DE102007018775B4 - System and method for adaptive control of tappet switching with variable valve lift - Google Patents

System and method for adaptive control of tappet switching with variable valve lift Download PDF

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Publication number
DE102007018775B4
DE102007018775B4 DE102007018775.2A DE102007018775A DE102007018775B4 DE 102007018775 B4 DE102007018775 B4 DE 102007018775B4 DE 102007018775 A DE102007018775 A DE 102007018775A DE 102007018775 B4 DE102007018775 B4 DE 102007018775B4
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valve
combustion
cylinder
sensor
engine
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DE102007018775A1 (en
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Themi Philemon Petridis
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Ford Global Technologies LLC
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Ford Global Technologies LLC
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01LCYCLICALLY OPERATING VALVES FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES
    • F01L13/00Modifications of valve-gear to facilitate reversing, braking, starting, changing compression ratio, or other specific operations
    • F01L13/0005Deactivating valves
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01LCYCLICALLY OPERATING VALVES FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES
    • F01L1/00Valve-gear or valve arrangements, e.g. lift-valve gear
    • F01L1/12Transmitting gear between valve drive and valve
    • F01L1/14Tappets; Push rods
    • F01L1/143Tappets; Push rods for use with overhead camshafts
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01LCYCLICALLY OPERATING VALVES FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES
    • F01L13/00Modifications of valve-gear to facilitate reversing, braking, starting, changing compression ratio, or other specific operations
    • F01L13/0015Modifications of valve-gear to facilitate reversing, braking, starting, changing compression ratio, or other specific operations for optimising engine performances by modifying valve lift according to various working parameters, e.g. rotational speed, load, torque
    • F01L13/0036Modifications of valve-gear to facilitate reversing, braking, starting, changing compression ratio, or other specific operations for optimising engine performances by modifying valve lift according to various working parameters, e.g. rotational speed, load, torque the valves being driven by two or more cams with different shape, size or timing or a single cam profiled in axial and radial direction
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01LCYCLICALLY OPERATING VALVES FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES
    • F01L1/00Valve-gear or valve arrangements, e.g. lift-valve gear
    • F01L1/20Adjusting or compensating clearance
    • F01L1/22Adjusting or compensating clearance automatically, e.g. mechanically
    • F01L1/24Adjusting or compensating clearance automatically, e.g. mechanically by fluid means, e.g. hydraulically
    • F01L2001/2444Details relating to the hydraulic feeding circuit, e.g. lifter oil manifold assembly [LOMA]
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01LCYCLICALLY OPERATING VALVES FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES
    • F01L2307/00Preventing the rotation of tappets
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02BINTERNAL-COMBUSTION PISTON ENGINES; COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL
    • F02B11/00Engines characterised by both fuel-air mixture compression and air compression, or characterised by both positive ignition and compression ignition, e.g. in different cylinders
    • F02B11/02Engines characterised by both fuel-air mixture compression and air compression, or characterised by both positive ignition and compression ignition, e.g. in different cylinders convertible from fuel-air mixture compression to air compression or vice versa

Abstract

A method for controlling the switching of cylinder valves between a first valve state and a second valve state for switching between combustion modes of an engine (10), the combustion modes comprising spark ignition and homogeneous compression ignition, characterized in that the control time of a signal for switching between the valve states in response to Information is adjusted by a combustion sensor (142).

Description

  • Territory
  • The present invention relates to systems and methods for controlling tappet switching with variable valve lift during the change of combustion modes.
  • Background and abstract
  • Engines can use various cylinder intake and / or exhaust valve profiles to improve engine operation over a range of conditions. For example, engines can use variable valve timing, cam profile switching, etc. to provide different valve operation. Switching operations between the various valve profiles are typically controlled by means of hydraulic circuits, which can have variable delays. These delays can result in valve operation other than desired for a particular combustion process.
  • A method according to the preamble of claim 1 is known from the DE 10 2006 000 271 A1 known. The DE 10 2006 000 271 A1 describes an engine with a cylinder and a sensor for acquiring information regarding combustion conditions of the cylinders. Each cylinder is provided with an ignition device, an intake valve and an exhaust valve. The engine also has a controller that receives the information from the sensor. Based on the information from the sensor, the control unit identifies a cylinder with the strongest combustion. The control unit controls at least the valve timing of the intake valves, the valve timing of the exhaust valves or an amount of fuel injected into the cylinders, whereby the combustion of all cylinders is suppressed so that the combustion state of the identified cylinder becomes a suitable combustion state. Regarding a cylinder whose combustion state is outside a predetermined range and in a state that causes misfires, the control unit selectively activates the corresponding ignition device in order to carry out assisted ignition. This configuration reduces a change in the combustion conditions between the cylinders.
  • The pamphlets WO 2005/113 947 A1 , AT 005 720 U1 , US 5,301,636 A and EP 1 464 813 A1 show further methods for controlling internal combustion engines.
  • One approach that takes into account the delay of an oil circuit to change valve properties is given in US 6 330 869 B1 described where the combustion is spark ignition before and after switching valve operation. In this regard, the property of the working oil is detected in the hydraulic valve property changing mechanism of the valve moving device, and the delay time is changed according to the detected property of the working oil to make a change in the valve operation coincide with the change in the combustion state of the engine.
  • However, the present inventors have recognized disadvantages in such an approach, particularly when applied to an engine that changes combustion modes during switching valve operation, for example between spark ignition combustion and compression combustion.
  • Specifically, there are numerous factors that can affect valve switching and combustion modes. For example, the time delay may include factors such as delays in the electronic valves and the solenoid valves. In addition, external conditions such as humidity or altitude can influence the response time of the tappet switching sequence, which is required to switch the combustion modes between different combustion modes, such as spark and compression ignition. Finally, plunger shift errors can result in undesirable combustion modes in the cylinders and can cause engine misfires in a compression ignition mode, for example.
  • Thus, in one approach, the above point can be addressed by a method of controlling cylinder valve switching between a first valve state and a second valve state to switch between combustion modes of the engine. The method includes adjusting the timing of a signal to switch between valve states in response to information from a combustion sensor, the combustion modes including spark ignition and homogeneous compression ignition.
  • In this way, it is possible to compensate for the dynamics of the oil circuit and the delay in the electronic components by means of combustion sensor information. Thus, it is possible to provide precise control of a valve switching order while changing combustion modes, thereby reducing torque fluctuations, emission peaks, vibration, and audible noise. In one embodiment, information regarding the control times when each tappet has switched can be used to provide suitable signal control times so that the correct amount of fuel can be injected into the respective cylinder and the required temperature and pressure can be achieved in the cylinder to perform desired combustion modes such as HCCI and SI.
  • Furthermore, learned modifications of the switching time and / or switching sequence can be achieved by enabling adaptation over time based on information from a combustion sensor to take into account system deterioration and external conditions such as moisture or altitude.
