CA2681557A1 - Presenting multimedia objects in conjunction with voice calls from a circuit-switched network - Google Patents

Presenting multimedia objects in conjunction with voice calls from a circuit-switched network Download PDF

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Publication number
CA2681557A1
CA2681557A1 CA 2681557 CA2681557A CA2681557A1 CA 2681557 A1 CA2681557 A1 CA 2681557A1 CA 2681557 CA2681557 CA 2681557 CA 2681557 A CA2681557 A CA 2681557A CA 2681557 A1 CA2681557 A1 CA 2681557A1
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Prior art keywords
handset
network
multimedia object
voice call
sn
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Abandoned
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CA 2681557
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French (fr)
Inventor
Shamim A. Naqvi
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Aylus Networks Inc
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Aylus Networks, Inc.
Shamim A. Naqvi
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Priority to US91886307P priority Critical
Priority to US60/918,863 priority
Application filed by Aylus Networks, Inc., Shamim A. Naqvi filed Critical Aylus Networks, Inc.
Priority to PCT/US2008/057367 priority patent/WO2009009167A1/en
Publication of CA2681557A1 publication Critical patent/CA2681557A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M7/00Interconnection arrangements between switching centres
    • H04M7/0024Services and arrangements where telephone services are combined with data services
    • H04M7/0027Collaboration services where a computer is used for data transfer and the telephone is used for telephonic communication
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L65/00Network arrangements or protocols for real-time communications
    • H04L65/10Signalling, control or architecture
    • H04L65/1013Network architectures, gateways, control or user entities
    • H04L65/1016IMS
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L65/00Network arrangements or protocols for real-time communications
    • H04L65/40Services or applications
    • H04L65/4007Services involving a main real-time session and one or more additional parallel sessions
    • H04L65/4023Services involving a main real-time session and one or more additional parallel sessions where none of the additional parallel sessions is real time or time sensitive, e.g. downloading a file in a parallel FTP session, initiating an email or combinational services
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L67/00Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications
    • H04L67/16Service discovery or service management, e.g. service location protocol [SLP] or Web services
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L67/00Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications
    • H04L67/32Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications for scheduling or organising the servicing of application requests, e.g. requests for application data transmissions involving the analysis and optimisation of the required network resources
    • H04L67/325Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications for scheduling or organising the servicing of application requests, e.g. requests for application data transmissions involving the analysis and optimisation of the required network resources whereby a time schedule is established for servicing the requests
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M1/00Substation equipment, e.g. for use by subscribers; Analogous equipment at exchanges
    • H04M1/57Arrangements for indicating or recording the number of the calling subscriber at the called subscriber's set
    • H04M1/575Means for retrieving and displaying personal data about calling party
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L67/00Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications
    • H04L67/20Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications involving third party service providers
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L67/00Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications
    • H04L67/30Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications involving profiles
    • H04L67/306User profiles
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M1/00Substation equipment, e.g. for use by subscribers; Analogous equipment at exchanges
    • H04M1/57Arrangements for indicating or recording the number of the calling subscriber at the called subscriber's set
    • H04M1/575Means for retrieving and displaying personal data about calling party
    • H04M1/576Means for retrieving and displaying personal data about calling party associated with a pictorial or graphical representation
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M2203/00Aspects of automatic or semi-automatic exchanges
    • H04M2203/65Aspects of automatic or semi-automatic exchanges related to applications where calls are combined with other types of communication
    • H04M2203/651Text message transmission triggered by call
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M2207/00Type of exchange or network, i.e. telephonic medium, in which the telephonic communication takes place
    • H04M2207/18Type of exchange or network, i.e. telephonic medium, in which the telephonic communication takes place wireless networks
    • H04M2207/187Type of exchange or network, i.e. telephonic medium, in which the telephonic communication takes place wireless networks combining circuit and packet-switched, e.g. GPRS
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M2207/00Type of exchange or network, i.e. telephonic medium, in which the telephonic communication takes place
    • H04M2207/30Type of exchange or network, i.e. telephonic medium, in which the telephonic communication takes place third party service providers
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M3/00Automatic or semi-automatic exchanges
    • H04M3/42Systems providing special services or facilities to subscribers
    • H04M3/42025Calling or Called party identification service
    • H04M3/42034Calling party identification service
    • H04M3/42059Making use of the calling party identifier
    • H04M3/42068Making use of the calling party identifier where the identifier is used to access a profile
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M3/00Automatic or semi-automatic exchanges
    • H04M3/42Systems providing special services or facilities to subscribers
    • H04M3/42025Calling or Called party identification service
    • H04M3/42085Called party identification service
    • H04M3/42102Making use of the called party identifier
    • H04M3/4211Making use of the called party identifier where the identifier is used to access a profile
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M3/00Automatic or semi-automatic exchanges
    • H04M3/42Systems providing special services or facilities to subscribers
    • H04M3/487Arrangements for providing information services, e.g. recorded voice services, time announcements
    • H04M3/4872Non-interactive information services
    • H04M3/4878Advertisement messages
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W76/00Connection management

Abstract

The present invention provides systems and methods for presenting a multimedia object to a handset in conjunction with voice call from a circuit switched (CS) network. The voice call is delivered over the CS network and the multimedia object is delivered over a packet-switched (PS) network. The multimedia object can be rendered as a voice call alert, during the voice call, or after the voice call. The multimedia object can be an advertisement object and can be provided by a third party. The systems and methods described are applicable to IMS and non-IMS networks.

Description

PRESENTING MULTIMEDIA OBJECTS IN CONJUNCTION WITH VOICE CALLS FROM A CIRCUIT-SWITCHED NETWORK

Cross-Reference to Related Applications 100011 This application claims priority under 35 U.S.C. l 19(e) to U.S.
Provisional Patent Application No. 60/918,863, entitled "Systems and Methods for Rendering Multimedia Objects as Incoming Voice Call Indicators," filed March 19, 2007;
and claims priority under 35 U.S.C. S 120 as a continuation-in-part of U.S. Patent Application No. 11/709,469, filed Febl-uary 22, 2007, entitled Systems and n7ethods_f6r enabling IP
signaling in wireless networks; and claims priority under 35 U.S.C. 120 as a continuation-in-part of U.S. Patent Application No. 11/504,896 (U.S. Patent Pub. No.
2007/0197227), filed August 16, 2006, entitled Systern and Method,for Enabling Corribinatianal Services in Wireless Networks By Using a Service Delivery Platforni, (whieh in turn claims priority under 35 U.S.C. 119(e) to U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/800,688, filed May 16, 2006, entitled System arld Metlzod for Sr~ppor-ting Combinational Services Without Simultaneous Packet and Cir-cuit Connections and to U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/809,029, filed May 26, 2006, entitled Systenn and Method for Supporting Combinational Services Without Simultaneous Packet and Cir-cztit Connections), the disclosures of each of the above are incorporated herein by reference in their entirety.

Background Field of tlze Invention [0002] The present invention generally relates to wireless networks for voice and data communications, and more specifically to systems and methods for presenting multimedia objects in conjunetion with voice calls from a circuit-switched network.

Descrzption of Related Art 100031 Current wireless networks support circuit-switched (CS) and packet-switched (PS) connections. Some wireless networks use a technology, known as mRAB
(Multiple Radio Access Beai-er) networks, that allows both types of connections to exist contemporaneously and may be made available to nlobile handsets or user endpoints (UEs), e.g., UMTS/WCDMA networks.

(0004] CS and PS networks will now be described in greater detail. In a CS
network such as PLMN, users' network mobile handsets are connected to Base Transceiver Stations (BTS) through a radio access network. The BTS in turn are connected to a plurality of Base Station Sei-vers (BSC) that in turn are connected to a network of Mobile Switching Centers (MSC). The MSC provide wireless services to the users' handsets, and are also inter-connected with the Public Switched Telephone network (PSTN). This arr-angement makes it possible for voice traffic to be carried between mobile handsets and landline telephone sets. The MSC in a wireless network effectively behaves as a switch that supports the mobility and roaming functions of a user's handset.
100051 When a user's handset requests a telephone call or a service, such as voice mail, a prepaid call, or a toll-free call, it generates a "call event" at the MSC. Each call event can potentially "trigger" one or more Trigger Detection Points (TDP) in the MSC.
When a call event triggers a particular TDP, the MSC sends a pre-specified message to a Service Control Function (SCF). The message includes, for example, the phone numbers of the calling and called parties, and the nature of the sel-vice request. The SCF then "fields" the message, i.e., se1-vice logic within the SCF responds appropriately to the message. In WIN/CAMEL implementations, the MSC and SCF communicate using standards-based protocols such as Transaction Capabilities Application Par-t (TCAP) from the family of protocols commonly referred to as Signaling System 7 (SS7).
[0006] For example, consider a "call oi-igination" call event that happens when a user makes a new call request at the MSC. This call event triggers a con-esponding TDP, causing the MSC to send a message with event-related information to the SCF, e.g., the calling and called numbers. The SCF then processes the message, e.g., by querying an internal or external database to verify that the calling party is authorized to initiate telephone calls. The SCF then responds back to the MSC with a message that indicates whether the call is "allowed" or "denied."

