DE202015008006U1 - Light-emitting diode module and lighting device - Google Patents

Light-emitting diode module and lighting device

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Publication number
DE202015008006U1
DE202015008006U1 DE202015008006.5U DE202015008006U DE202015008006U1 DE 202015008006 U1 DE202015008006 U1 DE 202015008006U1 DE 202015008006 U DE202015008006 U DE 202015008006U DE 202015008006 U1 DE202015008006 U1 DE 202015008006U1
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DE
Germany
Prior art keywords
light
emitting diode
strands
mains voltage
vl
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Active
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DE202015008006.5U
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German (de)
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Zumtobel Lighting GmbH, Germany
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Zumtobel Lighting GmbH, Germany
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Application filed by Zumtobel Lighting GmbH, Germany filed Critical Zumtobel Lighting GmbH, Germany
Priority to DE202015008006.5U priority Critical patent/DE202015008006U1/en
Publication of DE202015008006U1 publication Critical patent/DE202015008006U1/en
Application status is Active legal-status Critical
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical

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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05BELECTRIC HEATING; ELECTRIC LIGHTING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05B45/00Circuit arrangements for operating light emitting diodes [LED]
    • H05B45/40Details of LED load circuits
    • H05B45/44Details of LED load circuits with an active control inside an LED matrix
    • H05B45/48Details of LED load circuits with an active control inside an LED matrix having LEDs organised in strings and incorporating parallel shunting devices

Abstract

A light emitting diode module comprising: a plurality of light emitting diode strands (21, 22, 23); for each of the light-emitting diode strands (21, 22, 23), a switch (31, 32, 33) for connecting the respective light-emitting diode string (21, 22, 23) to a mains voltage (VL); for each of the light-emitting diode strings (21, 22, 23), a current regulator (41, 42, 43) for controlling a current through the respective light-emitting diode string (21, 22, 23); a zero crossing detector (60) for detecting zero crossings of the mains voltage (VL); and a controller (50), which is designed to control the switches (31, 32, 33) such that each of the light-emitting diode strands (21, 23, 24) in each case at a time, which for this light-emitting diode strand (21, 22, 23 ) is defined in relation to a zero crossing detected by the zero crossing detector (60) is temporarily connected to the mains voltage (VL).

Description

  • TECHNICAL AREA
  • The present application relates to light emitting diode modules, in particular light emitting diode modules which can be flexibly equipped with different configurations of light emitting diode strands. Furthermore, the present application relates to lighting devices with one or more such light-emitting diode modules.
  • BACKGROUND
  • In the case of light-emitting diode-based light-emitting devices, it is known to use light-emitting diode modules which have a plurality of strings of light-emitting diodes connected in series, referred to below as light-emitting diode strings. In such light-emitting diode modules, it is possible to supply the light-emitting diode strings in a so-called AC operation directly via a mains voltage of, for example 230 V or 120 V, without a special LED driver would be required to convert the mains voltage into a DC voltage signal with a low voltage level. Occasionally, such light-emitting diode modules can also be designed for a so-called DC operation. An adapted for DC operation LED module additionally has a rectifier, via which the light-emitting diode strands are connected to the mains voltage.
  • In such based on several light emitting diode strands LED modules, however, there are problems in that at a certain mains voltage, for. B. of 230 V, a corresponding configuration of the light-emitting diode strands must be selected. In particular, here are limitations with respect to the type of LEDs used and the number of light-emitting diodes in a light-emitting diode strand. Furthermore, it may be problematic due to different requirements regarding operating voltage or current, different types of light-emitting diodes, for. As multi-junction LEDs and single-junction LEDs, to combine in a light emitting diode module.
  • SUMMARY
  • There is a need for light emitting diode modules that provide improvements in terms of the disadvantages described above. There is a particular need for light-emitting diode modules in which different configurations of light-emitting diode strands can be used flexibly.
