CA2559039C - Apparatus and method for boosting sound in a denta-mandibular sound-transmitting entertainment toothbrush - Google Patents

Apparatus and method for boosting sound in a denta-mandibular sound-transmitting entertainment toothbrush

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Publication number
CA2559039C
CA2559039C CA 2559039 CA2559039A CA2559039C CA 2559039 C CA2559039 C CA 2559039C CA 2559039 CA2559039 CA 2559039 CA 2559039 A CA2559039 A CA 2559039A CA 2559039 C CA2559039 C CA 2559039C
Authority
CA
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
sound
user
transducer
device
comprises
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Active
Application number
CA 2559039
Other languages
French (fr)
Other versions
CA2559039A1 (en )
Inventor
Andrew S. Filo
David G. Capper
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Hasbro Inc
Original Assignee
Hasbro Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61CDENTISTRY; APPARATUS OR METHODS FOR ORAL OR DENTAL HYGIENE
    • A61C17/00Devices for cleaning, polishing, rinsing or drying teeth, teeth cavities or prostheses; Saliva removers; Dental appliances for receiving spittle
    • A61C17/16Power-driven cleaning or polishing devices
    • A61C17/22Power-driven cleaning or polishing devices with brushes, cushions, cups, or the like
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A46BRUSHWARE
    • A46BBRUSHES
    • A46B15/00Other brushes; Brushes with additional arrangements
    • A46B15/0002Arrangements for enhancing monitoring or controlling the brushing process
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A46BRUSHWARE
    • A46BBRUSHES
    • A46B15/00Other brushes; Brushes with additional arrangements
    • A46B15/0002Arrangements for enhancing monitoring or controlling the brushing process
    • A46B15/0016Arrangements for enhancing monitoring or controlling the brushing process with enhancing means
    • A46B15/0028Arrangements for enhancing monitoring or controlling the brushing process with enhancing means with an acoustic means
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A46BRUSHWARE
    • A46BBRUSHES
    • A46B15/00Other brushes; Brushes with additional arrangements
    • A46B15/0002Arrangements for enhancing monitoring or controlling the brushing process
    • A46B15/0038Arrangements for enhancing monitoring or controlling the brushing process with signalling means
    • A46B15/004Arrangements for enhancing monitoring or controlling the brushing process with signalling means with an acoustic signalling means, e.g. noise
    • A46B15/0042Arrangements for enhancing monitoring or controlling the brushing process with signalling means with an acoustic signalling means, e.g. noise with musical signalling means
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61CDENTISTRY; APPARATUS OR METHODS FOR ORAL OR DENTAL HYGIENE
    • A61C17/00Devices for cleaning, polishing, rinsing or drying teeth, teeth cavities or prostheses; Saliva removers; Dental appliances for receiving spittle
    • A61C17/16Power-driven cleaning or polishing devices
    • A61C17/22Power-driven cleaning or polishing devices with brushes, cushions, cups, or the like
    • A61C17/221Control arrangements therefor
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04RLOUDSPEAKERS, MICROPHONES, GRAMOPHONE PICK-UPS OR LIKE ACOUSTIC ELECTROMECHANICAL TRANSDUCERS; DEAF-AID SETS; PUBLIC ADDRESS SYSTEMS
    • H04R1/00Details of transducers, loudspeakers or microphones
    • H04R1/02Casings; Cabinets ; Supports therefor; Mountings therein
    • H04R1/028Casings; Cabinets ; Supports therefor; Mountings therein associated with devices performing functions other than acoustics, e.g. electric candles
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A46BRUSHWARE
    • A46BBRUSHES
    • A46B15/00Other brushes; Brushes with additional arrangements
    • A46B15/0002Arrangements for enhancing monitoring or controlling the brushing process
    • A46B15/0004Arrangements for enhancing monitoring or controlling the brushing process with a controlling means
    • A46B15/0012Arrangements for enhancing monitoring or controlling the brushing process with a controlling means with a pressure controlling device
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A46BRUSHWARE
    • A46BBRUSHES
    • A46B2200/00Brushes characterized by their functions, uses or applications
    • A46B2200/10For human or animal care
    • A46B2200/1066Toothbrush for cleaning the teeth or dentures
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04RLOUDSPEAKERS, MICROPHONES, GRAMOPHONE PICK-UPS OR LIKE ACOUSTIC ELECTROMECHANICAL TRANSDUCERS; DEAF-AID SETS; PUBLIC ADDRESS SYSTEMS
    • H04R2460/00Details of hearing devices, i.e. of ear- or headphones covered by H04R1/10 or H04R5/033 but not provided for in any of their subgroups, or of hearing aids covered by H04R25/00 but not provided for in any of its subgroups
    • H04R2460/13Hearing devices using bone conduction transducers

