a free end, said tobacco plug being located adjacent said free end, said cigarette including a tubular element spaced apart from said plug of tobacco so as to define said unfilled tobacco rod portion between said free-flow filter and said plug of tobacco. 7. The cigarette as claimed in any preceding Claim, wherein said tubular element (74) is a filter. 8. The cigarette as claimed in Claim 7, wherein said tubular element (74) is constructed from a plasticized tow material. 9. The cigarette as claimed in Claim 7, wherein said free-flow filter (74) is constructed from a molded material. 10. The cigarette as claimed in any preceding Claim, further comprising filter tipping (62) adjacent said opposite end. 11. The cigarette as claimed in Claim 10, wherein said tipping (62) comprises a second free-flow filter (102) adjacent said opposite end, said cigarette further comprising tipping paper (64) attaching said second free-flow filter (102) to said opposite end. 12. The cigarette as claimed in Claim 11, wherein said tipping further comprises a mouthpiece filter plug (104) adjacent said second free-flow filter (102). 13. The cigarette as claimed in Claim 12, wherein said free flow filter (74) of said tobacco rod (66) includes a first passage (75) and said second free-flow filter (102) of said tipping includes a second passage, said first and second passages communicating said unfilled space (91) of said tobacco rod with said mouthpiece filter plug (104), said second passage having a second inside radius greater than a first inside radius of said first passage (75). 14. The cigarette as claimed in Claim 12, wherein said tobacco rod further comprises a backflow filter (200") at said free end. 15. The cigarette as claimed in Claim 12, wherein said plug of tobacco (80b) includes a first portion (320b) adjacent said free end (78b) which has a higher density than a second portion (3l0b) of said plug of tobacco distal from said free end. 16. A cigarette (23) comprising a tobacco rod (60) having a back-flow resistive free end (78) and an opposite end (72), said tobacco rod comprising a tubular tobacco (66) web including a layer of tobacco material (78) a flow constriction (74) operative at said opposite end of said tubular web and tobacco (78, 80) operatively situated adjacent said free end and spaced from said flow constriction, the tobacco comprising cut filler partially filling said tobacco rod so as to define a filled tobacco rod portion and an unfilled tobacco rod portion, said unfilled portion being located adjacent said flow constriction, said tubular web arranged to communicate heat received by said tubular web to said tobacco, said tobacco rod (60) being arranged such that during a puff on said cigarette with an application of heat along a region of said tubular web, at least a portion of the tobacco is caused to release tobacco aerosol which is drawn through said flow constriction. 17. The cigarette as claimed in Claim 16, wherein said flow constriction (74) is defined by a tubular element. 18. The cigarette as claimed in Claim 17, wherein said tubular element comprises a first free-flow filter (74), said first free flow filter defining a first passage (75) therethrough. said cigarette further comprising tipping (62), said tipping including a second tubular free-flow filter (102) located adjacent said first free-flow filter of said tobacco rod, said second tubular free-flow filter defining a second passage therethrough, said first passage of said first free-flow filter being narrower than said unfilled portion (91) of said tobacco rod and narrower than said second passage of said second free-flow filter (102). 19. The cigarette as claimed in Claim 18, wherein said cut filler tobacco forms a back-flow resistive plug. 20. The cigarette as claimed in Claim 19, wherein said portion of said cut filler tobacco (80) is located at said free end (78) and has a density greater than a remainder of said cut filler tobacco distal from said free end. 21. The cigarette as claimed in Claim 20, wherein said tipping (62) further comprises a mouthpiece filter (104) adjacent said second free-flow filter (102). 22. The cigarette as claimed in Claim 20, wherein said tubular web includes a cigarette wrapper (71) about said tobacco rod (60), said tipping attached to said tobacco rod with a tipping paper (64). 23. The cigarette as claimed in any preceding Claim, wherein said tobacco or plug of tobacco (80) comprises a cut filler tobacco. 24. The cigarette as claimed in Claim 23, wherein said tobacco or plug of tobacco (80) comprises a blend of cut filler tobacco, said blend comprising a combination of at least two of Bright, Burley and oriental tobaccos. 25. The cigarette as claimed in Claim 23 or 24, wherein said plug of tobacco includes a plug wrap (84) disposed about said cut filler tobacco (80). 26. The cigarette as claimed in Claim 23 or 24, wherein said tobacco (70) is located along an inside surface of said tubular tobacco web (66). 27. The cigarette as claimed in Claim 26, wherein said tobacco rod comprises an overwrap (71) disposed about an outside surface of said tubular tobacco rod or rod portion. 28. A method of improving delivery of smoke from a cigarette (23) operated with an electronic lighter, said cigarette comprising a tubular web (66) having a free end (78), and an opposite end (72), smoke being withdrawable from said opposite end, said method comprising the steps of establishing an unfilled portion along said tubular web at a location adjacent said opposite end and a tobacco filled portion along said tubular web at a location adjacent said free end; and superposing an electrical heater element of said electronic lighter at least partially over said filled portion of said tubular web while activating said electrical heater element so as to cause release of smoke constituents from said tobacco. 29. The method of Claim 28, wherein said superposing step includes superposing said electrical heater element partially over both said filled portion of said tubular web and said unfilled portion of said tubular web while activating said electrical heater element. 30. The method of Claim 28 or 29 further comprising the step of passing said released tobacco constituents through a construction located adjacent said opposite end. 31. A tobacco web adapted to be rolled into a tubular tobacco rod (60) of a cigarette (23) operative with an electrical cigarette lighter (25), said tobacco web comprising a base web (68) and a tobacco material (70) disposed along a first side of said base web; said base web comprising a combination of tobacco fiber and cellulosic fiber, said tobacco fiber and said cellulosic fiber combined at a ratio in the range of approximately 2:1 to 4:1, said base web having a basis weight in a range of approximately 35 to 45 g/m<2>; said tobacco material having at least twice the basis weight of said base web, said tobacco material comprising finely ground tobacco and extracted tobacco solids at a ratio in a range of approximately 3:1 to 9:1, and a humectant at a level of approximately 5% to 20% by weight of said material. 32. The tobacco web as claimed in Claim 31, wherein said tobacco material has a basis weight of approximately three to four times that of said base web. 33. The tobacco web as claimed in Claim 31 or 32, wherein said tobacco material further comprises pectin at a level of up to approximately 2% by weight of said tobacco material. 34. The tobacco web as claimed in Claim 33, wherein said base web comprises approximately 28 g/m<2> tobacco fiber and approximately 12 g/m<2> cellulosic fiber of a wood pulp or flax pulp, or tob

Description

The present invention relates generally to electric smoking systems and, in particular, cigarettes adapted to interact with electric lighters of electric smoking systems, and a heater intended for use in electric smoking systems.

Traditional cigarettes deliver the taste and aroma to the smoker as a result of burning, during which most of the combustible material, mainly tobacco, burns at temperatures that often exceed 800 ° C during puffing. Heat is drawn in through the adjoining mass of tobacco by inhaling through the mouthpiece. During heating, the inefficient oxidation of combustible material releases various combustion gases and distillates from the tobacco. When these gaseous products pass through a cigarette, they are cooled and condensed to form an aerosol that provides the taste and aroma associated with smoking.

Traditional cigarettes have various tangible associated disadvantages. One of them is the formation of a sidestream of smoke during smoldering between puffs, which can be unpleasant for non-smokers. Smoked cigarette must be completely smoked or thrown away. The re-smoking of a traditional cigarette is possible, but usually it is an unattractive venture for a true smoker for subjective reasons (aroma, taste, fragrance).

An alternative to more traditional cigarettes includes cigarettes in which the combustible material itself does not release tobacco spray. Such smoking articles may contain a combustible, carbon heating element (heat source) located near or around one end of the smoking product, and a layer of tobacco-filled elements located adjacent to the above-mentioned heating element. The heating element is ignited with a match or a lighter, and when the smoker pulls on a cigarette, the heat produced by the heating element is transferred to the layer of tobacco-filled elements to cause the release of tobacco aerosol. Although this type of smoking device produces a small amount of sidestream smoke or does not form it at all, it still produces combustion products in the heat source, and if its heat source is ignited, it is not easy to extinguish for future use in a practical sense.

Both in the more common and carbon-heated devices described above, combustion occurs during their use. This process naturally increases the yield of many by-products when burnt material is destroyed and interacts with the surrounding atmosphere.

Being in the process of simultaneous consideration and in the usual way assigned applications for US patent with registration number 08 / 380.718, registered on September 30, 1995 (PM 1697 Cont) and with registration number 08 / 943.504, registered on September 11, 1992 (PM 1550), together with US Patent Nos. 5,093,894, 5,225,498, 5,060,671 and 5,095,921 disclose various heating elements and aroma-forming products that significantly reduce the sidestream smoke, while at the same time allowing the smoker to stop and start smoking again. However, the cigarette products disclosed in these patents are not very durable and can be destroyed, torn or broken by prolonged or careless handling. In some cases, these famous cigarettes can be crushed, as they are even weaker, and can burst or break when removed from a lighter.

The aforementioned U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 08 / 380.718, filed on Sept. 30, 1995 (PM 1697 Cont) and U.S. Patent No. 5,388,594, described an electric smoking system that includes a new electric-powered cigarette lighter and a new cigarette that interacts with lighter. A preferred embodiment of the lighter includes a plurality of sinuous metal heaters arranged in such a configuration that a portion of the tobacco rod of the cigarette is slidably received.

The preferred embodiment of a cigarette in US patent application number 08 / 380.718, registered on September 30, 1995 (PM 1697 Cont) and also disclosed in EP-A-0.615.411, contains a tobacco-filled tubular holder, cigarette paper wrapped around tubular holder, the device passing through the strands of the filter material in the mouth part of the holder and the extrusion of the filter material at the free (distant) end of the holder. The cigarette and the lighter are configured such that when a cigarette is inserted into the cigarette lighter, and when individual heaters are activated for each puff, localized charring occurs in the spots around the cigarette at locations where each heater touched a cigarette (hereinafter referred to as heater traces). After all heaters are activated, these charred spots are located close to each other and surround the central part of the cigarette holder area.

Depending on the maximum temperatures and all the energy released by the heaters, charred spots clearly reveal more than color changes in the tissue paper. In most applications, charring forms, at least in a minute, the holes in the tissue paper and underlying material of the holder, and these holes tend to weaken the cigarette mechanically. For a cigarette to be removed from a lighter, charred spots should at least partially slide past the heaters. In the worst case, when the cigarette is wet or turned in her hands, or twisted, she may be prone to breakage or leaving the particles when it is removed from the lighter. Pieces remaining in the lighter jig can interfere with the proper operation of the lighter and / or give some unwanted flavor to the smoke of the next cigarette. If a cigarette breaks in half while taking it out, the smoker may not only be upset about the damaged cigarette products, but also because of the prospect of cleaning out the litter from the lit cigarette lighter before enjoying another cigarette.

The preferred embodiment of a cigarette in U.S. patent application number 08 / 380.718, EP-A-0.615.411 and patent No. 5.388.594 represents a substantially hollow tube between the extrusion of filter material at the end of the cigarette mouth and the extruded end at the remote end. It is believed that this design increases the allocation to the smoker by providing sufficient space into which the holder can release the aerosol with minimal collision and condensation of the aerosol on any nearby surfaces.

Several proposals have been made that significantly reduce unwanted sidestream smoke, while at the same time allowing the smoker to stop smoking the product for the required period of time and then resume smoking. For example, in commonly assigned US patents No. 5,093,894; 5.225.498; 5.060671 and 5.095.921 disclosed various heating elements and forming the aroma of the system. EP-A-0.615.411 and U.S. Patent No. 5,388,594 disclose a smoking electrical system having heaters which are actuated under the influence of the perception of thrust by means of a control and logic circuit. Heaters are preferably a relatively thin convoluted design for transferring sufficient heat to a cigarette and are lightweight.

Although these devices and heaters overcome the problems in question and achieve the stated goals, many embodiments are subject to mechanical weakening and eventual destruction due to stresses arising from the insertion and removal of the cylindrical tobacco medium, as well as during fitting or twisting in the hands of the inserted cigarette.

Moreover, undesirable electrical short circuits may occur if the shape of the heater assembly changes, for example, by fitting or twisting in the hands of an inserted cigarette.

In addition, electric resistive heaters are used in electric smoking systems, which inevitably require relatively complex electrical connections that can be broken when a cigarette is inserted or removed.

When we turned on crushed tobacco with a hollow cigarette design in patent EP-A-0.615.411, we found that such cigarettes, when fully filled with broken tobacco, tended to function properly in an electric lighter with the first few puffs. After that, their selection tends to decrease. The same phenomenon occurs when smoking more traditional cigarettes in an electric lighter such as an electric lighter, disclosed in EP-A-0.615.411.

When left blank, the hollow construction of cigarettes of preferred embodiments of the invention in patent EP-A-0.615.411 is also susceptible to some degree if it is excessively or roughly treated.

In light of these various aspects, the invention is defined by the independent claims of the attached claims.

Embodying aspects of the present invention, the cigarette has an advantage due to the presence of shredded tobacco, still able to work while smoking as part of a smoking electrical system.

Embodying aspects of the invention, a cigarette has the advantage that it contains shredded tobacco and is adapted to interact with an electric cigarette lighter and provides satisfactory levels of taste and excretion.

Embodying aspects of the present invention, the cigarette has the advantage that it includes shredded tobacco and still provides improved constancy of release from puff to puff.

Embodying aspects of the invention cigarettes can be easily manufactured and packaged in attractive packaging.

Embodying aspects of the invention cigarettes can have physical strength and allow to minimize the condensation and (or) filtration of an aerosol in a cigarette and (or) in a cigarette lighter. They may provide additional resistance to breakage during the removal of a cigarette from a lighter.

Embodying aspects of the present invention are cigarettes and adapted for use with a cigarette lighter electrical smoking system, and may be the least vulnerable to destruction or breakage during rough handling by the consumer.

Embodying aspects of the present invention, cigarettes and cigarettes adapted for use with an electric cigarette lighter may not be prone to breakage or breakage when making or packaging cigarettes.

Embodying aspects of the invention of cigarettes and operating with an electric cigarette lighter can lead to manufacturing methods with an effective cost, even at industrial speeds.

Embodying aspects of the invention, heaters can produce smoke from a tobacco environment without continuous burning, can reduce the formation of unwanted sidestream smoke, can provide an opportunity for a smoker to stop and resume use, and can improve the formation of aerosol in the smoking system.

The heater design embodying the invention can provide the required number of puffs and can be directly modified to change the number and / or length of puffs, without prejudice to the subjective qualities of tobacco.

Embodying the invention, the heating element may mechanically be suitable for insertion and withdrawal of a cigarette.

Embodying aspects of the invention, the electrical resistance heater may have simplified connections with an associated source of electrical energy.

Embodying aspects of the invention, the heating element may be mechanically robust during heating cycles.

Embodiments of the invention can minimize a change in the interface between the heating element and the cigarette in order to avoid changes in heat transfer.

Embodying the invention, the heater may be more economical to manufacture.

One preferred embodiment of the invention provides a smoking system for delivering a response of flavored tobacco to a smoker. The system includes a cigarette and an electric-powered lighter, and this lighter includes many electric heaters, and each of the heaters is adapted either alone or together to thermally release a predetermined amount of tobacco aerosol from the cigarette when it is activated. The cigarette contains a tubular tobacco plate in which the first part of the tubular tobacco plate is filled with a column of tobacco, preferably in the form of shredded tobacco, and the second part of the tubular tobacco plate is left unfilled or hollow to determine the emptiness in the tobacco column.

More specifically, the aforementioned cigarette preferably comprises a tobacco rod made of a ribbed tobacco plate and a tobacco strand located inside the tubular tobacco plate. The tobacco rod is adapted to slide in the clamping device of an electric heater so that the heating elements are located near the tobacco rod in a position between the free end and the opposite end of the tobacco rod. The plug (or column) of the tobacco preferably extends from the free end of the tobacco rod to a location that is spaced from the opposite end of the tobacco rod so as to define a void (or hollow portion) adjacent to the opposite end.

The relative dimensions of the cigarette and the fixture of the heater are defined so that when a cigarette is inserted into the lighter, each heater is located next to the tobacco rod at a predetermined location along the tobacco rod, and preferably so that the longitudinal contact between the heater and the cigarette (hereinafter referred to as heater trace) is superimposed at least part of the aforementioned void and at least part of the tobacco strand. With this arrangement, a constant and sufficient discharge is achieved when the cigarette is electrically lit, and the condensation of the tobacco spray around and around the heating elements is reduced.

Alternatively, the relative sizes of the cigarette and the fixture of the lighter heater are defined so that when a cigarette is inserted into the lighter, each heater is located next to the tobacco rod, so that at least some, if not all, of the heater traces are superimposed only on the filled part of the tobacco rod (above the extrusion filter material). With this configuration, the void can still be used to promote the formation of an aerosol and help cool the smoke.

Tissue paper is preferably wrapped around a tubular tobacco plate in such a way as to provide the look and feel of a more traditional cigarette when the smoker holds it in his hands.

The tobacco plate preferably contains an unpaired tobacco base plate and a layer of tobacco material located along at least one side of the base tobacco plate.

In addition, the cigarette preferably contains a filter worn on the aforementioned opposite end of the tobacco plate, which contains the filter material extruded through itself (also known in the technique as slanted strands), the mouthpiece filter extruder and the top worn paper attaching the strands to the tobacco rod.