  • Figure list
    • 1 shows an exemplary engine cylinder configuration;
    • 2A-B showed detailed views of exemplary combustion chambers;
    • 2C FIG. 12 shows a detailed view of an exemplary plunger for use with the example of FIG 2 B ;
    • 3rd shows exemplary lifting profiles;
    • 4-5 show exemplary hydraulic actuator circuits for controlling the actuation of multi-cylinder valve actuator systems;
    • 6-7 show exemplary control time diagrams and control time windows for the exemplary configuration of 4th ;
    • 8-9 show exemplary control time diagrams and control time windows for the exemplary configuration of 5 ;
    • 10th shows an exemplary flow diagram for adaptive control of valve lifter switching;
    • 11 FIG. 3 shows an exemplary flow diagram for adaptive control of valve operations, wherein a plurality of signals are used to control an oil circuit, and
    • 12th shows a schematic diagram of a baseline correlation of a crank angle for sending a switching signal with engine speed and adapted calibration over time.
  • Detailed description
  • 1 shows a cylinder of a multi-cylinder engine and the inlet and outlet section connected to this cylinder. Continue with 1 becomes a direct injection internal combustion engine 10th , which comprises several combustion chambers, by an electronic control unit 12th controlled. A combustion chamber 30th of the motor 10th comes with combustion chamber walls 32 with one arranged in it and with one crankshaft 40 connected piston 36 shown. A starter motor (not shown) is connected to the crankshaft by means of a flywheel (not shown) 40 connected. The combustion chamber or cylinder 30th is by means of respective inlet valves 52a and 52b (not shown, see 2nd ) and exhaust valves 54a and 54b (not shown, see 2nd ) with the intake manifold 44 and the exhaust manifold 48 related shown. An injector 66a for supplying injected fuel proportional to the pulse width of that from the control unit 12th using an electronic driver 68 received signal fpw directly into the combustion chamber 30th is shown directly connected to it. The injection valve can be installed, for example, in the side of the combustion chamber or in the upper part of the combustion chamber. Fuel is the injector 66A by means of a (not shown) conventional high-pressure fuel system with a fuel tank, fuel pumps and a distributor pipe.
  • The intake manifold 44 comes with a throttle body 58 by means of a throttle valve 62 related shown. In this particular example, the throttle is 62 with an electric motor 94 coupled so that the position of the throttle valve 62 by means of the electric motor 94 through the control unit 12th is controlled. This configuration is often referred to as electronic throttle control (ETC), which can also be used during idle control.
  • The exhaust gas sensor 76 is with the exhaust manifold 48 upstream of the catalyst 70 shown connected. The sensor 76 can be one of many known sensors for providing an indication of the fuel / air ratio of the exhaust gas, for example a linear oxygen sensor or UEGO (unheated lambda probe from the English Universal Exhaust Gas Oxygen), a two-state oxygen sensor or EGO, a HEGO (heated EGO), a NOx, HC or CO sensor.
  • A distributorless ignition system 88 delivers the combustion chamber 30th under selected operating modes using the spark plug 92 in response to a pre-ignition signal SA from the control unit 12th an ignition spark. Even if spark ignition components are shown, the engine can 10th (or part of the cylinders thereof) are operated in a compression ignition mode with or without ignition assistance, as will be explained in more detail below. In another embodiment, the combustion chamber also has no spark plug.
  • The control unit 12th can be designed so that it is the combustion chamber 30th caused to operate in various combustion modes as described herein. The Fuel injection timing can be adjusted to provide different combustion modes, along with other parameters such as EGR , Valve timing, valve operation, valve deactivation.
  • A pollution control device 70 becomes downstream of the exhaust manifold 48 shown. The device may be a three-way catalyst, a NOx filter, various other devices, or combinations thereof.
  • 1 also shows a vapor recirculation system, the recovery of fuel vapors from a fuel tank 180 and a fuel vapor storage device 184 by means of a purge control valve 168 enables.
  • In 1 becomes the control unit 12th shown as a conventional microcomputer, which comprises: a microprocessor 102 , Input / output ports 104 , an electronic storage medium for executable programs and calibration values, which in this particular example is a read-only memory chip 106 is shown a working memory 108 , a battery-powered storage 110 and a conventional data bus. The control unit 12th is shown as well as the signals from the engine described above 10th coupled sensors receives various signals, including measurement of the introduced air mass ( MAF ) from an air flow meter 100 with the throttle body 58 connected is; Engine coolant temperature ( ECT ) from one with a cooling jacket 114 connected temperature sensor 112 ; an ignition profile pickup signal ( PIP ) from one with the crankshaft 40 connected Hall sensor (or other sensor) 118 ; and a throttle position TP from a throttle position sensor 120 ; and a manifold pressure signal (MAP) from a sensor 122 . An engine speed signal RPM is generated by the control unit 12th from the signal PIP generated in a conventional manner, and manifold pressure signal MAP from a manifold pressure sensor provides an indication of negative pressure in the intake manifold. It should be noted that different combinations of the above sensors can be used, for example MAF sensor without a MAP sensor or vice versa. During stoichiometric operation, this sensor can give an indication of engine load. Furthermore, this sensor, along with engine speed, can provide a charge estimate (including air) that is admitted into the cylinder. In one example, the sensor generates 118 , which is also used as an engine speed sensor, a predetermined number of equally spaced pulses per revolution of the crankshaft.
  • Continue with 1 becomes an engine 10th with an intake camshaft 130 and an exhaust camshaft 132 shown with the camshaft 130 both intake valves 52a , b actuated and the camshaft 132 both exhaust valves 54a , b operated. The valves can be operated using stroke profiles (see 2nd ) are actuated on the camshafts, the stroke profiles between the various valves being able to vary in terms of height, duration and / or timing. However, alternative (overhead and / or bumper) camshaft arrangements could be used if required.
  • In an embodiment that is related to 2A Described in more detail, a deactivatable plunger may be in the valve stem of one or more of the intake and exhaust valves 52 and 54 can be used to provide individual valve deactivation under selected operating conditions. In this example, the plunger may have an idle function, for example. 2 B but shows an alternative example, in which an alternative deactivatable plunger is shown, in which only a part of the plunger is deactivated. Furthermore, in one example, the cam timing can be done using actuators 136 and 138 be changed based on operating conditions. The actuators can be driven hydraulically or electrically or by combinations thereof. A signal line 150 can set up a valve timing signal 136 send and receive a cam timing measurement. A signal line can do the same 152 a valve timing signal to the device 138 send and receive a cam timing measurement.
  • As shown above 1 only one cylinder of a multi-cylinder engine and that each cylinder has its own set of intake / exhaust valves, injection valves, spark plugs etc. In an alternative embodiment, a duct fuel injection configuration can be used, in which an injector is in a duct with the intake manifold 44 is connected instead of directly to the cylinder 30th .