  • According to one exemplary embodiment, a light-emitting diode module is provided, which comprises a plurality of light-emitting diode strands. Typically, such a light emitting diode string comprises one or more light emitting diodes connected in series. These may be conventional single-junction type light emitting diodes or multi-junction type light emitting diodes. For each of the light-emitting diode strings, the light-emitting diode module comprises a switch for connecting the respective light-emitting diode string to a mains voltage. The mains voltage may in particular be an AC voltage of 230 V or 120 V. Furthermore, the light-emitting diode module for each of the light-emitting diode strands comprises a current regulator for controlling a current through the respective light-emitting diode string. Such a current regulator can be realized in various ways, for. B. based on a variable resistor and / or current mirror. In addition, the light emitting diode module includes a zero crossing detector for detecting zero crossings of the mains voltage. Furthermore, the light-emitting diode module comprises a controller, which is designed to control the switches such that each of the light-emitting diode strands is temporarily connected to the mains voltage at a time which is defined for this light-emitting diode string in relation to a zero crossing detected by the zero-crossing detector.
  • By means of the control of the switches depending on the zero crossings of the mains voltage can be achieved that at the time at which a particular light-emitting diode is connected to the mains voltage, the instantaneous level of the mains voltage has a suitable voltage for the light-emitting diode string. Thus, for example, a light-emitting diode string can be designed for a low voltage drop across the light-emitting diode string and accordingly be connected to the mains voltage at a time which is close to a zero crossing of the mains voltage. Conversely, for a light-emitting diode string which is designed for a higher voltage drop across the light-emitting diode string, the connection to the mains voltage can be made at a time which is closer to a maximum level of the mains voltage and thus further away from the zero crossings.
  • By means of the current regulators, a desired current through the light-emitting diode string can be set simultaneously for each of the light-emitting diode strands. In this way, a high flexibility with respect to the usable configurations of light emitting diode strands and possible modes of operation, for. B. with regard to individually controllable luminous intensities of the different light-emitting diode strands, can be achieved. The time of the temporary connection to the mains voltage can thus be selected for each of the light-emitting diode strands depending on a number of light-emitting diodes in the light-emitting diode strand. Furthermore, this time may be selected for each of the light emitting diode strands depending on a type of LEDs in the light emitting diode strand. For example, at least one of the light-emitting diode strands may comprise multi-junction LEDs and another of the light-emitting diode strands comprise single-junction LEDs, and the times of the temporary connection to the mains voltage and thus the voltages applied to the light-emitting diode strands of different types can be adapted accordingly. The same applies to light-emitting diode strands, which differ with regard to the number of light-emitting diodes.
  • The controller may be further configured to control a period of temporary connection of the light emitting diode strings to the mains voltage. In this case, a period of time is selected which is less than or equal to 10% of a period of the mains voltage, preferably less than or equal to one percent of the period of the mains voltage. With a smaller amount of time, higher accuracy can be achieved with respect to the voltage applied to the respective light emitting diode string. Conversely, a higher light output can be achieved with a longer period of time.
  • The controller may be further configured to drive the current regulators to adjust the respective currents through the light emitting diode strings. For example, the current regulator can be configured as voltage-controlled or current-controlled current sources, for. B. based on a variable resistor and / or a current mirror, and the controller corresponding voltage control signals or output current control signals to the current controller.
  • In which the currents are controllable via the controller, a flexible adjustment of the currents can also be made during operation of the light emitting diode module, for. B. By also different currents are set for a particular LED strand at different times. The controller can thus be designed to control the current regulator for adjusting the respective currents through the light-emitting diode strands such that different currents are set through the light-emitting diode strand for at least one of the light-emitting diode strands at different times of the temporary connection of the light-emitting diode strand with the mains voltage. As a result, it can be achieved, for example, that a given light-emitting diode string illuminates at a first time with a higher brightness than at a second time.