When an incarnating cigarette is inserted into a cigarette lighter of an electric smoking system, the cigarette is precisely adjusted relative to the stop inside the lighter heater fixture (or some equivalent fit), so that the electric heating elements of the cigarette lighter are arranged in series with the cigarette. same location for each cigarette. When the puff begins, at least one of the heaters of the lighter is activated in response, heating the cigarette at the above location along the tobacco rod. With the development of puffs, the tobacco rod is heated, and the aerosol is separated from the tobacco plate and the shredded tobacco. Where a heater trace is applied to a void in a tobacco rod, tobacco aerosol is almost immediately released into the space defined in the unfilled part of the tobacco rod and is removed from the cigarette. The tobacco plate contributes a large part to this fraction from the entire aerosol emitted by a cigarette, and it is believed that the efficiency of the release favorably affects the character and duration of the smoker's puff of a cigarette. Due to the greater mass of tobacco in the filled part of the tobacco rod, there is a slight delay in the release of the aerosol from the place where the heater trace overlaps the filled part of the rod. The aerosol, which is separated from the filled part of the tobacco rod, introduces an additional, dominant flavor and character to smoking.

An additional aspect of the present invention is the ability to control the discharge of a cigarette of an electric smoking system, in which the proportional amount of overlap between the filled and unfilled parts of the tobacco rod of the heater track produces the required regulation in the discharge from one brand of cigarette to another or within the linear development of the same brand.

Another aspect of the present invention consists in a method for improving the levels and constancy of aerosol release from a cigarette, driven by an electric heating device, where the cigarette has a free end and an opposite end. The method comprises the steps of superimposing a trace of the heater on both the tobacco-filled part of the cigarette adjacent to the free end and the empty part of the cigarette adjacent to the opposite end while simultaneously heating resistively along the trace of the heater and advancing through the cigarette through its opposite end.

Another aspect of the present invention is to provide a cigarette containing a filler, driven by an electric cigarette lighter, and this cigarette contains a tobacco rod, having a free-flowing filter and a part of the rod free from the filler, adjacent to the free-passing filter, so that a suitable aerosol product is formed.

Another aspect of the present invention is a reinforced tubular tobacco plate having flax or wood pulp fiber added to its main plate so as to provide additional strength. Alternatively, cellulosic fiber from the stem of the midrib of a tobacco leaf can be incorporated into the structure of the main plate as a reinforcing agent.

The strength of a cigarette is improved by incorporating crushed tobacco within its tubular tobacco plate so as to provide a cigarette that can better resist handling it, including manipulating cigarette-producing mechanisms and consumers.

The heater embodying the invention preferably comprises a support sleeve and a plurality of electroresistive heating blades defining a receptacle for receiving inserted cigarettes. Each blade contains a first heater blade foot, having a first end and a second end protruding from the supporting sleeve with a first end, a second heater blade foot having a first end and a second end, and a connecting section connecting the second end of the first leg and the first end of the second leg. The second end of the second leg extends towards the support sleeve and is electrically insulated from it. To heat the electroresistive heater blade, a resistive heating circuit is formed, which, in turn, heats the inserted cigarette. The first and second legs are separated by a gap to provide air access to facilitate the release of aromatic substances from a heated cigarette when pulled in by a smoker.

Embodiments of the invention will now be described by way of example and with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

1 and 2 show perspective views of an electronic smoking system in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention;

figure 3 is a perspective view from cut of a cigarette enclosed in a clamping fixture of the heater of the smoking system shown in figure 1;

in fig. 4A is a side sectional view of a cigarette constructed in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 4B is a detailed perspective view of the device shown in FIG. 4A cigarettes with some components of the cigarette, not partially separated;

in fig. 5A and 5B are flow diagrams for manufacturing the reels of the tobacco plate shown in FIG. 4 A and 4B cigarettes, where FIG. 5A depicts the steps of converting a tobacco raw material into a leaf of a tobacco plate, and FIG. 5B depicts the steps of converting a leaf of a tobacco leaf into reels of a tobacco leaf;

in fig. 6A is a side cross-sectional view of a cigarette constructed in accordance with the substantially hollow embodiment of the present invention;

in FIG. b, a graphical representation of the production of an aerosol versus time during each puff produced by a cigarette constructed in accordance with substantially the hollow embodiment of the present invention shown in FIG. 6A;

bbc is a plan of a smoke metering device that was used to establish the data shown in bb, 7B, and 8;

in fig. 7A is a side cross-sectional view of a cigarette constructed in accordance with a fully populated embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 7B is a graphical representation of the generation of aerosol versus time during each puff produced by a cigarette constructed in accordance with the fully populated embodiment of the present invention shown in FIG. 7A;

on Fig - graphical comparison of the volume of the aerosol during each successive puff allocated by each cigarette of the types described with reference to Fig.4A, 6A and 7A;

FIG. 9 is a graphical representation of the relationship between the release of the entire particulate matter (HFM) and the amount of heater overlap on top of a filled portion of a partially filled cigarette, designed in accordance with the preferred embodiment (FIG. 4A) of the present invention; FIG.

in fig. 10 is a side cross-sectional view of a cigarette constructed in accordance with a second preferred embodiment of the present invention;

in fig. 11 is a side cross-sectional view of a cigarette constructed in accordance with a third preferred embodiment of the present invention;

in fig. 12 is a side cross-sectional view of a clamping fixture of a heater embodying an additional aspect of the present invention;

in fig. 13 is a side view of a heater assembly embodying an additional aspect of the present invention;

in fig. 14 is a side cross-sectional view of a clamping fixture of a heater embodying a further aspect of the present invention using an electrically insulating coating;

in fig. 15 is a side cross-sectional view of a clamping fixture of a heater embodying an aspect of the present invention using an electrically insulating coating forming a sleeve;

in fig. 16 is a side cross-sectional view of a heater fixture using an aspect of the present invention, having serpentine-shaped legs of heater blades;

in fig. 17A is a front cross-sectional view of a heater blade having a flat bottom facing the inserted cigarette;

in fig. 17B is a front cross-sectional view of a heater blade having an angled lower side facing the inserted cigarette;

in fig. 17C is a front cross-sectional view of a heater blade having a rounded lower side facing the inserted cigarette;

in fig. 18 is a top view of a symmetric arrangement of heater blades in a flat state before twisting;

in fig. 19 is a top view of an asymmetrical arrangement of heater blades in a flat state before twisting;

in fig. 20 is a radial cross-sectional view of an electric smoking system embodying the present invention, depicting an alternative embodiment of the heater;

in fig. 21 is a longitudinal view in cross section of the receiving cavity of the sleeve of the flavoring substance shown in FIG. 20 of the electric smoking system, taken along line A-A of FIG. 20;

in fig. 22 is a radial cross-sectional view showing another alternative embodiment of the heater;

on Fig.23 is a longitudinal view in cross section of the receiving cavity of the sleeve of the flavoring substance of the electric smoking system shown in Fig.22, taken along the line B-B of Fig.22.

A detailed description of preferred embodiments of the invention.

Consider figures 1 and 2, in which a preferred embodiment of the present invention provides a smoking system 21, which includes a partially filled cigarette 23 with a filler and a cigarette lighter 25 with the possibility of its reuse. The cigarette 23 is adapted to be inserted and removed from the receiver 27 in the front end portion 29 of the lighter 25. Once the cigarette 23 is inserted, the smoking system 21 is used in much the same way as a more traditional cigarette, but without burning or smoldering cigarette 23. The cigarette 23 is ejected after one or more cycles of puffs. Each cigarette 23 preferably provides a total of eight puffs (puff cycles) or more for smoking; however, adjusting to a smaller or larger total number of possible puffs is a matter of design experience.

Lighter 25 includes a housing 31 having front and rear portions 33 and 35 of the housing. One or more rechargeable batteries 35a are interchangeably located inside the rear part 35 of the housing and provide electricity to a plurality of electroresistive heating elements 37 that are located in the front 33 of the housing next to the receiver 27. The control circuit 41 in the front part 33 of the housing establishes an electrical connection between the batteries 35a and heating elements 37. The rear part 35 of the housing is preferably adapted for easy opening and closing, for example, with screws or clamping elements, to facilitate the replacement of rechargeable batteries. If necessary, an electrical connector or contacts can be provided to recharge the batteries from a household or similar current source.

The front part 33 of the housing is preferably removably connected to the rear part 35 of the case, for example, by means of a dovetail connection or a ground fit. The housing 31 is preferably made of solid, heat-resistant material. Preferred materials include metallic, or more preferably, polymeric materials. The housing 31 preferably has a total size of about 10.7 cm by 3.8 cm by 1.5 cm, so that it is convenient for the smoker to hold it in hand.

The rechargeable batteries 35a are sized to provide sufficient energy for the intended operation of the heating elements 37, and preferably contain a replaceable and rechargeable type. Alternative energy sources, such as capacitors, are also suitable. In a preferred embodiment, the power source contains four nickel-cadmium battery cells connected in series with a total no-load voltage of about 4.8-5.6 volts. However, the characteristics required for the source of electricity are chosen in view of the characteristics of other components in the smoking system 21, in particular, the characteristics of the heating elements 37. US Patent No. 5,144,962 (РМ 1345), incorporated herein by reference, describes several types of electricity sources useful in connection with a smoking system of the present invention, such as rechargeable battery sources and power devices that contain a capacitor rechargeable from a battery bat yards.

Let us now consider FIG. 3, in which the front part 33 of the body of the lighter 25 supports an essentially cylindrical clamping device 39 of the heater that slides the cigarette 23 in a sliding manner. The clamping device 39 of the heater encloses the heating elements 37 and is adapted to maintain the inserted cigarette 23 in a fixed manner heating elements 37, so that heating elements 37 are located near the cigarette at approximately the same location along each cigarette. The place where each heating element 37 is held opposite (or in thermal contact) of a fully inserted cigarette 23 is referred to herein as a heater trace.

In order to ensure consistent placement of the heating elements 37 with respect to each cigarette 23 from the cigarette to the cigarette, the fixture 39 of the heater is provided with a stop 182 to which the cigarette fits when placed in the cigarette lighter 25. Alternatively, other suitable means can be used to register the cigarette 23 regarding the lighter 25.

The front part 33 of the body of the lighter 25 also includes an electrical control circuit 41, which transfers a predetermined amount of energy from the source of electrical energy 35a to the heating elements 37. In a preferred embodiment, the heater fixture 39 contains eight circumferentially spaced heating elements 37, which concentrically aligned with the receiver 27 and have the shape of a serpentine. Details of the heating elements 37 are shown and described in the US patent application with the registration number 07 / 943.504 (PM 1550), which is in the process of simultaneous consideration with the present application, and in the US patent assignment No. 5.388.594 (RM 1697) , both of which are hereby incorporated by reference in their entirety. Additional clamping fixtures 39 of the heater, which are capable of operating as part of the lighter 25, include the fixtures disclosed in a conventional assignment, which is in the process of simultaneous consideration of a US patent application with registration number 08 / 291.690, registered on August 16, 1994 (Authorized File No. PM 1719), all of which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety; and in a later part of this description, referring to FIG. 1323. The power supply to the heating elements 37 is preferably supplied separately from the source of electric power - the batteries 35a by means of the control circuit 41 for heating the cigarette 23, preferably eight times in spaced locations around the periphery of the cigarette 23. Heating provides eight puffs from the cigarette 23, as is usually the case when smoking more traditional cigarettes. It may be preferable to light more than one heater at a time for one or more puffs.

Another preferred heater arrangement is proposed in a concurrent review, assigned in the usual manner to a US patent application with registration number 08 / 224.848, filed April 8, 1994 (RM-1729B), here incorporated by reference in its entirety.

Returning again to FIG. 2, the circuit 41 is preferably activated by a pulling actuated sensor 45, which is sensitive to either pressure changes or air flow velocity changes that occur at the start of a pull through the cigarette 23 produced by the smoker. The tightening-actuated sensor 45 is preferably located in the front part 33 of the lighter body 25 and communicates with the space inside the heater fixture 39 near the cigarette 23 through the passage through the spacer sleeve at the base of the heater fixture 39 and, if necessary, the puff sensor tube ( not shown). The tightening actuated sensor 45, suitable for use in the smoking system 21, is described in commonly assigned US Pat. No. 5,060,671 (PM 1337), which is described here by reference. The puff sensor 45 preferably contains a silicon sensor of model 163PCOID35, manufactured by the MicroSwitch department of Honswlls company. Inc., Freeport, Illinois. Flow sensitive devices, such as devices using the principles of thermal anemometry, have also successfully demonstrated their suitability for activating a suitable one of the heating elements 37 when a change in air flow is detected. As soon as the control circuit 41 is activated by the sensor 45, it directs the electric current to a suitable one of the heating elements 37.

At a location on the outer part of the lighter 25, preferably on the front part 33 of the housing, an indicator 51 is provided to indicate the number of puffs remaining to smoke a cigarette 23. The indicator 51 preferably includes a seven-segment liquid crystal display. In a preferred embodiment, the indicator 51 displays the number 8 when the cigarette detector 53 detects the presence of a cigarette in the heater fixture 39. The detector 53 preferably includes a light sensor on the basis of the clamping device 39 of the heater, which determines when the light beam is reflected from the inserted cigarette 23. After that, the cigarette detector 53 will signal the circuit 41, which. in turn, it responds with a signal to the indicator 51. The display of the figure 8 on the indicator 51 reflects that. that there are eight puffs provided in each cigarette 23, that is, none of the heating elements 37 is activated to heat the cigarette 23. After the cigarette 23 is fully smoked, the indicator shows the number 0. When the cigarette 23 is removed from the lighter 25, the cigarette detector 53 no longer detects the presence of cigarette 23, and the indicator 51 is turned off. The cigarette detector 53 is modulated so that it does not constantly emit a beam of light, which otherwise creates unnecessary energy consumption at the source of electrical energy. A preferred cigarette detector 53, suitable for use in the smoking system 21, is an OPR5005 type light sensor manufactured by ORTECH Doci Inc. (Technology, Inc.), 1215 West Crosby Road, Carolton, Texas 75006, USA.

As an alternative to displaying the remaining number of puffs, the detector display can instead be set to indicate whether the system is active or inactive (on or off).

As one of several possible alternatives to using the above-mentioned cigarette detector 53, a mechanical switch (not shown) can be provided to detect the presence or absence of the cigarette 23, and a reset button can be provided to restore the circuit 41 to its original state when inserting a new cigarette into the lighter 25 (not shown), for example, in order to cause the indicator 51 to display the number 8, etc. Electric power sources, torque-driven circuits, sensors and indicators suitable for use with the smoking system 21 according to the present invention are described in the patent assigned in the usual way.

No. 5,060,671 (PM 1337) and US patent application with registration number 07 / 943.504 (РМ 1550), described here by reference.

Consider now FIGS. 4A and 4B, where a cigarette 23, designed in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention, contains a tobacco rod 60 and a filter tip 62, which are connected together by a paper tip 64.

A partially filled cigarette 23 preferably has a substantially constant diameter throughout its length and, like more traditional cigarettes, preferably has a diameter between about 7.5 mm and 8.5 mm, so that the smoking system 21 provides the smoker with a familiar oral feeling In a preferred embodiment, the cigarette 23 has a total length of 62 mm, which makes it easier to use conventional packaging mechanisms when packing cigarettes 23. The combined length of the mouthpiece filter 104 and the free-flow filter 102 is preferably 30 mm. The paper tip preferably extends 6 mm across the tobacco rod 60. The total length of the tobacco rod 60 is preferably 32 mm. You can choose other proportions of length and diameter instead of those listed above for the preferred embodiment of the invention.

The tobacco rod 60 of the cigarette 23 preferably comprises a tobacco plate 66, which is rolled into a tubular (cylindrical) shape.

The upper wrapper 71 tightly wraps the tobacco plate 66 and is held together along a longitudinal seam, as in the conventional construction of more traditional cigarettes. The upper wrapper 71 maintains the tobacco plate 66 in a collapsed state around the free-flow filter 74 and the tobacco rod 80.

The upper cigarette wrapper paper 71 is preferably wrapped tightly around the tobacco sheet 66 so as to reproduce the look and feel of a more traditional cigarette. It has been found that the best-tasting smoke is achieved by using as a top wrap 71 a tissue paper of a standard type, preferably linen paper, approximately 20-50 CORESTA (defined as the amount of air, measured in cubic centimeters, that passes through one square centimeter of material, e.g., a paper sheet, in one minute at a pressure drop of 1.0 kilopascal) and more preferably about 30-45 CORESTA, specific gravity of about 23-35 grams per square meter (g / m2), or more preferred tion about 23-30 g / m 2, and a filler loading (preferably calcium carbonate) of approximately 23-35% by weight and more preferably 28-33% by weight.

The upper wrapper paper 71 preferably contains little or no citrate or other combustion modifiers with preferred citrate levels ranging from 0 to about 2.6% by weight of the paper of the upper wrapper 71, and more preferably less than 1%.

The tobacco plate 66 itself preferably contains the main plate 68 and a layer of tobacco flavor material 70 located along the inner surface of the main plate 68. At the end 72 of the tip of the tobacco rod 60, the tobacco plate 66 together with the upper wrap 71 is wrapped around the free passage filter tube 74. passage 74 provides a constructive definition and support at the end 72 of the tip of the tobacco rod 60 and allows you to remove the aerosol from the inside of the tobacco rod 60 with a minimum pressure drop. Free passage filter 74 also acts as a restriction of the flow at the end 72 of the tip of the tobacco rod 60, which is believed to contribute to the formation of an aerosol while pulling in a cigarette 23. The free passage filter preferably has a length of at least 7 millimeters to facilitate mechanical manipulation and preferably ring-shaped, although other shapes and types of low-efficiency filters are suitable, including cylindrical strands of filter material.

