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CA2638532A1 - Flow control device and method for a downhole oil-water separator - Google Patents

Flow control device and method for a downhole oil-water separator

Info

Publication number
CA2638532A1
CA2638532A1 CA 2638532 CA2638532A CA2638532A1 CA 2638532 A1 CA2638532 A1 CA 2638532A1 CA 2638532 CA2638532 CA 2638532 CA 2638532 A CA2638532 A CA 2638532A CA 2638532 A1 CA2638532 A1 CA 2638532A1
Authority
CA
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
water
oil
flow
downhole
restrictor
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
CA 2638532
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Matthew R. Hackworth
Nihat Ovutmen
Kevin J. Forbes
Lance I. Fielder
Allan Ross
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Schlumberger Canada Ltd
Original Assignee
Schlumberger Canada Ltd
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Classifications

    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B43/00Methods or apparatus for obtaining oil, gas, water, soluble or meltable materials or a slurry of minerals from wells
    • E21B43/34Arrangements for separating materials produced by the well
    • E21B43/38Arrangements for separating materials produced by the well in the well
    • E21B43/385Arrangements for separating materials produced by the well in the well by reinjecting the separated materials into an earth formation in the same well

Abstract

A downhole device having an oil/water separator having a well fluid inlet, an oil stream outlet conduit, and a water stream outlet conduit; a removable flow-restrictor located in at least one of the water stream outlet conduit or the oil stream outlet conduit.

Description

89.0534 FLOW CONTROL DEVICE AND METHOD FOR A
DOWNHOLE OIL-WATER SEPARATOR

This application claims priority to United States provisional application no.
60/969066 filed on August 30, 2007 and to United States non-provisional application no. 11/953970 filed on December 11, 2007.

TECHNICAL FIELD

The present application relates generally to the field of artificial lifts, and more specifically to artificial lifts in connection with hydrocarbon wells, and more specifically, associated downhole oil/water separation methods and devices.
BACKGROUND
Oil well production can involve pumping a well fluid that is part oil and part water, i.e., an oil/water mixture. As an oil well becomes depleted of oil, a greater percentage of water is present and subsequently produced to the surface. The "produced" water often accounts for at least 80 to 90 percent of a total produced well fluid volume, thereby creating significant operational issues. For example, the produced water may require treatment and/or re-injection into a subterranean reservoir in order to dispose of the water and to help maintain reservoir pressure.
Also, treating and disposing produced water can become quite costly.
One way to address those issues is through employment of a downhole device to separate oil/water and re-inject the separated water, thereby minimizing production of unwanted water to surface. Reducing water produced to surface can allow reduction of required pump power, reduction of hydraulic losses, and simplification of surface equipment. Further, many of the costs associated with water treatment are reduced or eliminated.
However, successfully separating oil/water downhole and re-injecting the water is a relatively involved and sensitive process with many variables and 89.0534 factors that affect the efficiency and feasibility of such an operation. For example, the oil/water ratio can vary from well to well and can change significantly over the iife of the well. Further, over time the required injection pressure for the separated water can tend to increase.
Given that, the present application discloses a number of embodiments relating to those issues.

SUMMARY
An embodiment is directed to a downhole device comprising an electric submersible motor; a pump connected with the electric submersible motor, the pump having an intake and an outlet; the electric submersible motor and the pump extending together in a longitudinal direction; an oil/water separating device having an inlet in fluid communication with the pump outlet and having a first outlet and a second outlet, the first outlet connecting with a first conduit and the second outlet connecting with a second conduit; a redirector integrated with the first conduit and the second conduit, the redirector having a flow-restrictor pocket that extends in the longitudinal direction, a downhole end of the flow-restrictor pocket connecting with a re-injection conduit; the first conduit extending uphole to a level of the flow-restrictor pocket, and the second conduit extending farther uphole than the first conduit; the uphole end of the flow-restrictor pocket connecting with the second conduit; and a passage connecting the first conduit with the flow-restrictor pocket.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES
Figure 1 shows a configuration of an embodiment;
Figure 2 shows a portion of a cross section of an embodiment;
Figure 3 shows a portion of a cross section of an embodiment;
Figure 4 shows a portion of a cross section of an embodiment;
Figure 5 shows a configuration of an embodiment;
Figure 6 shows a cross section of a portion of an embodiment;
Figure 7 shows a cross section of portion of an embodiment;

2 89.0534 Figure 8 shows a cross section of a portion of an embodiment; and Figure 9 shows a cross section of a portion of an embodiment in use.
DETAILED DESCRIPTION