  • The light-emitting diode module may further comprise a switch array, via which at least two of the light-emitting diode strands can be used temporarily in series. About such a switch array, the light-emitting diode strands can be flexibly reconfigured. This in turn can be taken into account at the times of the temporary connection to the mains voltage. Thus, for example, two light-emitting diode strings can be connected in series, resulting in a combined light-emitting diode strand, which is suitable for a higher voltage, and this combined light-emitting diode strand at a time at which the current level of the mains voltage corresponds to this higher voltage, temporarily with the mains voltage get connected. The controller may thus be further configured to drive the switch array such that at least two of the light emitting diode strands are temporarily connected in series at a time defined relative to a zero crossing detected by the zero crossing detector. In addition, the controller may be configured to drive the switches such that the serially connected light emitting diode strings are temporarily connected to the mains voltage at a time defined in relation to a zero crossing detected by the zero crossing detector.
  • The light emitting diode module may further comprise a rectifier, which is coupled between the light emitting diode strands and the mains voltage. The light-emitting diode strings can thus be connected to the mains voltage via the rectifier. In this way it can be achieved that the light-emitting diode strands are operable in each half-wave of the mains voltage and thus a higher light output is possible.
  • According to a further embodiment, a lighting device is provided with the light-emitting diode module described above. Such a lighting device may, for example, be a luminous means designed for direct operation on the mains voltage, for example a retrofit luminous means based on light-emitting diodes.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES
  • The invention will be explained in more detail with reference to the accompanying drawings with reference to preferred embodiments.
  • 1 shows a light-emitting diode module according to an embodiment.
  • 2 shows a light-emitting diode module according to another embodiment.
  • 3 illustrates an example of driving LED strands in one Light-emitting diode module according to one embodiment.
  • 4 illustrates another example of driving light emitting diode strands in a light emitting diode module according to an embodiment.
  • 5 shows an example of a flexible time-dependent control of currents through different light-emitting diode strands in a light-emitting diode module according to an embodiment.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF EMBODIMENTS
  • The invention will be described in more detail below on the basis of exemplary embodiments with reference to the figures, in which identical reference symbols represent identical or corresponding elements. The features of various embodiments may be combined with each other unless expressly excluded in the description.
  • 1 shows a light emitting diode module. The light-emitting diode module is supplied by a mains voltage VL. Specifically, this may be an alternating voltage of 230 V at 50 Hz, which is common in many European countries for the supply of households, or an AC voltage of 120 V at 60 Hz, as they are used, for example, in North and Central America of households is common. However, it goes without saying that deviating voltage amplitudes or frequencies are also possible. The light-emitting diode module may for example be part of a lighting device, for. As a light-emitting diodes based on light-emitting diode which has no separate LED driver.
  • The light-emitting diode module of 1 is with a rectifier 10 provided, which may be, for example, conventional bridge rectifier. As indicated in the figure, by means of the rectifier 10 the mains voltage VL is converted into a rectified input voltage VIN. In the illustrated example, negative half-waves of the mains voltage VL are converted into positive half-waves of the rectified input voltage VIN by the rectification, so that the rectified input voltage VIN has only positive half-waves. It goes without saying, however, that deviating forms of rectification could also be used. For example, the rectifier could 10 be configured such that negative half-waves of the mains voltage VL are cut off. Furthermore, like the 1 shown a capacitor 15 be provided for damping voltage variations of the rectified input voltage VIN.
  • The light-emitting diode module moreover has a plurality of light-emitting diode strands 21 . 22 . 23 on. As shown, each of the light emitting diode strands 21 . 22 . 23 from a series arrangement of a plurality of light-emitting diodes. The light-emitting diode strands 21 . 22 . 23 can be both in terms of the number of light emitting diodes in the light emitting diode strand 21 . 22 . 23 as well as the type of light emitting diodes in the light emitting diode string 21 . 22 . 23 differ. For example, at least one of the light-emitting diode strands could 21 . 22 . 23 conventional single-junction type LEDs comprise, while at least one other of the light-emitting diode strings comprises multi-junction type LEDs. It is understood that in 1 shown number of three light-emitting diode strands 21 . 22 . 23 is merely exemplary and that also a smaller or larger number of light-emitting diode strands could be provided.