At the free end 78 of the tobacco rod 60, the tobacco plate 66 together with the upper wrapper 71 is wrapped around a cylindrical tobacco rod 80. The tobacco rod 80 is preferably made separately from the tobacco plate 66 and contains a relatively short column of shredded tobacco that is wrapped by the strang wrapping material 84 and held by it.

Tobacco extrusion 80 is preferably formed on a conventional cigarette rod manufactured by a machine, where broken tobacco (preferably mixed) is formed by an air stream in the form of a continuous tobacco rod on a conveyor belt and wrapped with continuous tape of a strang wrapping material 84, which is then glued together with a longitudinal seam and heat-insulated. However, in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention, the extrusion wrapping material 84 is preferably made from a cellulosic web with or without a small amount of filler, with glued or baked additives (each below 0.5% by weight), and preferably with little or no sizing.

The tobacco extrusion wrapping material 84 preferably has a low specific gravity, below 15 grams per square meter, and more preferably about 13 grams per square meter. The tobacco extrusion wrapping material 84 preferably has a high permeability in the range of about 20.00035.000 CORESTA, and more preferably in the range of about 25.000-35.000 CORESTA and is preferably made of softwood pulp, Manila hemp pulp or other long-fiber pulp. These types of paper are available at Papierfabrik Schoeller and Hoescht GMBH, post office 1155, D-76584, Gernsback, Germany; Another paper suitable for use as a wrapping material 84 extrusion is TW 2000 paper from the DeMaudute of Yumperlle, France, with the addition of carboxymethylcellulose at 2.5 weight percent.

The tobacco rod manufacturing machine operates in such a way that it provides a tobacco rod density of about 0.17-0.30 grams per cubic centimeter (g / cm 3 ), but more preferably in the range of at least 0.20-0.30 g / cm 3 and even more preferably between about 0.24 and 0.28 g / cm 3 . Increased densities are preferred in order to avoid the appearance of loose ends at the free end 78 of the tobacco rod 60. However, it should be understood that lower rod densities will allow the tobacco column 82 to contribute a large proportion of aerosol and aroma when smoking. In line with this, it is necessary to find a balance between the release of aerosol (which is favored by the low core density in tobacco column 82) and the avoidance of loose ends (which is favored by the increased core density ranges).

Tobacco column 84 preferably contains shredded tobacco from a mixture of tobacco varieties, typical for industry, including mixtures containing Bright, Burley, and Oriental tobacco varieties along with reproduced (optional) tobacco varieties and other components of the mixture, including traditional cigarette bouquets. However, in a preferred embodiment of the invention, the shredded tobacco of the tobacco column 84 contains a mixture of varieties of Bright, Burley and Oriental tobacco at a ratio of about 45:30:25 for the US market, without including reproducing varieties of tobacco or any other shredded flavored substances. Optionally, the expandable tobacco component may be included in the mixture to control the core density, and aromatic substances may be added.

The continuous tobacco rod formed by the method described above is cut according to a predetermined length of the extrusion for the tobacco extrusion 80. This length is preferably at least 7 mm to facilitate the manipulation of the mechanism. However, the length can vary from about 7 mm to 25 mm or more, depending on preferences in cigarette design, which will become clear from the following description, with specific references to FIG. 4 A and 4B.

In total, the length 86 of the tobacco rod 80 is preferably set depending on the total length 88 of the tobacco rod 60 so that along the tobacco rod 60 a voids section 90 is formed 91 between the free passage filter 74 and the tobacco extrusion 80. The void 91 corresponds to the unfilled portion of the tobacco rod 60 and is in direct communication downstream with the tip 62 through the free passage filter 74 of the tobacco rod 60.

Consider, in particular, FIG. 4A, where the length 86 of the tobacco rod 80 and its relative position along the tobacco rod 60 is also chosen in accordance with the features of the heating elements 37. When the cigarette is properly positioned relative to the stop 182 of the heater fixture 39, a portion 92 of each heating element 37 contacts the tobacco rod 60 along the region of the tobacco rod 60. This contact area is called the trace of the heater 94. The trace of the heater 94 (shown by the double arrow in FIG. 4A) is not part of the console itself. cigarette, and represents that area of the tobacco rod 60, where it is expected that heating element 37 can reach operating heating temperatures while smoking cigarette 23. Because heating elements 37 are at a fixed distance of 96 from heater stopper 182 уп 39 39, the trace of heater 94 is constantly located along the tobacco rod 60 at the same predetermined distance 96 from the free end 78 of the tobacco rod 60 for each cigarette 23, which is fully inserted into the lighter 25.

The length of the tobacco rod 80, the trace length of the heater 94 and the distance between the trace of the heater 94 and the stop 182 are preferably chosen so that the trace of the heater 94 passes beyond the limits of the tobacco extrusion 80 and overlaps the space 90 of the void 91 at a distance of 98. The distance 98 on which the heater trace 94 superimposed on the void 91 (the empty part of the tobacco rod 60) is also called overlapping the void heater 98. The distance that the rest of the trace of the heater 94 overlaps the tobacco extrusion 80 is called overlap Nitel heater 99.

Tip 62 preferably comprises a free passage filter 102 located adjacent to the tobacco rod 60 and filter media extrusion of the mouthpiece 104 at the remote end of the tip 62 from the tobacco rod 60. The free passage filter 102 is preferably tubular and carries air with a very small pressure drop. However, other low-efficiency standard configuration filters can be used instead. The internal diameter of the free passage filter 102 is preferably from 2 to 6 millimeters and is preferably larger than the internal diameter of the free passage filter 74 of the tobacco rod 60.

The strand of the filtering material of the mouthpiece 104 covers the free end of the tip 62 to improve the appearance and, if necessary, some filtering, although it is preferred that the extruded filtering material of the mouthpiece 104 contains a low-efficiency filter, preferably of the order of 15-25% efficiency.

The free pass filter 102 and the filter media extrusion of the mouthpiece 104 are preferably joined together as a single extrusion 110 by the extrusion wrapping material 112. The extrusion wrapping material 112 is preferably a porous, lightweight extrusion wrapping material such as is commonly used for this purpose in a cigarette making technique. A single extrusion 110 is attached to the tobacco rod 60 using a paper tip 64 with characteristics that are standard and commonly used in the cigarette industry. Paper tip 64 may be cork, white or any other color corresponding to the decorative preferences.

A cigarette 23, constructed in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention, preferably has a total length of approximately 62 mm, of which 30 mm contain a combined sleeve 110 of the tip 62. Accordingly, the tobacco rod 60 is equal in length to 32 mm. The free passage filter 74 of the tobacco rod 60 preferably has a length of at least 7 mm, and the portion of the void 91 between the free passage filter 74 and the tobacco rod 80 is preferably at least 7 mm in length. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the trace length of the heater 94 is approximately 12 mm, and is positioned so that it provides 3 mm overlap of the void of the heater 98, leaving 9 mm of the trace of the heater 94 superimposed on the tobacco rod 80.

It should be understood that the length of the voids section 91 and the length of the tobacco rod 80 can be adjusted to facilitate manufacture and, more importantly, to regulate the smoking characteristics of the cigarette 23, including adjusting its taste, tightening and excretion. The length of the voids section 91 and the amount of filler overlap by the heater (and heater overlap of the voids) can also be manipulated to adjust the immediate response, to promote uniformity of release (based on the uniformity from puff to puff, and also between cigarettes), and to control the aerosol condensation around or around heaters.

In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the voids section 91 (the filler-free portion of the tobacco rod 60) extends approximately 7 mm to ensure proper cleaning between the heater trace 94 and the free-flow filter 74. Thus, the reserve is provided that the heater trace 94 does not heat the filter free passage 74 while smoking. Other lengths are acceptable, for example, if tolerances from the standard size during manufacture allow, the space of the cavity 91 can be made about 4 mm or even shorter, or at another extreme, extend beyond 7 mm, defining the elongated part free from the filler along the tobacco rod 60. The preferred length range for the filler-free part (voids 91) is from about 4 mm to about 18 mm, and more preferably from 5 to 12 mm.

The main plate 68 physically separates the heating elements 37 from the tobacco flavor material, transfers the heat generated by the heating elements 37 to the flavor material 70, and maintains the physical adhesion of the tobacco rod during handling, insertion into the cigarette lighter 25 and removal of the cigarette after smoking.

In the following description, for various components, including the tobacco plate 66, certain percentage levels and / or relative weights are established. Unless otherwise noted, or, conversely, on the contrary, it is well understood by those skilled in the art, weight percent transfers are based on dry weight, i.e., percentage levels and / or relative weights are adjusted for moisture content (not including her).

Subsequent paragraphs also describe the manufacturing process for a tobacco plate 66, preferably without the addition of carbon fiber. At the conclusion of the preferred manufacturing process, the core plate 68 itself has a preferred overall specific gravity of about 35-45 g / m 2 , more preferably about 40 g / m 2 . At 40 g / m 2, the base plate 68 preferably contains about 28 g / m 2 of tobacco fiber and about 12 g / m 2 of cellulose fiber such as wood pulp or flax.

Cellulose fiber serves as a cellulosic hardening agent in the structure of the main plate 68. It is preferable to minimize the amount of cellulose fiber in the main plate for subjective reasons (to avoid establishing a paper tone to the taste of a cigarette). In general, the ratio of tobacco fiber to cellulose fiber in the main plate 68, based on the weight of the dry matter, should vary from about 2: 1 to 4: 1. The preferred cellulosic material is unbleached softwood kraft pulp, although most wood and flax pulps are applicable.

An alternative hardening agent for the main plate 68 is cellulosic fiber from treated tobacco stem.

Although not preferred, alginate can be coated on one side of the main plate 68 at a level of about 1 g / m 2 . If alginate is used, it is preferable to apply it on the side of the main plate 68, the opposite side receiving the tobacco flavor material 70.

Aromatic material 70 is preferably used in the base plate 68 at a dry weight level greater than at least twice, and more preferably about three to four times the base plate 68. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the tobacco material has a specific gravity of about 130 g / m 2 , so that preferably the final total weight of the tobacco plate 66 was approximately 170 g / m 2 . When the weight of the base is dry, material 70 contains a portion of basic tobacco and extracted solid in a ratio ranging from about 3.5 to 1 (3.5: 1) to five to one (5: 1) by weight, although this the ratio can range from about 3: 1 to 9: 1. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the ratio is about 4: 1.

Glycerin is added to the flavor material 70 as a humidifier and aerosol precursor at levels of about 1014%, more preferably about 12% by weight of dry tobacco material 70, but this level of additive can vary from about 5% up to 20% or more by weight dry matter of tobacco material 70. When glycerin is reduced to about 5-7% by weight of dry matter composition, the tobacco plate 66 may be somewhat more rigid and resistant to breakage when twisted into a tubular shape.

Pectin is also added to flavor material 70 in percent levels by weight of dry matter, varying from about 0.5 to 2%, preferably about 1.4%. Pectin is added as a coating substance. In its absence, material 70 may tend to excessively leak (penetrate) into the main plate 68 during the coating operation, creating a rough surface structure on the coated side of the tobacco plate 66. Too much pectin prevents penetration and weakens the bond between material 70 and the main plate 68. With content of approximately 1%, pectin contributes to sufficient penetration and bonding between the layers, so that the main plate 68 can resist the immobility of automatic production igaret.

More preferably, the flavor material 70 on the base plate 68 contains approximately 16-20% by weight of the dry matter of the extracted solid, 6671% by weight of the dry substance of the main tobacco substances, 8-14% glycerol and approximately 1.4% pectin. For markets in the United States, basic tobacco, which is included in material 70, preferably contains a mixture of Bright, Berley and Oriental tobacco, in which almost half of the mixture is Bright tobacco, about 1/3 is Burley tobacco, and the rest is eastern. The composition and relative amounts of the components of the mixture can be adjusted favorably to meet consumer preferences in the United States or other markets.

Consider now FIG. 5A and 5B, where a preferred method for manufacturing raw materials for a tobacco plate 66 in a form suitable for the automatic manufacture of cigarettes 23 is illustrated, which comprises the first series of steps 120 (shown in FIG. 5A) for converting tobacco raw materials to industry, preferably tobacco strips, into a continuous sheet of tobacco plate 66s, and a second series of steps 122 (shown in FIG. 5B) of converting a continuous sheet of tobacco plate 66s into one or more wound spools 66b of a tobacco plate, which are dny for use in automated production of cigarettes 23.

In particular, consider FIG. 5A, where the steps 120 of converting the tobacco raw material into a continuous sheet of the tobacco leaf sheet 66s begin with exposing the tobacco raw material to the extraction step 124 (preferably using water) to isolate the tobacco fiber from the tobacco dissolved in the raw material. Tobacco raw materials preferably contain tobacco strips, but other forms of tobacco and / or tobacco sheets are suitable for use in this process. Tobacco strips preferably contain a mixture of Bright and Burley tobacco varieties and may optionally include Oriental or other tobacco varieties.

The tobacco fiber obtained as a result of the extraction step 124 is subjected to processing 23 of the paper production type 126 in order to form a continuous sheet 68s of the main plate.

In processing 126, the tobacco fiber after extraction step 124 is subjected to dispersion in water with the addition of a predetermined amount of cellulose fiber, which serves as a hardening agent in the composition of the main plate 68. The cellulose fiber preferably contains pulped pulp from wood, flax and (or) the middle leg of tobacco sheet. After connecting, the mixed dispersion of tobacco fiber and cellulose fiber is cleaned so as to form a slurry 128 suitable for casting in the casting step 130, where the slurry 128 slides is sent to the plate forming mechanism and the mold formation mechanism is cast on a Fourdrinier wire or an endless steel tape, preferably frame.

It is more appropriate to clean the dispersed mixture of tobacco fiber and the hardening agent after mixing the two components together. Instead, they can be cleaned separately and then mixed.

After the casting step 130, the resulting plate 132 is guided through one or more drying units at the drying stage 134, and this step preferably comprises passing the plate through the Yankee drying unit, and the drying units may be one or more, although a lot of alternative fixtures are known in the art. devices that can be used to perform step 134 drying. At the conclusion of the step 134 of drying the plate, the control is passed to step 136 to measure the moisture content and weight of the dried plate. The output signal 138 relating to moisture content measurement is used to control the drying step 134 in order to achieve and maintain the desired final moisture level in the base plate sheet 68s for the purposes of the subsequent coating step 144. The sheet of the main plate 68s in step 144 of the coating preferably contains about 15% moisture by weight.

Let us go back to control stage 136, where the output signal 140, relating to the weight of the sheet of the main plate 68s, is used to control the operation in the casting stage 130 so as to obtain the preferred specific weight in the main plate 68, as described above. Such adjustment includes changes in the rate at which the slurry 128 of the plate is inserted into the tops of the plate formation mechanism in the casting stage 130.

The plate formation step 126 may optionally further comprise a coating step 142, in which one side of the main plate 68s is covered with alginate to the levels described above on one side of the main plate 68s, opposite to the side to which the tobacco flavor material 70 is applied. In practice, however, they prefer to do without use of alginate.

At the conclusion of the processing process 126 of the plate, the main plate takes the form of a continuous sheet, which is transitional to the operation 144 of the coating. Alternatively, it can be assembled for subsequent autonomous coverage operations. However, it is preferable to proceed immediately to the coating operation 144 when a sheet of the main plate 68s is formed.

The main plate 68s preferably enters the coating operation 144 with a moisture content of approximately 12-17%, more preferably 14.5-15.5% moisture.

Go back to the extraction step 124. where the tobacco solutions leave the extraction stage 124 in the form of a dilute solution containing approximately 5-10% of dissolved tobacco constituents (solutions), more preferably 7-8% of dissolved tobacco constituents. The diluted solution is preferably not subjected to any evaporative treatment in order to minimize the use of heat to the solution. The use of heat can affect the aroma introduced by tobacco solutions when smoking as part of a cigarette 23.

These solutions (also known as extracted fluid) after extraction stage 124 are mixed in 146 'cm crosslinking with additional, fine-fiber basic tobacco, glycerin and pectin, together with water, all in relative amounts, which ultimately affect the final proportional contents, as described above with respect to the drying conditions of the aromatic material 70. In connection with the mixing step 146 ', water is added (or retained) in quantities sufficient to form upon completion uu step 124 a dispersion of approximately 20-35protsentnym with solids, more preferably from about 24-26protsentnym solids. The particle size of the basic tobacco blend is preferably in the range of 60-400 mesh, where the term mesh refers to 95% of the speed of passage of tobacco particles through a sieve having a given number of openings per square inch. Preferably, the size of the additional mainstream tobacco particles is in the range of about 100-200 mesh, and more preferably 120 mesh.

If the particle size of the main tobacco is set to about 120 mesh, in particular, 180-220 mesh or so, the contents of the suspended tobacco material solutions may be increased, for example, to levels of approximately 28-31% at the conclusion of the mixing stage 146 '.

At the completion of mixing step 146 ', the resulting suspended tobacco material is immediately sent to coating operation 144, although the coating operation can optionally be performed at some subsequent time on an autonomous basis. In coating operation 144, the suspended tobacco material should have a solids content of about 22-27% by weight, and more preferably about 24-25%.

