CA2658987A1 - Sports cue training aid - Google Patents

Sports cue training aid

Info

Publication number
CA2658987A1
CA2658987A1 CA 2658987 CA2658987A CA2658987A1 CA 2658987 A1 CA2658987 A1 CA 2658987A1 CA 2658987 CA2658987 CA 2658987 CA 2658987 A CA2658987 A CA 2658987A CA 2658987 A1 CA2658987 A1 CA 2658987A1
Authority
CA
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
cue
sports
material
longitudinal axis
weight
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
CA 2658987
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Neil Johnson
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
GRAVITY CUE Co Ltd
Original Assignee
The Gravity Cue Company Limited
Neil Johnson
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63DBOWLING-ALLEYS; BOWLING GAMES; BOCCIA; BOWLS; BAGATELLE; BILLIARDS
    • A63D15/00Billiards, e.g. carom billiards; Billiard tables; Pocket billiards, i.e. pool
    • A63D15/08Cues

Abstract

A sports cue (1) for improving the consistency of a player's shot comprising a tapered length of material having a longitudinal axis (x - x) therethrough wherein the total relative density of the material (2) above the longitudinal axis is less than that (4) below the longitudinal axis to form a "bottom-heavy" cue.

Description

SPORTS CUE TRAINING AID

The present invention relates to a sports cue for combined training and improved play, more particularly to a cue that is adapted to improve the consistency of a player's shots.

Conventional cues comprise tapered sticks that are generally made from wood having a wider butt connected to a smaller shaft that terminates in a tip for contacting a ball in play. The cue normally has a uniform taper. The butt and shaft may be made of different types of wood and be connected together by means of a joint. The bulk of the weight of the cue is usually distributed in the butt, generally within its core. The tip is normally of leather and is held in place by a ferrule, comprising a cuff at the end of the shaft. The ferrule may be made of ivory, carbon fibre, plastic or brass.

Numerous training aids for cue sports (snooker, billiards, pool and the like) have been developed but most, if not all, relate to separate pieces of equipment that may be used in conjunction with the cue to assist a player in achieving a straight shot in a desired direction. Whilst these types of aids are useful in improving the technique of the player, they are somewhat artificial in that the player is practising using additional tools that cannot be used legally in competitions.

It is an object of the present invention to provide an improved sports cue for improving the technique of a player that may be used legally in competitions and the like.

Accordingly, the present invention provides a sports cue comprising a tapered rod having a longitudinal axis therethrough characterised in that total weight of the rod above the longitudinal axis is less than the total weight of the rod below the longitudinal axis.

In this manner, the snooker cue of the present invention is "bottom heavy", that is, has a weight bias in the intended lower half of the snooker cue.

In accordance with the present invention the weight of the cue may be biased by the provision of weights in the lower half of the cue. For example, at least a part of the cue may be hollowed out to form a cavity, into which is placed a heavier material, such that the heavier material is placed below the longitudinal axis of the cue relative to the weight of the material that is placed above the longitudinal axis. A
suitable heavy material employed for this purpose may be, for example, but not limited to, lead. Foam or other suitable filling material may be inserted into the cavity above the longitudinal axis if so required.

Preferably, the weighted part of the cue is substantially provided in half of the cue, preferably at the wider end thereof (or "butt" of the cue).

In a preferred embodiment of the present invention, the sports cue comprises a tapered length of material having a longitudinal axis therethrough characterised in that the total relative density of the material above the longitudinal axis is less than the total relative density of the material below the longitudinal axis.

A cue according to this preferred embodiment of the present invention is preferably made from materials having at least two different relative densities, with the material of greater density forming at least a portion of the bottom or lower side of the cue when in use,, that is, below the longitudinal axis of the cue. This creates a weight bias in the cue to make it "bottom heavy" which has been found to enable a player to make improved shots with the cue.

