DE19906158C1 - Low skew optical fibre cable, with homogenised transit delay times - Google Patents

Low skew optical fibre cable, with homogenised transit delay times

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Publication number
DE19906158C1
DE19906158C1 DE1999106158 DE19906158A DE19906158C1 DE 19906158 C1 DE19906158 C1 DE 19906158C1 DE 1999106158 DE1999106158 DE 1999106158 DE 19906158 A DE19906158 A DE 19906158A DE 19906158 C1 DE19906158 C1 DE 19906158C1
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DE
Germany
Prior art keywords
cable
individual
end
optical fibers
optical
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Fee Related
Application number
DE1999106158
Other languages
German (de)
Inventor
Karl Behm
Axel Beier
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Siemens AG
Original Assignee
Siemens AG
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Siemens AG filed Critical Siemens AG
Priority to DE1999106158 priority Critical patent/DE19906158C1/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of DE19906158C1 publication Critical patent/DE19906158C1/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Application status is Expired - Fee Related legal-status Critical

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Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G02OPTICS
    • G02BOPTICAL ELEMENTS, SYSTEMS, OR APPARATUS
    • G02B6/00Light guides
    • G02B6/44Mechanical structures for providing tensile strength and external protection for fibres, e.g. optical transmission cables
    • G02B6/4401Optical cables

Abstract

The cable has several individual optical fibres (2-1,2-2,2-3,2-4) running from one end (4) of the cable to the other end (5). The individual lengths (L-1,L-2,L-3,L-4) of the fibres are dimensioned to minimise skew. Excess lengths (18,19,20) may be arranged at the cable end, and stored as loops in a receptacle (26). The delay of signals from one end to the other of each individual fibre is measured and the lengths of each fibre is established accordingly.

Description

For parallel optical data transmission via individu All physically separate transmission channels are becoming more common have one of the number of desired transmission channels speaking multitude of individual optical fibers turns. The optical fibers run from a first location (For example, from a corresponding number of optical Transmitter) to a second location (e.g. to an ent speaking variety of optical receivers). Such ge together from a first to a second location Optical fibers are also referred to below as optical fibers termed composite or optical fiber cable, where diverse geometrical designs of the light wave cable are conceivable. So the fiber optic cable for example a common to all optical fibers Encompass vein; the optical fibers can on their However, the transmission route is also laid by other means and / or held together. The respective coupling location at the end of the optical waveguide is also subsequently referred to as the cable end.

With parallel optical data transmission, it is in the rear with a high data transfer rate and reliability to strive for data transmission that the (optical) Runtimes of light coupled in at one end of the cable pulse to the respective receivers at the other end of the cable as soon as possible, d. H. Differences in transit times are as small as possible are. Optimized in this regard, i. H. homogeneous maturities  Fiber optic cables are also known as "low skew" Designated cable.

The invention relates to light which is homogenized in terms of runtime waveguide cable with several individual optical fibers tern according to the preamble of claim 1 and a method for the production of such an optical fiber cable.

From the essay "DEVELOPMENT OF LOW-SKEW OPTICAL FIBER CABLE" by F. Hosoi et al. in International Wire & Cabel Symposium Proceedings 1998, pages 227 to 231 go to light waves conductor cable and a method for its production. This known optical fiber cable results from a Analysis of possible causes for runtime differences Manufacture of optical fiber ribbon, namely in particular different refractive indices of the individual Optical fibers, different tensile loads of the Optical fiber due to relative, positional deviations in Fiber optic composite if the fiber optic cable or fiber optic ribbon on a cable reel celt, and different remaining chip tension due to the manufacturing process. Consequently there is a solution to minimize the runtime differ in the known fiber optic cable in one Optimization of the manufacturing process with regard to this Aspects.

However, this leads to a very complex process process and does not allow for subsequent compensation of runtime differences. So this is problematic because e.g. B. also when storing the fiber optic cable (for example when winding onto a supply roll) mechanical loads of different sizes for the  single optical fibers can occur, which in turn Differences in transit times.

JP-A-1-48011 discloses a runtime homogenized Optical fiber cable with several individual light waveguides and a method for its production. The known cable has a large number of optical light waves conductors with individual connectors at both ends. Runtime differences between the individual light waves ladders are measured and the position of the individual Connector adjusted so that the runtime differences be compensated. The resulting Lengths of the optical fibers either lead to a difference Lichen axial positions of the individual connectors or uncontrolled excess lengths or optical fiber arcs in the Area of one end of the cable.

The invention is therefore based on the object a Lichtwel lenleiterkabel with several individual optical fibers to create, whose terms matched to each other (homo genized) that is easy and safe to use.

This object is achieved with an optical fiber terkabel solved with the features of claim 1.

The individual optical fibers can advantageously in the form of a bundle of optical fibers in a conventional Blood sheath runs. The runtime differences become one very late manufacturing or assembly stage by indivi duel dimensioning of the optical fiber lengths balanced.