  • Furthermore, the light-emitting diode module has for each of the light-emitting diode strands 21 . 22 . 23 via a corresponding switch 31 . 32 . 33 , As shown, each is the switch 31 . 32 . 23 with the corresponding light-emitting diode string 21 . 22 . 23 connected in series and allows the respective light emitting diode strand controllable 21 . 22 . 23 to couple with the mains voltage VL. In the example shown, this coupling takes place in which one end of the respective light-emitting diode string 21 . 22 . 23 over the switch 31 . 32 . 33 is selectively connected to ground or separated from ground. It is understood, however, that other types of controllable coupling with the mains voltage VL are possible. So could the switch 31 . 32 . 33 for example, the other end of the light-emitting diode strand 21 . 22 . 23 with the rectifier 10 connect. The switches 31 . 32 . 33 For example, based on transistors, for. As MOS transistors, implemented.
  • Furthermore, the light-emitting diode module has for each of the light-emitting diode strands 21 . 22 . 23 via a current regulator 41 . 42 . 43 , As shown, each is the current regulator 41 . 42 . 43 with the corresponding light-emitting diode string 21 . 22 . 23 and switches 31 . 32 . 33 connected in series and allows, with the switch closed 31 . 32 . 33 the current through the corresponding light-emitting diode string 21 . 22 . 23 adjust. The current regulator 41 . 42 . 43 For example, they may be implemented as voltage controlled or current controlled current sources and based on controllable resistors and / or current mirrors.
  • For controlling the switches 31 . 32 . 33 The light-emitting diode module furthermore has a controller 50 on. The control 50 can be used, for example, as an application-specific special circuit (ASIC, " Application Specific Integrated Circuit "), as a controller, as a microcontroller, as a processor, as a microprocessor or as another chip. The control 50 generates control signals to control the switches 31 . 32 . 33 , These control signals may, for example, be voltage signals, which then gate connections of the switches 31 . 32 . 33 forming transistors. In the illustrated example, the controller generates 50 furthermore control signals for controlling the current controller 41 . 42 . 43 , For the control signals for controlling the current controller 41 . 42 . 43 It may depend on the implementation of the current regulator 41 . 42 . 43 to act on voltage signals or current signals.
  • Furthermore, the light-emitting diode module has a zero-crossing detector 60 which is configured to detect zero crossings of the mains voltage VL. The zero crossing detector 60 For example, it may be configured to output a voltage pulse when a zero crossing of the mains voltage VL occurs.
  • Furthermore, in the light-emitting diode module, a DC voltage source 70 be provided, about which, for example, the controller 50 can be supplied with a suitable DC voltage. For this purpose, the DC voltage source 70 For example, convert the rectified input voltage VIN into a low voltage DC voltage of, for example, 5V. Optionally, those of the zero-crossing detector can also be used here 60 detected zero crossings of the mains voltage VL are used. It is understood, however, that even a direct operation of the controller 50 would be conceivable over the rectified input voltage VIN.
  • Depending on the type of light-emitting diode used and the number of light-emitting diodes in the light-emitting diode string 21 . 22 . 23 Also typically vary the requirements for one for the operation of the respective light emitting diode strand 21 . 22 . 23 to be provided voltages or in terms of one for the operation of the respective light emitting diode string 21 . 22 . 23 maximum allowable voltage. So is typically with higher number of light emitting diodes in the light emitting diode strand 21 . 22 . 23 the voltage to be supplied or the maximum permissible voltage also higher. Furthermore, when multi-junction type light emitting diodes are used, the voltage to be supplied or maximum allowable is typically higher than when using single junction type light emitting diodes.