  • Furthermore, an exhaust gas recirculation system ( EGR ) a desired portion of the exhaust gas from the exhaust manifold 48 by means of an EGR valve (not shown) to the intake manifold 44 . Alternatively, part of the combustion gases can be retained in the combustion chambers by controlling exhaust valve timing.
  • The motor 10th works in various modes, including lean operation, rich operation and "almost stoichiometric" operation. “Almost stoichiometric” operation means an operation that fluctuates around the stoichiometric air / fuel ratio.
  • Moisture detection can also be used in conjunction with the versions shown be used. For example, an absolute or relative humidity sensor 140 be used to measure the humidity of the ambient air or intake air. This sensor can either be located in the manifold 44 flowing intake air flow or, for example, in the measurement ambient air flowing through the engine compartment of the vehicle. It should also be noted that the humidity can be estimated or inferred based on various operating parameters. Alternatively, the moisture can be inferred based on autoignition properties through adaptive learning. Furthermore, air pressure and adaptive learning can be used in combination and can also be used with recorded moisture values.
  • Furthermore, combustion detection can be used in connection with the illustrated embodiment. For example, a combustion sensor 142 be connected to the cylinder. In one embodiment, the combustion sensor 142 a knock sensor connected to the head of the cylinder, as in 1 will be shown. In another embodiment, a knock sensor can be attached to the body of the cylinder. In yet another embodiment, the combustion sensor 142 be a pressure sensor built into the cylinder. In some versions, the combustion sensor 142 be an ion current sensor or a seal sensor. Information from the combustion sensor 142 may determine types / modes of combustion, as described below, and may indicate whether the combustion being performed is predetermined or desired. Thus, it is possible to adaptively control the switching between combustion modes based on information from the combustion sensor 142 to have.
  • As described in more detail below, engine combustion may occur 10th be of different types / operating modes depending on operating conditions. In one example, spark ignition (SI) can be used, the engine using an ignition device, for example a spark plug coupled in the combustion chamber, to regulate the control times of the combustion chamber gas at a predetermined point in time after the top dead center of the work cycle . In one example, during spark ignition operation, the temperature of the air entering the combustion chamber is significantly lower than the temperature required for auto-ignition. While SI combustion can be used over a wide range of engine torque and speed, it can produce increased NOx values and lower fuel economy compared to other types of combustion.
  • Another type of combustion from the engine 10th can be used, uses homogeneous compression ignition (HCCI) or controlled auto-ignition (CAI), whereby the combustion gases ignite at a predetermined point after the compression cycle of the combustion cycle or close to it compression top dead center occurs. When compression ignition of a premixed air and fuel charge is used, fuel is typically premixed with air in a normally homogeneous manner, as in a port injected spark ignition engine, or is directly injected with fuel during an intake stroke but with a high proportion of air to fuel. Since the fuel / air mixture is greatly diluted by air or residual exhaust gases, which leads to lower peak temperatures of combustion gas, the generation of NOx can be reduced compared to the values found in SI combustion. Furthermore, fuel economy when working in a compression combustion mode can be improved by reducing engine pumping loss, increasing the gas specific heat ratio, and using a higher compression ratio.
  • In the compression ignition mode, it may be desirable to tightly control the auto-ignition timing. The initial intake charge temperature directly affects the auto-ignition timing. The start of the ignition is not directly controlled by an event such as the injection of fuel in a standard diesel engine or the ignition of the spark plug in a spark ignition engine. Furthermore, the heat release rate is not controlled by the rate or duration of the fuel injection process, as is the case with the diesel engine, nor by the turbulent flame propagation time, as in the gasoline engine.
  • It should be noted that auto-ignition is also a phenomenon that knocking on a spark ignition engine can cause. Knocking is undesirable with spark ignition engines because it increases heat transfer within the cylinder and can burn or damage the piston. In an HCCI engine with its high air / fuel ratio, knock generally does not cause engine degradation because the dilute charge keeps the rate of pressure rise low and the maximum temperature of the burned gases relatively low. The lower rate of pressure increase mitigates the deleterious pressure fluctuations characteristic of spark ignition knock.
  • Compared to a spark ignition engine, the temperature of the charge at the beginning of the Compression stroke typically be raised to achieve autoignition conditions at or near the end of the compression stroke. It will be understood by those skilled in the art that numerous other methods can be used to raise the initial fill temperature. Some of these include: heating the intake air (heat exchanger), keeping some of the warm combustion products in the cylinder (internal EGR ) by adjusting the intake and / or exhaust valve timing, compressing the intake charge (turbocharging and charging), changing the auto-ignition characteristic of the fuel supplied to the engine and heating the intake air charge (external EGR ).
  • During HCCI combustion, the auto-ignition of the combustion chamber gas can be controlled to occur at a desired position of the piston or at a desired crank angle to produce the desired engine torque, and so it is not necessary to trigger an ignition mechanism spark to achieve combustion. However, a late spark plug timing can be used as a replacement ignition source after auto-ignition temperature is reached, if auto-ignition does not occur.
  • A third type of combustion from the engine 10th can be performed, for example when an igniter is included, uses the igniter to initiate (or assist) combustion when the temperature of the combustion chamber gas approaches auto-ignition temperature (e.g., reaches a value near auto-ignition without realizing combustion). Such an ignition assisted type of combustion can have improved fuel economy and reduce NOx generation compared to SI combustion, but can operate in a higher torque range compared to HCCI combustion. Ignition assistance can also provide an overall larger window for controlling temperature at set timing in the engine cycle. In other words, without ignition assistance, a slight change in temperature can result in a fairly large change in combustion timing, which affects engine performance. In other words, in ignition assist mode, a small change in temperature can result in a large change in combustion timing, which affects engine performance. In the ignition assist mode, it is possible to achieve many of the benefits of HCCI combustion, but rely on ignition control to provide the required final energy to achieve auto-ignition to more precisely control combustion timing. Thus, in one example, the ignition support can also be used during transitions between SI combustion and HCCI under certain conditions.
  • In one embodiment, the ignition assist mode can be operated in which a small amount of fuel is supplied to the gases near the spark plug. This small cloud of fuel can be used to allow a flame to spread better and generate increased pressure in the cylinder, thereby triggering the remaining fuel / air mixture to self-ignite. Thus, a relatively small cloud of richer gases located near the spark plug can be used, which can also be homogeneous, stratified or lightly stratified. One way to provide such operation is to use a second direct fuel injection in the compression stroke.
  • An example of an application that includes at least the three combustion modes presented above may include using SI to start and / or after engine start during an engine warm-up period. After such an engine start and engine warm-up, the combustion process can change to ignition-assisted combustion for HCCI combustion for improved fuel economy and emissions. During periods of high engine torque demand, ignition assistance can be activated to ensure proper combustion control times. When the engine is returned to a low or moderate torque demand, ignition assistance involvement may end to realize the full benefits of HCCI.