100071 In a PS network, services are generally supported by IP Multimedia Subsystem (IMS). The IMS at-chitecture manages the network with several control functions, i.e., functional entities. The Breakout Gateway Control Function (BGCF) is an inter-working function that handles legaey circuit-switched traffic. A new function called the Media Gateway Control Function (MGCF) controls the Media Gateway (MGW).
The Media Resource Function Processor (MRFP), which is controlled by the Media Resource Control Function (MRFC), performs media processing functions. An IMS
session is controlled by a logical function called the Call State Control Function (CSCF).
It is logically partitioned into three functional entities, the Proxy, Interrogating and Serving CSCFs. The Proxy Call State Control Function (P-CSCF) is the first contact point for a user's handset. The Interrogating CSCF (I-CSCF) is mainly the contact point within an operator's network for all IMS connections destined to a subscriber of that network operator, or a i oaming subscriber curi-ently located within that network operator's sel-vice area. The Serving CSCF (S-CSCF) actually handles the session states in the network.
"Third party" application servers (AS) provide services to the mobile handset, such as voice mail, via the S-CSCF. The IMS controls packet seT-vices among the different functional entities with signaling protocols such as Session Initiation Protocol (SIP), which is an IP-based signaling protocol designed for multimedia communications.
[0008] When a mobile handset first powers on, logic residing in the handset initiates a "registration" procedure with the IMS core, first by requesting the radio access network to assign it an IP address. After it receives an IP address, the mobile handset attempts to register as an IP-enabled endpoint with the IMS core, by sending a "register"
request to the P-CSCF. Assuming that the handset is registering from a visiting domain, the P-CSCF then uses a Domain Name Server (DNS) to search for the handset's home domain S-CSCF. Once the P-CSCF locates the S-CSCF for the mobile handset, it passes the "register" request to that S-CSCF. The S-CSCF contacts the Home Subscriber Subsystem (HSS), which looks up the mobile handset's profile. This profile contains assorted infoi-mation about the user, and what sei-vices the handset is authorized to use. A logical function in the S-CSCF called the "registrar" then authenticates the mobile handset, e.g., verifies that the handset is legitimate.

100091 The S-CSCF also loads Service Point Triggers (SPT) from the handset's profile. The SPT define the appropriate action for the S-CSCF to take when the handset oi- an AS requests a transaction. For example, if the handset requests voice mail service, the SPT triggers the S-CSCF to provide the addresses of the voice mail AS for the handset. So long as the handset is powered on, the SPT for that handset are loaded into the S-CSCF, so a ser-vice request fires the appropriate trigger in the S-CSCF.
The SPT
are analogous to the above-described TDP in the CS network. The SPT and TDP
both trigger an appropriate response from a controlling seiver, e.g., the MSC or S-CSCF.
However, the TDP are more generally applicable to call requests and call related events such as dialed number, etc., and are not particular to the user's profile. The SPT are specific to the mobile handset, and are stored in the user's profile in the HSS and loaded into the S-CSCF when the handset registers.
100101 If an entity wishes to engage in a transaction with the mobile handset, e.g., to send a message to the handset, the entity utilizes an AS to send a request for the transaction to the S-CSCF. This triggers an SPT in the S-CSCF, which recognizes the request as pertaining to a registered handset and sends the appropriate information to the handset. Other ASs may not know which S-CSCF to contact in order to engage in a transaction with a particular handset. In this case, the AS interrogate a Subscriber Location Function (SLF), which provides infonnation about a handset's S-CSCF
to the AS, which then contacts that S-CSCF as described above. If the handset wishes to request a selvice, it sends the request to the S-CSCF, e.g., using a SIP
invite. This triggers an SPT in the S-CSCF, which then directs the ser-vice request to a particular Application Ser-ver (AS), which then pi-ovides the service to the handset. For example, if the user wants to initiate an IMS call, it sends a SIP invite message to the S-CSCF, which may then contact the AS responsible for IMS calls, called the Back-to-Back User Agent (B2BUA), which initiates the IMS call flow.

Summary [0011] The present invention provides systems and methods for presenting multimedia objects in conjunction with a voice call via a circuit switched (CS) network.
100121 In one aspect, the invention provides method for delivering and presenting a multimedia object in conjunction with a voice call to a recipient handset over a wireless network utilizing multiple Radio Access Bearer (mRAB) technology comprising: a circuit switched (CS) network initiating a voice call to a recipient handset over the CS network;
the CS network in response to the voice call sending a trigger message about the state of the voice call to the serving node (SN) residing on a packet switched (PS) network; the SN initiating transfer of a inultimedia object to a PS r-adio channel of the recipient handset over the PS network; the recipient handset receiving the voice call on a CS
radio channel over the CS network and the multimedia object on the PS radio channel ovei-the PS
network; and the recipient handset pi-esenting the nulltimedia object in conjunction with the voice call.

100131 In another aspect, the invention provides a method foi- delivering and presenting a multimedia object in conjunction with a voice call to a i-ecipient handset over a circuit switched (CS) network comprising: preloading a multimedia object to a recipient handset over a packet switched (PS) network; a CS netwoi-k delivering a voice call to the recipient handset over a CS radio channel; in i-esponse to the received voice call, the recipient handset presenting the multimedia object in conjunction with the voice call.
100141 In yet another aspect, the invention provides a system foi- delivering and presenting a multimedia object in conjunction with a voice call to a recipient handset ovei-a wireless network utilizing multiple Radio Access Bearer (mRAB) technology, by coordinating operation of a circuit-switched (CS) network and a packet switched (PS) network, the system comprising: a serving node (SN), residing on a PS network, responsive to a voice call on the CS network, having logic to select and initiate transfer of a multimedia object to the recipient handset over the PS network; and a personal agent (PA) logic, on the recipient handset, for presenting the multimedia object in conjunetion with the voice call.

[00151 In still another aspect, the invention provides a system for delivering and presenting a multimedia object in conjunction with a voice call to a recipient handset, the voice call being delivered over a circuit switched (CS) network and the multimedia object being delivered over the packet switched (PS) network, the system comprising:
a seiving node (SN), residing on a PS network, for preloading a multimedia object to a recipient handset over the PS network; and a personal agent (PA) logic on the recipient handset for presenting the multimedia object in response to a voice call over the CS
network.

[0016] The systems and methods can comprise a serving node (SN) and/or a personal agent (PA) on the initiator handset to select the multimedia object in response to the profile information for the initiator or the recipient. The selection of the i11u1timedia object to be transfezred can be in T-esponse to the tiine of day or logic residing in the initiator handset. The selection of the multimedia object to be transfetTed can be updated periodically and can be pre-provisioned in the SN by a party other than the initiator or the recipient. The CS network trigger messages can be gener-ated by a trigger detection point (TDP) in a mobile switching center (MSC) switch residing in the CS network.

[0017] The SN initiated transfer can be controlled so that the multimedia object is delivered for the start of the voice call. The recipient handset can comprise a personal agent (PA) to coordinate the timing of the voice call and the presentation of the multimedia object on the recipient handset. The serving node (SN) can preload the multimedia object onto the recipient handset via the PS network prior to the initiation of the voice call. If preloaded, the multimedia object can reside on the recipient handset prior to being displayed.

[0018] The multimedia object can be provided by a party other than the initiator or the recipient. An example of such multi-media object is an advertisement object, such an electronic image oi- a video clip. The multimedia object can be presented contemporaneously with the voice call alert, during the voice call, or after the tel-inination of the voice call.

[0019] In some of the systems and methods above, the recipient handset only needs to be capable of operating a CS radio or a PS radio at a given time. In this case, the multimedia object is preloaded onto the recipient handset via a PS network when the CS
radio of the handset is inactive. In some systems and methods above, the recipient handset needs to be capable of operating a CS radio and a PS radio concurrently.

Brief llescription of the Drawings [0020] In the drawings:

Fig. 1 illustrates a GSM/GPRS packet-switched network architecture;
Fig. 2 illustrates a CDMA circuit-switched network architecture;

Fig. 3 illustrates an overview of the seivice delivery platfoim (SDP) and its comiections to the circuit-switched (CS) and packet-switched (PS) networks;
Fig. 4 illustrates the logical components of the sei-ving node (SN) component of the sei-vice delivery platform (SDP); Fib. 5 illustrates the logical components of the personal agent (PA) component of the ser-vice delivery platform (SDP);

Fig. 6 illustrates the interaction of the serving node (SN) with the circuit-switched (CS) network, the packet-switched (PS) network, and a personal agent (PA) on the recipient handset;

Fig. 7 illustrates an exemplary flowchart according to one embodiment of the invention;

Fig. 8 illustrates an exemplary flowchart according to one embodiment of the invention;

Fig. 9 illustrates an exemplary flowchai-t according to one embodiment of the invention; and Fig. 10 illustrates an exemplary flowchart according to one embodiment of the invention.