In the following description, numerous details are set forth to provide an understanding of the present invention. However, those skilled in the art will understand that the present invention may be practiced without many of these details and that numerous variations or modifications from the described embodiments may be possible.
In the specification and appended claims: the terms "connect", "connection", "connected", "in connection with", and "connecting" are used to mean "in direct connection with" or "in connection with via another element";
and the term "set" is used to mean "one element" or "more than one element". As used herein, the terms "up" and "down", "upper" and "lower", "upwardly" and downwardly", "upstream" and "downstream"; "above" and "below"; and other like terms indicating relative positions above or below a given point or element are used in this description to more clearly described some embodiments of the invention. However, when applied to equipment and methods for use in wells that are deviated or horizontal, such terms may refer to a left to right, right to left, or other relationship as appropriate.
The present application relates to downhole oil/water separation, and more particularly, advantageously managing back-pressure to manipulate the oil/water separation. One way to advantageously control separation of fluids is by regulating back-pressure applied to the oil stream and/or the water stream.
One way to regulate back-pressure is by regulating a flow-restriction (i.e., throttling) of the oil stream and/or the water stream exiting the oil/water separator. Embodiments herein relate to equipment that allows a stream to be throttled, i.e., a back-pressure to be manipulated. The magnitude of a throttling can cover a range from completely closed to wide open depending on the oil/water content of the well fluid.

3 89.0534 The form and function controlling backpressure and related flow is highly dependent upon the injection zone orientation relative to the producing zone (injection zone uphole or downhole of the producing zone). Some key differences between the two orientations relate to injecting uphole where the device can throttle and vent to a tubing annulus in a single operation, and injecting downhole where the device may need to throttle the flow "in-line", .i.e.
receive the injection flow from the tubing, throttle the flow, and then return the flow to another tube headed toward the injection zone. Some or all of these factors can be considered. The diameter of a throttle opening can generally be from 0.125 to 1.0 inches.
Figure 1 shows an overall schematic for an embodiment of a device.
Some of the main components of the device are an ESP 100 comprising a motor 110 and a pump 120. A centrifugal or cyclone oil/water separator 200 is connected adjacent to the pump 120. The apparatus is placed downhole in a hydrocarbon well, preferably inside a well casing 10. The motor 110 drives the pump 120. The motor 110 also drives the oil/water separator 200. During operation, well fluid is drawn into the pump 120 through a vent 125. The oil/water mixture is driven out of the pump 120 and into the oil/water separator 200, a centrifugal type separator in this case. The oil/water separator 200 accelerates and drives the oil/water mixture in a circular path, thereby utilizing centrifugal forces to locate more dense fluids (e.g., water) to a farther out radial position and less dense fluids (e.g., oil) to a position nearer to the center of rotation. An oil stream and a water stream exit the oil/water separator 200 and travel separately along different paths to a redirector 250, where the water stream is redirected and re-injected into formation while the oil stream is directed uphole to surface.
Figure 2 shows a cut away view of the oil/water separator 200, which is of the centrifugal type. A well fluid mixture is driven into and rotated in a cyclone chamber 201 of the oil/water separator 200. The layers of the stream are separated by a divider 202 that defines a beginning of an oil conduit 204 and a beginning of a water conduit 206. The oil conduit 204 is further inward in a radial