  • In order to take account of the different voltage requirements, the light-emitting diode module makes use of the fact that the mains voltage VL or the rectified input voltage VIN is time-variable. In particular, a particular light emitting diode strand 21 . 22 . 23 then over the rectifier 10 connected to the mains voltage VL when the mains voltage VL and the rectified input voltage VIN one for this LED strand 21 . 22 . 23 has appropriate voltage level. This is done via the switches 31 . 32 . 33 which of the controller 50 be temporarily closed at appropriate times. For example, for a light-emitting diode string 21 . 22 . 23 which is to be operated at a lower voltage level, the corresponding switch 31 . 32 . 33 be closed at a time which is closer to a zero crossing of the mains voltage VL as in a light-emitting diode string 21 . 22 . 23 , which is to be operated with a higher voltage level.
  • At the same time and independently of this can be via the current regulator 41 . 42 . 43 for each of the light-emitting diode strands 21 . 22 . 23 the current can be adjusted, which when closing the corresponding switch 31 . 32 . 33 through the light-emitting diode string 21 . 22 . 23 flows. Furthermore, via the current regulator 41 . 42 . 43 also a maximum on the light-emitting diode strand 21 . 22 . 23 occurring voltage drop can be limited. If, for example, via the current regulator 41 . 42 . 43 a current is given, in which according to the voltage-current characteristic of the light-emitting diode string 21 . 22 . 23 a voltage drop occurs which is below the instantaneous voltage level of the rectified input voltage VIN when the switch 31 . 32 . 33 closed, the difference to this instantaneous voltage level would be via the current regulator 41 . 42 . 43 fall off. Through the current regulator 41 . 42 . 43 Thus, the flexibility with respect to the usable configurations of the light-emitting diode strands 21 . 22 . 23 elevated. Furthermore, as exemplified below, the independent adjustability of the current for each light emitting diode string 21 . 22 . 23 also be used to provide various effects.
  • 2 shows a variant of the light emitting diode module of 1 in which the light-emitting diode module additionally a switch array 80 includes. As shown, the switch array is 80 between the mains voltage 80 and the light-emitting diode strands 21 . 22 . 23 coupled. About the switch array 80 can the individual light-emitting diode strands 21 . 22 . 23 be connected in series in a flexible manner, so as to form one or more combined light-emitting diode strands. Such a combined light-emitting diode string can then via the switch array 80 be coupled to the mains voltage VL. For this purpose, the switch array 80 also via a control signal from the controller 50 controllable. This control signal may be, for example, an address signal for addressing individual switches in the switch array 80 act.
  • At the in 2 The example shown has the switch array 80 a first input E1, which via the rectifier 10 is coupled to the mains voltage VL. Furthermore, the switch array has 80 via a first output A1, which is connected to a first end of the light-emitting diode string 21 is connected, a second output A2, which with a first end of the light-emitting diode strand 22 and a third output A3 connected to a first end of the light emitting diode string 23 connected is. About the switch array 80 can these first ends of the light-emitting diode strands 21 . 22 . 23 be coupled individually or simultaneously with the mains voltage VL. Furthermore, the switch array has 80 via a second input E2, which is connected to a second end of the light-emitting diode string 22 is connected and third input E3, which is connected to a second end of the light emitting diode string 23 connected is. In addition, the switch array has 80 via a fourth output A4, which via the current regulator 42 and the switch 32 connected to ground, and via a fifth output A5, which via the current regulator 43 and the switch 33 connected to ground. A second end of the light-emitting diode string 21 is over the current regulator 41 and the switch 43 connected to ground. Furthermore, the switch array has 80 via a control input C for receiving the control signals from the controller 50 ,
  • By selectively making connections in the switch array 80 Thus, different configurations of light emitting diode strands can be made. Thus, by connecting the input E1 to the outputs A1, A2 and A3, connecting the input E2 to the output A4 and connecting the input E3 to the output A5, a configuration can be made in which the light emitting diode strands 21 . 22 . 23 similar to 1 individually coupled in parallel between the rectified input voltage and ground. Furthermore, by connecting the input E1 to the outputs A2 and A3 and connecting the input E2 to the output A1 and connecting the input E3 to the output A5, a configuration can be made in which the light-emitting diode strands 21 and 22 connected in series and coupled between the rectified input voltage VIN and ground while the light emitting diode string 23 in parallel, individual is coupled between the rectified input voltage VIN and ground. Similarly, by connecting the input E1 to the outputs A2 and A3 and connecting the input E3 to the output A1 and connecting the input E2 to the output A4, a configuration can be made in which the light emitting diode strands 21 and 23 connected in series and coupled between the rectified input voltage VIN and ground while the light emitting diode string 22 is coupled individually in parallel between the rectified input voltage VIN and ground. Furthermore, by connecting the input E1 to the output A3, connecting the input E3 to the output A2 and connecting the input E2 to the output A1, a configuration can be made in which the light-emitting diode strands 21 . 22 and 23 connected in series and coupled between the rectified input voltage VIN and ground.