At step 144 of the coating, the suspended tobacco material has a planned weight percentage of tobacco solutions of 4-8 percent, more preferably 5.5-6.5 percent by weight of tobacco solutions. Suspended tobacco material is preferably supplied to coating operation 144 at a temperature in the range of about 70-130 ° F (21.11-54.44 ° C), more preferably at 90 ° F (32.22 ° C) plus or minus 5 ° F (29.44-35.00 ° C).

Coating stage 142 is preferably performed using a standard coating machine with reversing rollers after a Yankee drying installation outside of an endless conveyor belt or fourdrinier wire. The coating step can be performed using other suitable coating devices that are known and available to those skilled in the art of plate forming operations. The tobacco flavor material 70 may instead be cast or extruded onto a main plate 68. Alternatively, the coating step 142 may be performed autonomously, separately from the production of the sheet of the main plate 68s. During or after step 142, coatings are added, if necessary, to flavors that are common in the cigarette industry.

Upon completion of the coating operation 144, a continuous sheet of tobacco plate 68s is formed.

Consider now FIG. 5B, where the process now goes through a series of steps 122 to convert a leaf of a tobacco plate 68s into a wound reel 66b of a tobacco plate that is suitable for use in automatic cigarette production 23. Steps 122 are preferably non-autonomous, producing a continuous sheet of tobacco plate 68s. During the execution of conversion stages 122, the operator must eliminate the conditions that create breaks, tears or other defects in the leaf of the tobacco plate 68s, so that a continuous winding of the tobacco plate on the reel 66b with or without several splittings is obtained. In addition, the leaf of the tobacco plate 68s is subject to conditioning so that at the completion of the transformation steps 122 the tobacco plate cannot fix itself and can be quickly wound onto the reel 66b and unwind without breaking it.

Conversion steps 122 begin with a drying step 146, in which a sheet of tobacco plate 68s is preferably continuously fed through a gas-powered, hot-air-emitting dryer of the type that Eatich Systems Cori has. (Airtech Systems Corp.), by Strouton, Maine, or by using a steam-heated drying installation in hot air. Instead, other drying units known in the plate forming technique may be used. Drying step 146 should be performed with minimal use of heat, but in quantities sufficient to dry the tobacco plate 68s from its original state (approximately 15% moisture content in the main plate and moisture level approximately 75% in its cover) to about 8.5–12% the total moisture content at the end of the drying stage 146. The dried tobacco leaf sheet 66b more preferably has a moisture content in the range of 10-11%. This final moisture content is preferred for several reasons: to facilitate the longitudinal operation of the cutting device at a later stage in the conversion process 122; to establish the level of moisture, which is approximately equal to the level with which the material can be in equilibrium during storage and (or) shipment to manufacturing factories; and to establish the level of moisture, which eliminates the stickiness and bonding of the material of the main plate when it is on the reel 66b.

After drying step 146, the dried leaf of the tobacco plate 66d is cooled to ambient temperature, preferably to the likely temperature of the storage place and / or associated manufacturing factory, usually in the range of 65-80 ° F (18.33-26.67 ° C) . This cooling phase not only facilitates the balancing of the tobacco plate 66 with the working environment, but also eliminates the risk of heat remaining in the reel 66b, which could otherwise initiate the self-heating process. If left unchecked, self-heating can lead to extreme temperatures and a deterioration in the subjective characteristics of the tobacco plate 66. The cooling stage is preferably performed with an air-cooled device running on rapidly cooled water available from Eatich Systems Core. (Airtech Systems Corp.), Strouton, Maine, although many alternative cooling systems are known to those skilled in the art of plate formation.

After the drying and cooling steps 146 and 148, the dried and cooled sheet of a tobacco plate 66dc passes through a decultation apparatus, such as that offered by Thermo Electron Web Systems, Inc. (Thermo Electron Web Systems, Inc.), Auburn, Maine, or some other suitable plate decultation device that may be known and available to a person skilled in the art of plate making. At the completion of deculation step 150, the tobacco plate 66 is substantially free from temperature-induced warping along its edges and is in a suitable state for the subsequent steps of winding and slitting 152 and 154, respectively. However, prior to performing these steps, it is preferable to monitor the temperature, humidity level and total weight of a leaf of a tobacco plate 68s when it exits from deculation stage 150 in order to provide feedback and process control to ensure that the sheet of tobacco leaf 68s is in appropriate condition for winding and slitting and will give the required temperature and moisture setpoints, the total weight for reels 66b.

In particular, when controlling a leaf of a tobacco plate 66, its total weight is used to control the coating operation 144, for example, the feed rate of the suspended tobacco material to the coating machine with reversing rollers or the gap in the capture of the coating machine. The resulting moisture levels in control 151 are used to control the drying operations so as to achieve the required moisture levels in the sheet, as described above. In the same way, the cooling stage 14 ^ is controlled by reading the temperature of the sheet of the tobacco plate 66 in the control stage 151.

After that, a sheet of tobacco plate 66 is wound up in a winding step 152, which is carried out using the mechanisms of the winding of the plate well known and accessible to those skilled in the field of plate processing. Then the coiled sheet of tobacco plate 68s is cut into individual reels 66b where the cut width corresponds to the desired circumference of the cigarette 23.

After the conversion steps 122 are completed, the reel 66b is in a state for automated cigarette manufacturing processes 23, for example, when combining the operations disclosed with reference to FIG. registered on September 11, 1992, which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety.

The glycerin in the tobacco flavor material 70 serves as the aerosol precursor and facilitates the formation of a visible aerosol during smoking of the cigarette 23. In addition, since glycerin is released into the atmosphere, it condenses and provides the appearance usually expected when smoking cigarettes. Instead, in the tobacco industry, you can use other suitable humidifiers.

After the casting step 130 along the side, the plate 68 need not be coated with alginate before, during or after the coating step 142. The alginate coating provides additional strength and film formation along one side of the main plate 68. However, the main plate 68 has sufficient strength without alginate, and in practice they prefer to form the main plate 68 without it.

The present invention can be applied to other types of base plates 68 (holders), including carbon fiber mats or metal or wire mats described in the United States patent applications 07 / 943.504 (РМ 1550) that are in the process of simultaneous consideration assigned in the usual way. registration number 07 / 943.747 (РМ 1655) and US Patent No. 5.388.594 (РМ 1697) assigned in the usual way and our message about the application for European Patent EP-A-0.615.411, all of which are listed here by reference throughout lnote.

With regard to carbon fiber mats, disclosed in EP-A-0.615.411 and in the usual US-assigned US Pat. No. 5,388,594 (PM 1697), which is a continuation of the United States patent application with registration number 08 / 380.718, registered on September 30, 1995 (PM 1697 Cont), the preferred composition of such mats contains a base plate 68 containing tobacco fiber in the range of 2030 g / m 2 , more preferably about 24-28 g / m 2 , best of all 26 g / m 2 ; carbon fiber in the range of 2-9 g / m 2 , more preferably 2-4 g / m 2 , preferably about 3 g / m 2 , and pectin in the range of about 0.51.5 g / m 2 and more preferably about 26 g / m 2 pectin. These components are preferably balanced in such a way as to create a base plate 68 having a total specific gravity of approximately 30 g / m 2 . It is also preferable to use 1/4-inch (6.35 mm) carbon fiber of standard length to facilitate its dispersion during the part of the process concerning the formation of a suspension. The beginning of the dispersion of the raw carbon fibers is facilitated when using procedures similar to those disclosed in US Pat. Nos. 4.007.083 and No. 4.234.379.

In an alternative embodiment of the tobacco core plate 66 (i.e. carbon fiber mat), the total final weight of the dry sheet is preferably about 160 g / m 2 , of which 30 g / m 2 contains the main plate 68 and 130 g / m 2 contains tobacco material 70. In contrast, a more preferred embodiment of the tobacco core plate 66, which does not contain carbon fiber, has a weight of dried sheet of about 170 g / m 2 , of which 40 g / m 2 contains the main plate 68 and 130 g / m 2 contains tobacco mat Series 70.

Whatever type of main plate 68 (or holder) is used, the aromatic tobacco material 70 is preferably located on the inner surface of the main plate 68 and, when heated, releases the tobacco flavored aerosol (response). Such materials may also include continuous sheets, foam, gels, dried suspensions, or dried sprayed suspensions of tobacco material.

Consider now figure 3 and in connection with the provisions included by reference from the commonly assigned US patent No. 5,388,594 (PM 1697), when the cigarette 23 is inserted into the socket 27 in accordance with the preferred embodiment of the invention, it is sent to the heating fixture 39 to those until the free end 78 of the cigarette 23 rests on the stop 182, firmly fixed on the base of the fixture 39 of the heater. When the cigarette is in place, you can start smoking, after which any action of the cigarette produced by the smoker is detected by the puff sensor 45, which, together with the control system 41, causes an electrical current to be applied to a pre-selected one of the heating elements 37. which contains conductors 183 at one end of each element 37, a common ring 184 at the opposite end of each element 37, and a common conductor 186 extending from the common ring 184 back to me stae near conductors 183. When activating each heating element 37, heat is transferred through the upper wrapper 71 and the tobacco plate 68 in sufficient quantity to cause the tobacco tobacco flavor 70 of tobacco aerosol plate 66 to be released within the tobacco rod 60, which is removed from the cigarette 23 in response to a puff of a smoker at the end with a cigarette filter 23.

Smoking by a smoker through a cigarette usually takes about 1.5-2.0 seconds, although the testing procedure for the FTC (Federal Trade Commission) cigarettes implies a 2.0-second puff duration.

Where the trace of the heater 94 overlaps the portion of the void 91, the aerosol is released directly from the heated tobacco aroma material 70 into the void 91, after which it is discharged and passes through the tip 62 with a very slight pressure drop. On the other hand, where the trace of the heater 94 overlaps the tobacco extrusion 80 (the heater overlaps - shredded tobacco), the closest sections of the tobacco extrusion 80 become heated along with the nearest sections of the tobacco plate 66. Accordingly, the mixed sorts of tobacco tobacco strang 80 contribute their own fraction of the total aerosol so as to contribute its taste and other subjective characteristics. Selected from tobacco rod 80 in the place of overlap of the heater - shredded tobacco 99 or near it, the aerosol undergoes some filtration and pressure drop as it passes through the tobacco rod 80 and the void section 91.

The aerosol formed from heating tobacco strang 80 has a distinctive characteristic and taste that can be changed depending on the mixture of tobacco sorts, as well as by regulating the amount of overlap followed by heater 94 of tobacco extrusion 80. The aerosol component that forms in the vicinity of emptiness 91 is released from cigarettes more immediately, because there is less thermal inertia in the void 91, and since the thermally evaporated tobacco substance in the void 91 is not affected by the pressure drop I use tobacco plug 80, and instead directly penetrates tip 62 through a free-flow filter 74. However, it has a characteristic that differs from the aerosol component released from tobacco plug 80 because it is released predominantly from tobacco flavor material 70 on the main plate 68 As will be described in more detail below, it has been found that in order to satisfy the smoker, the aerosol released from the cigarette 23 preferably includes both components of the aerosol to ensure immediate th transmission to the smoker and to include aromatic characteristic features peculiar mixed chopped tobacco varieties. As will also become clear from the subsequent provisions, the presence of the void 91 and its immediacy of the initial discharge, ensures consistent puffs on the cigarette 23 and contributes to the constancy between the cigarettes. This ratio is confirmed in the comparative characteristics of consecutive puffs of a partially filled cigarette 23 in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention (having shredded tobacco 80 and a void portion 91) compared to cigarettes 23 'of the first alternative design (see FIG. BA), which does not have the shredded tobacco inside its rolled-up tobacco plate, and the second alternative design (see FIG. 7A), which has a rolled-up tobacco plate completely filled with shredded tobacco. It should be understood that in these alternative designs depicted, tobacco plates 66 'and 66 contain a main plate 68 and a layer of tobacco flavor material 70 as in a preferred embodiment of the invention. Tobacco rods 60 'of these alternative designs also include an upper wrap 71.

To generate the comparative data shown in FIG. 6B and 7B, with the cigarettes shown in FIG. 2A and 7A, respectively, a serpentine-type heating element with an energy set at 15 joules was used.

In fig.bA, a cigarette adapted for smoking in an electric smoking system of the first alternative design contains a tobacco rod 60 'and a tip 62', each of which includes components indicated by the positions with the top bar corresponding to the components shown in FIG. 4A of the preferred embodiment. However, the tobacco rod 60 'of the cigarette 23' does not enclose the shredded tobacco inside its tobacco plate 66 ', and the free end 78' of the tobacco plate 60 'is equipped with a backflow filter 200'. The main plate 68 'of the tobacco plate 66' was of a type that includes carbon fiber as described above. The design of the cigarette 23 ', in addition, is described in detail in commonly assigned US patent No. 5.388.594 (PM 1697), which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety. For the purpose of the description below, references will be made to this cigarette 23 ', as to a cigarette without shredded tobacco 23'.

Let us now consider fig.bS, where an installation for conducting experiments using a smoking machine together with a smoking system 21 is presented. The output of the smoking machine was guided during each pulling through a smoke metering device with a bu transparent chamber 6v, where the light beam 6i from the source 6w passes through camera 6v to the photodetector 6z on the opposite side of the transparent camera 6v. The output of the photodetector 6z is processed to analyze the intensity of the light beam 6 and when it hits the photodetector 6z. Any tobacco spray passing through chamber 6v has the effect of scattering light on a beam of light 6i, so that any resulting change in the detectable light intensity on the photodetector 6z is the inverse of the total amount of particulate matter (OTPP) in the aerosol. In accordance with the practice of testing FTK cigarettes, it is preferred that the smoking machine produces standard two-second puffs in the smoking system 21.

The information shown graphically in FIG. Bb depicts the intensity recorded on the smoke metering device, depending on the time when the smoking machine passes through each of the puff sequences in the cigarette 23 'without shredded tobacco. The data show the following tendency: in the case of a cigarette 23 'without shredded tobacco, the first and second puffs are not consistent with the other three puffs, with the last three puffs much more consistent with each other; and that the aerosol exudes well before the two-second period of time expires for each puff. Cigarette 23 'without shredded tobacco is less consistent in the selection with the first few puffs, and consistency prevails only in the last puffs. The data on the first puff is quite consistent with the general observation that machine smoking of a cigarette 23 'without shredded tobacco releases a smaller amount of aerosol during the first puff, if no corrective measures are taken, such as punching a tobacco rod 60' or other measures proposed in the US patent No. 5.388.594 (PM 1697).

Consider now FIG. 7A, in which another design of an electric-powered cigarette 23 comprises a tobacco rod 60 and a tip 62 having components and apparatus similar to those in the preferred embodiment of the invention shown in FIG. 4A, with similar components provided with double top bar symbols. However, the cigarette 23 in FIG. 7A contains a backflow filter 200 at the free end 78 and a shredded tobacco 220, running along the entire length of the tobacco rod 60 between the backflow filter 200 and the free passage filter 74 of the tobacco rod 60. The tobacco column 220 of the cigarette 23 contains a mixture of tobacco varieties Burley, Bright and east with a rod density of 0.275 grams per cubic centimeter. The main plate 68 of the tobacco plate 66 is a carbon fiber plate as described above. In the following description, cigarette 23 will be referred to as cigarette 23 completely filled with shredded tobacco.

Consider now FIG. 7B, where measurements of the intensity of light from a smoke metering device 6y were associated with the development of a time lapse of each puff for a sequence of puffs numbered from one to seven for a cigarette full of crushed tobacco 23. The data presented in FIG. 7B show two recognizable trends in a cigarette designed according to a completely filled cigarette tobacco 23, that the first few puffs provide a significant release of aerosol, but you the division from this time is reduced to such an extent that the last three puffs provide essentially less emphasis than the first few puffs (if no corrective measures are taken); and in the case of a cigarette 23 completely filled with crushed tobacco, the release of aerosol is delayed, and the initial puffs (puffs one, two and three) do not reach the maximum excretion until the essential part of the two-second period has elapsed.

During the first few puffs, a cigarette 23 completely filled with crumbled tobacco tends to produce a larger total volume of aerosol than a cigarette without crumbled tobacco 23 '. A comparison of the data presented in Figures 7B and 6B confirms this general observation in that the total areas above the first few pulling curves in Fig. 7B in the case of a completely filled with shredded tobacco cigarettes 23 are larger than the total areas above the first several pulling curves fig.BV in the case of cigarettes without shredded tobacco 23 '. The area of each puff curve in FIG. 7B and FIG. BB represents the overall selection during this puff.

However, it is known that delaying the release of a completely filled cigarette tobacco 23 causes the smoker to undertake a prolonged, stronger draw in response to an unattended aromatic response from the cigarette 23. A more dramatic pull in may in turn lead to a more complete consumption (oxidation) of additional drawn in by the air, heated portions of the upper wrapper 71 and the tobacco plate 66, so that during the first few puffs there is a greater decay and possibly localized ushenie tobacco column 220. In addition, it is believed that immediately after the initiation of pyrolysis in a fully filled crumbling tobacco cigarette, it tends to be self-supporting because of the greater mass of tobacco fuel, and (or) due to its denser state. In any case, since the air can be drawn in much more easily into the tobacco rod through the places of the first several puffs burned through, it is believed that these localized openings short the necessary air flow paths of subsequent puffs. Consequently, excretion decreases during later puffs in the case of a cigarette completely filled with shredded tobacco 23.

The data and the explanation given above in Fig. 7B correspond to a general observation, showing that cigarettes 23 or traditional cigarettes, which are completely filled with broken tobacco 23, or when smoking them with electric lighters, tend to reduce the excretion during the development of their puffs.