4 89.0534 direction with respect to the water conduit 206. Back-pressure of the streams affects the oil/water separation process. For example, for well fluids having a high percentage of oil, higher back-pressure for the water stream 206 can improve separation results. Similarly, for well fluids having a higher percentage of water, a higher back-pressure for the oil stream 204 can improve oil/water separation. Essentially the same back-pressure principal applies to cyclone type oil/water separators.
Figure 3 shows another sectional view of the oil/water separator 200 having the oil conduit 204 and the water conduit 206. Arrows 350 show a representative path of the oil stream. Arrows 355 show a representative path of the water stream. A flow-restrictor 304, e.g., a throttle, is in the water conduit 206. The water stream flows uphole into the flow-restrictor 304. The flow-restrictor 304 could be located in the oil conduit 204. One flow-restrictor could be in the water conduit 206 and another flow-restrictor 304 could be in the oil conduit 206 simultaneously. Selection of a flow-restrictor 304 from a number of different flow-restrictors having different variations of orifice size and configuration enables adjustment of the aforementioned backpressure in the water stream 206. There are many ways to replace the flow-restrictor 304 with another different flow-restrictor 304 having a different throttle, thereby adjusting the backpressure situation. Preferably, a wireline tool can be lowered to place/remove a flow-restrictor 304. A flow-restrictor 304 can also be inserted and removed using slickline, coiled tubing, or any other applicable conveyance method. Slickline tends to be the most economical choice. In connection with use of a slickline, or coiled tubing for that matter, the oil stream channel is preferably positioned/configured to prevent tools lowered down by wireline, slickline or coiled tubing from inadvertently entering the oil conduit 204.
The oil conduit 204 can be angled to prevent the tool from entering the oil conduit 204.
The oil conduit 204 can further be sized such that the tool will not be accepted into the bore.
Alternately, the flow-restrictor 304 can have a variable size throttle orifice so that replacement of the flow-restrictor is not required to vary orifice size. The 89.0534 orifice size can be varied mechanically in many ways, e.g., at surface by hand, by a wireline tool, a slickline tool, a coil tubing tool, a hydraulic line from the surface, by an electric motor controlled by electrical signals from the surface or from wireless signals from the surface, or by an electrical motor receiving signals from a controller downhole.
Check valves 302 can be located in the oil conduit 204 and/or the water conduit 206. The check valves 302 can prevent fluid from moving from the oil conduit 204 and the water conduit 206 down into the oil/water separator 200, thereby causing damage to the device.
Packers can be used to isolate parts of the apparatus within the wellbore.
For example, Figure 1 shows packers 410 and 420 isolating an area where water is to be re-injected into the formation from an area where well fluid is drawn from the formation. The packer configuration effectively isolates the pump intake from re-injection fluid. Alternately, the packer 420 could be located below the pump 200, so long as the water is re-injected above the packer 410 or below the packer 420, thereby adequately isolating the area where the well fluids are produced from the area of the formation where water is re-injected. No specific packer configuration is required, so long as isolation between producing fluid and injecting fluid is adequately achieved.
The above noted configurations can also be used to inject stimulation treatments downhole. Figure 4 shows the apparatus of Figure 3 except with the flow-restrictor 304 removed. Figure 4 shows pumping of stimulating treatments down the completion tubing and into both the oil conduit 204 and the water conduit 206. A flow-restrictor can be replaced with a flow device that prevents treatment fluid from following along the path of re-injection water. The arrows 360 illustrate a representative path of the stimulating treatment. The check valves 302 can prevent the stimulation fluid from traveling into the oil/water separation 200, thereby potentially causing detrimental effects.