  • By means of the switch array 80 Thus, different configurations of individual light-emitting diode strands or combined light-emitting diode strands can be produced, which also have different voltage requirements due to a different number of light-emitting diodes. For these different configurations, in turn, suitable times for the temporary connection to the mains voltage VL can be selected and the switches 31 . 32 . 33 according to the control 50 be controlled. Furthermore, for any such configuration via the current regulator 41 . 42 . 43 a suitable current for the individual light-emitting diode string or combined light-emitting diode strand can be set.
  • 3 illustrates an example of the driving of different light emitting diode strands in a light emitting diode module, as in 1 or 2 shown. In particular shows 3 a sequence of half-waves of the rectified input voltage, which comprises a first half-waves HW1, a second half-wave HW2 and a third half-waves HW3. Further shows 3 exemplary currents through the various light-emitting diode strands, which are set at different times by temporarily closing the switch corresponding to the respective light-emitting diode string. Here, I A denotes the current through a first light-emitting diode strand, which is caused at a first time, I B the current through a second light-emitting diode, which is caused at a first time, and I C the current through a third light-emitting diode strand, which leads to a third Time is caused. As in 3 In the first half-wave HW1 and the second half-wave HW2, the currents I A , I B , I C are selected to be the same, whereas in the third half-waves HW3 the currents I A , I B , I C deviate from the half-waves HW1 and HW2 are selected. This deviating setting of the currents I A , I B , I C is due to the current regulator 41 . 42 . 43 possible, although due to the same times in relation to the zero crossings of the mains voltage VL, the same voltage level of the rectified input voltage VIN is present.
  • 4 illustrates another example of the driving of different light-emitting diode strands in a light-emitting diode module. In the example of 4 However, it differs from the illustrations in 1 and 2 It is assumed that the light-emitting diode module has no rectifier and thus both positive and negative half-waves of the mains voltage VL are applied to the individual light-emitting diode strands. Again, I A denotes the current through a first light-emitting diode string, which is produced at a first time, I B the current through a second light-emitting diode string, which is caused at a first time, and I C the current through a third light-emitting diode string, which leads to a third Time is caused. In this case, the currents I A , I B , I C flow only in the positive half-waves of the mains voltage VL. Similar to the example of 3 However, it is also possible in this case to set different values for the currents I A , I B , I C in different half-waves.