In the case of puffs that further support pyrolysis, a completely filled cigarette 23 tends to form a large amount of aerosol in the later stages of puffing and can sometimes continue to produce an amount of aerosol beyond the time when the smoker is really drawn out with the cigarette. The latter situation can lead to the formation of after-spray aerosol, which can linger in the body 33 of the lighter 25, in particular, near or around the fixture 39 of the heater. Some of this post-tightening aerosol problematically condenses on the heating elements 37 or is delayed long enough to retract into the cigarette 23 during the next puff. Any consequence is detrimental to a pleasant and consistent taste.

Returning to fig.bB, where the puff curves of a cigarette without broken tobacco 23 'prove that the release of aerosol is minimized (where the pull curves are most reduced) much earlier than a standardized puff duration of two (2) seconds, and the selection is minimal at the last stages of puffing, so that the formation of after-spray aerosol is not such a problem in the case of a cigarette without shredded tobacco 23 '. However, as noted above, a cigarette without crumbling tobacco 23 'emits a significantly smaller total volume of aerosol than a completely filled cigarette tobacco 23 cigarette, sometimes it suffers from incompatibility in discharge during the first few puffs, and it lacks the subjective properties and flexibility that otherwise, it would be a pleasure if mixed (or even unmixed) shredded tobacco were included.

FIG. 8 shows the comparison of smoking on smoking mechanisms using the above-described device for measuring smoke in case of a cigarette constructed in accordance with a cigarette without chopped tobacco 23 ', completely filled with chopped tobacco cigarette 23 and partially filled with a chopped tobacco cigarette 23, designed in accordance with the provisions of the preferred embodiment of the present invention (as shown in FIG. 4A). In all of these cigarettes, a carbon fiber mat was used as the primary plate. As the data description in FIG. 8 shows, corresponding to the present invention

Table 1, a cigarette 23, which is partially filled with shredded tobacco, provides a more uniform excretion during smoking. It eliminates the drop in excretion that occurs with later puffs in a cigarette 23, which is full of crushed tobacco, and provides a more even release than a cigarette without broken tobacco 23 'during the first few puffs.

The cigarette 23 partially filled with shredded tobacco, tested for data collection used in Fig. 8, was partially filled with shredded tobacco so that the heater covering the void in the cigarette design was relatively large, approximately 6 mm. The heating elements 37 used to generate the data available in FIG. 8 were serpentine type with an energy of 15 joules per heating cycle.

Consider, in particular, Fig, where the data available on it are the amount of aerosol (in milligrams) produced during the first two seconds of each puff as puffs develop during smoking of each particular type of cigarette. Regarding the data available in Figures B and 7B, the amount of aerosol shown in Fig. 8 can analytically correspond to the integration of each tightening curve (defined above the area) from 0 to 2 seconds in Fig. BB and 7B.

Presented on Fig data clearly illustrate the decline in allocation, which is tested in the case of a completely filled with crumbled tobacco cigarettes 23 during the development from the first puff to the subsequent puffs. In contrast, a cigarette without shredded tobacco does not experience a decrease in excretion, as is the case with a completely filled with shredded tobacco cigarette 23.

The presentation of the data in FIG. 8 also clearly illustrates that a cigarette 23, partially filled with crumbled tobacco, provides a constant discharge compared to a cigarette without crumbled tobacco 23 'over six puffs. Moreover, this is due to the contribution of shredded tobacco to its taste and subjective impact.

Consider the table 1, where the collected data show how changes in the amount of overlap of the heater on the void in a cigarette, designed in accordance with the cigarette 23, can affect the selection. Available in table. 1 data was obtained during mechanical smoking of cigarettes partially filled with shredded tobacco, having 32 mm tobacco rod, 7 mm free-flow filter at the end with a tobacco rod tip and 30 mm tip length, where the heater track was 12 mm long and centered at the midpoint of the tobacco rod every cigarette.

Void length, mm four 7 ten
Heater overlap along the void, mm one four 7
Heater overlap along tobacco extrusion eleven eight five
Average OCTP 4.9 5.5 7.0
Adjustable average value of OCPP (the lowest readable values are omitted) 5.2 5.9 7.3
Standard Deviation of Adjustable Average 0.3 four 0.53 0.50

Figure 9 presents graphically the dependence of the allocated total amount of solid impurities (OTPP) on the amount of overlap of the shredded tobacco heater (in millimeters). The data shown in the drawing was obtained using standard testing techniques for determining FTC resin levels using Cambridge pads and two-second puff intervals in standard smoking mechanisms. The test cigarettes were partially filled with crushed tobacco cigarettes having a main plate with carbon fiber and a total length of 58 mm, except that the data shown on the ordinate axis in FIG. 9 were obtained from a cigarette without broken tobacco having a main plate with carbon fiber and the same overall length. When the tobacco heater overlapped, the heater trace remained of a constant length and remained centered about the middle of the tobacco rod. In line with this, any increase in tobacco overlap with a heater caused a proportional decrease in heater overlap of voids. The heater was a serpentine type, having a heater trace of approximately 10 mm. All the data together show that under these conditions there is a second-order relationship between the total amount of solid impurities released and the amount of overlap of the shredded tobacco heater. Presented on Fig.9 data and a separate set of data set in the table. 1 show that the amount of overlap by the heater of shredded tobacco can be adjusted to obtain the desired (planned) level of excretion in a cigarette 23 partially filled with shredded tobacco.

Adjusting the amount of overlap of shredded tobacco heater is the preferred way to achieve the desired level of tar in cigarettes partially filled with shredded tobacco for reasons including determining that changes in the overlap of shredded tobacco heater have a more defined and manageable effect on release than changes in the core density in tobacco rod 80. Besides In addition, this approach allows the choice of rod density in tobacco rod 80 for purposes that differ from tar level, such as hlymi ends and (or) the creation of a desired degree of pressure differential and (or) the filter at the free end 78 of the tobacco rod 60, or otherwise facilitate manufacturing. It also provides the ability to change the selection of tar among related cigarette products without the need to change either the tobacco plate 66 or the tobacco rod 80.

It is also favorable for choosing the relative sizes of a cigarette 23 partially filled with shredded tobacco and a clamping device 39 of a lighter heater 25 so that when a cigarette 23 is inserted into a lighter 25, each heating element 37 is positioned next to a tobacco rod 60 so that at least some , if not all traces of heaters were imposed only on the filled part of the tobacco rod 60 (on top of the tobacco extrusion 80). In such constructions, 91 weight emptiness still contributes to the formation of an aerosol and helps to cool the smoke. It is believed that the free passage filter 74 helps to accelerate the formation of an aerosol due to the presence of restriction of the flow of aerosol components when they are pulled through a wider portion of the void 91. In this regard, it should be noted that the free passage filter 74 of the tobacco rod 60 defines edges 73 and 75 when switching between him and the area of emptiness 91 on the one hand and between him and the free-flow filter 102 on the other hand, respectively. These edges 73 and 75 are due to the free-flow filter 74 having a smaller inner radius than any of the other two adjacent areas (voids 91 and the space enclosed within the free-flow filter 102). These edges 73 and 75 (and possibly other adjacent parts of the free-flow filter 74) are believed to contribute to turbulence and other flow patterns favorable for the formation of an aerosol from the components of the gas phase and the phase of particles emitted from the heated tobacco parts of the tobacco rod 60.

Consider now FIG. 10, where the cigarette 23a is constructed in accordance with another preferred embodiment of the present invention, having the same components and arrangements as established in the description of the cigarette 23 shown in FIG. 4A, but with an additional backflow filter 200a located at the free end 78a of the tobacco rod 60a. The backflow filter 200a prevents tobacco from the extrusion rod 80a from leaking through the free end 78a. The free-flow filter 200a may also be colored to indicate that cigarette 23a is a cigarette intended for use in an electric smoking device, instead of a cigarette fired with a match or a conventional cigarette lighter, as is the case with more traditional cigarettes. Although the backflow filter 200a is shown as a separate element of wrapped tobacco rod 80a, for the convenience of making a cigarette 23a, it is possible to combine the tobacco rod 80a with a reverse flow filter 200a using a rod wrap (not shown). In the case of a reverse flow filter extrusion, the cigarette 23a can be equipped with a tobacco extrusion 80a having a low core density without the risk of problems such as loose ends or falling out of the tobacco rod 60a. As shown in EP-A-0.615.411 and in the United States Patent Application Registration Number 07 / 943.504, registered on September 11, 1992 (RM 1550), and in the US Patent assigned in the usual way, which is in the process of simultaneous consideration. No. 5.388.594 (PM 1697), the backflow filter 200a is designed to limit or completely prevent the release of aerosol from the free end 78a of the tobacco rod 60a after the end of the puff and create a pressure drop at the free end 78a so that but limit the amount of air that is replenished into the cigarette 23a from the free end 78a, is proportional to the amount of air being passed along the sides of the tobacco rod 60a.

With regard to the technique of designing a partially filled cigarette tobacco 23 preferred embodiment of the invention, it is possible to use the energy of the heaters and the amount of overlap of the heater of the shredded tobacco to establish and / or control the release to the desired level of resin. Accordingly, during the design of a new, partially filled with crushed tobacco cigarette 23, the choice of rod density in tobacco rod 80 is usually available to achieve the required degree of pressure drop at the free end 78 and (or) to control the reverse flow in the same way as using the reverse flow filter 200a of alternative embodiment 23a.

Consider now FIG. 11, where another cigarette 23b, constructed in accordance with another preferred embodiment of the present invention, includes a tobacco extruder 80b, which contains a low-density section 310b adjacent to a 9lb void area and high-density sections 320b near the free end 78b of the cigarette rod 60b. The cigarette 23b is designed in such a way that the trace of the heater 94b overlaps the low density section SUB of the tobacco extrusion 80B so as to obtain an enhanced discharge achieved at lower rod densities. The area of high density of shredded tobacco 320b is located to avoid loose ends and to restrict air transfer in the axial direction through the rod 60b in a manner similar to the backflow filter 200a.

Preferred current embodiments of the heaters are shown in FIG. 12-21. These heaters are suitable for any of the above-described cigarette embodiments, that is, for cigarettes completely filled with chopped tobacco, partially filled with chopped tobacco and without chopped tobacco, shown in FIGS. 4A, 4B, 6AA, 7A, 10 and 11, and modifications of these cigarettes.

These heaters provide improved mechanical strength with repeated injections, adjustment and removal of cigarettes 23 and a significant improvement in the formation of aerosols from a heated cigarette, while maintaining the same energy requirements. It was found that the aerosols formed tend to flow radially inwards from the pulsating heater.

Usually, there are preferably eight heater blades 121 for providing eight puffs with the sequential ignition of the heater blades 121, thereby simulating the counting of the puffs of a conventional cigarette. Specifically, the heater blades 121 exit the sleeve 110 to form a cylindrical arrangement of the heater blades for receiving the inserted cigarette 23. Preferably, there is a gap 129 between the adjacent heater blades 121.

It may be desirable to change the number of puffs and, therefore, the number of heater blades 121 achieved when a cigarette is inserted into a cylindrical receiver CR. This required amount is obtained due to the formation of the required number of heater blades 121. This can be achieved by providing blades of equal or unequal size.

The fixture of the heater is located at the mouth of the receiver 27 of the lighter 25. The cigarette 23 is inserted, optionally initially with a backflow filter 200, into the mouth of the receiver 27 of the lighter 25, essentially into the cylindrical space of the clamping device 39, defined by a ring shaped tip 83 having an open end for receiving a cigarette, a cylindrical bushing 87 of the air channel, a heater assembly 100 including heater blades 121, an electrically conductive lead, or a common wire 104A, which serves as a common wire for heating elements of the heater assembly, electrically conductive positive pins or wires 104B and the spacer. The inner surface of the base 81 of the spacer stops the cigarette 23 in the desired position in the heater jig 39 so that the heater vanes 121 are located near the cavity 79 in the cigarette, and in the preferred embodiment of the invention are arranged as described above in connection with FIG. 1-11.

Essentially, the entire clamping fixture 39 of the heater is located inside and secured in place by a tight fit relative to the body 31 of the front part 33 of the lighter 25. The front edge 93 of the tip 83 is located preferably at the first end 29 of the lighter or passes slightly behind it and preferably includes a beveled inward or roundish in order to facilitate the direction of the cigarette 23 into or from the heater fixture 39. The terminals 104A and 104B preferably enter the respective sockets (not shown), thereby providing support for the fixture 39 of the heater in the lighter 25, and conductors or printed circuits lead from the outlet to the various electrical elements. Other leads may provide additional support for the strength of the lead assembly. These terminals 104A and 104B may contain any suitable material, and preferably contain tinned phosphor bronze. The passage 47 in the spacer sleeve and the base 50 is connected to the anti-torque sensor 45, and the photosensitive element 53 senses the presence or absence of the cigarette 23 in the lighter 25.

As seen in FIG. 12 and 13, the heater assembly 100 is preferably a monolithic structure that comprises eight heater blades 121 extending from the central sleeve 110 in a symmetrical arrangement or, as described below with reference to FIG. 19, in the form of an asymmetrical arrangement. As best seen from FIG. 13, the heater assembly defines a generally circular inlet 360, having a neck 365, which guides the cigarette injected in the direction of a coaxially arranged cylindrical receiver CR, the diameter of which is smaller than the inlet 360. The opening 360 is defined by the corresponding end sections 118B of the connecting sections 118 of the heater blades 121 , and the section of the neck 365 is determined by the section of the sections 118 between the connecting edge 118A and the end 118B. The edge of the inlet 360 preferably has a diameter greater than the diameter of the injected cigarette 23 for directing the cigarette to the CR receiver, and the CR receiver has a diameter approximately equal to the diameter of the cigarette 23 in order to ensure a tight fit for a good transfer of thermal energy. Cigarette 23 preferably has a diameter that is approximately equal to the diameter range known in the art. These acceptable manufacturing tolerances for the cigarette 23, a gradually narrowing region or neck 365 in the transmission between the distal end and the CR receiver can also serve to compress the cigarette slightly to increase thermal contact with the surrounding vanes 121 serving as the inner walls of the receiver. As a non-limiting example, the edge of the hole 360 preferably has an internal diameter of approximately 0.356 inches ± 0.02 inches (9.042 mm ± 0.508 mm), and the receiver CR preferably has an internal diameter of approximately 0.278 daim ± 0.02 daim (7.061 mm ± 0.508 mm) . Blades 121 can be bent inward to increase thermal contact with the cigarette due to the narrowing of the diameter of the cylindrical receiver.

Each U-shaped blade 121 of the heater includes a first section or leg 116A protruding from the first end of the sleeve 111, a connecting section 118 connected to the opposite second end of the first section or leg 116 A, and a second section or leg 116B protruding from the first end of the connecting section 118 towards the sleeve 111. The first and second legs 116A and 116B are separated by a gap 125, which may be relatively constant, preferably substantially parallel in any unfolded state, described below with reference to FIG. 18 and 19 are continuous in the direction of insertion of the cigarette in order to reduce undesirable cigarette obstacles, and are oriented to define a cylindrical receiver CR for the inserted cigarette 23. The connecting section 118 has a curved connecting edge 118A for connecting the opposite internal edges of the legs 116A and 116B of the vanes with such the way that an elongated U-shaped resistive path is formed, which is essentially parallel to the longitudinal axis of the inserted cigarette, and passes next to the cigarette, as described in more detail Sano below. The curved joint edge 118A preferably has a curvature of approximately 180 ° ± 20 °, so that a U-shaped blade is formed and has a curvature that is concave towards the sleeve 111 and convex towards the inlet 360. The first end of the first blade 116A of the blade near sleeve 111 can have an increased width, with the same approximate thickness, in section 115 relative to the remaining part of the first leg 116A to obtain a lower electric current density and energy density in section 115 in order to reduce ohmic th heating section 115. Furthermore, this expansion increases the mechanical integrity of the blade 121 at hub 111.

The second end 122 of the second leg 116B of the blade is preferably raised relative to the main part of the second section of the leg 116B in the form of a ledge to facilitate electrical connection with the corresponding positive terminal 104B. More specifically, as shown in FIG. 12 and 13, the end 122 comprises three sections, namely, section 122A, which is essentially a flat extension of the main section of the second blade foot 116B, a transition section 122B that rises at an angle, as shown, and a connecting end section 122C, which generally parallel to section 122A. Sections of end 122 may have a greater width than the second blade blade 122B to increase strength, in order to provide an appropriate contact area for a positive connection at the connecting end section 122C, and to reduce the density of electrical current and, thus, ohmic heating of the end 122. End section 122C is welded with a tack weld or electrically and mechanically connected using some other technical method to the positive terminal 104B.

FIG. 14 and 15, another embodiment of the invention is shown for obtaining positive connections of heater blades 121. The connecting end 122 is preferably not in the form of a step, as in FIG. 12 and 13; rather, it is essentially a flat continuation of the second leg 116B of the heater, which simplifies the manufacture described below. To reduce the possibility of short circuits resulting from contact between the positive end 122 with the sleeve 111 and (or) section 115 of the first leg 116A, as. for example, when twisting the injected cigarette or when another device is smoked, at the end 122, the sleeve 111 and the section 115, especially on the respective leading edges of these elements, an electrical insulating ceramic coating 300 is applied.