Abstract

A device and method for transmitting sound waves between a signal source and a user's ears, wherein the sound waves bypass the air. The sound waves are conducted by the user's teeth and bones to the user's ears, where they are perceived as sound. Sound~transmitting toothbrushes and the like are described to transmit and/ or conduct sound to the user's ear, while the user is brushing his or her teeth. The toothbrush head and a signal source are configured to produce sound waves for transmission through the toothbrush head to the user's mouth, and a tension controller is configured to control the volume of the sound waves based on the pressure applied by the toothbrush head. The signal source may produce sound waves directly or with the assistance of a transducer. The signal source may be replaceable, connect to a replaceable cartridge, or connect to an adaptor capable of downloading data to allow the signal source data to be replaceable. The tension controller may include gap spacing between the transducer coil and transducer plate. The tension controller may also include a boost switch configured as a bypass switch, activation signal, or force sensor.

Description

4 t APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR BOOSTING SOUND IN A DENTA- MANDIBULAR
SOUND-TRANSMITTING ENTERTAINMENT TOOTHBRUSH
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION
This application claims priority benefits from U.S. Provisional Patent Applications 60/634,398 filed December 8, 2004 and 60/652,791 filed February 14, 2005.
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
1. Field of the Invention The present invention relates generally to transmitting sound waves for entertainment via toothbrushes, and more particularly to apparatus and methods that modulate transmitted sound energy through a user's teeth and bone structure to the user's ears, e.g., proportional to brushing pressure.

2. Description of the Related Art Mechanisms for transmitting sound to the ears that bypasses the air and external ears has been recently understood in the general denta-mandibular art. Through such mechanisms, sound waves are transmitted directly to the inner ears, without traveling through the air, by conduction through an object to bones in the user's head, from which the sound waves travel through the bones to the ears to be perceived as sound.
A particularly efficient way to incorporate this mechanism is through a process termed denta-mandibular conduction. Denta-mandibular conduction involves transmitting sound waves through the user's teeth and bones to the inner ear where it is perceived as Page 1 of 30 sound. Because teeth are connected directly to bones in the head, they provide an advantageous non-airborne sound conduit to the ears.
Devices based on denta-mandibular sound transmitted are disclosed in several U.S.
patents. As discussed in U.S. Patent No. 5,902,167, an edible substance and a signal source are operatively associated and configured to produce sound waves for transmission through the edible substance to a user's mouth, from which sound waves are conducted by the user's teeth and bone structure to the user's ears to be perceived as sound. As further disclosed in U.S. Patent 6,115,477, the sound-transmitting device may embody pacifiers, teething rings, pipes, cigarette holders, candy dispensers, toothbrushes, and toys.
It is not believed that a denta-mandibular device has used a method to boost or modulate the transmitted sound wave energy proportional to certain parameters such as the pressure applied to the user's teeth or the like. It would be desirable to incorporate this method into a toothbrush as to adjust the sound waves to facilitate good brushing technique.
The invention described herein addresses this deficiency of the prior art.
SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
The present invention provides a toothbrush capable of denta-mandibular sound transduction and also provides entertainment and tooth cleaning utility.
The denta-mandibular toothbrush contains a transducer which is mounted with a toothbrush head. The transducer provides controlled mechanical vibration energy to the head, in order to provide sound waves to the user's teeth and bones.
Page 2 of 30 The toothbrush contains a signal source which may comprise a microchip having a preprogrammed song or message. The toothbrush is preferably sealed against moisture, and may include a replaceable head to allow for replacing worn out bristles or in order to change the sound source. The toothbrush may further include a motor to agitate the brush head to facilitate teeth cleaning.
In one embodiment, the toothbrush precisely controls the transducer gap and tension, such that the mechanical energy is efficiently coupled to the user's teeth in a range of approximately 60 to 120 grams of force.
In another embodiment, the toothbrush contains a pressure sensitive sensor and a "boost switch." The toothbrush precisely senses the pressure, such that the mechanical energy is efficiently coupled to the user's teeth in a range of approximately 40 to 100 grams of force. The boost switch acts to enhance the sound level or to modulate sound energy when proper brushing technique is applied. The boost switch may be implemented in a variety of ways, including a by-pass switch, an activation switch to provide a boost signal to the signal source, or as a force sensor.
By controlling the pressure applied to maximize the sound, the denta-mandibular toothbrush can act as an aid for developing proper brushing technique by providing audible sound when the pressure in the preferred range.
Additionally, the toothbrush may take on different embodiments in order to replace or add on to the signal source data. The toothbrush may make use of replaceable cartridges which contain signal source date. This would allow the user to change the sound he or she perceives while operating the device. Alternatively, the toothbrush may contain an adapter capable of uploading and downloading data, in order for new signal Page 3 of 30 source data to be downloaded to the toothbrush. The toothbrush would contain a remote pad that would allow the user to cycle through the downloaded signal source data to select the sound he or she prefers while operating the device. These and other advantages are realized with the described embodiments. The invention advantages may be best understood from the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the drawing figures.
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
The invention will now be more particularly described, by way of example only, with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:
Fig. 1 shows the active components of one embodiment of the present invention;