Detailed Description 10021] The present invention provides systems and methods for presenting multimedia objects in conjunction with a voice call from a CS network. The voice call is delivered over a circuit-switehed (CS) network and the multimedia object is delivered over a packet-switched (PS) network. Since the multimedia object is car-ried by the packet-switched (PS) network and the voice call is can-ied by the CS network, coordination is generally needed between the CS and PS networks such that the multimedia object can be presented at the appropriate times, e.g., at the start of the call, during the call or after the call. Preferably, the delays to call setup times are minimized.
The call setup delay can be reduced by preloading the multimedia object onto recipient handset before initiation of the voice call. The coordination between the CS
network and the PS network is achieved using a serving node (SN). The SN can also include logic for selection of a multimedia object to be transferred, for example, to select a multimedia object in response to the recipient or the initiator profile information. This selection can be made based on a variety of cr-iteria, for example the recipient profile, the initiator profile, the time of the day, or any other desired criteria. The selection can be updated periodically, for example, every hour, every 4 hours, every 8 hours, every 12 hours, every 24 hours, etc.

100221 In some embodiments, the initiator and/or the recipient handset includes personal agent (PA) logic. The PA residing in the initiator handset can be used to select the multimedia object to be delivered to the recipient in conjunction with a voice call.
The PA in the recipient handset can deter-mine whether to present the multimedia object at the start, during, or after the voice call, or it can select which object to render from a plurality of multimedia objects received by the handset via the PS network, or a plurality of multimedia objects residing in the recipient handset. The systems and methods described herein are applicable to IMS and non-IMS netwoi-ks.

100231 The systems and methods of the invention enable multimedia objects to be rendered on a recipient handset as incoming call notifications, coordinated with an incoming voice call request. In some embodiments the systems and methods personalize the voice calling experience by enabling an originating voice call subseriber to choose a multimedia object and have it rendered on the receiving handset as an integral part of the incoming voice call indication. In other embodiments, the systems and methods are used in mobile advertising. We shall use the term Image Ring or Video Ring to denote this service experience. In WCDMA/UMTS networks this involves coordinating the CS
and PS connections for an originating voice call request. In other wireless networks, a mobile handset may have access to either a CS connection or a PS connection but not both at the same time. In such networks, the coordination between the CS and PS
connections is either more involved and complicated and may require serial sequencing of certain signaling and media connections, or the multimedia object needs to be preloaded onto the recipient handset prior to initiation of the voice call. Moreover, even if a mobile handset has a PS connection, it may lose packet connectivity due to a policy implemented by a network operator (e.g., in a situation where the operator has a limited numbea-of IP
addresses that need to be shared amongst a lar(ye number of handsets). In this case, because the mobile handset is no longer assigned an IP address, it is not reachable by addressing schemes based on IP addresses, i.e., it is not IP-accessible. In such situations, the coordination schemes used in Image/Video Ring will involve methods that involve the acquisition of an IP address by the receiving User Endpoint (UE).

100241 The multimedia object can be an image (e.g. a photograph, a gr-aphic, etc.), a video clip, an audio-video clip, an animation, a sound clip, or an object comprising a coinbination thereof.
100251 In some embodiments, the multimedia object is an advertiseimnt object.
The advertisement object can be provided by a party other than the caller and the recipient, for example, by an advertiser. An advertiser can be a business advertising its own or someone else's goods or ser-vices. In a typical scenario, the advertisement is targeted to the recipient. The advertiser can also be a party that is sponsoring the voice call between the initiator and the recipient. The logic and/or the data to associate a multimedia object and a voice call can be provided by the advertiser.
[0026] Since different wireless networks depend on a variety of different technologies whose capabilities to support CS and PS connections vary widely, different systems and methods may be needed for different wireless technologies so that the coordination is reasonably accurate and no extraneous delay ol- "lag" is introduced to the voice call setup time.

100271 We begin by describing IP signaling in mobile devices and how IP
connectivity can be re-established if handset becomes not IP-accessible. We then describe how a CS network can be used to initiate connection to the PS network using a service delivery platform (SDP). We then focus our attention on the Sei-ving Node (SN) and the personal agent (PA) components of the SDP. Finally, we describe the details of the system and methods for presenting n7ultimedia objects in conjunction with voice calls from a CS network.

IP Signalinb in Mobile Devices [00281 As is known to persons skilled in the art, in some circumstances a network operator may disconnect a mobile handset from a packet-switched (PS) network by withdrawing its IP address. For example, if a first mobile handset registers to the IMS
network, thus obtaining an IP address, but then does not use its IMS
connection for a specified period of time, the network may withdraw its IP address and assign that address to a second mobile handset. In this case, the first handset is disconnected from the IMS
network, and thus no longer IP accessible until it i-e-registers to the IMS
network. When a handset loses its IP address and is disconnected from the IMS network, it can no longer participate in IP-based services. Systems and methods described below allow another entity, such as another handset or a network entity, to send an IP-based message to a handset that lacks an IP adch-ess, in effect "waking up" the handset and causing it to initiate its own request for an IP address, so that it can receive the IP-based message.
Uses of IP Signaling in Mobile Sei-vices [0029] As an example of an IP service that would benefit from user-to-user (handset-to-handset) IP signaling, consider the case in which party A wishes to place a voice call to party B, and to transmit a photograph as part of "call alerting." It is expected that party B
will receive the call alert (indicated by "ringing") and the photograph synchronously, e.g., party B may use the photograph to identify the calling pai-ly. In order to transmit the image to party B, party A's handset needs to establish a packet connection to party B's handset and negotiate resources and capabilities. However, if parly B's handset is disconnected from the IMS network, party A's handset cannot send the photograph to party B's handset. Further details on this kind of interaction may be found in U.S. Patent Pub. No. 2007/0197227, the entire contents of which are incorporated herein by reference.

(0030] As an example of an IP service that would benefit from network-to-user (netlvork-to-handset) IP signaling, consider the case in which a network server wishes to transmit a multimedia object to a mobile handset. In order to begin transmitting the object, the server needs to know the capabilities of the handset. If the handset is not IP
accessible, the network server may not reaeh the handset to begin resource negotiation or to transmit the object.

Coyiditiotas Under Which Handsets May Not be IP-f1 ccessibCe 10031] Fig. I depicts components in a GSM/GPRS packet-switched (PS) network, and their communication pathways to an IP network, e.g., the Internet 1200, and to handset 1100. The GSM/GPRS network includes one or more Base Station Servers (BSC) 1500, which are in communication with handset 1100, Serving Gateway Support Node (SGSN) 1400, and GPRS Gateway Suppoil Node (GGSN) 1300, which is in communication with Intemet 1200. GGSN 1300 and SGSN 1400 work collaboratively to assign an IP address from Internet 1200 to mobile handset 1100. Specifically, GGSN
1300 communicates with Internet 1200, and allocates IP addresses for user handsets, e.g., handset 1100. SGSN 1400 communicates with GGSN 1300 and with base station server (BSC) 1500 to provide a wireless connection between handset 1100 and Internet 1200.
When this is accomplished, it is said that mobile handset 1100 has a Packet Data Protocol (PDP) context.

[0032] Most network operators implement a policy that de-establishes the PDP
context of a mobile handset when it is not used. Such de-commissioning is typically implemented within a time period of a few minutes. When the handset loses its PDP
context, it does not have an IP address assigned to it and is not reachable by IP-based addressing schemes. At some time in the future, the handset may initiate a data request, causing a new PDP context to be established for this handset, including obtaining a new IP address to the handset. In other words, if a handset lacking an IP address requests an IP connection, then it can initiate that connection, but if another entity requests an IP

connection with a handset lacking an IP address, the entity cannot itself establish that connection. It is possible for a network operator to assign a "static" IP
address to a mobile handset, so that it will remain connected to the IP network, but this is atypical because IP addresses are a valuable resource in short supply.

(0033] Fig. 2 depicts components in a CDMA circuit-switched (CS) network, and their communication pathways to an IP network, e.g., Internet 220, and to mobile handset 210. The CDMA network includes one or more Base Station Ser=vers (BSC) 250, which are in communication with handset 210, and Packet Data Seiving Node (PDSN) 240, whieh is in communication with Internet 220. A Point-to-Point protocol (PPP) session exists between the mobile handset 210 and PDSN 240. PDSN 240 acts as a connection point between BSC 250 and an IP network, e.g., Inteinet 220, by assigning handset 210 an IP address from Internet 220 and providing access to the Inter-net 220. As practitioners skilled in the art know, the PPP session may be maintained even if the handset goes "dormant," so the handset will remain IP-accessible. An incoming packet for a dor-mant mobile handset then waits at the packet control function (PCF) upon a "mobile origination" message from the handset in response to overhead messages generated collaboratively by the PCF and the BSC. However, network operators in such networks typically choose to de-allocate IP addresses and tear down the PPP session in ordei- to conserve IP addresses, if the mobile handset does not use its PPP session for a specified period of time. If the mobile handset 210 does not have a PPP session, other entities cannot contact it via the IP network.

100341 Even if a mobile handset is not IP-accessible, e.g., because the GSM/GPRS or CDMA network has de-allocated its IP address, it still has a connection to the circuit-switched (CS) network; as described above, the CS connection can be used to initiate and receive voice calls, SMS and other circuit-switched set-vices.