  • 5 schematically illustrates another example of ways of adjusting different currents through different light emitting diode strands of a light emitting diode module such as in 1 or 2 shown. In the example of 5 It is assumed that the light-emitting diode module has four light-emitting diode strands, designated A, B, C and D. A period of the mains voltage is in 5 each illustrated in the manner of a clock, wherein segments of the clock scale correspond to different times within the period. In 5 Thus, three different periods of the line voltage VL are illustrated, which correspond to three consecutive or separate time intervals T 1 , T 2 and T 3 . In 5 I A1 denotes the current which is set in the light-emitting diode string A in the time interval T 1 , I B1 the current which is set in the light-emitting diode strand B in the time interval T 1 , I C1 the current which is present in the light-emitting diode strand C in the time interval T 1 is set, and I D1, the current which is set in the LED strand D in the time interval T 1 . Since a separate current regulator is provided for each of the light-emitting diode strands A, B, C and D, the currents I A1 , I B1 , I C1 and I D1 can be adjusted independently of each other. Similarly, I A2 denotes the current which is set in the light emitting diode string A in the time interval T 2 , I B2 the current which is set in the light emitting diode string B in the time interval T 2 , I C2 the current which is present in the light emitting diode string C is set in the time interval T 2 , and I D2 the current which is set in the light-emitting diode strand D in the time interval T 2 , and I A3 the current which is set in the light-emitting diode strand A in the time interval T3, I B3 the current, which is set in the light emitting diode string B in the time interval T 3 , I C3 the current which is set in the light emitting diode strand C in the time interval T 3 , and I D3 the current which is set in the light emitting diode strand D in the time interval T 3 . It is understood that in the time intervals T 2 and T 3, the respective currents in the different light-emitting diode strands can be set independently. Furthermore, the currents for the same light-emitting diode string can be set differently in the different time intervals. According to one example, the following values can be selected for the currents in the individual light-emitting diode strands in the various time intervals: I A1 = 50 mA, I B1 = 50 mA, I C1 = 100 mA, I D1 = 100 mA; I A2 = 100 mA, I B2 = 50 mA, I C2 = 50 mA, I D2 = 50 mA; I A3 = 50 mA, I B3 = 50 mA, IC3 = 50 mA, I D1 = 100 mA. When using a switch array such as in 2 in particular, in cases in which currents are to flow through two or more light-emitting diode strands, several of the light-emitting diode strands can also be connected in series, so that excessively high voltage drops across the individual light-emitting diodes can be avoided.
  • It goes without saying that various modifications are possible with the light-emitting diode modules described above, for example with regard to the number of light-emitting diode strings provided therein or with regard to the type of coupling to the mains voltage. Moreover, it should be understood that the light emitting diode modules described herein may be used in a variety of types of lighting devices that are not limited to retrofit type light emitting diode based light emitting devices.

Claims (13)

  1. A light emitting diode module comprising: a plurality Light-emitting diode strands ( 21 . 22 . 23 ); for each of the light-emitting diode strands ( 21 . 22 . 23 ) a switch ( 31 . 32 . 33 ) for connecting the respective light-emitting diode string ( 21 . 22 . 23 ) with a mains voltage (VL); for each of the light-emitting diode strands ( 21 . 22 . 23 ) a current regulator ( 41 . 42 . 43 ) for controlling a current through the respective light-emitting diode string ( 21 . 22 . 23 ); a zero-crossing detector ( 60 ) for detecting zero crossings of the mains voltage (VL); and a controller ( 50 ), which is designed to switch ( 31 . 32 . 33 ) in such a way that each of the light-emitting diode strands ( 21 . 23 . 24 ) each at a time, which for this light-emitting diode strand ( 21 . 22 . 23 ) in relation to one of the zero-crossing detector ( 60 ) detected zero crossing is temporarily connected to the mains voltage (VL).
  2. Light emitting diode module according to claim 1, wherein the controller ( 50 ) is further configured for a period of temporary connection of the light-emitting diode strands ( 21 . 22 . 23 ) with the mains voltage (VL).
  3. Light-emitting diode module according to claim 2, wherein for each of the light-emitting diode strands a time duration of the temporary connection to the mains voltage (VL) is less than or equal to 10% of a period of the mains voltage (VL), preferably less than or equal to 1% of the period of the mains voltage (VL).