Fig. 2 is a diagram of the present invention, including a housing and base charger;
Figs. 3A-F illustrate detailed views of the brush head transducer methods according to embodiments of the present invention;
Figs. 4A-D illustrate several designs to control the tension and slug assembly of the electro-mechanical transducer, and Figs. 4E-I illustrate the slug assembly according to a preferred embodiment of the present invention;
Figs. 5A-D illustrate alternative embodiments of the brush head design, with Fig.
5D illustrating the toothbrush transducer head assembly according to a preferred embodiment of the present invention incorporating the slug assembly according to Figs.
4E-I;
Fig. 6A illustrates the toothbrush assembly according to a preferred embodiment of the present invention incorporating the flexible bar assembly in a denta-mandibular Page 4 of 30 toothbrush and Figs. 6B-D illustrates a further alternative embodiment of the present invention which utilizes a motor to produce a reciprocating action at the brush head;
Figs. 7A-C illustrate schematic diagrams of different methods for controlling the volume level in a denta-mandibular tooth brush;
Figs. 8A-C illustrate how the denta-mandibular boost switch controls sound pressure in response to force applied to the brush head by employing the flexible joint and boost switch according to one embodiment of the present invention;
Figs. 9A-C illustrates indicia bearing surfaces for toothbrush embodiments of the invention;
Figs. 10A-C are side views of toothbrush embodiments illustrating toothbrush handles including over mold features for the front recess/ switch push-button, and rear landing gear/ finger guard;
Figs. 11A-B illustrate an alternative embodiment of the present invention which allows removable cartridges containing signal source data to be used by the denta-mandibular toothbrush; and Figs. 12A-B illustrate an alternative embodiment of the present invention in which the denta-mandibular toothbrush contains an adaptor capable of uploading and downloading data.
DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERED EMBODIMENTS
The following description is provided to enable those skilled in the art to make and use the described embodiments set forth in the best modes contemplated for carrying out the invention. Various modifications, however, will remain readily apparent to those Page 5 of 30 skilled in the art. Any and all such modifications, equivalents, and alternatives are intended to fall within the spirit and scope of the present invention.
In general, the present described embodiments relate to denta-mandibular sound-transmitting toothbrushes and the like that transmit and/ or conduct sound to the user's ear, while the user is brushing his or her teeth. A toothbrush according to the present described embodiments generate mechanical energy in the bristles of the toothbrush that can be heard when the toothbrush is in use.
In an embodiment, while the user is brushing his or her teeth, the intensity of the sound is proportional to the pressure that the brush applies to the teeth. If too much or too little pressure is applied to the brush by the user, the user will perceive too little or no sound. Thus, the toothbrushes of the described embodiments encourage users to apply a moderate pressure, which facilitates good brushing technique.
One embodiment utilizes a miniature transducer that is capable of driving the toothbrush head with sufficient mechanical energy to be denta-mandibulary perceived by the user while brushing. In order to provide for the efficient production of mechanical energy, the transducer should produce minimal aerial sound. Typically, the toothbrush may produce approximately 95 dB of pressure at the bristles, while only leaking 50 dB of aerial sound.