Systems and Metlzods for Initi.ating IP Connectivity to Handsets Lacking IP
Addresses [0035] If a mobile handset lacks an IP address and so cannot be directly contacted by another entity, the handset's existing CS connection can be exploited to cause the handset to initiate its own connection to the PS network. Specifically, a specified message, or "trigger," is sent to the handset via the CS network, instructing logic residing on the handset to initiate a connection to the PS network.

[0036] One system that can facilitate this interaction is the Service Delivery Platfoi-m (SDP) described in detail in U.S. Patent Pub. No. 2007/0197227. Descriptions of other systems and/or components may be found in the incoiporated patent references, given below. An ovei-view of the service delivery platfoz7n is provided below.

Overview of Service Delivery Platfor nz [0037] Briefly, the SDP includes a Serving Node (SN) that may communicate with both the CS voice network and the packet-switched network (with or without IMS). The SDP also includes a Personal Agent (PA), which is a piece of service logic that resides in the mobile handset(s). The PA and the SN can send messages to each other, e.g., regarding services the user would like to use, the local network environment of the handset, or instructions the SN would like the PA to execute on the handset.

[0038] The service delivery platfot-m includes a Sei-ving Node (SN) that supports combinational seivices by communicating with both the circuit-switched voice netwot-k and the packet-based IMS network. In pai-ticular, the SN is simultaneously aware of the states of the Service Control Function (SCF) services of a voice call between User Endpoints (UE), and of the registration states of UEs involved in a packet session. The service delivery platform also includes a Personal Agent (PA), which is a piece of seivice logic that resides in the UEs. The PA sends messages to the SN t-egarding services that the user would like to use, and also regarding its local network environment.
The SN
then i-esponds appropriately by making appropriate voice network and/or IMS
network services available to the user. Thus, the service delivery platform has one "eye" on the circuit-switched voice network and another "eye" on the IMS network, allowing it to deliver combinational services to users without needing to upgrade the existing network to 3G.

[0039] Fig. 3 is an overview of the service delivery platform and its connections to the circuit-switched and packet-switched networks. The service delivery platform includes SN 110 and PA 185, which resides on UE 180. As discussed in greater detail below, SN 110 and PA 185 communicate with each other via the existing circuit-switched and packet-switched network infrastructures in order to provide combinational services to the user.

[0040] The existing "2G" infi asti-ucture includes radio access network 170, circuit-switched (CS) network 120, packet-switched (PS) network 190, and IMS core 130.
As described above, CS network 120 includes Mobile Switching Center(s) (MSC) that provides wireless voice services to UE 180 over radio access netwoi~-k 170. PS
network 190 includes Packet Data Selving Node(s) (PDSN) that act as the connection point between radio access network 170 and IMS core 130. IMS core 130 includes CSCF(s) and HSS(s) that provide multimedia services to UE 180 via PS network 190 and radio access network 170. However, as noted above, even if UE 180 is capable of processing signals from either network, i.e., can process a voice call or a multimedia session, radio access network 170 cannot support simultaneous connections between UE 180, CS
network 120, and PS network 190. In othei- words, CS network 120, PS network 190, and radio access network 170 are not, by themselves, capable of providing combinational seivices to UE 180.

[0041] The sei-vice delivery platfonn provides combinational services to UE
180 as follows. SN 110 communicates both with CS network 120 and with IMS core 130, and appears like a noi-inal system coznponent to each of the two networks.

[0042] In CS network 120, noi-mally when UE 180 requests a voice call or other service on CS network 120, the request triggers a Trigger Detection Point (TDP) at the MSC, and the MSC then sends a pre-specified message to a Service Control Function (SCF) that responds appropriately. The message includes, for example, the phone numbers of the calling and called parties, and the nature of the sei-vice request. However, in the service delivery platform, the MSC is programmed to provide the pi-e-specified message to SN 110 instead of to the SCF. Logic operating in SN 110 then processes the message, much as the SCF nonnally would, and returns a completion code to the MSC
indicating that it may now proceed to process the voice call request. SN 110 thus learns information about services on the circuit-switched network that UE 180 invokes, e.g., the phone numbers of the calling and called parties, and the nature of the selvice, and also can authorize or even modify the service request when it returns the completion code to the MSC on CS network 120. Thus, SN 110 looks like an SCF to the MSC. SN110 provides a control path to the CS network, but not a bear-er path.

100431 In the IMS core 130, the S-CSCF norinally communicates with "third pai-ty"
ASs in order to provide services to UE 180. Specifically, if an AS wants to communicate with UE 180, it sends a request to the S-CSCF which triggers a Seivice Point Trigger (SPT) in the S-CSCF. The SPT are analogous to the TDP of the MSC in the CS
network 120, with some diffei-ences, as described in greater detail above. The SPT
causes the S-CSCF to communicate appropriately with the UE 180. If UE 180 wants to communicate with an AS, i.e., to receive a service, it sends a SIP message to the S-CSCF, which triggers an SPT that instructs the S-CSCF to contact an AS to provide that service. in the described service delivery platform, SN 110 operates much like an AS, and indeed looks like an AS to the IMS core 130. When SN 110 wants to contact UE 180, it sends a transaction request to the S-CSCF, where it generates an SPT for the S-CSCF to forward the request to the UE. If UE 180 wants to contact the SN 110, it sends a SIP
invite message to the S-CSCF, which gener-ates an SPT for the S-CSCF to send the request to SN 110. The SN 110 then uses seivice logic to execute that request. Thus, in order to inter-work IMS 130 and SN 110, the S-CSCF simply needs to be configui-ed to recognize the SN 110 as an AS. This allows SN 110 to learn about the packet-based connections that the UE and/or AS make with the S-CSCF. SN 110 provides both control and bearer connectivity to the IMS core 130 and external endpoints. Methods of interaction between SN 110 and the IMS core 130 are discussed in greater detail in U.S. Patent Pub. No.
2006/0291488, the entire contents of which are incoi-porated herein by reference.

(0044] To readily communicate with CS network 120 and IMS core 130, SN 110 suppor-ts protocols for CS communications, e.g., SS7, and protocols for PS/IMS
communications e.g., IP. For example, if SN 110 is exchanging a message with in circuit-switched mode, it may use DTAP and if SN is exchanging a message with PA
185 in packet-switched mode, it uses SIP. DTAP (Direct Transfer Application Part) is a protocol that cat-t-ies messages between the handset and a switch and which is not interpreted by the intervening radio access network. Other protocols, such USSD
(Unstl-uctured Supplementary Services Data) can also be used. The protocol the service delivery platform, i.e., SN 110 and PA 185, uses depends on which network is more appropriate for the message.

[00451 In general, the triggering mechanisms such as TDP and SPT are examples of mechanisms that can be used to transfer information from the CS netwoi-k 120 and the IMS core 130 to SN 110; any mechanism that allows SN 110 to learn sufficient information about the UE's connections to the two networks can be used. One example is Unstructured Supplementary Services Data (USSD).

[00461 In addition to signaling traffic, SN 110 can also receive media traffic from content source(s) 140, e.g., camcorders or digital cameras, and content seiver(s) 150 that are capable of providing multimedia content 160. This functionality is described in greater detail below.

Serving Node Conzpoizent ofSer=vice Deliveiy I'latf'or~tn [00471 As described above, SN I 10 communicates with CS network 120 and IMS
core 130. As illustrated in Fig. 4, SN 110 includes Load Balancer/Admission Control 221, which includes a series of load balancing functions that handle incoming signals from CS network 120 and IMS core 130. Load Balancer/Adniission Control 221 then passes the signals to Signaling Adaptation Layer (SAL) 222, which aggregates the signals into a common intenlal foim.

[0048] Call Leg Manager (CLM) 223 then logically processes the aggregated signals.
As will be readily apparent to skilled practitioners in the art, call models used to describe telephone connections often split call states in one or more "call legs." In combinational sei-vices since both a voice call and a packet connection may exist contemporaneously the various call legs are integrated into a single logical session by another function called the General Call Session Manager (GCCM) 232. Control of call legs is discussed in greater detail in U.S. Patent Pub. No. 2006/0291488, the entire contents of which are incoipoi-ated herein by reference.

100491 In addition to signaling traffic, SN 110 ean also receive media traff-ic from content servers 250, such as camcorders, external cameras, or proxies for same. A logical function called the Media Leg Manager (MLM) 240 handles this media traffic, using protocols such as RTP, IP, and/or RTSP. Media traffic may also be re-directed by SN
110 under roaming scenarios, as descr-ibed in greater detail in U.S. Patent Pub. No.
2006/0291412, the entire contents of which are incoiporated herein by reference. Various media ser-vers and content servers will be not necessarily be aware of SN I
10; rather, SN
110 may act as a proxy and retrieve content and media from such servers, then process it and transmit it to mobile handsets. In order to cairy out these functions, SN
110 supports vai-ious proxy functions.