Preferably, the greater density material comprises substantially half of the cue at the wider end thereof (or "butt" of the cue) but tapers off towards the pointed end (or "tip") of the cue to provide a narrow end that is comprised entirely of the lighter material. More preferably, only 50% to 75% of the total length of the cue is comprised of the heavier material. Most especially, 60 to 70% of the total length of the cue is comprised of the heavier material.

The relative densities of the two materials that comprise the cue are preferably in the range 1.2: 1 to 1.8: 1, more preferably 1.5:1 to 1.7:1 and especially around 1.6:1.
In the sports cue of the present invention it is preferred that with respect to the weight distribution within the gravity cue, it is preferred that 55 to 95% of the total weight of the cue is located below the longitudinal axis of the cue. More preferably, 70 to 90% of the total weight of the cue is located below the longitudinal axis of the cue. Most preferably however, 75 to 85%, especially around 80% of the total weight of the cue is located below the longitudinal axis of the cue. This weight distribution results in a cue with a strong longitudinal bias. (Figures 1, 2, 3).

This strong longitudinal bias and preferred weight distribution is achieved through the use of materials with different relative densities and the positioning of additional weights within the lower, greater density portion of the cue.

The additional weights maybe comprised of for example but not limited to lead, brass or other similar alloys or metals (with a relative density greater even than that of the higher density material used to form the cue) or mixtures thereof, and are ideally positioned below the longitudinal axis of the cue.

The additional weights are preferably between 0.5 to 10 ounces (14.2g to 283.3g), more preferably 2 to 5 ounces (56.7g to 141.7g).

The cross section of the additional weights may be for example but not limited to circular, square, rectangular or triangular. (Figure 4a to 4d).

The total weight of a sports cue according to the present invention is preferably between 15 - 25 ounces (425 grams to 567 grams).

Heavier cues of weight 30 to 50 ounces (425g to 567g) according to the present invention may also be manufactured for use as training cues. This further encourages a correct cue action and positioning of the wrist, arm and body during training.

The actual length of the sport cue of the preset invention will vary in line with the sports regulations and depending upon whether or not the cue is for use in play by junior or adult players. However, in any sport involving a cue according to the present invention the cue length will preferably be greater than 3 feet (914cm).

In a preferred embodiment of the present invention, the cue is comprised of two types of wood each being of different densities in accordance with the ratios given above. For example, the lighter wood may comprise for example, ash or maple and the greater density wood may comprise for example a hardwood such as ebony or rosewood. The relative densities of the light and heavy woods may be, for example, in the region of 670 kg/m3 and 1120 kg/m3 respectively.

Preferably, the heavier wood comprises more than 60% of the total weight of the cue. More preferably, the heavier wood comprises between 65 and 75% of the total weight of the cue. If required, an additional weight may be provided at least partially within the section of heavier wood to increase the total weight thereof. For example, the weight may be in the form of a piece of lead, thereby providing a cue of a particular required overall weight. More preferably, the additional weight is provided entirely within the heavier material that is below the longitudinal axis of the cue.
It will be appreciated by one skilled in the art that the other suitable materials may be employed to form the additional weight required in the heavier piece of wood.
In the sports cues of the present invention, it is preferable for the lighter wood to have a wedge `spliced off, to which is then adhered a wedge of a heavier wood to form a cue that corresponds in shape to a normal cue but which is still "bottom heavy". Preferably, a weight is added to the heavier wedge to form a cue of the required total set weight (normally being in the range 15 to 20 oz, or 425 grams to 567 grams) and having the correct balance. The cue is normally around 1.5m in length, although smaller or larger cues maybe custom made as required by the end user, for example children.