The handling of the optical fiber cable according to the invention and the connectivity are improved in that the  Optical fiber excess lengths arranged in a receptacle from which the individual optical fiber ends are made kick and finish flush. This can preferably be done by are supported that the optical fiber at least with one end runs in a common ribbon. The buffer tube can preferably be filled with a filling gel be and any number of optical fibers contain.

The technically particularly advantageous solution of the The object underlying the invention succeeds with regard to a method for producing a runtime homogeneity based fiber optic cables with the process features according to claim 4.

The determination of the runtime differences can be done with carry out usual measuring methods with the highest accuracy; in Knowing the terms can easily be used to compensate reductions in the time difference to be made Calculate fiber optics.

An embodiment of the invention is described below a drawing further explained; show it:

Fig. 1 and 2 schematically an inventive Lichtwel lenleiterkabel in cross section and in longitudinal view and

Fig. 3 shows an end of an optical waveguide cable according to the invention in various stages of manufacture.

Figs. 1 and 2 show a fiber optic cable with egg ner buffer tube 1 extends a plurality indi vidual optical waveguide 2 in the interior thereof. The interior of the core sleeve is preferably filled with a gel 3 for mechanical stabilization and for protecting the optical waveguide. A plurality of such wire sheaths can be arranged in a common jacket. As illustrated in FIG. 2, the individual optical waveguides 2 end with their ends 2 a, 2 b ready for coupling each at one end 4 , 5 of the optical waveguide cable. The ends 4 , 5 can each be equipped with an optical fiber connector 7 , 8 for optical coupling of the individual optical fibers 2 , each of which closes the outermost ends of the optical fibers in a manner capable of coupling. Such fiber optic connectors are known per se and are used, for example, in the form of so-called MT ferrules. Thus, the ends 2 b of the optical waveguide 2 can each be aligned with an optical coupling partner (z. B. 9 ) and optically coupled to this if z. B. the connector 8 is inserted into a corresponding receptacle for optical coupling with respect to the coupling partner. The coupling partner 9 can be an electro-optical transmitter or receiver or be formed by the end of a further optical waveguide. The optical coupling partner 9 can in particular be part of a network 10 , in which a large number, for example, of optical transmitters (so-called transmitter array) is contained.

The optical waveguide cable has at least in the area of its one end 5 an adaptation area 12 in which, in the manner described in detail below, an adaptation of the individual lengths of the optical waveguides 2 to ensure an equal (homogeneous) transit time for light signals is ensured, for example on one End 4 of the cable are fed and received at the other end 5 of the cable.

Reference is made to FIG. 3 for the following detailed explanation of the production of the optical waveguide cable in this regard. In a process stage presented in the upper part of FIG. 3, the optical fiber cable in the end region 5 is freed from its buffer tube 1 , so that the individual optical fibers 2-1 , 2-2 , 2-3 , 2-4 are accessible. Although only three optical fibers are shown in FIG. 3 for the sake of clarity, the cable can of course contain a much larger number of optical fibers. The ends 2 a, 2 b of the optical waveguide are preferably held parallel and flush. Each optical waveguide 2-1 to 2-4 initially has an output length A-1 to A-4, the output lengths preferably being geometrically the same. In this state, as indicated schematically in the upper part of FIG. 3, each individual optical waveguide is acted upon at its one end 2 a ( FIG. 2) with a light pulse 15 and the transit time of the light pulse 15 until the other end 2 b is reached of the respective optical fiber 2 measured. From the determined transit times, the differences (transit time differences) Δt 1 , Δt 3 , Δt 4 - z. B. based on the optical fiber 2-2 with the shortest transit time t2 - be determined. Subsequently, the optical fibers, whose terms are longer than the lowest determined term (here the term of the optical fiber 2-2 ), are shortened accordingly. This situation is shown in the middle part of FIG. 3. For the exemplary embodiment it is assumed that the light waveguide 2-4 has the longest transit time for the fed signal 15 . Accordingly, the optical waveguide 2-4 compared to the optical waveguide 2-2 , which has had the shortest running time, is to be shortened accordingly the most. The shortening of the optical waveguide 2-4 is measured from page 5 in that the length to be separated is deduced from the running time and the length of the optical waveguide or from the usual running time. A rough approximate value is, for example, an approach of approx. 0.2 mm ≘ 1 ps.

The fiber optic cables can be used according to the calculated reductions shifted to each other and then cut flush. After cutting, you can measure the runtime again if necessary the degree of homogenization can be checked.

As further illustrated in FIG. 3, the optical waveguides 2-1 and 2-3 have approximately the same transit time, their transit time being less than the transit time of the optical waveguide 2-4 , but greater than the transit time of the optical waveguide 2-2 . Accordingly, the optical fiber 2-2 has the longest remaining individual length L-2 after homogenization of the transit times, followed by the lengths L-1 and L-3 of the optical fibers 2-1 and 2-3 and the length L-4 of the optical fiber 2-4 .