[0050] SN 110 supports a variety of combinational services, some examples of which are described below, and also provides an interface for supporting 3`d party Application Servers (AS) 255. These services, as stated earlier, generally involve contemporaneous circuit-switched and packet-switched connections. Some examples of such services as "See What I See" (SWIS), "Image Ring" (IR), and "Ad Ring" (AR) are described in greater detail below. The architecture of SN 110 includes SCF 233 and Registrar 235 components cooperatively to make such services possible. In those cases where an external media service is needed, the proxy components of SN 110 may be used to receive the extei-nal media, process it internally for use in mobile handsets, and then transmit the media to the handsets. Under roaming situations, SN may also use its mobility management coinponents as described in greater detail in U.S. Patent Pub. No.
2006/0291412, the entire contents of which are incorporated herein by reference, to ensure that a favorable network connection is used to deliver the media to the roaming mobile handset. In particular, services from the circuit-switched and packet-switched networks may be combined in various temporal sequences and modalities. SN 110 contains a Service Control Interaction Manager (SCIM) 234 component that uses policy driven service logic to resolve feature interactions when ser-vices are combined fi-om different or the san-ie networks are combined in various ways.

[0051] For security, privacy, management and efficiency reasons, the PS logic only responds to messages from SN. And since it is only the SN that is aware of both the PS
and CS connections and impending and ongoing call state infoi-ination, the SN
is useful in delivering and coordinating the advei-tisements. The PA logic provides flexibility in which advertisements are shown when to the recipient. However, it is possible to envision a system in which the PA logic is not used to provide such flexibility. In this embodiment, a fixed rendering inechanism may be used (e.g., provided by the handset manufacturer) in the handset that employs a single algorithm to render the advertisements. This algorithm may be updated by sending an SMS message to the recipient llandset. The user is then required to "click" on the received SMS
message that causes a new algot-ithm to be loaded from the SN on to the handset.

Per=sonal Agent Conzponent of tlie Service Delivery Platforni [0052] A special piece of service logic installed in a user's handset is refen-ed to as the Personal Agent (PA). The basic architecture of PA 185 assumes that the handset supports connections to both the circuit-switched (CS) network 120 and the packet-switched (PS) network 190, which are described in greater detail above.
Generally, some handsets simultaneously support connections to both networks, and other handsets support a connection to only one network at a time. Here, the handset is assumed to support a number of CS signaling channels (CS Sch 1-n), and also a number of PS
signaling channels (PS Sch 1-n). Thus, when a network entity such as SN 110 sends a message to PA 185 via CS network 120 or PS network 190, the message arrives at the eon=esponding signaling channel (CS Sch 1-n or PS Sch 1-n).

100531 As illustrated in Fig. 5, the PA includes CS "Listener" 321 and PS
"Listener"
322, which receive messages on the signaling channels (CS Sch 1-n) and (PS Sch 1-n), respectively. CS Listener 321 and PS Listener 322 direct these messages to another service logic component called the "Dispatcher" 330. Dispatcher 330 uses internal logic to direct the messages appropriately either to the handset's operating system (OS) 350 or to the Combinational State Machine 340. Combinational State Machine 340 handles the message according to its seiviee logic. The actions of the combinational state machine are specific to the service that is being implemented. For example, if the service were "Image Ring," described in more detail below, and the incoming message was a call alert, then the state machine would specify actions that would render an image on the display including a Caller ID indication and simultaneous ringing of the phone.

[0054] As an illustrative example, consider a combinational sezvice in which party A
wishes to transmit a picture to party B while making a circuit-switched switched voice call to pai-ty B. Further assume that the underlying wii-eless network does not support multiple radio access bearers (mRAB). Thus, both handsets already share a CS
connection, and not a PS connection. In such a case, the PA in the handset of party A
sends a message e.g., using a USSD messagc, to the PA in the handset of party B via CS
network 120 and SN 110. The message includes instructions to end the CS voice call;
initiate a PS connection to receive the picture; and to end the PS eonnection.

10055] The appropriate Listener in party B's handset receives the message and transmits it to the Dispatcher, which then sends it to the Combinational State Machine.
The Combinational State Machine in party B's handset then intelprets the message, teianinates the CS voice call, initiates a PS connection to receive the picture and, after receiving the picture, terminates the PS connection. Then, the Combinational State Machine in party A's handset initiates a new CS voice call to party B's handset, and the pailies can continue talking.

[00561 Some other illustrative examples of combinational services that the sei-vice delivery platform provides will now be described.

Synchronizing Packet-Switched and Circaiit-Switched Connections, e.g., Iinage Ring/Ad Ring [0057] Because the service delivery platform has knowledge of both the CS and PS
networks, the platfozm could be said to be aware of the cii-cuit and packet components of combinational ser-vices. Specifically, the SN and the PA can be used together to synchronize a packet-switched connection with a circuit-switched connection in the user's handset, even if the handset itself cannot simultaneously support both kinds of connections.

[00581 ln an exemplary embodiment illustrated in Fig. 7, if party A calls party B, the sezviee delivery platform can precede the circuit-switched voice call with a packet-switched data connection. The service delivery platform can play an announcement or-display a picture on party B's handset before presenting a "voice call indication" that alerts party B that party A is attempting to call hirn. Tn such a case, the PA
in party B's handset receives the announcement or picture via the PS network, and holds the announcement or pictui-e until it also receives the "voice call indication"
via the CS
network. Then, the PA in party B's handset synchronizes the rendering of the announcement or picture with the alert that party A is attempting to call.
This can be done, e.g., with the following sequence of steps:

710. Party A dials the telephone number of party B.

720. The PA on party A's handset captures and holds the dialed digits.
730. The PA on party A's handset initiates and establishes a packet connection to party B's handset via SN.

740. The PA on party A's handset transmits a multimedia object, e.g., an announcement or picture, to the PA on par-ty B's handset.

750. The PA on pai-ty B's handset receives and holds the multimedia object.
760. The PA on party A's handset initiates a circuit-switched voice call to pai-ty B's handset.

770. The PA on party B's handset receives a voice call indication.

780. The PA on party B's handset synchronizes the display/presentation of the multimedia object with the alert that party B is receiving a voice call from paily A.

[0059] It should be observed that step 720, above, introduces a delay in the overall proccss, so that after party A dials party B's phone number, party A will have to wait for the service delivery platform to establish the packet connection and to deliver the multimedia object before establishing the voice call. This delay may be eircumvented, however. For example, the multimedia object (e.g., an announcement) can be kept in the SN instead of in the users' handsets. As illustrated in Fig. 8, the procedure above can be modified as follows:

810. Party A dials the telephone number of party B.

820. The circuit voice call request is fielded by the MSC as per standard voice call flow procedures.

830. The voice call request triggers a TDP in the MSC, causing the MSC to send a pre-determined message, containing the calling and called numbers, to the SN.

840. SN receives the pre-determined message from the MSC, holds the return response to the MSC, and establishes a packet connection with party B's handset.

850. SN transmits a multimedia object to the PA on party B's handset.

860. The PA on party B's handset receives and holds the multimedia object.
870. SN responds back to MSC "proceed with voice call."

880. The PA on party B's handset receives the eii-cuit voice call indication.
890. The PA on party B's handset syncluonizes the display/presentation of the multimedia object with the alert that party B is receiving a voice call fi-om party A.

[0060] In some of the embodiments described herein, the packet connection is used exactly once.

[0061] As a further extension, a third party can use the packet connection to send a multimedia object to the calling and/or called parties. For example, consider a case where party C (hereafter referred to as "advertiser") wishes to "sponsor" or "subsidize" a telephone call between parties A and B. In order to make parties A and B aware of this facility, the advei-tiser can send an indication to all of the handsets that are included in his advertising campaign. Upon receiving the indication, pai-ty A or pai-ty B
initiates the call.
One example of' a procedure to effectuate this process, illustrated in Fig. 9, is as follows:

910. Advertiser requests the SN to send a"sponsored call indication" to handsets participating in the campaign. The SN can identify participating handsets with an out-of-band process which asks users to "opt-in" to the campaign (or a group of campaigns), and identifies par-ticipating handsets when they register during power-on. Party A and party B are part of the campaign.

920. SN sends the "sponsored call indication" to participating handsets using the underlying packet network.

930. Subsequently, party A dials the telephone number of party B.

940. The MSC fields the circuit voice call request as per standard voice call flow procedures.

950. The voice call request triggers a TDP in the MSC, causing the MSC to send a pre-determined message, containing the calling and called numbers, to the SN.

960. SN receives the pre-determined message, holds the retuin response to the MSC, and establishes a packet connection with pai-ty B.

970. SN transmits the multimedia object specified by the advertiser to party B
via the packet connection.

980. The PA in party B's handset receives and holds the multimedia object.

990, SN responds back to MSC "proceed with voice call."

993. The PA in party B's handset receives a circuit voice call indication.
995. The PA in pai-ty B's handset synchronizes the multimedia object fronl the advertiser with "voice call indication" from party A and renders both on part B's handset.

100621 The above procedure can be further streamlined and the time delay reduced by sending a priori the multimedia object, or a group of objects, to participating handsets, which then store the object(s). Then, the SN needs only to send the identifying tag of the stored object to the handset during the call. Objects that are sent a priori to participating handsets con-espond to "ongoing campaigns" from advertisers, and may be refi-eshed as the requirements and durations of campaigns change over time.