  • As mentioned above, the humidity of ambient air drawn into the engine during the intake stroke can affect the combustion temperature by diluting the fill with material that cannot be oxidized and since the specific heat capacity of water is higher than that of air. As a result, the initial filling temperature should be adjusted according to the moisture values when the humidity rises to achieve the desired auto-ignition timing. For example, the use of moisture sensing or estimation may thus allow for improved adjustments to multiple engine operating parameters to help achieve or maintain HCCI combustion, even if a vehicle experiences different levels of ambient humidity. As a result, increasing humidity may require higher starting temperatures, and lower humidity may require a lower starting temperature for a given auto-ignition timing at a given speed and torque.
  • The ambient humidity of the air drawn into the engine during the intake stroke also affects the peak combustion temperatures as it has a higher specific heat capacity than air, the more common diluent. As the ambient humidity of the air drawn into the engine during the intake stroke increases, the peak combustion temperature is reduced by diluting the charge with material that cannot be oxidized and then raising the initial charge temperature required to achieve efficient HCCI combustion. The ambient humidity or relative humidity can be measured with the help of sensors 140 and or 141 can be determined or can be inferred from other data and sent to the engine control unit 12th forwarded to determine the ideal adjustments of engine control parameters for efficient operation.
  • It should be noted that several other parameters can affect both the peak combustion temperature and the temperature required for efficient HCCI operation. These and other applicable parameters can be found in the engine control unit 12th embedded routines are taken into account and used to determine optimal operating conditions. For example, if the octane number of the fuel increases, the required peak compression temperature may increase because the fuel requires a higher peak compression temperature to achieve ignition. Furthermore, the value of the fill dilution can be influenced by various factors, including both moisture and the amount of exhaust gas present in the intake fill. In this way it is possible to understand the engine operating parameters to compensate for the effect of moisture change on auto-ignition, ie the effect of water makes auto-ignition less likely.
  • While one or more of the above combustion modes may be used in some examples, other combustion modes may be used, such as stratified operation, either with or without spark-initiated combustion.
  • As mentioned herein, in one example of a compression or auto-ignition engine, the intake valve (s) are actuated by either high or low lift cam profile depending on the combustion mode selected. The low stroke cam profile is used to retain a high level of residual (exhaust) gases in the cylinder. The retained gases, in some examples, promote compression or auto-ignition by raising the initial fill temperature. However, in a spark ignition mode (either high or low loads), the high lift cam profile is used. Such a switchable cam profile can be realized by various cam and tappet systems, which can switch between an inner and outer surface, for example. Shifting can be accomplished by hydraulic oil flow actuators, which may require a higher flow oil pump, which may increase weight and cost, and reduce efficiency (e.g., a higher flow oil pump may result from increased oil volume and possible problems with insufficient flow in the oil channels lead to higher parasitic loss). As another example, such systems can involve a larger number of rams and higher machining costs.
  • Instead of using a cylinder with a single intake valve (or several switchable intake valves) that changes between different profiles, a cylinder with at least two intake valves can be used in another embodiment, each of the valves having a different stroke profile (at least for this cylinder ) Has. During compression or auto-ignition, a higher and / or longer stroke intake valve can be deactivated using a variable length plunger, while a lower and / or shorter stroke intake valve remains active. During spark ignition, the intake valve may operate higher / longer strokes to increase airflow into the engine while the lower / shorter stroke continues to operate.
  • Due to the fact that in this example now only half of the valves have to be switched, the oil flow requirements for valve actuation are significantly reduced, which reduces the overall oil flow requirements of the engine system. In this example, taking into account the valve sequence, only half of the tappets are switchable devices, and the camshaft can be manufactured using a less expensive manufacturing process with considerably less machining. Furthermore, the oil pump can have a lower work flow rate, which reduces costs, and lower parasitic losses. In this way, system costs can be reduced while still providing spark ignition and compression ignition or auto-ignition along with switching between them.
  • Active valve operation may refer to valve opening and closing during a cycle of the cylinder, wherein deactivated valves may be held in a closed position over a cycle of the cylinder (or may be held in a fixed position over the cycle).
  • While the examples above illustrate the benefits of a particular situation, the approaches here can be applied to a variety of different systems and configurations, for example exhaust systems and systems that have more than two intake or two exhaust valves per cylinder.
  • Back to an exemplary intake valve system, the first intake valve may have a lower stroke profile that alone is capable of flowing sufficient air to operate the engine in compression or auto-ignition. Furthermore, the first intake valve may have valve timing (fixed or adjustable) that is set for compression or auto-ignition. The second intake valve may have a valve lift and / or valve timing (fixed or adjustable) that provide an air difference for spark ignition beyond that required for compression or auto-ignition, as in the example of FIG 3rd will be shown.
  • Valve deactivation can be provided by means of switchable tappets which are attached to a valve with a higher / longer stroke, which in one example is only active during spark ignition operation. The plunger may be deactivated during compression or auto-ignition to keep the higher / longer stroke valve closed during one cycle of the cylinder. The lower / shorter stroke valve may be constantly active to open and close during one cycle of the cylinder to provide either all of the air during compression or auto-ignition or part of the air for spark ignition.
  • In another embodiment, a higher / longer stroke intake valve may be deactivated under conditions other than compression or auto-ignition, such as during vehicle braking to reduce airflow, during fuel cut braking, or other conditions. Furthermore, various valves have been described as having a higher or shorter stroke, which can be determined by a maximum valve lift or a medium valve lift height (opening into the cylinder). Similarly, valves with a shorter or longer stroke can be determined by a crank angle opening duration, for example even if the valves can open and / or close earlier or later during the cylinder cycle.
  • Now referring to 2A this shows an exemplary cylinder configuration, with two intake valves ( 52a and 52b ) of the cylinder 30th of the motor 10th by means of a common camshaft 130 are operated, each valve having a different cam profile 210 and 212 has examples of which refer to 3rd be described in more detail. The figures show the valve 52a with a profile longer and higher valve strokes than 52b. In this example the valve 52b using a pestle 216 actuated while the valve 52a with a variable length ram 214 is actuated by means of the control unit 12th can be controlled.
  • 2A also shows two exhaust valves 54a and 54b , also using profiles 220 and 222 by pestle 224 and 226 are operated, the plunger 224 by means of the control unit 12th can be deactivated. In this example the valve 54a with a profile of longer and higher strokes as a valve 54b shown.
  • While this example shows an overhead camshaft engine with a tappet connected to the valve stems, tappets can also be used with a bumper motor and a variable length tappet can therefore be coupled to a bumper.