The ceramic coating is preferably applied in any known manner, for example, by plasma spraying onto a sleeve 111, a connecting end 122 and a section 115 of the first leg 116A. Ceramics preferably have a relatively high dielectric constant. Any suitable electrical insulator may be used, such as alumina, zirconia, mullite, cordierite, spinel, fosterite, a combination thereof, etc. They prefer to use zirconium dioxide or other ceramics with a thermal expansion coefficient that closely matches the thermal expansion coefficient of the underlying metal structure of the heater to eliminate the difference in expansion and compression ratios during heating and cooling, thereby preventing cracking and (or) delamination during work. The ceramic layer remains physically and chemically stable when the heater element is heated. For an electrical isolator, a thickness that is, for example, approximately 0.1-10 mil (0.00254 mm-0.254 mm) or approximately 0.5-6 mil (0.0127 mm-0.1524 mm), and more is respectful; preferably 1-3 mils (0.0254 mm-0.0762 mm). The portion of the end 122 is preferably not covered. Then, as described above, the positive terminals 104B are connected to this open area. To simplify masking, the corresponding section of section 115 is also not covered with ceramics.

Ceramics can also be applied, for example, at the same plasma spraying stage, in the gap 127 between the ends 122 and sections 115 of the first legs 116A and in the gap 126 between the ends 122 and sleeve 110 to form the ceramic structure of the sleeve, to increase the mechanical integrity of the heater assembly, as shown in FIG. 15. The size of this ceramic sleeve structure may be larger than shown. With or without this additional ceramic application, the ceramic coating electrically isolates the positive connecting ends 122, and the widths of the gaps 127 and 125 can be reduced, while protecting against short circuits is provided. In line with this, the end section 122 and section 115 of the first leg 116A may have an increased area, thereby further strengthening the receiver, and, in the case of the ceramic sleeve, increasing the skeletal structure and additionally strengthening the heater assembly. In addition, this ceramic coating smoothes the sharp edges that define the gaps 125 and 127, to reduce the chance of hooking and damaging a cigarette, especially during insertion, withdrawal and any kind of regulation produced by the smoker. Alternatively, the entire blade 121 and, in particular, the first and second legs 116 A and 116B completely cover on one surface, for example, the outer surface facing outward from the cigarette, the inner and outer surfaces and / or the edges defining the gaps with ceramic a layer of thickness, for example, about 2 mil (0.0508 mm) of zirconium dioxide, to strengthen the heater blades, maintaining gaps, if required. Blades 121 can be thinner, respectively, for example, from about 2 mils (0.0508 mm) to about 6 mils (0.1524 mm), thereby increasing the resistance of the heater path and allowing the blades to be made wider to increase the thermal interface with inserted cigarette 23, while at the same time maintaining the overall resistance of the scapula. This increased blade width, along with the ceramic layer, further strengthens the design of the heater. In addition, the ceramic coating on the outer surface of the vanes 121 facing away from the inserted cigarette can prevent heat losses from the heated blade into the surrounding space. Ceramics are preferably applied by plasma spraying or some other method described in related patent applications, and preferably applied by physical vapor deposition of coatings with an electron beam, in order to avoid targeting residual stresses that may be induced during plasma spraying. surface treatment and / or impact of particles.

Each blade 121 forms a resistive element of the heater. More specifically, the first end 115 of the first blade blade 116A is electrically connected to the negative terminal of the power source and is an integral extension of the sleeve 111 or mechanically and electrically connected to the sleeve 111, which, in turn, is electrically and mechanically connected to the negative terminal 104A using a weld or another technique, such as brazing or brazing. Two end terminals 104A are preferably used to provide balanced support, since the negative and positive connections also serve to mechanically support the heater. Thus, the sleeve 111 functions as an electric common for all heater blades 121. In any of the embodiments of the invention, the negative connection for each heater can be made separately, for example, by using a suitable negative contact applied to the end of the heater opposite to the corresponding sections 122 of the positive contacts.

A corresponding positive connection for each heater blade 121 is made at the connecting end section 122C of the second leg 116B of the blade, as described above. The connecting end section 122C is electrically isolated from the common sleeve 110 by means of a gap 127; from the first leg 116A of the blade and, in particular, from the first end 115 of the corresponding heater blade 121 using the gap 125; and from the adjacent heater blade with the aid of gap 131, in order to avoid short circuits and to enable thermal expansion. In addition, the described ceramic coatings are applied optionally. Alternatively, the connecting end sections 122C are connected, respectively, to ground.

Considered positive and negative connections provide a resistive path, and more specifically, a circuit for electric current coming from an electric power source, for example, through a control circuit, to a specific blade (blades) 121 when the smoking system is activated by pulling the smoker. The main heated area of the blade contains the first leg 116 A of the blade, the end portion 118A and the second leg 116B of the blade. Accordingly, a portion of the inserted cigarette 23 extending from below and in contact with the activated blade 121 extending along it will be heated along the outer surface contour corresponding to the heated portion of the blade, i.e. in the elongated U-shape corresponding to the blade lying above, first by conduction and radiation, with some addition of possible convection. In addition, the section of the inserted cigarette between the legs, i.e., lying under the gap 125, is heated by overlapping or crossing, the cumulative radiation and conduction heat transfer from both legs 116A and 116B. If the gap 125 is too large, the required overlap does not occur, and the portion of the inserted cigarette that lies under the gap 125 does not receive adequate heating. Likewise, the radiation and conductive heat heats the sections of the strips of the inserted cigarette, which are slightly behind the outer edges of the legs 116A and 116B of the heater blades. The various heated portions together constitute the heated region of the cigarette 23, which extends from a place slightly outside the outer edge of the leg 116A, under the leg 116A, through the gap 125, under the leg 116B and slightly beyond the outer edge of the leg 116B of the activated vanes 121, and which corresponds to the inhaling tobacco flavor. The size of the heated area depends on the configuration of the blade and the heating characteristics, as well as on the size and duration of the energy pulse. The heater blade is preferably sized and ultimately thermally designed to heat a plug-in cigarette segment having a sufficient size, for example, 18 square millimeters, to form a puff acceptable puff in response to a puff activated energy pulse.

The relatively large end sections 115 and 122 of the blades, forming part of the current path, do not heat up to these operating temperatures, since their relatively large volumes reduce the current density and, thus, reduce ohmic heating. The portion of the connecting end section 118 also does not heat to these operating temperatures, since the heating path tends to follow the end section 118A, and this section has a relatively larger volume and, accordingly, has a lower current density and, thus, has less ohmic heating than the section 118A and the adjacent sections. To further reduce unwanted heating of the remaining part of the connecting section 118, it is possible (1) to increase the thickness of the monolithic material of section 118 relative to the curved section 118A in the region 118C to further reduce the current density and ohmic heating, as shown in FIG. 14, (2) perforate section 118 to reduce the ohmic and / or heat conduction paths and (or) (3) add an additional heat sink 119 to section 118 to reduce heat transfer to the section, as shown in FIG. 15. To achieve this heat absorption function, a thermally non-conductive material is used, i.e. a heat insulator of the ceramic type. Examples of suitable ceramics include alumina, zirconia, a mixture of alumina and zirconia, mullite, etc., as in the case of coating a heater blade. Any of these modifications should be evaluated in terms of any adverse effect on the mechanical integrity of the connecting sections 118, which support the heater assembly 100 and define the opening for insertion and extraction of the cigarette.

After a pulse has been applied to the blade 12 ^ of the heater, there is a predetermined minimum time interval until the next delay is possible. Premature heating of a portion of a cigarette may also lead to undesirable and (or) partial formation of an aerosol or a decrease in the formation of heat on a portion of a cigarette to the required heating. Subsequent reheating of the previously heated area may result in the release of undesirable aromas and flavors.

If a longer tightening time is needed than is obtained by applying a pulse to one heater blade, then the control logic is configured to ignite another heater or additional heater blade (s) immediately after the pulse is applied to the original heater blade or during the end portion of the initial pulse , in order to heat another cigarette segment. An additional heater blade may be a radially sequential heater blade or another heater blade. Heater blades should be sized to produce the total required number of puffs of the required length.

In one embodiment of the invention, the number of heater blades 121 corresponds to the number of puffs required, for example, eight. In another embodiment of the invention, the number of heater blades 121 formed is equal to twice the number of puffs, for example, there are sixteen sections with heaters for a cigarette per eight puffs. This configuration provides different ignition sequences, unlike normal sequential ignition, after about 2 seconds, and preferably a radially sequential ignition sequence 47 for an embodiment in which the number of heating blades 121 corresponds to the number of puffs. For example, the logic circuit may dictate that two diametrically opposed heater blades 121, i.e. heater blades spaced 180 ° on the tube, are ignited simultaneously for the combined heating of a sufficient size of the cigarette to generate a puff to form a puff. Alternatively, the first ignition sequence of each other cigarette heater blade 121 is followed by a second ignition sequence of heater blades 121 located between them for the next cigarette. Alternatively, this first ignition sequence can be repeated for a predetermined period of existence of multiple cigarettes, and then a second ignition sequence is initiated. You can use any combination of heater blades. The number of heater blades may be less, equal to or greater than the number of puffs of one cigarette used. For example, for a six puff cigarette, you can use a system with nine blades, where for each subsequent cigarette a different set of six heaters ignites, and the bundled set of the remaining three heaters does not ignite.

The heater assembly 100 is electrically and mechanically fixed, respectively, at one end by welding the lead (s) 104A to the sleeve 110, and the leads 104B to sections 122. The leads 104A and 104B are preferably pre-pressed into the plastic sleeve or otherwise fixed relative to preferably minimizing air leakage. This attached end is preferably opposite the inlet 360. The connecting sections 118, and especially opposite edges 118B opposite to the connecting edges 118A, define the inlet 360. The end sections 118B can be expanded outwardly to define the neck 365. Then the blades 121 taper off from this neck for determine the inner diameter, which is slightly smaller than the outer diameter of the inserted cigarette 23, for example, at the middle of the blades, to ensure the required thermal contact, i.e. lev els of efforts between the shoulder blades and the cigarette. The end sections are free to expand when heated, i.e. the end sections 118B are not fixed. More specifically, each section 118B is located inside the corresponding channel 210 located in the inner wall 201 of the end tip 83 of the lighter. More specifically, the radial outward movement of the end portions 118B, which are displaced inside the blades 121, is stopped by the outer walls of the channels 210, thereby defining the displacement boundary and the displacement itself in the inward direction. This inward displacement may be supplemented by the internal displacement made, as described above. As shown in the drawing, the inner wall 201 expands outward so that the end portions 118B of the blades can be inserted. The outer wall of the channel 200, in contact with the section 118B, is sized and shaped to allow insertion of this section 118B to the appropriate end size so that the end of the blade does not leave channel 210 when the blade is heated or cooled or the cigarette is inserted or removed. If necessary, this radially outer wall of the channel is provided with an emphasis, for example, trapezoidal, which is in contact with the sections 118B. In an alternative embodiment of the invention, the portion 118D of the end portion 118B is rounded, and more specifically, is elliptical to the insertion end portion 118B. This rounded portion 118D allows the insertion portion to rotate inside the channel 210 under the action of thermal or mechanical induced moments, thereby supporting the inserted portion of the end of the blade inside the channel 210. Additionally or alternatively, the edges of the sections 118B are rounded even more.

For the first embodiment of the invention shown in FIG. 3, the channel 210 is of such size that the end 118B of the heater blades 12 can expand with movement in the direction of the end surface 202 of the channel 210 when the cigarette 23 is inserted and / or the blade is heated so that the required contact is achieved between a cigarette and paddles. Such a device, where one end of the blade is free relative to the opposite sleeve, provides mechanical movement and (or) thermal expansion and contraction of the heater blades 121 in the longitudinal direction with appropriate insertion of a cigarette and / or cooling of the blade, thereby reducing stress. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 14 of the second embodiment of the invention, the stop 204, which may have a trapezoidal shape, is located in the channel 210 so that the heater blade 121 expands thermally when heated or shifts when the cigarette 23 is inserted, the section 118B contacts the stop 204 and sets a pivot point, allowing the blade 121 is displaced inward towards the inserted cigarette 23, thereby reducing the stresses in the blade and increasing the required thermal contact, i.e. compressive forces between the blade and the cigarette. This means that, thanks to the turning point, the paddle 121 is free to rotate, but preferably does not move at the location of this stop 204.

Thus, the node 100 of the heater is preferably a monolithic structure, which is not necessarily covered with ceramics, as described above. The sleeve 111 and the blades 121 of the heater are made of a material having the required electrical resistance and strength. For example, materials having an electrical resistance in the range of from about 50 to about 500 μOm-cm, and more preferably from about 100 to about 200 μOm-cm are preferred, so that temperatures of from about 200 ° C to about 1000 ° C are reached, and preferably from approximately 400 ° C to approximately 950 ° C, and even more preferably from approximately 300 ° C to approximately 850 ° C by activating the blade 120 for approximately from 0.2 to approximately 2.0 with a pulse with an energy of approximately about 10 to about 50 J, more preferably from about 10 to about 25 J, and even more preferably about 20 J. The material should be able to withstand from about 1800 to about 10,000 such impulses without damage, significant deterioration or unwanted deflection of the blades 121.

The materials from which the blades 121 of the heater are made are preferably chosen to ensure reliable re-use in at least 1800 on-off cycles without breakage. The clamping device 39 of the heater can preferably be replaced separately from the lighter 25, including the source of electricity and the circuit, which is preferably replaced after 3600 cycles or more. Heater materials and other metallic elements are also selected based on their resistance to oxidation and the general absence of chemical activity to ensure that they do not oxidize or otherwise react with the cigarette 23 at any possible temperature. If necessary, heater blades 121 and other metal elements are sealed in an inert heat-conducting material such as a suitable ceramic material to further exclude oxidation and reaction.

However, more preferably, the blades 121 of the heater and other metal elements are made of a heat-resistant alloy, which is characterized by a combination of high mechanical strength and resistance to surface oxidation, corrosion and destruction at high temperatures. Heater blades 121 are preferably made of a material that is characterized by high strength and surface stability at temperatures up to about 80 percent of their melting point. Such alloys include alloys, commonly referred to as special alloys, and, in general, are based on nickel, iron and cobalt. For example, alloys mainly made of iron or nickel with aluminum or yttrium are suitable. The alloy of the heater blades 121 preferably includes aluminum to further improve the performance of the heater element, for example, by providing oxidation resistance.

Preferred materials include aluminides of iron and nickel, and more preferably the alloys disclosed in a US patent application with registration number 08 / 365.952, registered on December 29, 1994, and in particular with the application filed simultaneously with this patent application entitled Iron Aluminide Alloys, useful as electrical resistive heating elements (Case File No. PM 1769) still its entirety.

In addition to the Ni 3 Al alloy, several elements can be used. For section 122 of the heater, the principal additions are B and Si. It is believed that B enhances the strength of the grain boundary and is most effective when Ni 3 Al is enriched in nickel, for example, A1 <24 at.% (Atomic percent). Si is not added to Ni 3 Al alloys in large quantities, since the addition of Si above a maximum of 3 percent by weight forms nickel silicides and, upon oxidation, leads to SiO. Adding Mo improves strength at low and high temperatures. Zirconium helps to improve the resistance to cracking of oxide during periodic changes in temperature. In addition, Hf can be added to improve high temperature strength. The preferred Ni 3 Al alloy for use as the substrate 300 and resistive heater section 122 is referred to as IC-50 and is described to consist of approximately 77.92% Ni, 21.73% Al, 0.34% Zr, and 0.01 % B in work Processing of intermetallic aluminides V. Sikka, labor Intermetallic metallurgy and processing of intermetallic compounds, edited by Stoloff et al., Van Nestrand Reinhold, New York, 1994, table 4. To iron aluminide, you can add various items. Possible additions include Nb, C. Ta, Zr, Ti, Mn, Si, Mo and Ni. The heater material may be Haynes® 214 alloy (Haynes'® Alloy No. 214, a nickel-based alloy containing 16.0 percent chromium, 3.0 percent iron, 4.5 percent aluminum, with traces of yttrium and the rest (approximately 75 percent ), commercially available from Gaines International of Kokomo (Haynes International of Kokomo), Indiana), Inconel 702, MCrAlY alloy, nichrome alloys (54-80% nickel, 10-20% chromium, 7-27% iron , 0–11% copper, 0–5% manganese, 0.3–4.6% silicon, and sometimes 1% molybdenum, and 0.25% titanium, the content of 60% nickel, 25% iron, 11% chromium and 2% manganese , Nichrome II contains 75% nickel, 22% iron, 11% chromium and 2% manganese, and nichrome III is a heat-resistant alloy containing 85% nickel and 15% chromium), as described in the usual US patent application with registration number 08 / 380.718, registered January 30, 1995, and US Pat. No. 5,388,594, or materials having similar properties.

As shown in FIG. 12, the blades 12 of the heater are mounted in such a way that they protrude symmetrically from the sleeve 111. As an alternative, asymmetric devices are used. For example, a plurality of, for example, six or eight heater blades 121 can be divided, for example, into two equally numbered subgroups, for example, of three or four heater blades. The heater blades in each subgroup are separated by gaps 131, as described above. The subgroups are separated by wider gaps 133, as shown in FIG. 19 in an unfolded flat state. The gap 133 is determined in such a way that the conductive, and especially radiation heat transfer from adjacent blades 12 ^ of the adjacent subgroups is minimized to the section of cigarette 23 that lies under the gap 133. Accordingly, the gap 133 provides a wider non-heated and strong section of the cigarette, which is more durable than the unheated parts of a cigarette, which lie under narrower gaps 131, thereby improving the strength of the cigarette pack 23, helping to remove the cigarette after smoking and the subsequent heating and weakening of the cove If required, the logic circuit can activate simultaneously more than one heater in a symmetric or asymmetrical device.