Figure 5 shows a configuration to re-inject a water stream to a zone located below the producing zone. A motor 110, a pump 120, and an oil/water separator 200 are connected as before. A redirector 250 is connected uphole 89.0534 from the oil/water separator 200. The redirector 250 is connected to a conduit 260 that extends downhole from the re-injection and through a packer 420. The packer 420 separates a production area that is uphole from the packer 420, from a re-injection area that is downhole from the packer 420. In that embodiment, the water stream travels through a tailpipe assembly 270. The tailpipe assembly 270 extends though the packer 420 into the re-injection area that is downhole from the packer 420.
Figure 6 shows a more detailed cross section of an embodiment of the redirector 250. Figure 9 shows a cross section of a redirector 250 and a flow-restrictor 304 in operation with the flow-restrictor 304 positioned in the flow-restrictor pocket 610. The flow-restrictor pocket 610 is configured to receive a flow-restrictor 304. The water conduit 206 is configured to be radially outside the oil conduit 204, i.e., a centrifugal oil/water separation. The oil conduit 204 extends from down-hole of the redirector 250, through the redirector 250, and uphole past the redirector 250, where the oil conduit 204 connects with production tubing 620 (e.g., coil tubing). The water conduit 204 extends from below the redirector 250 and into the redirector 205. The water conduit 204 merges into a water passage 630 that connects the water conduit 204 with the flow-restrictor pocket 610. The water passage 630 can extend in a direction substantially perpendicular to the water conduit 204 proximate to the water passage. That is, during operation, the flow of the water makes approximately a 90 degree turn. The water can alternately make as little as approximately a 45 degree turn and as much as approximately a 135 degree turn. A re-injection passage 670 extends from the flow-restrictor pocket 610 downhole past the redirector 250. The re-injection passage 670 can be connected with completion tubing or other tubing.
Figure 7 shows an embodiment of the fiow-restrictor 304. The flow-restrictor 304 has a body 701 that defines therein an upper inner chamber 725 and a lower inner chamber 720. The upper inner chamber 725 and the lower inner chamber 720 are divided by a flow-restriction orifice 740. The flow-restriction orifice 740 and the body 701 can be the same part, or two separate 89.0534 parts fit together. Preferably the flow-restriction orifice 740 has a narrower diameter in a longitudinal axial direction than either the upper inner chamber or the lower inner chamber 720. However, the diameter of the flow-restriction orifice 740 can be essentially the same diameter of either the upper inner chamber 725 or the lower inner chamber 720. Passages 710 are located in the body 701 and hydraulically connect the upper inner chamber 725 with an outside of the flow-restrictor 304. Passage 715 is on the downhole end of the flow-restrictor 304. When the flow-restrictor 304 is in position in the flow-restrictor pocket 610, the passages 710 allow fluid to pass from the water passage 630, though the passages 710 and into the upper inner chamber 725. The fluid then flows through the restrictor orifice 740, into the lower inner chamber 720 and out of the flow-restrictor 304 for re-injection. It should be noted that the flow-restrictor 304 can have many internal configurations, so long as the flow is adequately restricted/throttled.
The flow-restrictor 304 has an attachment part 702 that is used to connect to a downhole tool (not shown) to place and remove the flow-restrictor 304 from the flow-restrictor pocket 610. As noted earlier, the downhole tool can be connected to any relay apparatus, e.g., wireline, slickline, or coiled tubing.
There are many ways to determine an oil/water content of a well fluid.
Well fluid can be delivered to surface where a determination can be made.
Alternately, a sensor can be located downhole to determine the oil/water ratio in the well fluid. That determination can be transmifted uphole in many ways, e.g., electrical signals over a wire, fiber-optic signals, radio signals, acoustic signals, etc. Alternately, the signals can be sent to a processor downhole, the processor instructing a motor to set a certain orifice size for the flow-restrictor 304 based on those signals. The sensor can be located downstream from the well fluid intake of the oil/water separator, inside the oil/water separator, inside the redirector, inside the flow-restrictor, upstream of the oil/water separator, outside the downhole device and downhole of the well fluid intake, outside the downhole device and uphole of the sell fluid intake, or outside the downhole device and at the level of the well fluid intake.