It is to be appreciated that the material of choice for the sports cue of the present invention is likely to be wood as this is the material conventionally used for sports cues. However, other suitable materials of different relative densities may be used, such as carbon fibre, plastic, graphite or mixtures thereof. Moreover, the cue may be provided in two or more parts, wherein the parts are provided with appropriate connectors, such as male and female threads, for mating the two together. For example, the butt and shaft may comprise separate pieces that may be connected together. However, it is important to maintain the greater relative density through one side of the butt and part of the corresponding side of the shaft to form a cue that, in the assembled state, is "bottom heavy" in accordance with the present invention.

In addition, sports cues may also be provided with attachments of different sizes that may be fitted to the larger end of the cue (that is, the butt), generally by means of a threaded screw mechanism, to extend the length of the cue. It is preferable for such attachments to also be comprised of materials of different relative densities, wherein the material of each particular density `lines up' with the corresponding material in the end of the cue to which the extension is attached.

To this end, a second aspect of the present invention provides an extension for a sports cue, the extension comprising means for attachment to a cue, the extension having a longitudinal axis therethrough characterised in that total weight of the extension above the longitudinal axis is less than the total weight of the extension below the longitudinal axis.

Preferably, the total relative density of the material of the extension above the longitudinal axis is less than the total relative density of the material below the longitudinal axis.

For a better understanding of the present invention and to show more clearly how it may be carried into effect, reference will now be made by way of example only to the accompanying drawings in which:
Figure 1 is a longitudinal cross-sectional view through a cue according to one embodiment of the present invention; and Figure 2 is a longitudinal cross-sectional view through an extension for a cue according to another embodiment of the present invention.

Figure 3 is a longitudinal cross-sectional view through a cue according to a third embodiment of the present invention.
Figures 4a to 4d illustrate cross-sectional views taken along line a-a for cue in for example Figure 1 depicting the different types of weight that can be employed in a snooker cue of the present invention.
Figure 5 is a longitudinal cross-sectional view through a cue according to a fourth embodiment of the present invention.
Figure 6 is a longitudinal cross-sectional view through a cue according to a fifth embodiment of the present invention.
Figure 7 is a longitudinal cross-sectional view through a cue according to a sixth embodiment of the present invention.
Figure 8 is a longitudinal cross-sectional view through a cue according to a seventh embodiment of the present invention.
Figure 9 is a longitudinal cross-sectional view through a cue according to a eighth embodiment of the present invention.
Figure 10 is a longitudinal cross-sectional view through a cue according to a ninth embodiment of the present invention.

Referring to Figure 1 of the accompanying drawings, a snooker cue 1 according to one embodiment of the present invention is illustrated. The cue comprises a rounded, tapered length of wood having a ferrule 6 surrounding a tip 3 attached to the pointed end thereof which, in play, contacts the ball. The overall shape and profile of cue is the same as a conventional cue enabling it to be used legally in tournaments. However, the cue is weight-biased to be bottom heavy by providing a wedge 4 of heavier wood in the lower half of the cue that is adhered to a lighter wood 2 that makes up the rest of the cue. In this manner, the total relative density of the cue is greater below its longitudinal axis x - x than above.

As illustrated in the accompanying drawing, in this first embodiment of the present invention, the heavier wood 4, only extends approximately two-thirds (2y) along the length of the cue, thereby having around one third (y) of the length of the narrower end of the cue comprised entirely of lighter wood. Additionally, a weight 8 is secured within the heavier wood to provide a cue having its overall weight and balance maintained.

Figure 2 of the accompanying drawings illustrates how the invention may also be applied to an extension 10 for a cue 1. The extension comprises a threaded region 12 for attachment to the end of a cue, the extension being comprised of two materials 14, 16 of different relative densities that correspond to the two materials of the cue to which the extension is to be attached. The materials are arranged in the extension such that the heavier material 14 lines up exactly with the heavier material of the cue and the lighter material 161ines up exactly with the lighter material of the cue when the extension is fully secured onto the cue.