  • The diagram of 2A only one cylinder of engine 10th wherein the engine may be a multi-cylinder engine, each cylinder being the same, similar, or different from that in FIG 2A can be shown. While the above valve system can offer advantages in an engine with compression or auto-ignition, it can also be used in other engine combustion systems.
  • Now referring to 2 B this shows an alternative camshaft and tappet configuration. In this example, the stroke profile is in detail 210 in lifting parts 210A and 210C and a zero stroke part 210B divided. The plunger is activated during active valve operation 284 as a unit through the profiles 210A and 210C actuated, and during deactivation an outer part of 284 decoupled from an inner part, as in 2C is described so that the valve 52a is not activated. The stroke is analog 220 similarly divided, and the pestle 294 resembles pestle 284 . Thus, an alternative approach to deactivation is shown that, for example, can offer improved manufacturability. It should also be noted that a single profile like 210A instead of the double profile shown ( 210A and 210C) can be used.
  • In detail shows 2C an alternative deactivatable plunger, in which a locking pin 254 used to the inner part 252 with the outer part 250 to connect or detach from it. In this way, when the pin is in the locked position, it causes contact with the profiles 210A and 210C caused movement that the inner part follows the movement and thereby actuates the valve stem and the valve connected to the inner part. Alternatively, when the pin is in the unlocked position, an idle spring acts in the inner portion 256 that the outer part 250 separate from the inner part 252 emotional. Because the profile 210 that with the inner part 252 is in contact, furthermore has a reduced stroke or no stroke, the valve remains essentially closed, and thus the cylinder can be deactivated. The pencil 254 can, in one example, be actuated by means of hydraulic pressure, which is controlled by means of a hydraulic valve connected to the control device.
  • In this way, an alternative approach using a deactivatable plunger can be used, in which the producibility of the plunger can be improved while still maintaining the desired mode of operation.
  • Finally, other examples of valve deactivation can be used if necessary.
  • Now referring to 3rd this shows at 310 an exemplary stroke profile of the valve 52b that can be used to provide a target fresh air charge and a residual charge to improve compression and auto-ignition, for example by providing a higher initial charge temperature at the start of compression. As mentioned herein, in one example, the valve 52b no deactivation mechanism. 3rd also shows an exemplary valve lift profile at 312 52a that can be used to provide a desired operation for spark ignition operation. In the example of 3rd assigns the profile 312 some stroke parts higher than that of 310 and also has a longer stroke than 310. As mentioned herein, the valve 312 can be selectively deactivated during compression or auto-ignition operation using a deactivatable plunger.
  • If both intake valves are active, an effective lift profile, as shown by 314, can be realized, whereas profile 310 at least in one example, while compression or auto-ignition can be used.
  • The above exemplary implementations and alternatives can be used to transfer one or more cylinders of an engine between combustion modes. However, in order to reduce torque fluctuations, emission peaks and NVH during a shift, it can be important to know when each tappet has shifted so that the correct amount of fuel can be injected into the respective cylinder. One approach may be to measure tappet switching, which may require additional sensors and other systems that can increase system costs. Another approach is to infer a switched plunger from cylinder pressure measurements of compression immediately after switching.
  • As mentioned herein, a switchable plunger mechanism can be used that uses a pin that slides into a locked or unlocked position depending on the oil pressure applied to the pin. The exact position at which each tappet switches can depend heavily on the dynamics of the oil circuit. If a valve is open on a particular tappet and the oil pressure switching limit is reached, the locking pin may not move until the valve is fully closed, and the changed valve lift will not occur until the next valve event. Further, if the locking pin has started to move and a valve event occurs before the pin is fully engaged or disengaged, then the pin may be worn. Together with aging and deterioration effects, these factors make stable control of the plunger switching times and the plunger switching sequence an important point.
  • One approach, which is applied to a four-cylinder engine in the following, uses an oil circuit configuration that reduces complexity but provides a system with sufficient repeatability and stability and variability to handle a variety of operating conditions in which the cylinder shift order is predetermined and stable is achieved.
  • With reference to 4th becomes a first exemplary configuration using a first hydraulic actuator 410 and a second hydraulic actuator 412 described, the respective oil pressures to the actuators in the cylinders 1 to 4th can be controlled as shown. In this example is the engine firing order 1-3-4-2 , although this is just an example. Continue with 4th the two actuators each use separate oil lines for each of the inlet tappet and outlet tappet. This configuration enables independent control of each group of intake and exhaust valves and can allow sufficient switching windows (depending on response time and switching speeds) to be achieved for a predetermined cylinder switching order for both intake and exhaust valves, as described below with reference to FIG 6 and 7 is described in more detail. As shown, with such a system it is possible to achieve a cylinder switching order that is the same for both the intake and exhaust tappets. In other words, since the cam event shift windows used to achieve both acceptable and stable shifting in a predetermined cylinder shift order do not overlap between the intake and exhaust sides, a separate control for intake and exhaust valves of multiple cylinders can be used to to get the desired switching order.
  • In an alternative embodiment, however, further improvements to the stable control with the oil circuit configuration of 5 can be achieved. In this version, the oil circuit uses four actuators ( 510 , 512 , 514 , and 516 ) to control the oil pressure in four separate oil lines. Again uses the configuration of 5 a cylinder firing order of 1-3-4-2 .
  • It should be noted that the above approaches can be adapted and / or modified to handle alternative firing sequences. For example, the oil lines can be redesigned to achieve the same or a different target result, for example by connecting any two subsequent cylinders in the firing order to the same oil line. Note that in the example above, the figures show an engine with a single bank of four cylinders. However, the approach can be extended to a V-8 engine, for example with two engine banks, each with four cylinders. In this case, the firing order of the cylinders of the particular bank can be used to configure the oil lines, even if the overall engine firing order regularly switches between banks. The cylinder 3rd can in other words by cylinder 1 Ignite under the cylinders in the particular bank shown, even if one cylinder in another bank may be between the cylinders 1 and 3rd ignites.
  • The above configuration can be used to extend the switching window for actuating the valve change mechanism to values typically on the order of 220 to 270 crank angle degrees, which is an enlarged range of 6.1 to 7.5 ms at 6,000 rpm. corresponds. A timing diagram that shows the execution of 5 shows is in the 8th and 9 illustrates the schematic cam event timing tables and the safe switching windows for switching from SI to HCCI and vice versa.
  • Now referring specifically to the 6-7 are schematic cam event timing tables for the configuration of 4th (Four-cylinder engine with a cylinder ignition sequence of 1-3-4-2) for switching from a SI with a long stroke and a long duration to an HCCI with a short stroke and a short duration or vice versa. Specifically, the figures show the intake and exhaust valve opening times for each of the cylinders. Furthermore, a cam profile switching window (CPS) for each of the actuators 410 and 412 shown.