The present invention, having two legs 116 A and 116B of the heater, separated by a gap 125, leads to significant improvements in the amount of aerosol released compared to the amount allocated by the solid heater element. A solid heater provides good heat transfer to the cigarette; however, the mass transfer of the aerosol into the inhaled air flow is compromised by a solid design that blocks the optimal entrainment of air located outside the cigarette into the cigarette, especially if the casing of the smoking system housing is provided with perforations to connect the air outside the casing with the outer surface of the cigarette. A heater in accordance with the present invention, having the same volume as a continuous heater but having a larger perimeter, leads to a more favorable opportunity for entrainment, for example, due to the gap 125, and, accordingly, leading to an improved odor release per unit of energy on the blade 121. As discussed, the gap 125 should be of such size as to provide optimal overlap of radiation for a given outline of the blade. Since a larger amount of aerosol is formed, the required mass of the blades can be reduced, at the same time forming the same required amount of aromatic substances, leading to a lighter block and reducing the energy required for proper heating of the heater blades 121 and the inserted cigarette, which further reduces the weight of the block, since the source of electricity, for example, rechargeable batteries, may be less. As a non-limiting example, the width of the gap 125 may be approximately 0.020 inches (0.508 mm) ± approximately 0.005 inches (0.127 mm), and the width of the legs 116 A and 116B of the blade may be approximately from 0.0125 daim (0.3175 mm) to about 0.017 daimy (0.4318 mm) ± approximately 0.005 daimy (0.127 mm), and a length of approximately 0.55 daimy (13.97 mm) ± approximately 0.005 daimy (0.127 mm), and a thickness of approximately 0.008 daim (0, 2032 mm) to approximately 0.010 inch (0.254 mm) ± approximately 0.005 daim (0.127 mm), and the length from the edge of the sleeve 110 to the tip of the connecting section and 118 may be equal to approximately 1.062 daim (26.975 mm) ± approximately 0.0625 daim (1.5875 mm).

It is found that the main transverse or radial air flow relative to the inserted cigarette leads to more smoke generation than the main longitudinal flow. Clearances 125, 127, and 131 provide air intake paths for contact with the inserted cigarettes. Using perforated sections of the heater blades, additional air passages are provided to optimize the transverse air flow.

FIG. 16 shows another embodiment of the blade geometry, where the first leg 116 A and the second leg 116B are sinuous. The winding legs 116A and 116B are parallel, so that the legs are evenly spaced, and the gap 125 also has a tortuous shape. Such a tortuous shape increases the perimeter of the blade and thus improves aerosol entrainment. This winding form is described in more detail in the aforementioned EP-A-0.615.411 and in the primary application assigned to the United States with registration number 08 / 380.718, registered on January 30, 1995, and US Pat. No. 5,388,594.

Now with reference to FIG. 18 and 19, a first preferred manufacturing method will be described. The manufacturing steps defined here can be performed in any desired order to achieve the desired manufacturing speed, materials, economy, etc.

To define a plurality of blades 121, passing generally perpendicularly through the respective first legs 116A of the blades and, in particular, through the respective first end sections 115, from a generally straight section 111A, in a comb-like device, form a sheet or strip of suitable material having a thickness of, for example, from about 2 to about 20 mils (0.0508 mm-0.508 mm), for example, about 10 mils (0.254 mm). The vanes 121 are substantially parallel to each other with a gap 131 located between the opposing edges of the second leg 116B of one blade and the first leg 116A of the adjacent blade. As already mentioned, the blades 121 either are arranged symmetrically with equal gaps 131 between them, as shown in FIG. 18, or asymmetrically, for example, with equal gaps 131 between adjacent blades 121 defining subgroups 121A and 121B of the blades, and a large gap 133 between two subgroups with a width X, as shown in FIG. 19. Note that the straight section 111A has two end portions with a length equal to at least half the length from one half X to form the second gap 133 when collapsed. These end sections must be larger than X to provide overlap for the joint. As a non-limiting example, the gap 131 may be approximately 0.040 inches (1.016 mm) ± 0.005 inches (0.127 mm) in width in any of the embodiments of the invention, and the gap 133 may be approximately 0.125 inches (3.175 mm) ± 0.005 inches ( 0.127 mm) in width in an asymmetrical embodiment of the invention.

The blades are configured as described above to form the connecting section 118 and the legs 116A and 116B.

Such formation of a sheet or strip of material into the desired configuration is performed using any conventional technique, such as punching or cutting, for example, using a CO 2 laser or a Yag laser. If the strip form is used, the number of heater blades 121 formed from the strip may exceed the required quantity for a single device of a cylindrical heater. Then, a straight strip is cut out, if necessary, to form sections 111A having the required number of heater blades 121 exiting from them. When used with stamping, the steps 122A, 122B and 122C are made in steps.

If applied, the ceramic coating 300 is then applied by masking the stamped profile and, for example, thermally spraying the coating onto sections 111A, 115, 122 or the entire blade, or some part of it to form the desired pattern, as already described. Alternatively, the ceramic coating is applied after the folding step using these processes or, if required, prior to the formation of the blades. As you know, suitable masking is used to determine the areas of application before performing each of the stages of applying the heater and ceramics.

Then section 111A is folded to form a circular sleeve 111. Section 111A can be folded in any direction. Section 111A is preferably folded so that the positive contacts of section 122C on end section 122 are on the outer surface of the formed cylindrical heater, i.e., on the side opposite the cigarette, in order to simplify the connection with the terminals 104B and to avoid damage during insertion and withdrawal of the cigarette. The rolled section can be rolled up to a diameter smaller than its maximum required diameter and inserted into the jig. Then the folded section expands and is further maintained in shape by means of electrical connections. Alternatively, the folded section is joined, for example, using some welding technique, such as spot welding or laser welding, to form the sleeve 111.

Each blade 121 is preferably biased in such a way that the legs 116A and 116B and the connecting ends 118A exert a compressive force on the inserted cigarette when the heater assembly is formed, as shown in FIG. 13. This offset preferably occurs prior to folding, but can be performed after folding. This displacement increases the thermal contact between the heater blade and the inserted cigarette in order to improve the heat transfer efficiency.

The efficiency of heat transfer is also improved by optimizing the size of the surface areas of the legs 116A and 116B of the blades, which are in effective thermal interaction with the cigarettes under them. As seen in FIG. 17A, in the described embodiments of the invention, the lower sides 117 of the legs 116A and 116B (the leg 116A is shown as an example) are flat, that is, the legs of the scapula, even in the transverse direction. To improve the heat transfer interaction, the lower side 117 is shaped in various non-planar forms, such as angle or curvature to maximize the surface of the heated leg relative to a cigarette without an undesirable increase in volume and, therefore, an undesirable decrease in current density and the resulting ohmic heating of the heater leg, as respectively shown in FIG. 17B and 17C. The profiled lower side 117 preferably does not pierce any part of the cigarette 23, excluding loosening and possible rupture of the cigarette during insertion, adjustment or withdrawal. Rather, the midpoint or top of the lower side 117 contacts or is in close thermal proximity to the cigarette 23, and the rest of the lower side 117 is in search of a chatting thermal interaction with the cigarette 23.

This configuration of the bottom side is preferably achieved by stamping the legs 116 A and 116B of the blades 121 in the unfolded state. This stamping can be carried out at the same time as the stamping to achieve the offset described above. This stamping, designed to be profiled on the underside, also increases the strength of the legs 116A and 116B, thereby eliminating undesirable short circuits and deformations.

Now the second manufacturing method will be described. Provide a tube of suitable material. Then the blades 121 are formed using any technical technique, such as laser cutting. Alternatively, the blades are formed using a die-forging method, in which the inner frame is inserted into the tube to form the blade profiles described, and then another crimp is used, either from the inside or the outside, to cut the profile. If necessary, a ceramic coating 300 is applied to the shaped tube as described above.

The present invention also minimizes potentially destructive thermally induced stresses. Since the blades 121 of the heater and the sleeve 111 are monolithic, the stresses arising from the interconnection of individual sections of the heating element are eliminated.

All of the various embodiments of the present invention are designed to allow the release of an effective amount of flavored tobacco in response to the smoker under standard conditions of use. In particular, it should be understood that at present it is desirable to allocate between 5 and 13 mg, preferably between 7 and 10 mg of aerosol for a smoker within 8 puffs, each puff being 35 ml puff having a two-second duration. It has been established that in order to achieve such a discharge, the heater elements 121 must be able to transmit the temperature, as described above, when interacting with heat transfer with the cigarette 23. In addition, the heater vanes 121 should preferably consume the described energy. Lower energy consumption is achieved by the heater blades 121, which are curved inward towards the cigarette 23 in order to improve the interaction of the thermal transfer.

Of course, the resistance of the heater is also dictated by a specific source of electricity, which is used to provide the necessary electrical energy to heat the heater blades 121. For example, resistances of heater elements 37 correspond to embodiments of the invention in which electric power is provided by four nickel-cadmium cells of batteries, connected in series, with a total voltage of an electrical source without load equal to approximately 4.8-5.8 volts. Alternatively, if six or eight such series-connected batteries are used, the heater blades 121 should preferably have a resistance between about 3 ohms and about 5 ohms, or between about 5 ohms and about 7 ohms, respectively.

FIG. 20 and 21 show another embodiment of a heater assembly 450 according to the present invention, comprising a plurality of heating elements 451. Each heating element 451 has the shape of an elongated U, both ends 452, 453 of the corresponding legs of each element are connected to the side wall of the cavity 430 near the end wall 443 cavities 430. Each respective end 452 is separately connected to control circuits, and ultimately to a source of electrical energy, for individually actuating the heating elements 451, and the ends 453 are connected together to ground. Although the ends 452 adjacent to the end of the mouthpiece of the cavity 430 are not electrically connected and thus do not have to touch the side wall of the cavity 430, they are nevertheless rotated to the side wall of the cavity 430, as shown in both FIGS. 20 and 21, to allow entry of a space to be placed, i.e. an inserted cigarette, as described above. It should be noted that in FIG. 21, the uppermost and lowermost elements 451 are shown cut along their U-shaped tops 454.

In the other embodiment of the heater assembly 470 shown in FIGS. 22 and 23 according to the invention, the heating elements 471 are located somewhat farther from the wall of the cavity 430, and each is equipped with some pointed tip 472 in (|) orms V, as well as a fold 473 to increase them stiffness. Thus, the heating elements 471 are actually piercing and passing into the deployable flow 57 to ensure the required close thermal contact. For this option, the open-cell foam structure described above is particularly well suited. In this embodiment, due to the fact that the heating elements 471 are located further from the side wall of the cavity 430, the ends 452, 453 are not attached to the side wall of the cavity 430, but to its end wall 443. Connections of the ends 452, 453 to the end wall 443 are preferably made through gaskets 480, which do not conduct any heat or electricity. Thus, the preemptive action pushes the remainder past the ends 452, 453 onto gaskets 480, where the residues do not overheat, as described in more detail in US Pat. No. 5,249,586. A perforation 412 is provided in the wall to allow external air to pass through section 420, as described in more detail in US Pat. No. 5.249. 586, which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety.

Specialists in this field of technology can understand many modifications, replacements and improvements, while not going beyond the nature and scope of the present invention, as described and defined here and in the claims below. For example, the decouring step can be performed prior to the cooling step by modifying a portion of the above process with reference to FIG.

Claims (91)