[0063] In another example, the third party sends the multimedia object to the handset of the calling pal-ty (i.e., the initiator), but not of the called party (i.e., the recipient), after the current call is tei-minated. The handset renders the object for a subsequent (possibly, next) incoming call to the original calling party. This example, illustrated in Fig. 10, can be done as follows:

1010. Part A dials the telephone number of pai-ty B.

1020. The MSC fields the circuit voice call as per standard call flow procedures.

1030. The voice call request triggers a TDP in the MSC, causing the MSC to send a pre-detennined message, containing the calling and called numbers, to the SN.

1040. SN receives the pre-detennined message, stores the information in it, and responds back to MSC "proceed with voice call."

1050. MSC connects call between parties A and B as per standard call flow procedures.

1060. Call is established between parties A and B; parties talk and subsequently terminate call.

1070. The call termination triggers a TDP in the MSC, causing the MSC to send a message to SN that the call has been terminated.

1080. SN receives the message.

1090. SN transmits a multimedia object to party A's handset.

1010. The PA in party A's handset receives the multimedia object and stores it in the handset's memory.

1011. For a subsequent incoming call to party A(including, but not limited to the next call party A receives after receiving the multimedia object), the PA
in party A's handset intercepts the incoming call indication and synchronizes the rendering of the multimedia object with the incoming voice call indication.

[00641 It should be further observed that steps 1070 and 1080 of the above example are optional; in particular, the MSC need not inform the SN of call termination. Rather, the SN may introduce a delay in its sei-vice logic and then attempt to transmit the multimedia object to party A, and repeat the attempt at periodic intervals until successful.
In radio access networks such as UMTS, which support multiple radio access bearers, the multimedia object can be sent to a user in parallel with an ongoing circuit-switched voice call. It will be appreciated that the multimedia object can be sent to only the calling pai-ty, to only the called pai-ly, or to both.

Uses of Iinage Rirag and Video Ring 100651 As another example of an application of the Image Ring service, consider a case in which party A wishes to place a voice call to party B, and to transmit an image (e.g., a photograph) as part of "call alerting." It is expected that party B
will receive the call alert (indicated by "ringing") and the image synchronously, e.g., party B
may use the image to identify the calling party. The image in question may have been pre-selected by party A from a collection of images residing on party A's handset for use in futul-e calls, or future calls to a particular subscriber; the image may also be chosen and pre-selected from a gallery of such objects resident in the network or portal of a service provider. In order to transmit the image to party B, party A's handset needs to establish a connection to party B's handset using the PS connection, negotiate resources and capabilities, and transmit or othei-wise cause the image to be transmitted to called party B, ensuring that the voice call indication which uses the CS connection, aia-ives contemporaneously with the rendei-ing of the transinitted image.

[0066] As an example of another embodiment of the Image Ring service, consider a case in which party A wishes to place a voice call to pai-ty B, and to transmit a multimedia object (e.g., calling card information) to party B at the end of the voice call.
[00671 As an example of Video Ring service, consider a case in which the calling pal-ty wishes the called party to view a video clip as a part of the "call alert." The video clip will be transmitted to the called party handset using the PS connection.
The voice call aler-t uses the CS connection. As for the Image Ring seivice, the video clip can be rendered contemporaneously with the voice call alert.
[0068] It will be appreciated that the multimedia object can also be displayed dul-ing the voice call, after the voice call, as a call alert for a subsequent call, or even during, or after a subsequent call.

Selection of the Multimedia Object 100691 The association between a recipient and the multimedia object that is rendered for the recipient will now be explained in more detail. As is well known in mobile advertising models, the advertisements are generally targeted to the recipient based on lulown oi- profile infoi-ination of the recipient. Generally such information lies outside the scope of the SN; rather it is assumed that an external entity stores and formulates this information. This infor-mation is then conveyed to the SN. Such infoi-ination may have a logical fonn as a table consisting of rows with two columns. Each row represents a single recipient identified by a telephone number, i.e., the first column of the table is a telephone number. The second column contains the serial number of advertisements that may be rendered for the associated telephone. Related to such a table is a database of advertisements indexed by ser-ial numbers. All this infoi-ination may be made available to the SN. Upon receiving a trigger from the CS network of an impending call in a UMTS
network destined for a particular receiving mobile handset identified by a telephone umber, the SN may look up the telephone numbei- in the association table, retrieve the serial number of the advertisement(s) to be shown to this recipient, then retrieve the corresponding advertisement from the database, and cause it to be transported to the handset. In non-UMTS networks where mRAB technology is not available, or in those networks where pre-loading of advertiseznents has been chosen, the SN may retrieve the advertisement from the database for a particular handset and cause it to be pre-loaded in the handset. In those cases where the association table specifies multiple advertisements for a single telephone number, a scheduling algorithm such as round-robin may be used either by the SN or the PA. A person skilled in the art will be able to adapt these techniques to associate the multimedia object with the initiator profile.

Systerns for Coord'inatitzg CS and PS corzfaectzojzs 100701 One systern that can facilitate coordination between the CS and PS
networks is the Service Delivery Platfoi-in (SDP), described in detail in U.S. Patent Pub.
No.
2007/0197227, filed October 16, 2006, and entitled "System and method for enabling combinational seivices in wireless networks by using a service delivery platform," the entire contents of which are incorporated herein by reference. Descriptions of other systems and/or components may be found in the incorporated patent references, given below. Briefly, the SDP includes a Serving Node (SN) that may communicate with both the CS voice network and the packet-switched network (with or without IMS).
The SDP
also includes a Personal Agent (PA), which is a piece of service logic that resides in the handset(s). The PA and the SN can send messages to each other, e.g., regarding services the user would like to use, the local network environment of the handset, or instructions the SN would like the PA to execute on the handset. The SN receives inforination from the CS network (called "triggers") about ongoing call events. It also has the capability to receive information and data from elements connected to the PS network.
Examples of such data received by the SN from elements connected to the PS network are images (e.g., photographs), advertisements, video clips, and other multimedia objects. Examples of infol-mation received by the SN from elements connected to the PS networ-k include, but are not limited to: what multimedia object to render and when; whether to associate presentation of the multimedia object with a specific telephone number or a specific time of the day; event infonnation from IMS services, and the like.

Systenzs and Methods for lynage and Video Ring in UMTS/WCDMA
netwof=ks [0071] In UMTS/WCDMA networks, since multiple Radio Access Bearet-s are possible, and the SN can contact the PA while the handset may be engaged in interactions with the CS network. In this case we assume the voice call is to be carried by the CS
network, the multimedia object to be rendered is carried by the PS network and/or pre-stored (as a result of an out of band process) in a stoi-age area controlled by the SN, and the modulation technology being used by the Radio Access Network (RAN) is WCDMA/UMTS. We shall assume that the service being implemeilted is to render a selected multimedia object as a part of the call alerting phase of an incoming call to a receiving handset. The implementation of this service is as follows. Party A
dials telephone number of party B. The signaling for this call is caiTied to the originating MSC
fi-om where it is routed to the terminating MSC and onwards to the receiving handset.
During this routing phase, one or more triggers are gencrated by elements in the CS
network and transmitted to the SN where they are received by the interface shown in the Fig. 6 (SN). We shall describe the generation of these triggers in more detail later. The triggers serve to infonn the SN of the progress ("state of the call") of the voice call. The SN uses this state information to coordinate the delivery of the multimedia object to the receiving handset. In UMTS/WCDMA networks, since inultiple Radio Access Bearers are possible, the SN can contact the PA while the handset may be engaged in interactions with the CS network. Because multiple Radio Access Bearers are possible, the SN can contact the PA while the handset is engaged in interactions with the CS
network. Thus, when a trigger is received from the CS network by SN indicating that a voice call has been initiated (but that the voice bearer has not started yet) the SN may initiate and send a selected multimedia object to the PA i-unning in the handset. The SN may optionally respond to the trigger received from the CS network element or the CS network may simply wait for a pre-determined amount of time befoi~-e carrying on with actions dictated by its logic. The PA renders the received object on the handset. The criteria for selecting the object to be rendered may be pre-stored in the SN (having received it from the PS
network elements in an out of band process) or inay be dynamically received or created by logic resident inside SN. As will be clear to skilled practitioners, triggei-s from the CS
network can also be used to indicate tennination of a voice call and "voice call in progress." This tr-iggering infol-mation can be used to coordinate the rendering of rnultimedia objects in handsets with the receiving of incoming calls to a fine granular-ity.
[0072) In some embodiments, the methods involve the pi-ocedures outlined below:
Proceclure 1.0 ISequentialJ:

1. Transmit the image from A's handset to B's handset using the PS
connection first. Assume this takes "tl" seconds of time.