Fig. 1 illustrates the active components of the denta-mandibular toothbrush of an embodiment of the present invention. The toothbrush includes a battery power source 112 and electrical contacts 110 to connect the battery source and a printed circuit board (PCB) 108. The PCB 108 includes the signal source data for driving the transducer with the desired sounds. Typical of such a signal source is the Winbond W561S15 chip that Page 6 of 30 delivers 4 volts of Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) signal for audio applications. A push-button style switch 106 activates the signal source. The transducer comprises a coil assembly 104 and a metal plate or slug 102. The slug 102 is mounted to the brush head 100 having a platfoim with bristles. The coil assembly 104, when activated by the signal source located on the PCB 108, causes the slug 102 to vibrate, which in turn vibrates the platform and bristles locates on the brush head 100. The coil assembly 104 is typically 32 ohms, and if capable of producing up to 30 mGuass of magnetic field for mechanical deflection or motion. Such a construction allows sufficient mechanical energy to be transmitted through the bristles located on the brush head 100.
As illustrated by Fig. 2, the components of Fig. 1 may be mounted within a housing. A head and neck assembly 202 contains the push-button switch 106, the PCB
204, transducer and brush head 100. The head and neck assembly 202 is connected to the handle 208 via a joint 206. An 0-ring type seal at the joint 206 is used to make the connection waterproof The handle 208 contains a rechargeable battery 210 and a charging coil 212. The handle 208 may be placed into a charging base 214, containing a charging coil 216, and a 115 VAC plug 218. When the toothbrush is mounted in the charging base 214, the rechargeable battery 210 is charged via the charging coils 212 216. Additionally, the head and neck assembly 202 may be replaceable. For example, the head and neck assembly 202 may be replaced when the bristles are worn down, or alternatively in order to change the sounds that are generated by the signal source.
Figs. 3A-F illustrate detailed views of an embodiment of the brush head 100, and particularly the brush head preloading methods according to the described embodiments.
The transducer is mounted integral to the neck 314, and includes a coil 310, a core 308, a Page 7 of 30 back plate 316, and a magnet 306. A wire 312 connects the transducer to the PCB 204. A
transducer plate or "slug" 310 is mounted to the brush head platform 302. The brush head platform 302 contains a plurality of standard toothbrush bristles 300. The brush head platform 302 is attached to the neck 314 via a bellows assembly 304. This bellows assembly 304 correctly spaces the gap between the slug 310 and the coil 310, and also allows the brush head platform 302 to vibrate, while still providing a waterproof seal for the transducer.
Figs. 3B-F illustrate detailed views of the brush head transducer methods according to embodiment for respective self-centering linear coil, spring loading, and tension strap preloading methods facilitating sound transfer via the toothbrush bristles of the toothbrush head assembly 100. In addition to the bellows assembly 304 as illustrated in Fig. 3A, there are several methods of controlling the tension and gap within the transducer. Fig 3B shows the slug 310 of the transducer, weight and spring assemblies.
The bottom view of the assembly of Fig. 3B shows a dome-shaped pressure plate opposite the slug 310 for spring pressure. As shown and described, the transducer is pre-loaded at the bristle plate to ensure that the maximum vibration is sent to the bristles, which has been found to achieve transmission at about 120 grams of loading force to facilitate coupling. The loading mechanism will also permit low frequency vibration = sound production. As illustrated in Figs. 3C-F this may be accomplished by using a flexible means, such as the spring coil or dome spring, a domed rubber cap, or the like such as that found in a keyboard or a strap or the like. In order for the transducer to function properly, the amount of tension should be controlled. The transducer configuration must control the positioning of the slug relative to the electromagnetic coil Page 8 of 30 such that the mechanical energy is efficiently coupled to the user's teeth in a range of between approximately 40 to 100 grams of force. Any less force is ineffective for teeth cleaning, and any more is too great a force. By controlling the pressure applied to maximize the sounds, the denta-mandibular toothbrush can act as an aid for developing proper brushing technique by providing an audible sound when the pressure is in the preferred range.
Various transducer methods may be employed as illustrated in Figs. 4A-I. Figs.