  • The CPS window shows the range of crank angles over which a signal can be sent to the actuator to trigger valve operation switching. The start and end areas of the windows can be determined by the ignition sequence, valve opening duration, etc. In the exemplary operating mode switching starting with cylinder number 1 the start of the exhaust signal window is determined to be after the opening angle of the exhaust valve for cylinders 2nd lies and the end before the exhaust valve opening angle of the cam high stroke for cylinders 1 (shown by the dashed line on the exhaust cam opening window of cylinder 1 ). It should also be noted that in this example the switching is controlled so that the exhaust stroke profile is of the HCCI type for the last combustion process in the SI operating mode and the first combustion event in the HCCI operating mode uses an intake stroke profile of the HCCI type.
  • Continue with 6 In the exemplary mode shift starting with cylinder # 1, the beginning of the intake signal window is determined to be according to the opening angle of the intake valve for cylinders 2nd and the end before the intake valve opens the cam high stroke for cylinders 1 (shown by the dash line on the intake cam opening window of cylinder 1 ).
  • 7 vice versa shows a change from HCCI to SI operation and the corresponding windows for this operation. It should be noted that the window start angle, window end angle and / or duration differ from those of 6 can distinguish. For example, this may be due to different valve opening times and time spans between the different stroke profiles.
  • As in the example of 6 are the respective inlet and outlet windows of 7 matched to the intake and exhaust valve timing of the cylinders firing immediately before and after the shift in the firing order of the cylinders in the particular engine bank or group of cylinders with a common camshaft. In this example, however, no dashed lines are required, since the valve openings shown open the windows in the same way as in 6 determine.
  • Depending on the basic cam timing and duration of the engine, the windows can be on the order of 150 crank angle degrees for switching from SI to HCCI and typically on the order of 50 crank angle degrees for switching HCCI to Sl. At 6,000 rpm. this corresponds to a range of 1.4 to 4.2 ms, which may require precise control, especially when aging and deterioration effects of the oil and the oil system are taken into account. However, if shifting is limited to lower engine speeds, improved robustness can be achieved.
  • Now referring to the 8-9 become schematic cam event timing tables for the configuration of 5 (Four-cylinder engine with a cylinder ignition sequence of 1-3-4-2) for switching from a SI with a long stroke and a long duration to an HCCI with a short stroke and a short duration or vice versa. Specifically, the figures show the intake and exhaust valve opening times for each of the cylinders. Furthermore, a cam profile switching window (CPS) for each of the actuators 510 to 516 shown.
  • The CPS window shows the range of crank angles over which a signal can be sent to the actuator to trigger valve operation switching. The start and end areas of the windows are determined by the firing order, valve opening duration, etc. In the exemplary operating mode switching starting with cylinder number 1 becomes the beginning of the cylinder exhaust signal window 1 and 3rd set so that it is according to the opening angle of the exhaust valve for cylinders 3rd lies and the end before the exhaust valve opening angle of the cam high stroke for cylinders 1 (shown by the dashed line on the exhaust cam opening window of cylinder 1 ). In this example, the switching is again controlled so that for the last combustion process in the SI mode, the exhaust stroke profile is that of the HCCI type and the first combustion event in the HCCI mode uses an intake stroke profile of the HCCI type.
  • Continue with 8th In the exemplary mode shift starting with cylinder # 1, the beginning of the intake signal window for the cylinders 1 and 3rd set so that it is according to the opening angle of the intake valve for cylinders 3rd and the end before the intake valve opens the cam high stroke for cylinders 1 (shown by the dash line on the intake cam opening window of cylinder 1 ). A similar analysis applies to the windows of the cylinders 2nd and 4th , with only the beginning of the exhaust signal window for the cylinders 2nd and 4th is set according to the opening angle of the exhaust valve for cylinders 2nd lies and the end before the exhaust valve opening angle of the cam high stroke for cylinders 4th (shown by the dashed line on the exhaust cam opening window of cylinder 4th ). It is also the beginning of the intake signal window for the cylinders 2nd and 4th set so that it is according to the opening angle of the intake valve for cylinders 2nd is and the end before the intake valve opening angle of the high stroke cam for cylinders 4th (shown by the dash line on the intake cam opening window of cylinder 4th ).
  • 9 vice versa shows a change from HCCI to SI operation and the corresponding windows for this operation. It should be noted that the window start angle, window end angle and / or duration differ from those of 8th can distinguish. For example, this may be due to different valve opening times and time spans between the different stroke profiles.
  • That in the 6-9 The cam profile shift window shown shows crank angles when the hydraulic shift is carried out by means of an oil line. As described above, however, many factors can affect the stable control of plunger switching control times and plunger switching order. In one example, using tappet switching technology with oil lines, each acting on multiple cylinders, tappet switching may occur when an oil pressure limit is reached. Thus, the point at which each tappet switches can depend on the dynamics of the oil circuit. Furthermore, if a tappet is depressed by a cam when the oil pressure limit is reached, the tappet will not switch until the camshaft rotates again. Furthermore, aging, deterioration effects and external conditions of an engine also affect the timing of the switching of the valve operation in relation to the timing for the transmission of a signal for triggering the switching. These factors include, but are not limited to, a delay in the electronics and solenoid valves, a variable time delay in the oil circuit, deterioration, and external conditions. Because precise control of valve profile switching affects the operation of compression or auto-ignition combustion, at least some of the factors that affect switching can be considered in the control strategy.
  • In one approach, the ram switching timing can be adjusted according to the combustion conditions in the cylinders by using a combustion sensor. With this approach, the desired tappet or cylinder switching order can be assumed to be known and attainable. For example, the cylinder shift order in a four-cylinder engine 1 , 4th , 3rd , 2nd his. The crank angle at which the switching signal is sent can change with the engine speed or other operating parameters. In one embodiment, crank angles can be calibrated at different engine speeds in order to achieve repeatable tappet switching control times or a repeatable tappet switching sequence. In another embodiment, calibration of crank angles with a different oil temperature can be used to achieve desired shift control times or a desired shift sequence. The calibration of the operating parameters can take into account the relatively constant pure time delay that is present in the electronics and in the solenoid valves, as well as the extremely variable time delay in the oil circuit. However, the calibration of the required crank angle for the switching signal may not be sufficient for the adaptation over time, since factors other than operation of the valve mechanism can affect the correct response time of the tappet switching.