Whilst one preferred embodiment of the present invention comprises a cue made from wood of differing densities, it is to be appreciated that the same effect could be achieved by hollowing out at least part of the core of the cue and providing weights, such as lead, below the longitudinal axis of the cue with a lighter material, such as foam, being provided above. This would again produce a bottom heavy cue having a "keel" effect.

This keel effect is further explained below by way of the accompanying drawings.
Referring to Figure 3 of the accompanying drawings there is provided a two piece sports cue 20 according to a third embodiment of the present invention.
The cue again comprises a tapered length of material, preferably wood, to which a ferrule and tip (not shown) can be applied to one end of the cue. The two pieces of cue, 22 and 24 are secured by a suitable attachment mechanism, such as but not limited to for example a screw thread attachment. The portion 24, which comprises the butt end of the cue 30, comprises a first material 26, and a second materia128, both of which are made of for example wood. However, the first material 26 is comprised of for example wood of greater density than the second material 28. Inside the greater density material 26 there is located a weight 8. The weight can be made of any suitable material, such as for example lead. The weight 8 is secured in place in for example a cavity created in the first material 26. If required, the weight may be secured in place using for example an adhesive suitable for use with the material of the weight and the material of the first material.

The second piece of the cue 22 to which may be applied a tip is preferably also comprised of a material such as for example wood. In this third embodiment of the present invention, the second piece of the cue 22 also comprises wedges that are spliced from the original material of the tapered cue and then replaced by a suitable attachment means with a wedge of greater density material 26, and a wedge of lighter density material as in the first portion of the cue.
When the first and second portions 22 and 24 are attached, the wedges of the first piece 26, 28 align with the materials 26 and 28 in the second piece of the cue, such that the materials appear to flow continuously from one piece of the cue to the other.
The presence of the weight 8 in the heavier density material of the second piece of the cue ensures that the cue is again bottom heavy having the effect of a keel.
Referring to Figures 4a to 4d there is illustrated a series of cross-sectional views taken along line a-a from the cue in for example Figure 1. Figures 4a to 4d illustrate examples of the different forms of weight 8 which can be employed in the sports cue of the present invention.
The weights 8 are preferably located in the lower portion of the sports cue that is comprised of the heavier density material 4. It will be appreciated by one skilled in the art that the weights may comprises a variety of shapes with varying cross-sections.
It will also be appreciated that whilst the weight 8 is shown as a continuous piece in for example Figure 1, that multiple weights may be employed either separately or secured together to achieve the same weight balance as required by the present invention.
In addition, it will also be appreciated that whilst the weights in Figures 4a to 4d are shown to be located towards the bottom portion of the greater density material 4 that the exact location of the weight 8 in the greater density material 4 can be varied so long as the weights are located within the greater density material.
It is preferred however, that the weights 8 are located towards the bottom of the greater density material 4 for the best `bottom heavy' keel effect of the cue of the present invention.

As mentioned previously, the sports cues of the present invention can be prepared in a range of different models, as exemplified in but not limited to the Figures enclosed herewith. For example, one two and even three-piece cues are known. Two and three piece cues comprise of a number of cue sections wherein the sections are joined together using a variety of different mechanisms. Examples of the types of connector that are available include for example: a screw type connector, a clip / push on connector, an offset joint connector, wherein the joint is situated below the longitudinal axis of cue.
It will be appreciated however, that other forms of connector may be employed at that this list of connectors is not exhaustive.