89.0534 One embodiment shown in Figure 8 has a flow-restrictor 304 having a sensor 800 located in the upper inner chamber 725. The sensor could be in the lower inner chamber 720. The sensor 800 can sense temperature, flow rare, pressure, viscosity, or oil/water ratio. The sensor 800 can communicate by way of a telemetry pickup 810 that is integrated with the redirector 250. The sensor 800 can communicate through an electrical contact or "short-hop" telemetry with a data gathering system (not shown).
The preceding description refers to certain embodiments and is not meant to limit the scope of the invention.

Claims (25)

What is Claimed Is:
1. A downhole device, comprising:
an electric submersible motor;
a pump connected with the electric submersible motor, the pump having an intake and an outlet;
the electric submersible motor and the pump extending together in a longitudinal direction;
an oil/water separating device having an inlet in fluid communication with the pump outlet and having a first outlet and a second outlet, the first outlet connecting with a first conduit and the second outlet connecting with a second conduit;
a redirector integrated with the first conduit and the second conduit, the redirector having a flow-restrictor pocket that extends in the longitudinal direction, a downhole end of the flow-restrictor pocket connecting with a re-injection conduit;
the first conduit extending uphole to a level of the flow-restrictor pocket, and the second conduit extending farther uphole than the first conduit;
the uphole end of the flow-restrictor pocket connecting with the second conduit; and a passage connecting the first conduit with the flow-restrictor pocket.
2. The downhole device of Claim 1, wherein the passage extends from the first conduit to the flow-restrictor pocket in a direction approximately perpendicular to the first conduit.
3. The downhole device of Claim 1, comprising a flow-restrictor located in the flow-restrictor pocket, the flow-restrictor having and uphole end, a downhole end and an internal passage;
the internal passage having an inlet and an outlet.
4. The downhole device of Claim 3, comprising a throttle part located within the internal passage between the inlet and the outlet of the flow-restrictor, the throttle part having an inside diameter that is smaller than an inside diameter of the internal passage.
5. The downhole device of Claim 4, wherein the first conduit is in fluid communication with the internal passage by way of the passage and the inlet of the flow-restrictor.
6. The downhole device of Claim 1, comprising a sensor that senses at least one selected from the following: fluid viscosity, temperature, pressure, flow rate, and oil/water content.
7. The downhole device of claim 4, wherein the inside diameter of the throttle part is mechanically variable by a downhole tool relayed on at least one selected from the following: wireline, slickline or coiled tubing.
8. A downhole device, comprising:
an oil/water separator having a well fluid inlet, an oil stream outlet conduit, and a water stream outlet conduit;
a removable flow-restrictor located in at least one of the water stream outlet conduit or the oil stream outlet conduit.
9. The downhole device of claim 8, wherein the removable flow-restrictor has a fixed throttle orifice and the orifice size in the downhole device is changed by interchanging flow-restrictors.
10. The downhole device of claim 8, wherein the removable flow-restrictor has a removable throttle orifice and the orifice size in the downhole device is changed by interchanging throttle orifices.
11. The downhole device of claim 8, wherein the water stream outlet conduit opens up into a wellbore at a point farther downhole than the pump.
12. The downhole device of claim 8, wherein the removable flow-restrictor is removable by a downhole tool relayed by at least one selected from the following: wireline, slickline or coil tubing.
13. The downhole device of claim 8, wherein the oil/water separator is a cyclone oil/water separator.
14. The downhole device of claim 8, wherein the oil/water separator is a centrifugal oil/water separator.
15. The downhole device of claim 8, comprising a sensor that senses at least one selected from the following: viscosity, temperature, pressure, flow rate, and oil/water content.
16. The downhole device of Claim 15, wherein the sensor location is at least one selected from the following: downstream from the well fluid intake of the oil/water separator, inside the oil/water separator, upstream of the oil/water separator, outside the downhole device and downhole of the well fluid intake, outside the downhole device and uphole of the sell fluid intake, and outside the downhole device and at the level of the well fluid intake.
17. The downhole device of claim 8, wherein the removable flow-restrictor has a throttle part with a variable inside diameter.
18. The downhole device of claim 9, wherein the inside diameter of the throttle part is mechanically variable by a downhole tool relayed on at least one selected from the following: wireline, slickline or coiled tubing.
19. A method of downhole oil/water separation, comprising:
placing a downhole device downhole, the downhole device comprising: an oil/water separator having a well fluid inlet, an oil stream outlet, and a water stream outlet; a flow-restrictor pocket located in the oil stream outlet or the water stream outlet;
determining a quality of a downhole well fluid;
selecting a degree of flow-restriction based on the determination and selecting a corresponding flow-restrictor; and placing the selected flow-restrictor in the flow-restrictor pocket.
20. The method of claim 19, comprising:
varying the flow-restriction by removing the flow-restrictor from the oil/water separator while the oil/water separator is downhole; and placing a different flow-restrictor having a different throttle into the oil/water separator while the oil/water separator is downhole.
21. The method of claim 20, wherein the determining of the quality comprises:
sensing at least one selected from the following: viscosity, temperature, pressure, flow rate and oil/water content.
22. The method of claim 19, comprising:
placing the sensor in at least one location selected from the following locations: downstream from the well fluid intake of the oil/water separator, inside the oil/water separator, upstream of the oil/water separator, outside the downhole device and downhole of the well fluid intake, outside the downhole device an uphole of the well fluid intake, and outside the downhole device and at the level of the well fluid intake.
23. The downhole device of claim 1, wherein the first outlet is inward from the second outlet in a radial direction.
24. The downhole device of claim 3, comprising:
a sensor for detecting at least one selected from the following:
temperature, pressure, flow rate, viscosity and oil/water content, the sensor being integrated with the flow-restrictor; and a telemetry pick-up integrated with the redirector in a location adjacent to the sensor so as to be in communication with the sensor.
25. The downhole device of claim 24, wherein the sensor is inside the internal passage of the flow-restrictor.
CA 2638532 2007-08-30 2008-08-07 Flow control device and method for a downhole oil-water separator Abandoned CA2638532A1 (en)

Priority Applications (4)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US96906607 true 2007-08-30 2007-08-30
US60/969,066 2007-08-30
US11953970 US7814976B2 (en) 2007-08-30 2007-12-11 Flow control device and method for a downhole oil-water separator
US11/953,970 2007-12-11

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CA (1) CA2638532A1 (en)
GB (1) GB2452372B (en)

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US20090056939A1 (en) 2009-03-05 application
US20110000675A1 (en) 2011-01-06 application
US7814976B2 (en) 2010-10-19 grant
US8327941B2 (en) 2012-12-11 grant
GB2452372B (en) 2010-07-07 grant
GB2452372A (en) 2009-03-04 application
GB0814232D0 (en) 2008-09-10 grant

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