  • Thus, in some implementations, a combustion sensor can be used to provide control system information that can be configured to detect plungers that have switched earlier or later than expected. Now referring to 10th an exemplary flow diagram for the adaptive control of valve lifter switching is shown. The routine determines at 1010 whether conditions for tappet switching are met. The conditions may be steady-state conditions where the desired tappet and / or cylinder switching order is known and achievable, and / or if desired, switch a combustion mode between homogeneous compression ignition and spark ignition. If so, the routine continues 1010 to send a switching signal to an oil circuit to switch plungers at the crank angle specified in the calibration. The calibration can be a correlation of crank angles with engine speeds, oil temperatures, or suitable operating parameters that can achieve repeatable tappet switching control times and tappet switching orders. Then, at 1030, the routine includes using a combustion sensor to detect whether shift timing and / or the shift order are desired or predetermined. In one embodiment, the combustion sensor may be a knock sensor coupled to the engine head or to the engine block near a cylinder. In another embodiment, the combustion sensor can be a pressure sensor installed in a cylinder. In some implementations, the combustion sensor can be an ion current sensor or a seal sensor. The desired switching order may include predetermined orders of cylinders that perform a desired combustion order such as SI or HCCI.
  • Next, the routine determines 1040 whether a tappet is switched earlier or later than desired. Information from the combustion sensor may include whether the combustion is spark ignited or compression or self ignited. Alternatively, an undesired combustion such as torque fluctuations, vibration, noise or misfire can be detected by the combustion sensor. Furthermore, information for the combustion sensor can be used to detect and / or adjust combustion control times (for example by means of the location of the peak pressure). This can cause errors in the tappet switching 1040 be determined. If the answer to step 1040 Yes, the routine continues 1050 , otherwise the routine goes back 1010 . Continue with 10th updates the routine at 1050 the calibration of the crank angle of the switching signal based on the detected switching sequence and / or switching control times.
  • As above regarding the 4-5 An oil circuit used to control tappet switching can have a plurality of oil lines. 11 shows an exemplary flow diagram for an adaptive control of valve operations, wherein a plurality of signals are used to control an oil circuit. At 1110 the routine determines whether the conditions for tappet switching are met. The conditions can be stationary conditions in which the desired tappet and / or cylinder switching sequence and / or combustion modes are known and achievable. If yes the routine sends on 1120 Switching signals to a plurality of the oil lines that switch plungers at predetermined windows of a crank angle, each oil line controlling valve operations of a group of cylinders. The crank angle windows for the cam profile switching or the combustion mode can be as in the 6-9 shown to be predetermined. Examples of combustion modes and combustion orders in each cylinder are also shown in FIGS 6-9 intended. The crank angle windows can be determined by calibration or other suitable approaches. Then the routine includes at 1130 using a combustion sensor to detect combustion in each cylinder. The sensor can detect whether combustion is being performed in each cylinder in a desired mode, such as spark ignition or compression ignition. The sensor can also detect misfire in a compression ignition mode. In addition, information for the combustion sensor can be used to detect and / or adjust combustion control times (for example by means of the location of the peak pressure).
  • Next, the routine determines 1140 whether a predetermined combustion mode is carried out in each group of cylinders whose valve operations are controlled by an oil line. If the answer is yes, the routine goes to step 1110 . Otherwise, the routine continues to 1150 to determine which signal should be matched to a multi-cylinder oil line by detecting in each cylinder by means of a combustion sensor whether deteriorated combustion has occurred. The determination can also be based on the number of cylinders with deteriorated combustion in the predetermined combustion mode, which cylinders in the group have deteriorated combustion and / or on an order or sequence of cylinders with deteriorated combustion.
  • Next, the routine determines 1160 in which direction each signal for an oil line is to be adapted for the signals to be adapted. The determination can be based on the combustion conditions of a group of cylinders whose valve operations are controlled by an oil line. Again, factors such as the number of cylinders with deteriorated combustion in the predetermined combustion mode, which cylinders in a group have deteriorated combustion and / or the order or sequence of cylinders with deteriorated combustion can influence the adaptation of the tappet switching signal. Thus, the timing for sending a switching signal to an oil line or crank angle windows can be adjusted early or late based on the above factors to accommodate the changed combustion conditions and to control the change in combustion modes.
  • Next, the routine fits in 1170 the crank angle window to send switching signals to oil lines.
  • In this way, it is possible, based on information from at least one combustion sensor, to adapt the control times for sending valve switching signals to a plurality of cylinders.
  • Now referring to 12th a schematic diagram of a calibration curve between crank angle and engine speed is shown. It is understood that the calibration curve can be a correlation of crank angle with oil temperature or other suitable parameters. The solid line in 12th represents a baseline calibration when the routine 1000 or 1100 starts. The two dash lines represent calibration curves at a time t1 and another time t2 after baseline calibration.
  • 12th shows that the calibration curves for the control times of the tappet switching can be modified over time according to information from the combustion sensor. Thus, the above approach enables a learned modification of calibration, adaptation over time to account for system degradation, or an external difference such as humidity or altitude, which can affect the response time of the tappet switching. Furthermore, the correct switching time control based on learned modification can ensure efficient HCCI or compression ignition combustion. As described above, several parameters can affect HCCI or auto-ignition combustion. The parameters include, but are not limited to, moisture, octane number of the fuel, amount of exhaust gases, etc. By changing the ram control signal switching time based on a real time combustion condition, it is possible to take into account the constant change in the above parameters. Thus, the tappet switching can be precisely controlled so that undesirable conditions for certain combustion modes can be avoided or reduced. In one example, misfire in an HCCI mode can be reduced.
  • It is to be understood that the configurations and routines disclosed herein are exemplary in nature and that these specific implementations should not be taken in a limiting sense, since numerous changes are possible. For example, the above technology can be applied to V-6, I-4, I-6, V-12, counter-piston and other engine designs. As another example, various other mechanisms can be used in a system that uses two different valve profiles for each of the valves in a cylinder. Furthermore, the system can use selective deactivation of one or more valves to provide the correct flow conditions for compression or auto-ignition combustion. The subject matter of the present disclosure further includes all novel and non-obvious combinations and sub-combinations of the various systems and configurations as well as other features, functions and / or properties that are disclosed here.
  • The following claims show in particular certain combinations and sub-combinations, which are regarded as novel and not obvious. These claims can refer to “an” element or “a first” element or a correspondence thereof. These claims are to be understood to include the integration of one or more such elements, neither demanding nor excluding two or more of these elements. Other combinations and subcombinations of the disclosed features, functions, elements and / or properties may be claimed by amending the present claims or by submitting new claims in this or a related application. Such claims, whether broader, narrower, the same, or different from the scope of the original claims, are also considered to be included in the subject matter of the present disclosure.

Claims (20)

  1. A method for controlling the switching of cylinder valves between a first valve state and a second valve state for switching between combustion modes of an engine (10), the combustion modes comprising spark ignition and homogeneous compression ignition, characterized in that the control time of a signal for switching between the valve states in response to Information is adjusted by a combustion sensor (142).
  2. Procedure according to Claim 1 , characterized in that the combustion sensor (142) is a knock sensor.
  3. Procedure according to Claim 1 , characterized in that the combustion sensor (142) is a cylinder pressure sensor, an ion current sensor or a seal sensor.