The sports cue of the present invention may also be manufactured as a single, twin or four-spliced model. An example of a single spliced cue can be seen in Figures 8 and 9, an example of a twin-spliced model in Figure 7 and an example of a four-splice model in Figure 6.
In single spliced cues as illustrated in Figures 8 and 9 the majority of the cue is comprised of a single piece of material 2, for example wood, to which is secured by a suitable attachment means a single splice of material 4 that is of greater density than the material 2 to which it is secured. The splice of denser material is again located below the longitudinal axis of the cue in accordance with the present invention.
In Figure 8, the splice of denser material 4 preferably extends for up to two thirds of the length of the cue, whilst in Figure 9 the splice of denser material 4 extends along the cue for only around one third of the length of the cue.
In addition, when the splice is elongated, it provides a form of spine or backbone to the cue that provides additional strength and support for the cue.
It is also possible for a single splice cue to be a formed as a one-piece cue or a two or more piece cue by incorporation of the appropriate connections In Figure 7 there is illustrated a two-piece or twin splice cue 60 in which the cue is manufactured from a piece of material 2 with a splice of more dense material 4 below the longitudinal axis of the cue which is in turn mirrored by a splice of lighter weight or less dense material 62 above the longitudinal axis of the cue. In an alternative example of the two-piece or twin splice cue the splice comprised of the heavier or greater density material 4 may be elongated along the length of the cue below the longitudinal axis of the cue as illustrated in Figure 5.

In Figure 6 there is illustrated a four splice cue 60, in which the cue is manufactured such that it is comprised of two splices of heavier or more dense material 4 located below the longitudinal axis of the cue, mirrored by two splices of lightweight or less dense materia164 located above the longitudinal axis of the cue Finally, in Figure 10 there is illustrated a two-piece pool cue 90 wherein the two pieces 92 -and 94 are attached by a suitable mechanism at point 96.
The rear portion of the pool cue 94 is also comprised of two parts, a first lower portion 4, located below the longitudinal axis of the cue and within which is located a weight 8 and a second upper portion 98, which is located above the longitudinal axis of the cue.
In the example of the pool cue illustrated in Figure 10, it can be seen that the weight 8 extends along a substantial length of the lower portion of the cue, for example by up to 50% of the length of the lower portion of the cue.
The weight 8 in Figure 10 and all of Figures 1 to 9 therefore provides a suitable weight bias and keel effect to provide a cue which is bottom heavy in accordance with present invention.

The "bottom heavy" cue according to the present invention has been found to improve the shot of a player in a variety of ways. The cue sits on the palm of the hand more effectively, encouraging a consistent preparation pattern before the shot is taken. The bias in the cue ensures the heavier side is pulled downwards to facilitate this. Due to the bias, the cue will also sit on the player's bridge hand more satisfactorily. Furthermore, the cueing up stage of the shot is encouraged to be straighter as a result of the weight bias discouraging any unwanted sideways movements. Similarly, the bias discourages unwanted lateral movement to result in a straighter final back-swing and delivery.

The weight bias also reduces twisting of the cue during a shot, thus assisting in preventing the cue and cueing arm from moving off-line. This encourages the arm and hand to move more effectively, thereby creating a natural correct stroke through habit. Due to the way in which the biased cue sits in the player's hand, accuracy is encouraged as the player is able to fine-tune their technique and remember desired movements through "muscle memory".

Moreover, the cue of the present invention encourages a player to cue on a more parallel plane, helping them to get through the ball more efficiently when striking. The player will also be less likely to miss-cue. Playing of rest shots should also be improved using the cue of the invention. Any sideways movement or "whip"
is reduced as the heavier wood also acts as a stiffener.

Therefore, in summary, the distribution of weight within the sports cue of the present invention, forces a player to align their wrist arm and stance and hence develop a higher degree of accuracy.
Furthermore, the weight distribution also prevents rotation of the wrist and arm during use of the cue.

Experimental.
The resistance to rotation of the sports cue according to the present invention was analysed in comparison to that of a traditional snooker cue Both of the cues tested were one-piece cues of the same overall weight and length. The resistance to rotation of the cues was determined by measuring the weight required to turn the cue through an angle of 90 .
Identical weights were attached to both cues in the same position on the cues and then the action of both cues was tested on identical surfaces.