2. Once the tt-ansmitted image has been received, initiate the voice call setup request from A to B. Assume this takes "t2" seconds.
3. Intercept the voice call request an=iving at B's handset and initiate rendering of previously received itnage contemporaneously with the call alert.
[0073] It should be noted that the time "tl" of step 1 above includes the uplink and downlink time. Uplink time refers to the process of using the RAN to upload the object from A's handset, using the RAN, to the core network. Downlink time refers to the process of downloading the object from the core network to B's handset using the RAN.
Typically, uplink capacities are considerably less than downlink capacities.
Thus the total setup delay for Image Ring, i.e., the combined set of actions above, is tl +
t2 in which "t2" is, as indicated above, the nonnal voice call setup time. Moreover, the interval "tl"
precedes "t2," so the extra time factor of "tl" is added to the voice call setup delay time.
Thus, subscribers to some embodiments of Image Ring will typically experience longer call setup times for Image Ring calls than normal voice calls. A method that overlaps the actions in "tl" with actions in "t2" would shorten the total setup delay.
[0074) One system that can facilitate this interaction is the Service Deliver-y Platforin (SDP), described above.

[0075] In some embodiments, the SN is used to modify the above-described procedure as follows:
Pr-oceclure 1.1 [SN]:

1. Subscriber "A" seleets an image or video clip to be used for Iinage/Video Ring for a particular or a group of subscribers from a collection of such objects stored in the handset.
2. Subscriber A dials a voice call to subscriber B as per standard mobile phone technology, e.g., by using the keypad or using the contact list of the handset, etc.

3. The PA logic resident on A's handset intercepts the voice call request before it is sent out over the RAN. (In this case we shall say that the handset is being used as the synchronization point.) 4. The PA logic sends a trigger to the SN using the PS network connection containing infor-ination that uniquely identifies the image/video clip selected in step 1 above and identifies subscriber B, e.g., SIP URL of subscriber B.

5. The SN receives the trigger and initiates uploading and subsequent downloading of the selected object to the handset of subscriber B.

6. When the download is complete SN informs the PA of handset A which releases the voice call that had been intercepted.

7. The voice call indication from A r-eaches B's handset using CS network connection; PA logic resident in B's handset intercepts the voice call indication and renders the previously rcceived object contemporaneously with the voice call alert.

[0076] In terms of delay analysis Procedure 1.1 uses steps that are similar to Procedure 1Ø In particular Procedure 1.1 uploads the selected object to SN
and then SN
downloads selected object to handset B, which is similar to the step carried out in Procedure 1Ø Thus, the differ-ence in call setup delay between Procedure 1.0 and Procedure 1.1 may not be significant.

[0077] Step 1 of Procedure 1.1 can be modified to shorten the time tl as follows. We allow the multimedia objects that are to be used as a part of voice call indicators, i.e,, the images and video clips, to be stored in SN or in a portal or gallery.
Subscribers can select objects, which are then uploaded to SN before initiating voice calls (i.e., in an "out of band" process). Thus, an association is created between the multimedia objects and the individual subscriber's contact list and this association is stored in the subscriber's handset (accessible to the PA logic). This association has the following logical forlnat for illustrative purposes:
Contact John, Image #123 Contact Susan, Image #345 Contact Harry, Videoclip 654.

[0078] The names "John", "Susan" etc are mnemonics for phone numbers or URLs of individual subscribers and the Image numbers such as "123" uniquely identify the object to SN. Thus the association is a table that is maintained in the user's handset memory and is available to the PA logic. This table can be used in the following exemplary procedure:
Pr-ocecliir-e 1.2 [Assoc]:

l. Subscriber A dials a voice call to subscriber B as per standard mobile phone technology, e.g., by using the keypad or using the contact list of the handset, etc.

2. The PA logic resident on A's handset intercepts the voice call request before it is sent out over the RAN. (Again, we say that the handset is being used as the synchronization point.) 3. The PA logic consults the association list stored in A's handset and sends a trigger to the SN using the PS network connection containing infoili~ation that uniquely identifies the image/video clip selected in step 1 above and the subscriber B, e.g., SIP URL of subscriber B.
4. The SN receives the trigger and initiates downloading of the selected object to the handset of subscriber B.

5. When the download is complete SN inforins the PA of handset A, which releases the voice call that had been intercepted.

6. The voice call indication from A reaches B's handset using CS network connection; PA logic resident in B's handset intercepts the voice call indication and renders the previously received object contemporaneously with the voice call alert.

10079] It should be noted that in Procedure 1.2 we do not upload the selected object to SN contemporaneously with the call request; rather the selected object already exists on the SN, and the calling party transmits infonnation identifying the object to the SN with the call request. The SN then downloads the selected object to the terminating (called party) handset. This identifying information will in general be considerable smallel- than the actual object. Since the uplink capacity in the RAN is typically much smaller than the downlink capacity, Procedure 1.2 will have considerably less call setup delay as compai-ed to Procedure 1.1.

[0080] In another embodiment, the SN uses a Guard Ring Timer (GRT) to exploit the parallelism inherent in UMTS/WCDMA networks which allow simultaneous CS and PS
network connections. Such an embodiinent is illustrated below:
Pr oce(la4re 1.3 [Guar=d7irnerJ:

1. Subscriber A dials a voice call to subscriber B as per standard mobile phone technology, e.g., by using the keypad or using the contact list of the handset, etc.

2. The PA logic resident on A's handset intercepts the voice call request before it is sent out over the RAN. (Again, we say that the handset is being used as the synchronization point.) 3. The PA logic consults the association list stored in A's handset and sends a triggcr to the SN using the PS network connection containing information that uniquely identifies the image/video clip selected in step 1 above and the subscriber B, e.g., SIP URL of subscriber B.

4. The SN receives the trigger and initiates a timer called the Guard Ring Timer.

5. SN initiates downloading of the selected object to the handset of subscriber B.

6. When the Guard Ring Timer expires SN infonns the PA of handset A
which releases the voice call that had been intercepted.
7. The voice call indication from A reaches B's handset using CS network connection; PA logic resident in B's handset intercepts the voice call indication and renders the previously received object contemporaneously with the voice call alert.

[0081] In this embodiment, the SN need not wait until the downloading of the selected object to the called party handset is complete; rather the SN can anticipate such a completion, and inform the calling party handset to release the intercepted call before the downloading of the selected object is complete. This is accomplished by setting the GRT
interval appropr-iately. In other words the delay analysis descr-ibed in Procedure 1.0 [Sequential] in which "tl" preceded "t2" is modified by the introduction of GRT which allows the interleaving of tl and t2, thus no longer requiring tl and t2 to be sequential.
Thus the call set up delay in Procedure 1.3 [GuardTimer] is expected to be shoi-ter than the other procedures described above.

Systems and Metlzods for Iniage aizd Video Ring in Edge/GSM/GPRS
networks 100821 In this section we consider wireless networks that do not allow simultaneous CS and PS connections. Examples of such networks include GSM, GPRS, and some implementations of CDMA networks in which different radio frequencies are used for CS
and PS network connections and, hence, which do not support simultaneous CS
and PS
conulections since the handsets are single frequency. In such networks only one of the CS
or PS connections can be active at a time. Some networks may even have a built in bias to support CS connections as a priority over PS connections; in such cases an incoming CS call will cause the handset to hold the PS connection in abeyance to the CS
connection.

100831 Logic resident in the SN is awai-e of the radio technology under which it is deployed. Alternatively, PA logic can test the prevailing radio access network and communicate said infonnation to SN to set the proper parameters in SN's logic.
In Edge/GPRS networks SN logic pre-loads one or more multimedia objects to be rendered in a participating handset at a suitable time, i.e., when the handset is not in cominunication with the CS network. Now if a participating handset receives a voice call alert, said alert is intercepted by PA logic before it is received by othei-(no1-inal call) logic in the handset. Logic in the PA then decides when to render the multimedia object (before, during, after) the incoming call.

[0084] Some embodiments use the GRT described above, by appropriately selecting its value. In UMTS/WCDMA networks that allow a handset to receive infoi-ination on both PS and CS simultaneously, the value of the GRT can be set in such a manner as to allow enhance parallelism between the CS and PS streams. However, in EDGE/GPRS/CDMA networks that do not allow parallelism between the CS and PS
connections, the GRT can be set to a value that prohibits such parallelism, instead allowing a sequential transfel- of PS followed by a transfer on the CS
connection. Thus the value used for the GRT can be tuned for either kind of network and Procedure 1.3 can be used for either type of network. Thus, the tunable GRT values provide a flexible way to use the same basic embodiments of Image Ring and/or Video Ring on a variety of networks without the need for significant modification. In this embodiment, no coordination between the CS network and the PS network is required.

Otlzer Etnbodirnents [0085] In another embodiment the voice call may be carried by the PS network and not by the CS network, e.g., VoIP call. In such cases, the triggers indicating call state progr-ess to the SN may be generated by elements in the PS network such as Media Gateway Control Function, VoIP switch, Call State Control Functions (CSCF), or other IIvIS network elements.