So that the excess lengths 18 , 19 and 20 resulting from the homogenization of the transit times do not impair the handling of the optical fiber cable, the excess lengths 18 , 19 and 20 are each wound into a loop as shown in the lower part of FIG. 3. The loops 22 , 23 and 24 have different radii due to the different excess lengths. To protect the optical waveguide, the arrangement of the excess lengths 22 to 24 can be accommodated in a housing 26 or surrounded by a casting compound. The shortened ends 2 b of the optical waveguide 2 are again arranged flush and close to a common edge or end face 28 of the connector 8 .

Claims (4)

1. runtime homogenized optical fiber cable with several individual optical fibers ( 2-1 , 2-2 , 2-3 , 2-4 ), which run from one end of the cable ( 4 ) to the other end ( 5 ), whereby
  • - The individual lengths (L-1, L-2, L-3, L-4) of the optical waveguide ( 2-1 , 2-2 , 2-3 , 2-4 ) while minimizing the transit time differences (Δt 1 , Δt 2 , Δt 3 ) are dimensioned and
  • - Due to the individual dimensioning of the optical waveguide lengths (L-1, L-2, L-3, L-4), excess optical fiber lengths ( 18 , 19 , 20 ) are arranged in the region of a cable end ( 5 ),
characterized in that
  • - The fiber optic excess lengths ( 18 , 19 , 20 ) are arranged in a receptacle ( 26 ) from which the individual fiber ends ( 2 b) emerge and finish flush.
2. Optical fiber cable according to claim 1, characterized in that
  • - The optical fibers ( 2-1 , 2-2 , 2-3 , 2-4 ) run at least with one end ( 2 b) in a common ribbon ver.
3. Optical fiber cable according to claim 1 or 2, characterized in that
  • - The individual optical fibers ( 2-1 , 2-2 , 2-3 , 2-4 ) run at least in sections within a common outer wire sheath ( 1 ) which is filled with a gel ( 3 ).
4. A process for producing a transit time homogenized optical fiber cable with several individual optical fibers ( 2-1 , 2-2 , 2-3 , 2-4 ), which run from one cable end ( 4 ) to the other cable end ( 5 ), in which
  • - For each individual optical fiber ( 2-1 , 2-2 , 2-3 , 2-4 ) the transit time of light signals ( 15 ) from one end to the other ( 5 ) is determined and
  • - Depending on the determined transit time differences (Δt i ), the individual optical fiber lengths (L-1, L-2, L-3, L-4) are dimensioned so that the transit time differences are compensated for,
characterized in that
  • - The individual optical fibers ( 2-1 , 2-2 , 2-3 , 2-4 ) at the cable ends ( 4 , 5 ) are each arranged in parallel and flush before the optical fiber-specific runtimes are determined,
  • - The ends of the optical fibers ( 2-1 , 2-2 , 2-3 , 2-4 ) according to the determined transit time differences (Δt 1 , Δt 2 , Δt 3 ) are axially offset and fixed so that after the subsequent flush and to Longitudinal axis of vertical separation of the ends of the optical fibers ( 2-1 , 2-2 , 2-3 , 2-4 ) the transit times through the optical fibers ( 2-1 , 2-2 , 2-3 , 2-4 ) are the same and
  • - The resulting excess lengths ( 18 , 19 , 20 ) are accommodated at one cable end ( 5 ) in a receptacle ( 26 ) from which the ends ( 2 b) of the optical fibers ( 2-1 , 2-2 , 2-3 , 2-4 ) emerge and close flush.
DE1999106158 1999-02-10 1999-02-10 Low skew optical fibre cable, with homogenised transit delay times Expired - Fee Related DE19906158C1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
DE1999106158 DE19906158C1 (en) 1999-02-10 1999-02-10 Low skew optical fibre cable, with homogenised transit delay times

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
DE1999106158 DE19906158C1 (en) 1999-02-10 1999-02-10 Low skew optical fibre cable, with homogenised transit delay times

Publications (1)

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DE19906158C1 true DE19906158C1 (en) 2000-10-26

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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2003038476A2 (en) * 2001-10-29 2003-05-08 Schott Glas Method of testing optical fibers

Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JPS6448011A (en) * 1987-08-18 1989-02-22 Sumitomo Electric Industries Optical cable
JPH07209563A (en) * 1994-01-14 1995-08-11 Hitachi Cable Ltd Low-skew multiple optical fiber cable
US5768460A (en) * 1995-10-03 1998-06-16 Siecor Corporation Low skew optical fiber ribbons

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JPS6448011A (en) * 1987-08-18 1989-02-22 Sumitomo Electric Industries Optical cable
JPH07209563A (en) * 1994-01-14 1995-08-11 Hitachi Cable Ltd Low-skew multiple optical fiber cable
US5768460A (en) * 1995-10-03 1998-06-16 Siecor Corporation Low skew optical fiber ribbons

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2003038476A2 (en) * 2001-10-29 2003-05-08 Schott Glas Method of testing optical fibers
WO2003038476A3 (en) * 2001-10-29 2004-07-29 Schott Glas Method of testing optical fibers
CN100383511C (en) * 2001-10-29 2008-04-23 莫列斯公司 Method of testing optical fibers

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