The results of the tests showed that the sports cue of the present invention demonstrated a resistance to rotation of over 100 times greater than that shown by a traditional sports cue.
That is, for a traditional sports cue, a weight of 1 g was sufficient to force the cue to rotate through an angle of 90 . In contrast, the sports cue of the present invention required 105g to rotate the cue through an angle of 90 , thereby demonstrating the effect of the `bottom heavy' keel effect of the cue of the present invention.

Further tests were also carried out to demonstrate the improvement in performance of a cue according to the present invention compared with a traditional sports cue.
To this end, the performance of 25 players was tested using a traditional cue and a cue according to the present invention wherein both cues were of equal weight and length. It was found that the performance of all 25 players showed significant improvement in the following areas when a cue of the present invention was used such that the players demonstrated:
straighter cue action, improved parallel cue action, increased cue power, improved body position, and a reduction in hand and wrist twisting due play.

The present invention therefore provides a cue of conventional size, weight and shape but having a weight bias which serves to improve the technique of the player. Furthermore, the end of the cue which contacts the hand of the player during a stroke is still of softwood which has a preferable feel to hardwood, thereby maintaining the comfortable feel of the cue during play.

It is to be appreciated that the cue according to the present invention may be provided in two or more parts to provide a cue that may be dissembled for transport and storage purposes.

Claims (28)

1. A sports cue comprising a tapered rod having a longitudinal axis therethrough characterised in that total weight of the rod above the longitudinal axis is less than the total weight of the rod below the longitudinal axis.
2. A sports cue as claimed in claim 1 wherein weights are provided in the lower half of the cue.
3. A sports cue as claimed in claim 1 or 2 wherein at least a part of the cue is hollowed out to provide a cavity, with a heavier material or weight being placed in the cavity below the longitudinal axis relative to the weight of the material that is placed above the longitudinal axis.
4. A sports cue as claimed in claim 3 wherein the heavy material or weight is lead.
5. A sports cue as claimed in claim 3 or 4 wherein foam or other suitable filling material is inserted into the cavity above the axis.
6. A sports cue as claimed in any one of claims 1 to 4 wherein the weighted part of the cue is provided in substantially half of the cue at the wider end thereof (or "butt" of the cue).
7. A sports cue comprising a tapered length of material having a longitudinal axis therethrough characterised in that the total relative density of the material above the axis is less than the total relative density of the material below the axis.
8. A sports cue as claimed in claim 7 wherein the greater density material comprises substantially half of the cue at the wider end thereof (or "butt" of the cue) but tapers off towards the pointed end (or "tip") of the cue to provide a narrow end that is comprised entirely of the lighter material.
9. A sports cue as claimed in claim 7 or 8 wherein only 50% to 75% of the total length of the cue is comprised of the heavier material.
10. A sports cue as claimed in claim 9 wherein 60-70% of the total length of the cue is comprised of the heavier material.
11. A sports cue as claimed in any one of claims 7 to 10 wherein the relative densities of the two materials making up the cue are in the range 1.2: 1 to 1.8: 1.
12. A sports cue as claimed in claim 11 wherein the relative densities are 1.5:1 to 1.7:1.
13. A sports cue as claimed in any one of claims 7 to 12 wherein the relative densities are provided by different types of wood.
14. A sports cue as claimed in claim 13 wherein the lighter material is comprised of a softwood and the heavier material is comprised of a hardwood.
15. A sports cue as claimed in claim 13 or 14 wherein the relative densities of the lighter and heavier woods are around 670 kg/m3 and around 1120 kg/m3 respectively.
16. A sports cue as claimed in any one of the preceding claims wherein the heavier material comprises more than 60% of the total weight of the cue.
17. A sports cue as claimed in claim 16 wherein the heavier material comprises 65-75% of the total weight of the cue.
18. A sports cue as claimed in any one of claims 7 to 17 wherein an additional weight is included in the cue.
19. A sports cue as claimed in claim 18 wherein the weight is provided within at least part of the heavier material.
20. A sports cue as claimed in claim 19 wherein the weight is provided totally within the heavier material, that is below the longitudinal axis of the cue.
21. A sports cue as claimed in any one of the preceding claims wherein the cue is formed of at least two parts.
22. A sports cue as claimed in any one of the preceding claims wherein the total weight of the cue is in the range 15-20oz (425g to 567g).
23. A sports cue as claimed in any one of the preceding claims wherein 55 to 95%
of the total weight of the cue is located below the longitudinal axis of the cue.
24. A sports cue as claimed in any one of preceding claims 1 to 22 wherein 70 to 90% of the total weight of the cue is located below the longitudinal axis of the cue.
25. A sports cue as claimed in any one of preceding claims 1 to 22 wherein 75 to 85% of the total weight of the cue is located below the longitudinal axis of the cue.
26. A sports cue as claimed in any one of claims 1 to 25 further comprising an extension having means for attachment to the wider end of the cue and being comprised of at least two materials of different relative densities corresponding to the densities of the materials of the adjoining cue.
27. An extension for a sports cue, the extension comprising means for attachment to a cue, the extension having a longitudinal axis therethrough characterised in that total weight of the extension above the longitudinal axis is less than the total weight of the extension below the axis.
28. An extension for a sports cue, the extension comprising means for attachment to a cue, the extension having a longitudinal axis therethrough characterised in that the total relative density of the material above the axis is less than the total relative density of the material below the axis.
CA 2658987 2006-07-26 2007-07-26 Sports cue training aid Abandoned CA2658987A1 (en)