  4. Procedure according to Claim 1 , characterized in that the valve states comprise a first intake valve lift profile and a second intake valve lift profile, the first profile being provided by first and second intake valves (52a, 52b) which are each actuated by means of a common camshaft (130), the lift profile of the first valve (52a) from that of the second valve (52b), and the second intake valve lift profile is generated by switching at least one tappet (214, 216, 284) of the first or second intake valve (52a, 52b), the switching by a Signal receiving oil circuit is controlled.
  5. Procedure according to Claim 1 , characterized in that the valves are exhaust valves (54a, 54b).
  6. Method for controlling valve switching sequences for changing combustion modes of an engine (10), the engine (10) likewise having a plurality of cylinders (30), each with at least a first valve profile and a second valve profile, the cam profiles being controlled by switching plungers (214, 216, 284, 224, 226, 294) controlled by an oil circuit, the method comprising: Sending a signal to an oil circuit to switch the plungers (214, 216, 284, 224, 226, 294) in a first predetermined switching order to change combustion modes; Detecting a combustion carried out in the cylinders (30) with the aid of a combustion sensor (142); Adjusting a timing to send the signal based on information from the combustion sensor (142).
  7. Procedure according to Claim 6 , characterized in that the combustion modes include spark ignition and homogeneous compression ignition.
  8. Procedure according to Claim 6 , characterized in that the combustion sensor (142) is a knock sensor.
  9. Procedure according to Claim 6 , characterized in that the combustion sensor (142) is a cylinder pressure sensor, an ion sensor or a seal sensor.
  10. Procedure according to Claim 6 , characterized in that the valves are intake valves (52a, 52b).
  11. Procedure according to Claim 6 , characterized in that the valves are exhaust valves (54a, 54b).
  12. Procedure according to Claim 6 , characterized in that the control time based on the question of which cylinder (30) of the engine (10) has deteriorated combustion and / or based on an order of the cylinders (30) with deteriorated combustion and / or based on a number of cylinders (30) is adjusted with deteriorated combustion.
  13. Procedure according to Claim 6 , characterized in that the oil circuit further comprises a first oil line for controlling a valve profile of a first group of cylinders (30) and a second oil line for controlling a valve profile of a second group of cylinders (30), the control time for sending a signal to the the first oil line is adjusted based on combustion information in each cylinder (30) in the first group and the timing for sending a signal to the second oil line is adjusted based on combustion information in each cylinder (30) in the second group.
  14. Procedure according to Claim 13 , characterized in that the control time is adjusted based on a sequence of cylinders (30) with deteriorated combustion.
  15. Procedure according to Claim 13 , characterized in that the control time is adjusted based on which cylinders (30) in the engine (10) have a deteriorated combustion detected by the sensor (142).
  16. A system for operating an engine (10) of a vehicle, the engine (10) having at least a first cylinder (30), the system comprising: a first intake valve (52a) of the cylinder (30); a second intake valve (52b) of the cylinder (30); the first inlet valve (52a) and the second inlet valve (52b) being actuated by means of a common camshaft (130), the stroke profile of the first valve (52a) being different from that of the second valve (52b), the second valve (52b ) actuating plunger (216) has a deactivation device which is designed for the deactivate the second valve (52b) and a tappet (214, 284) actuating the first valve (52a) is continuously actuated by the camshaft (130); a combustion sensor (142); a control device (12) configured to send a signal to actuate the plunger (214, 216, 284, 224, 226, 294), a control time to send the signal in response to information from a combustion sensor (142) is adjusted.
  17. System according to Claim 16 , characterized in that the stroke profile of the first inlet valve (52a) is shorter than the stroke profile of the second inlet valve (52b).
  18. System according to Claim 17 , characterized in that the stroke profile of the first inlet valve (52a) is smaller than the stroke profile of the second inlet valve (52b).
  19. System according to Claim 16 which further comprises a control device (12): for operating the engine (10) in a first operating mode with an active first inlet valve (52a) and with the second inlet valve (52b) deactivated during a cycle of the cylinder (30), during operation the first intake valve (52a) is at least partially open during an intake stroke to at least admit air into the cylinder (30) where the air is mixed and compressed with fuel to achieve auto-ignition; and for operating the engine (10) in a second operating mode with the first intake valve (52a) and the second intake valve (52b) active during a cycle of the cylinder (30), the first and second intake valves (52a, 52b) at least during operation are partially open during an intake stroke to at least admit air into the cylinder (30) where the air is mixed with fuel and ignited by a spark plug (92) using a spark.
  20. System according to Claim 19 , further comprising: a first exhaust valve (54a) of the cylinder (30); a second exhaust valve (54b) of the cylinder (30); wherein the first exhaust valve (54a) and the second exhaust valve (54b) are actuated by means of a common camshaft (132), the stroke profile of the first exhaust valve (54a) being different from that of the second exhaust valve (54b), the second exhaust valve (54b ) actuating tappet (226) has a deactivation device which is designed to deactivate the second exhaust valve (54b), and a tappet (224a, 29a) actuating the first exhaust valve (54a) is actuated by the camshaft (132) under all conditions .
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US7845319B2 (en) * 2007-09-07 2010-12-07 Gm Global Technology Operations, Inc. Valvetrain control systems with independent intake and exhaust lift control
US7979195B2 (en) * 2007-09-07 2011-07-12 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Valvetrain control systems for internal combustion engines with multiple intake and exhaust timing based lift modes
US8955492B2 (en) * 2010-05-24 2015-02-17 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Control strategy for transitions between homogeneous-charge compression-ignition and spark-ignition combustion modes
DE102011076197A1 (en) 2011-05-20 2012-11-22 Ford Global Technologies, Llc Internal combustion engine with oil circuit and method for operating such an internal combustion engine

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EP1464813A1 (en) 2003-04-04 2004-10-06 Ford Global Technologies, Inc., A subsidiary of Ford Motor Company Method for the operation of an internal combustion engine with two intake valves
WO2005113947A1 (en) 2004-05-21 2005-12-01 Brunel University Method of operating an internal combustion engine
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US6330869B1 (en) 1999-05-14 2001-12-18 Honda Giken Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Control device of an internal combustion engine
AT5720U1 (en) 2001-09-25 2002-10-25 Avl List Gmbh Internal combustion engine
EP1464813A1 (en) 2003-04-04 2004-10-06 Ford Global Technologies, Inc., A subsidiary of Ford Motor Company Method for the operation of an internal combustion engine with two intake valves
WO2005113947A1 (en) 2004-05-21 2005-12-01 Brunel University Method of operating an internal combustion engine
DE102006000271A1 (en) 2005-06-06 2007-01-25 Kabushiki Kaisha Toyota Jidoshokki, Kariya Compression ignition internal combustion engine with homogeneous charge

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