Genei-atiorz of'Trigget=s 100861 In the description above, we have assumed that the CS network can generate triggers indicating call state information to the SN. These triggers can be generated by programming the Trigger Detection Points (TDP) resident as l.ogic in the MSC
switches.
In particular, an as exemplary embodiment, TDP #2 can be used at Originating MSC

switch to indicate a call originating event. Call terinination triggers may also be generated by TDP at Ter-minating MSC switches. In another einbodiment, TDP from originating and Terminating MSCs inay be used to achieve finer granularity coordination between the voice call and the rendering of multimedia objects.
[0087] In one embodiment, which uses a Synchronization Point (SP), the Synchi~-onization Point (SP) is moved from the originating handset to the SCF
(Service Control Function) in the CS core network. In this embodiment, a voice call originated by the originating handset proceeds to the MSC wherein a TDP is invoked by the MSC
service logic (pre-provisioned by the operator), e.g., IDP #2, which is then transmitted to the SCF as practiced by standard MSC logic and described herein earlier. In this embodiment the SN (described above) acts as the SCF and receives the TDP. It then initiates the GRT of procedure 1.3 above for a suitable pre-deter-rnined period of time.
Thus, in this embodiment, the voice call is "held" at the SN (acting as a SCF), allowing synchronization of the voice call part of the Image Ring with the transmission of the selected multimedia object on the PS eonnection. Hence, the SN acting as the SCF acts as a Synchronization Point (SP). The usef-ulness of this embodiment is that it allows a greater degree of synchronization between the CS and PS segments by using more of the normal voice call setup delay to transmit the selected multimedia object.
[0088] Anothel- embodiment uses two Synchronization Points (SP) as follows.
The SN acts as a SCF to not only the originating MSC but also the Terminating MSC
for a CS
voice call. The SN acting as a SCF receives TDP triggers from both MSCs and uses the GRT more efficaciously to provide a higher degree of synchronization or parallelism between the CS and PS segments of Image/Video Ring. In this embodiment, the transmission of the multimedia object is started by the SN when the TDP is received from the originating MSC, the voice call is released and proceeds to the terminating MSC
navigating its way through the MSC network. When it reaches the tei-ininating MSC, a TDP is triggered and received by the SN, which "holds" the call until the GRT
has expired. This "dual SP" embodiment allows further parallelism by using a part of the time spent in traversing the MSC network for delivering the selected multimedia object.
In another embodiment, the selected object an advertisement.

[0089] In some einbodiments the multimedia object (e.g., advertisement) to be rendered is selected by a third party, different froin the caller or called parties, while in other embodiments the caller or called pai-ty selects the advertisement. SN
service logic determines and associates the advertisement that is to be selected for a given voice call and transmits the selected multimedia object to the called party as described above. This association may be dependent on time of day, calling or called pai-ty identification which may be received by the SN via the TDP from the CS network or from the PS
network, or logic residing in the originating handset or pre-provisioned in the SN by a third party, or other third party determined targeting criteria.

[0090] Embodiments of the present invention build on techniques, systems and methods disclosed in earlier filed applications, referred to herein as the "incorporated patent references," including but not limited to the following references, the entire contents of which are incorporated herein by reference: U.S. Patent Application No.
11/709,469, filed Febr-uary 22, 2007, entitled Systern and Methods for IP
Signaling in Wiriless Networks; U.S. Patent Pub. No. 2007/0197227, entitled Systerra and Metlwd,lor Trzabling Coriahir7atiorial Services in Wireless Networ ks By Usirzg a Service Delivery Platform; U.S. Patent Pub. No. 2006/0291437, entitled System and Method to Provide Dyraarnic Call Models for Users in an IMS Network; U.S. Patent Pub. No.
2006/0291412, entitled Associated Device Discover y in IMS Networks; U.S. Patent Pub. No.
2006/0291487, entitled IMS Networ Irs with A VS Sessions witlr Mzdtiple Access Networks;
and U.S. Patent Pub. No. 2006/0291488, entitled Systern and Method ofhzterworking Non-IMS arrd IMS Networ^lfs to Create New Ser-vices UtiliZirzg Both Networks.
[0091] It will be further appreciated that the scope of the present invention is not limited to the above-described embodiments, but rather is defined by the appended claims, and that these claims will encompass modifications of and improvements to what has been described.

Claims (33)

1. A method for delivering and presenting a multimedia object in conjunction with a voice call to a recipient handset over a wireless network utilizing multiple Radio Access Bearer (mRAB) technology comprising:
a circuit switched (CS) network initiating a voice call to a recipient handset over the CS network;

the CS network in response to the voice call sending a trigger message about the state of the voice call to the serving node (SN) residing on a packet switched (PS) network;

the SN initiating transfer of a multimedia object to a PS radio channel of the recipient handset over the PS network;

the recipient handset receiving the voice call on a CS radio channel over the CS network and the multimedia object on the PS radio channel over the PS
network; and the recipient handset presenting the multimedia object in conjunction with the voice call.
2. The method of claim 1, wherein the SN selects the multimedia object to be transferred in response to the profile information for the initiator or the recipient.
3. The method of claim 2, wherein the SN selects the multimedia object to be transferred in response to the time of day or logic residing in the initiator handset.
4. The method of claim 2, wherein selection of the multimedia object to be transfer-red is updated periodically.
5. The method of claim 2, wherein selection of the multimedia object is pre-provisioned in the SN by a party other than the inititator or the recipient.
6. The method of claim 1, wherein the CS network trigger messages are generated by a trigger detection point (TDP) in a mobile switching center (MSC) switch residing on the CS network.
7. The method of claim 1, wherein the SN initiated transfer of the multimedia object is controlled so that the multimedia object is delivered to coincide with the start of the voice call.
8. The method of claim 1, wherein the recipient handset comprises a personal agent (PA) to coordinate the timing of the voice call and the presentation of the multimedia object on the recipient handset.
9. The method of claim 1, wherein the multimedia object resides on the initiator handset prior to being transferred via the packet switched (PS) network.
10. The method of claim 1, further comprising the serving node (SN) preloading the multimedia object onto the recipient handset via the PS network.
11. The method of claim 1, wherein the multimedia object is provided by a party other than the initiator or the recipient.
12. The method of claim 1, wherein the multimedia object is an advertisement object to be presented in the handset.
13. The method of claim 1, wherein multimedia object is an electronic image to be presented in the handset.
14. The method of claim 1, wherein the multimedia object is a video clip to be presented in the handset.
15. The method of claim 1, wherein the multimedia object is presented contemporaneously with a voice call alert.
16. The method of claim 1, wherein the multimedia object is presented during the voice call or after the termination of the voice call.
17. A method for delivering and presenting a multimedia object in conjunction with a voice call to a recipient handset over a circuit switched (CS) network comprising:
preloading a multimedia object to a recipient handset over a packet switched (PS) network;

a CS network delivering a voice call to the recipient handset over a CS radio channel;

in response to the received voice call, the recipient handset presenting the multimedia object in conjunction with the voice call.
18. The method of claim 17, wherein a serving node (SN) residing on the PS
network or a personal agent (PA) on the initiator handset selects the multimedia object in response to the profile information for the initiator or the recipient.
19. The method of claim 18, wherein the SN selects the multimedia object to be transferred in response to the time of day or logic residing in the initiator handset.
20. The method of claim 18, wherein selection of the multimedia object to be transferred is updated periodically.
21. The method of claim 18, wherein selection of the multimedia object is pre-provisioned by a party other than the initiator or the recipient.
22. The method of claim 17, wherein the multimedia object is preloaded onto the recipient handset while its PS radio connection is inactive.
23. The method of claim 17, wherein the recipient handset is capable of operating a CS radio and a PS radio concurrently.
24. The method of claim 17, wherein the recipient handset is capable of operating one of a CS radio and a PS radio at a given time.
25. The method of claim 17, wherein the recipient handset comprises a personal agent (PA) to coordinate the timing of the voice call and the presentation of the multimedia object on the recipient handset.
26. The method of claim 17, wherein the multimedia object is provided by a party other than the initiator or the recipient.
27. The method of claim 17, wherein the multimedia object is an advertisement object to be presented in the handset.
28. The method of claim 17, wherein multimedia object is an image to be presented in the handset.
29. The method of claim 17, wherein the multimedia object is a video clip to be presented in the handset.
30. The method of claim 17, wherein the multimedia object is presented contemporaneously with a voice call alert.
31. The method of claim 17, wherein the multimedia object is presented during the voice call or after the termination of the voice call.
32. A system for delivering and presenting a multimedia object in conjunction with a voice call to a recipient handset over a wireless network utilizing multiple Radio Access Bearer (mRAB) technology, by coordinating operation of a circuit-switched (CS) network and a packet switched (PS) network, the system comprising:

a serving node (SN), residing on a PS network, responsive to a voice call on the CS network, having logic to select and initiate transfer of a multimedia object to the recipient handset over the PS network; and a personal agent (PA) logic, on the recipient handset, for presenting the multimedia object in conjunction with the voice call.
33. A system for delivering and presenting a multimedia object in conjunction with a voice call to a recipient handset, the voice call being delivered over a circuit switched (CS) network and the multimedia object being delivered over the packet switched (PS) network, the system comprising:

a serving node (SN), residing on a PS network, for preloading a multimedia object to a recipient handset over the PS network; and a personal agent (PA) logic on the recipient handset for presenting the multimedia object in response to a voice call over the CS network.
CA 2681557 2007-03-19 2008-03-18 Presenting multimedia objects in conjunction with voice calls from a circuit-switched network Abandoned CA2681557A1 (en)

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