Priority Applications (5)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB0614813.4 2006-07-26
GB0614813A GB0614813D0 (en) 2006-07-26 2006-07-26 Sports cue training aid
GB0619329A GB0619329D0 (en) 2006-10-02 2006-10-02 Sports cue training aid
GB0619329.6 2006-10-02
PCT/GB2007/002850 WO2008012547A1 (en) 2006-07-26 2007-07-26 Sports cue training aid

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
CA2658987A1 true true CA2658987A1 (en) 2008-01-31

Family

ID=38573327

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
CA 2658987 Abandoned CA2658987A1 (en) 2006-07-26 2007-07-26 Sports cue training aid

Country Status (4)

Country Link
US (1) US20090186713A1 (en)
EP (1) EP2051786A1 (en)
CA (1) CA2658987A1 (en)
WO (1) WO2008012547A1 (en)

Families Citing this family (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20100160055A1 (en) * 2008-12-23 2010-06-24 David Suit Replaceable Inlay Pool Cues

Family Cites Families (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US692970A (en) * 1901-03-30 1902-02-11 William Zaehringer Billiard-cue.
US1241194A (en) * 1915-06-07 1917-09-25 Albert Pick & Company Manufacture of billiard-cues.
US5326329A (en) * 1993-05-11 1994-07-05 Doss Robert J Jump-shot pool cue
US5558584A (en) * 1995-03-06 1996-09-24 Brown; James C. Pool cue with sight
US5704842A (en) * 1996-04-02 1998-01-06 Petrusek; Paul C. Cue stick with guide rib
US6736733B2 (en) * 1999-01-08 2004-05-18 Kuo-Pin Yu On billiard cue
US20020072423A1 (en) * 2000-12-07 2002-06-13 Pot Rick D. Billiard cue stick
CA2414550C (en) * 2002-12-13 2006-08-15 Sam Miksym Nazaruk Cue, super-shaft
CA2427979A1 (en) * 2003-05-06 2004-11-06 Jung-Shih Chang An improved shaft for billiard cue
US20060030418A1 (en) * 2004-08-05 2006-02-09 Evans Kirk B Pool cue systems
JP2007125108A (en) * 2005-07-11 2007-05-24 Miki Co Ltd Billiard cue

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
EP2051786A1 (en) 2009-04-29 application
WO2008012547A1 (en) 2008-01-31 application
US20090186713A1 (en) 2009-07-23 application

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