  4. Light-emitting diode module according to one of the preceding claims, wherein the controller ( 50 ) is further configured to control the current regulators ( 41 . 42 . 43 ) for adjusting the respective currents through the light-emitting diode strands ( 21 . 23 . 24 ) head for.
  5. Light emitting diode module according to claim 4, wherein the controller ( 50 ) is further configured to control the current regulators ( 41 . 42 . 43 ) for adjusting the respective currents through the light-emitting diode strands ( 21 . 23 . 24 ) in such a way that for at least one of the light-emitting diode strands ( 21 . 22 . 23 ) at different times of the temporary connection of the light-emitting diode string ( 21 . 22 . 23 ) with the mains voltage (VL) different currents through the light emitting diode string ( 21 . 22 . 23 ).
  6. Light-emitting diode module according to one of the preceding claims, wherein for each of the light-emitting diode strands ( 21 . 22 . 23 ) the time of the temporary connection to the mains voltage (VL) depending on a number of light-emitting diodes in the light-emitting diode string ( 21 . 22 . 23 ) is selected.
  7. Light-emitting diode module according to one of the preceding claims, wherein for each of the light-emitting diode strands ( 21 . 22 . 23 ) the time of the temporary connection to the mains voltage (VL) depending on a type of light-emitting diodes in the light-emitting diode string ( 21 . 22 . 23 ) is selected.
  8. Light emitting diode module according to one of the preceding claims, wherein the light emitting diode module further comprises a switch array ( 80 ), over which at least two of the light-emitting diode strands ( 21 . 22 . 23 ) are temporarily connectable in series.
  9. A light emitting diode module according to claim 8, wherein the controller ( 50 ) is further adapted to the switch array ( 80 ) in such a way that the at least two light-emitting diode strands ( 21 . 23 . 24 ) at a time in relation to that of the zero-crossing detector ( 60 ) detected zero crossing is temporarily connected in series.
  10. Light emitting diode module according to claim 9, wherein the controller ( 50 ) is further configured to switch ( 31 . 32 . 33 ) in such a way that the series-connected light-emitting diode strands ( 21 . 23 . 24 ) at a time in relation to that of the zero-crossing detector ( 60 ) detected zero crossing is temporarily connected to the mains voltage (VL).
  11. Light-emitting diode module according to one of the preceding claims, wherein at least one of the light-emitting diode strands ( 21 . 22 . 23 ) Comprises multi-junction LEDs and at least one further of the light-emitting diode strings ( 21 . 22 . 23 ) Includes single-junction LEDs.
  12. Light emitting diode module according to one of the preceding claims, wherein the light emitting diode module further comprises a rectifier ( 10 ), which between the light-emitting diode strands ( 21 . 22 . 23 ) and the mains voltage (VL) is coupled.
  13. Lighting device with a light-emitting diode module according to one of the preceding claims.
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US20100308739A1 (en) 2009-06-04 2010-12-09 Exclara Inc. Apparatus, Method and System for Providing AC Line Power to Lighting Devices
US20110084619A1 (en) 2009-10-14 2011-04-14 Mr. Richard Landry Gray Light Emitting Diode Selection Circuit
DE102010040266A1 (en) 2010-03-19 2011-09-22 Active-Semi, Inc. Reduced flicker AC LED light with individual short-circuiting sections of an LED array
US20120038284A1 (en) 2009-06-11 2012-02-16 Tatsumi Setomoto Lighting device and lighting system

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* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
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US20100308739A1 (en) 2009-06-04 2010-12-09 Exclara Inc. Apparatus, Method and System for Providing AC Line Power to Lighting Devices
US20120038284A1 (en) 2009-06-11 2012-02-16 Tatsumi Setomoto Lighting device and lighting system
US20110084619A1 (en) 2009-10-14 2011-04-14 Mr. Richard Landry Gray Light Emitting Diode Selection Circuit
DE102010040266A1 (en) 2010-03-19 2011-09-22 Active-Semi, Inc. Reduced flicker AC LED light with individual short-circuiting sections of an LED array

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