  1. CLAIM
    1. A cigarette (23) containing a tobacco rod including a tubular tobacco plate (66) and a tobacco rod (80) located inside the tubular tobacco plate, said tobacco rod has a free end (78) and the opposite end (72), and the tubular the tobacco plate contains a main plate (68) and a layer (70) of tobacco aromatic material supported by the main plate, which is adapted to transfer heat from the electrical heating element (37) to the tobacco aromatic material, while the tobacco rod Day (60) is adapted for prompt reception of an electric heating element (37) along the tobacco rod (60) ensuring its location between the free end (78) and the opposite end (72), the tobacco rod (80) is located near the free end and is spaced from the opposite end to form a portion of the void (91) between the tobacco extrusion and the opposite end.
  2. 2. Cigarette on π. 1, characterized in that the location of the heater along said tobacco rod is such that it covers at least part of the void portion (91) and overlaps at least part of the tobacco rod (80).
  3. 3. Cigarette on π. 1 or 2, characterized in that the tobacco rod includes a free-pass filter (74) adjacent to the opposite end, separated from the tobacco strand (80) with the provision of a void section (91) between the free-flow filter and tobacco strand.
  4. 4. A cigarette and a lighter adapted to interact as an electrical smoking system, in which the cigarette contains a tube of a tobacco plate, partially filled with shredded tobacco so as to determine the tobacco-filled part of the rod and the portion of the void (91), while the cigarette (23) and The lighter (25) is mutually adapted so that the electric heater at least partially overlaps at least one of the core-filled parts of the rod and the void when the cigarette is in the working position in the lighter.
  5. 5. Cigarette on and. 4, characterized in that the tobacco-filled part of the rod includes tobacco extrusion, and the electric heater covers at least part of the void portion (91) and overlaps at least part of the tobacco extrusion when the cigarette is in the working position in the cigarette lighter.
  6. 6. A cigarette according to claim 4 or 5, characterized in that it has a free end, a tobacco extrusion is located near the free end, furthermore the cigarette includes a tubular element, spaced from the extrusion from the tobacco so as to determine the portion of the void between the free-flow filter and the extrusion from tobacco.
  7. 7. A cigarette according to any one of the preceding paragraphs, characterized in that the tubular element is a filter.
  8. 8. Cigarette according to claim 7, characterized in that the tubular element is constructed from plasticized tow material.
  9. 9. The cigarette according to claim 7, characterized in that the tubular member is constructed from a cast material.
  10. 10. A cigarette according to any one of the preceding claims, characterized in that it further comprises a filter tip (62) adjacent to the opposite end.
  11. 11. A cigarette according to claim 10, characterized in that the tip (62) comprises a second free passage filter (102) adjacent to the opposite end, and a paper tip (64) attaching the second free passage filter (102) to the opposite end.
  12. 12. A cigarette according to claim 11, characterized in that the tip further comprises a mouthpiece filter extruder (104) adjacent to the second free passage filter (102).
  13. 13. A cigarette according to claim 12, characterized in that the free passage filter (74) of the tobacco rod (66) includes a first pass, and the second free passage filter (102) of the tip includes a second pass, the first and second passes connecting the void section (91 a) tobacco rod with extrusion of filter material (104) mouthpiece, where the second passage has a second inner radius greater than the first inner radius of the first passage.
  14. 14. A cigarette according to claim 12, characterized in that the tobacco rod further comprises a backflow filter (200) at the free end.
  15. 15. A cigarette as claimed in claim 12, characterized in that the tobacco plug (80b) includes a first section (320b) adjacent to the free end (78b), having a higher density than the second section (sb) tobacco tobacco rod distant from free end.
  16. 16. A cigarette (23) containing a tobacco rod (60) having a free end (78) that prevents reverse flow and an opposite end (72), the tobacco rod containing a tobacco pipe plate (66) including a layer of tobacco material (70) and means narrowing the flow at the opposite end of the tubular plate, and tobacco extrusion (80), in working relation located near the said free end and at a distance from said means of narrowing the flow, moreover, the tobacco contains crushed tobacco partially filling the said tobacco s A rod in such a way as to determine the filled section of the tobacco rod and the empty section of the tobacco rod, said empty area being located adjacent to the flow restriction means, said tubular plate capable of conveying heat produced by it to tobacco, and the tobacco rod (60) is thus that during the tightening of the above-mentioned cigarette with the application of heat along the region of the tubular plate, at least part of the tobacco creates a release of tobacco aerosol, which pulls through said flow restriction means.
  17. 17. A cigarette according to claim 16, wherein said flow restriction means is defined by a tubular element.
  18. 18. A cigarette according to claim 17, characterized in that the tubular element comprises a first free passage filter (74) having a first pass through it, a tip (62), which includes a second tubular free passage filter (102) located adjacent to the first filter free passage of the rod and having a second passage through it, with the first passage of the first free passage filter narrower than the portion of the void (91) of the tobacco rod, and narrower than the second pass of the second free passage filter (102).
  19. 19. A cigarette according to claim 18, characterized in that the crushed raw tobacco forms a reverse flow resistance strand.
  20. 20. A cigarette as claimed in claim 19, characterized in that the shredded ground tobacco (80) is located at the free end (78) and has a density higher than the rest of the shredded tobacco that is remote from the free end.
  21. 21. Cigarette according to claim 20, characterized in that the tip (62) further comprises a filter (104) of the mouthpiece next to the second free passage filter (102).
  22. 22. Cigarette according to claim 20, characterized in that the tubular plate includes a wrapping material (71) of the cigarette around said tobacco rod (60), where said tip is attached to said tobacco rod with a paper tip (64).
  23. 23. A cigarette according to any one of the preceding paragraphs, characterized in that the tobacco or the tobacco strand (80) contains finely ground tobacco.
  24. 24. Cigarette according to item 23, characterized in that the tobacco or tobacco strand (80) contains a mixture of crushed main tobacco, which includes a combination of at least two of the varieties Bright, Burley and Oriental tobacco.
  25. 25. Cigarette according to item 23 or 24, characterized in that the tobacco strand includes a wrapper (84) of the extrusion located around the crushed strand of the minced tobacco (80).
  26. 26. Cigarette according to item 23 or 24, characterized in that the aromatic tobacco material (70) is located on the inner surface of the tubular tobacco plate (66).
  27. 27. Cigarette according to claim 26, characterized in that the tobacco rod contains an outer wrapper (71) located around the outer surface of said tubular tobacco rod or rod section.
  28. 28. A method for improving smoke emission from a cigarette (23) operating with an electric lighter, wherein said cigarette comprises a tubular plate (66) having a free end (78) and an opposite end (72), where smoke can be pulled out from said opposite end, and The method comprises the steps of providing a void section along said tubular plate near the opposite end and a tobacco-filled area along the tubular plate near the free end, and overlaying an element of the electric heater, at least re, partially on top of the filled portion of the tubular plate, with the activation of the element of the electric heater in such a way as to cause the release of smoke constituents from said tobacco.
  29. 29. The method according to p. 28, wherein the step of overlaying includes overlapping an element of an electric heater partially over a filled portion of the tubular plate and a portion of the hollow of the tubular plate with ensuring activation of the element of the electrical heater.
  30. 30. The method according to p. 28 or 29, characterized in that it further comprises the step of passing the released tobacco components through a tool located near the opposite end.
  31. 31. A tobacco plate adapted to collapse into a tubular tobacco rod (60) a cigarette (23) operating with an electric cigarette lighter (25), where said tobacco plate contains a main plate (68) and an aromatic tobacco material (70) located along the first side of the main plate, which contains a combination of tobacco fiber and cellulose fiber, where the tobacco fiber and cellulose fiber are combined with a ratio in the range of approximately from 2: 1 to 4: 1, and the main plate has a specific weight c in the range of approximately 35 to 45 g / m 2 , the aromatic tobacco material has at least twice the specific weight of the main plate, and contains fine tobacco sludge and extracted tobacco particles with a ratio in the range of approximately 3: 1 to 9: 1 and a humidifier at a level of from about 5 to about 20% by weight of said material.
  32. 32. Tobacco plate on p. 31, characterized in that the aromatic tobacco material has a specific gravity of about 3-4 times higher than the proportion of the main plate.
  33. 33. Tobacco plate p. 31 or 32, characterized in that the aromatic tobacco material further comprises pectin at a level of up to about 2% by weight of said tobacco material.
  34. 34. Tobacco plate according to p.ЗЗ, characterized in that the main plate contains about 28 g / m 2 of tobacco fiber and about 12 g / m 2 of cellulose fiber of wood pulp or flax pulp, or pulp from the midrib of tobacco leaf.
  35. 35. Tobacco plate according to clause 34, wherein the tobacco material contains from about 66 to 71% by weight of tobacco particles, from about 16 to 20% by weight of extracted tobacco solids, from about 10 to 14% by weight of glycerin and about 1-2% pectin.
  36. 36. A tobacco plate adapted to twist into a tubular tobacco rod (60) of a cigarette (23) operating with an electric lighter (25), where said tobacco plate contains a main plate (68) and an aromatic tobacco material (70) located on the first side the main plate, which contains a combination of tobacco fiber with a specific gravity of approximately 20 to 30 g / m 2 , and carbon fiber with a specific gravity of approximately 2-9 g / m 2 , and pectin with a specific gravity of approximately 1 g / m 2 , the tobacco material has a specific gravity of 3-4 times the specific weight of the main plate and contains fine tobacco sludge and extracted tobacco solid elements with a ratio in the range of approximately from 3: 1 to 9: 1, and a humidifier with a level in the range of approximately from 5 to 20% by weight of tobacco material.
  37. 37. A cigarette operating with an electric cigarette lighter, wherein said cigarette contains a tubular tobacco rod (60) constructed from a tobacco plate corresponding to any of claims 31 to 36.
  38. 38. Cigarette according to claim 37, characterized in that it further comprises a shredded tobacco strand (80) near the free end (78) of the tobacco rod (60), at least one tubular free-flow filter (74) near the opposite end (72) a tobacco rod and a void (91) without filler, located between the shredded tobacco extrusion and a free-flow tubular filter.
  39. 39. A method of manufacturing a tobacco plate (66) comprising a main plate (68) and a layer of aromatic tobacco material (70), wherein the tobacco plate can be bent into a tubular form as part of a cigarette (23) adapted for acting with an electric lighter ( 25), containing the stages of extraction of soluble substances (step 124) from the fibers of raw tobacco, and said soluble substances include dissolved tobacco constituents, forming (step 128) the main plate by forming a suspension from the section a tobacco fiber with a hardening agent to form a slurry mixture and cast (step 130) the slurry mixture in a plate-forming device, prepare (step 146) tobacco material by mixing a solution of tobacco components with additional tobacco particles so as to form a dispersion of tobacco material, and adjusting the water content so as to obtain a solids content in the dispersion in the range of from about 20 to 35%, applying (step 144) a dispersion of tobacco Container material to the main plate to form a sheet of said tobacco plate controlling at least one of the variables - the moisture content of the tobacco leaf and the temperature under conditions such that the sheet becomes prone adhesion to itself and the winding of the tobacco leaf.
  40. 40. The method according to claim 39, wherein the separated soluble substances comprise 563% by weight of tobacco constituents and the solution of tobacco constituents comprises at least one of glycerol and pectin.
  41. 41. The method according to p. 40, characterized in that the solution of tobacco soluble substances contains approximately 7-8% by weight of dissolved tobacco components.
  42. 42. The method according to paragraph 41, wherein the amount of water is adjusted to obtain a dispersion at the end of the mixing step with about 22-27% solids.
  43. 43. The method according to claim 42, characterized in that the size of the tobacco particles is kept in the range of about 100-220 mesh.
  44. 44. The method according to p. 43, characterized in that the size of the tobacco particles is kept at about 120 mesh.
  45. 45. The method according to any one of paragraphs. 39-44, characterized in that the hardening agent of the suspension contains at least one of wood pulp, flax pulp and pulp of the midrib of the tobacco leaf.
  46. 46. The method according to any of paragraphs 39-45, characterized in that the step of applying includes applying the above-mentioned dispersion of tobacco material on the main plate when the ratio of weight in a dry state, is at least 2: 1.
  47. 47. The method according to any of paragraphs 39-46, characterized in that the step of applying includes applying a dispersion of tobacco material on the main plate when the ratio of weight in a dry state, equal to at least 3: 1.
  48. 48. The method according to any of paragraphs 39-47, characterized in that the step of regulation includes drying the leaf of the tobacco plate to its moisture content in the range of about 8.5-12% and cooling the sheet.
  49. 49. The method according to p. 48, characterized in that it further comprises the step of decullerating a leaf of a tobacco plate before the step of winding.
  50. 50. The method according to p. 49, characterized in that it includes the step of separating a roll of a leaf of a tobacco plate to form a reel of a tobacco plate.
  51. 51. Tobacco plate p, characterized in that the tobacco fiber has a specific gravity of approximately 24-28 g / m 2 , carbon fiber has a specific weight of approximately 2-4 g / m 2 , and pectin has a specific weight approximately 2.5-1.5 g / m 2 .
  52. 52. A heater (39) for use in a smoking system having a source of electrical energy for heating a cigarette, the heater comprising a plurality of electrical resistive heater vanes (121) defining a receiver for receiving the inserted cigarette and running along the inserted cigarette, where each blade contains the first leg (116 A) heater blades having a first end and a second end, a second leg (116B) of a heater blade, having a first end and a second end (122), and a connecting section (118) connecting the second end the first leg of the heater blade and the first end of the said second leg of the heater blade, the first and second legs of the heater blade of each heater blade are separated by a corresponding gap (125), and the first ends of the first leg of the heater blade are adapted for electrical connection with the source of electrical energy in which corresponding resistive heating paths containing the first leg of the heater blade, the connecting section and the second leg of the heater blade to match Nogo heating each of the electrical resistive heater blades along first and second legs, which in turn heats the inserted cigarette, wherein the first ends of the first legs of the blades have a common connection.
  53. 53. The heater according to paragraph 52, wherein the first ends of the first legs (116A) of the heater blades are grounded.
  54. 54. The heater according to paragraph 52 or 53, characterized in that the common connection of the first ends of the first legs of the blades is a sleeve.
  55. 55. The heater according to any one of paragraphs.52-54, characterized in that the gap (125) separating the first and second legs of the heater blades has such a size, chosen to allow for the entry of air flow into the heated cigarette when smoked.
  56. 56. The heater according to any one of paragraphs.52-55, characterized in that it further comprises a supporting sleeve (111), with the first ends of each of the first legs (116A) of the heater blades extending from the supporting sleeve, which is adapted to provide electrical contact with an electrical source energy in order to form common for the first ends of the first legs of the heater blade.
  57. 57. The heater according to claim 56, characterized in that the ends of the second legs (116B) of the heater blades are adapted to be in appropriate electrical contact with a source of electrical energy, in which the corresponding heating resistive circuits are formed, containing the first leg of the heater blade, the connecting edge section and the second heater blade, in order to heat up each of the electrical resistive vanes (121) of the heater, which, in turn, heats the inserted cigarette.
  58. 58. A heater as claimed in Claim 56 or 57, characterized in that the second ends (122) of the second legs (116B) of the heater blades go towards the supporting sleeve (111) and are electrically insulated from it.
  59. 59. The heater according to claim 56 or 57, characterized in that the second ends (122) of said second legs (116B) of the heater blades are separated from the sleeve by a gap.
  60. 60. The heater according to claim 56, characterized in that it further comprises an electrical insulator applied at least to one of the sides of said sleeve and the second ends (122) of said second legs of the heater blades.
  61. 61. Heater and. 56, characterized in that it further comprises an electrical insulator applied to at least one of the second ends of the said second legs of the heater blades and the first ends of the said first legs of the heater blades.
  62. 62. A heater according to Claim 56, characterized in that it further comprises an electrical insulator (300) forming a ceramic structure supporting the sleeve around said supporting sleeve (111), second ends (122) of the second legs (116B) of the heater blades and first ends of said first legs (116A) of the blades of the heater.
  63. 63. The heater according to any one of paragraphs. 56-62, characterized in that the support sleeve and the blades are monolithic.
  64. 64. The heater according to any one of paragraphs.52-63, characterized in that the connecting section (118) further comprises a free end (118B) to compensate for thermal expansion when the heater element is heated.
  65. 65. The heater according to claim 64, characterized in that it further comprises a support structure (83) fixedly located inside the smoking system and defining channels (210) for receiving the free ends (118B) of the connecting sections of the blades (121).
  66. 66. The heater on p. 65, characterized in that the channels (210) are arranged to transfer thermal expansion and contraction of the heater blades.
  67. 67. The heater according to claim 65 or 66, characterized in that it further comprises an abutment (204) in each of the channels, arranged so that the corresponding free end (118B) of the connecting section can be rotated relative to the turning points in order to displace the first and second legs (116A and 116B) the heater blades inward towards the inserted cigarette when the corresponding heater blade is heated.
  68. 68. The heater according to any one of paragraphs.52-67, characterized in that portions of at least one of the first leg (116A) of the heater blade and the second leg (116B) of the heater blade are coated with ceramics for the purpose of hardening and electrical insulation, at least least one of the first and second legs of the blades of the heater.
  69. 69. The heater according to claim 68, characterized in that the portion of said second leg (116B) of the heater blade near the ceramic is adapted to provide electrical contact with a source of electrical energy.
  70. 70. The heater according to any one of paragraphs.52-69, characterized in that the vanes (121) are arranged to receive the inserted cigarette by sliding.
  71. 71. The heater according to any one of paragraphs.52-70, characterized in that the second end of the second leg of the heater blade has a stepped shape that contains an end section (122C) adapted to provide electrical contact with a source of electrical energy.
  72. 72. The heater according to any one of paragraphs.52-71, characterized in that the first and second legs (116A, 116B) of the corresponding heater blade (121) are essentially parallel.
  73. 73. The heater according to any one of paragraphs.52-72, characterized in that the connecting edge has a curvature of between about 160 and 200 °.
  74. 74. The heater according to any one of paragraphs.52-73, characterized in that the underside of at least one of the first and second legs (116A, 116B) of the heater blade, facing the inserted cigarette, is made substantially non-flat in the transverse direction mentioned legs of the blades of the heater.
  75. 75. The heater on p. 74, wherein the lower side is curved.
  76. 76. The heater on p. 74, wherein the lower side is angled.
  77. 77. The heater according to any one of paragraphs.52-76, characterized in that the plurality of electric resistive vanes (121) of the heater are arranged in groups, and the gaps (133) between the groups are sized to provide unheated sections of the inserted cigarette to increase strength and facilitate removal of the cigarette after smoking
  78. 78. The heater according to any one of paragraphs.52-77, characterized in that at least one of the aforementioned first and second legs (116A, 116B) of the heater blade has a tortuous shape.
  79. 79. The heater according to claim 78, characterized in that the first and second legs of the scapula are sinuous and mutually parallel, so that a sinuous space is formed between the legs.
  80. 80. The heater according to paragraph 52, wherein at least one end of at least one blade (121,122) is wider than the adjacent active portion of at least one leg, and the end of this leg has a lower density current and lower ohmic heating than the active area of the mentioned legs.
  81. 81. The heater according to any one of paragraphs. 52-80, characterized in that the connecting section (118) is perforated.
  82. 82. The heater according to any one of paragraphs.52-81, characterized in that the first and second legs (116A, 116B) of the heater blades are made with the possibility of displacement inwards towards the inserted cigarette.
  83. 83. The heater according to any one of paragraphs. 52-82, characterized in that the first and second legs (116A, 116B) of the heater blades and the connecting sections have a resistance of approximately from 100 to 200 µOhm-cm.
  84. 84. The heater according to any one of paragraphs.52-83, characterized in that the first and second legs (116A, 116B) of the heater blades and the connecting sections have a resistance of approximately from 50 to 500 µOhm-cm.
  85. 85. The heater according to any one of paragraphs. 52-84, characterized in that the first and second legs (116A, 116B) of the heater blades and the connecting sections are able to reach temperatures in the range from approximately 200 to approximately 1000 ° C for approximately 0.2 to approximately 2.0 with a pulse with energy from about 10 to about 50 joules.
  86. 86. The heater according to Claim 85, wherein the first and second legs (116A, 116B) and the connecting sections are capable of receiving pulses to achieve such temperatures for from about 1800 to about 10,000 such pulses.
  87. 87. The heater according to claim 52, characterized in that the gap (125) separating the first and second legs (116A, 116B) of the heater blades has dimensions chosen taking into account minimizing the cumulative radiating heating from each of the legs of the heater blade of the section of the inserted cigarette, located under the gap.
  88. 88. The heater according to any one of paragraphs.52-87, characterized in that the first and second legs (116A, 116B) of the heater blades and sections of the connecting section contain an electrosistive material selected from the group consisting of iron aluminides and nickel aluminides.
  89. 89. Electric smoking system containing a cigarette and a lighter, characterized in that the cigarette is made according to any one of paragraphs. 1-3, and the lighter has a plurality of resistive heater blades defining a receiver for receiving heater blades, whereby the blades at least partially overlap said tobacco extrusion when introducing said cigarette into said receiver.
  90. 90. The electrical smoking system of claim 89, wherein the heater blades extend along the length of the tobacco rod and partially overlap the void.
  91. 91. Electric smoking system according to and. 89 or 90, characterized in that the lighter includes a heater corresponding to any of paragraphs.52-88.
EA199700332A 1991-03-11 1996-04-19 The cigarette and the heater for use in an electrical smoking system EA000244B1 (en)

Priority Applications (4)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US08/425,166 US5692525A (en) 1992-09-11 1995-04-20 Cigarette for electrical smoking system
US08/425,837 US5499636A (en) 1992-09-11 1995-04-20 Cigarette for electrical smoking system
US08/426,165 US5591368A (en) 1991-03-11 1995-04-20 Heater for use in an electrical smoking system
PCT/US1996/005417 WO1996032854A2 (en) 1995-04-20 1996-04-19 Cigarette and heater for use in an electrical smoking system

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
EA199700332A1 EA199700332A1 (en) 1998-04-30
EA000244B1 true EA000244B1 (en) 1999-02-25

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ID=27411456

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Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
EA199700332A EA000244B1 (en) 1991-03-11 1996-04-19 The cigarette and the heater for use in an electrical smoking system

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EP (1) EP0822760B1 (en)
JP (1) JP3996188B2 (en)
CN (1) CN1113620C (en)
AR (1) AR002035A1 (en)
AT (1) AT242980T (en)
AU (1) AU711837B2 (en)
BR (1) BR9608201A (en)
CA (1) CA2218595C (en)
DE (2) DE69628745D1 (en)
DK (1) DK0822760T3 (en)
DO (1) DOP1996005265A (en)
DZ (1) DZ2022A1 (en)
EA (1) EA000244B1 (en)
ES (1) ES2202437T3 (en)
HR (1) HRP960185A2 (en)
HU (1) HU228654B1 (en)
MA (1) MA23846A1 (en)
MX (1) MX9708035A (en)
MY (1) MY119710A (en)
NO (1) NO317865B1 (en)
NZ (1) NZ306882A (en)
OA (1) OA10628A (en)
PL (2) PL182861B1 (en)
PT (1) PT822760E (en)
RO (1) RO120750B1 (en)
SK (1) SK284345B6 (en)
TR (1) TR199701210T1 (en)
TW (1) TW318780B (en)
WO (1) WO1996032854A2 (en)

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