4A-D illustrate several designs to control the tension and slug assembly of the electro-mechanical transducer, showing transducer gap and tension techniques in exploded and assembled views. Figs. 4E-I illustrate the slug assembly according to a preferred embodiment. In Fig. 4A the transducer gap and tension control of slug assembly of the electro-mechanical transducer of item 400 illustrates a torsion bar attached to a base of the coil and to the slug that may be used to accurately control the gap spacing between the coil and the slug. In Fig. 4B the transducer gap and tension control of slug assembly of the electro-mechanical transducer of item 402 illustrates a diaphragm that may be used as shown to accurately control the gap spacing between the coil and the slug.
In Fig. 4C
the transducer gap and tension control of slug assembly of the electro-mechanical transducer of item 404 illustrates a spring (preferably either coated or non-metallic) which can be mounted between the coil and slug. In Fig. 4D the transducer gap and tension control of slug assembly of the electro-mechanical transducer of item illustrates the aforementioned bellows assembly to accurately control the gap spacing between the coil and the slug. In Figs. 4E-I the slug assembly is illustrated showing top, side and bottom views, and a spot weld interface between the slug and the metal film of Page 9 of 30 the slug assembly. The shape of the slug is a cone, where the point of the cone would touch the bristle plate, with the mass of the slug of about 2.5 grams in the present described embodiment.
As described above, the transducer is generally formed using an electromagnetic coil in the neck of the toothbrush, and a slug mounted to a platform of the brush head.
However, the transducer may be formed as illustrated in Figs. 5A-D. Fig. 5A
illustrates that the transducer may be formed using a piezo-electric crystal 504 to generate the mechanical vibration. In construction, the piezo-electric crystal 504 may be sandwiched between the neck 500 and the brush head 501. Fig 5B illustrates the positioning of the coil 510 and the slug 512 may be reversed as compared to the embodiment presented in Fig. 3A, i.e. the slug 512 may be mounted in the neck 506, and the coil 510 in the brush head 507. Alternatively, as illustrated in Fig. 5C, the transducer may be positioned away from the brush as shown. The transducer 520 may be mounted in a handle 516 and in contact with a mechanical lever-pivot configuration 518. As the transducer vibrates, the mechanical energy is transmitted to the brush heard 514 via the pivoting action of the lever 518.
Alternatively, the transducer 520 may further provide its transducer as operatively associated with the signal source to produce vibrations for aerial sound from the signals operatively associated for sound transmission with the transducer to which the transducer can transmit vibrations in the user's mouth, where the sound-transmitting element is positioned adjacent to the transducer so that vibrations transmitted from the signal source to the sound-transmitting element are sufficient to be perceivable by the user as sound when the sound-transmitting element is in contact with the user's non-sound conductive Page 10 of 30 tissue. This facilitates sound production allowing the user to continue to hear sound signals. In Fig. 5D, the transducer has a body with added mass of about 2 to 3 grams.
Fig. 5D illustrates the toothbrush transducer head assembly according to a preferred embodiment incorporating the slug assembly according to Figs. 4E-I above.
In Fig. 5D, the transducer having the body with added mass of about 2 to 3 grams provides low frequency wave production this is perceived by the user as bass.
Bass starting at 250 Hz is best heard while brushing. The transducer includes a ring which holds the diaphragm to the body, with the slug welded to the diaphragm. The assembly magnet, coil and plate generate the magnetic force to deflect the diaphragm, and the body creates inertial mass for low frequency vibration and serves as an armature for the assembly. A PCB on the back provides a means for wire attachment. As described, the head assembly including the transducer is held to the bristle plate by a strap fixed, e.g., by two posts on the bristle plate. The housing back is welded to the bristle plate to ensure a watertight seal. The slug of the transducer is pressed against the back of the bristle plate to transfer vibrations to the bristles and ultimately the user's teeth.
Fig. 6A illustrates the toothbrush assembly according to a preferred embodiment incorporating the flexible bar assembly 602 in the denta-mandibular toothbrush operable with PCB 604. When pressure is applied at the brush head 100 causes the flex bar assembly 602 to bend. PCB 604 supports an underside boost switch 606 with a chip-on-board 608, and On/Off switch 610 being operated from an over molded front recess/
switch push-button 612, discussed further in connection with Figs. 10A-C
concerning over mold front recess and rear landing gear/ finger guard features. The PCB
604 is = positioned for electrical coupling with the battery assembly 614 as illustrated. Figs. 6B-Page 11 of 30 D illustrate a further alternative embodiment that utilizes a motor 620 to produce a reciprocating action at the brush head 100. Fig. 6D illustrates an alternative embodiment wherein in addition to the features previously discussed, the toothbrush includes a motor 610, a gearbox 612, and a grip handle 608 that cooperate to produce a reciprocating action at the brush head 100. Such an embodiment can be used to increase the brushing effectiveness of the denta-mandibular toothbrush. The control chip of the PCB
604 may control the speed, direction, and duration of the motor's 610 operation to further increase the motor's 610 effectiveness. Thus the flexible joint at the flexible bar assembly 602 can be used in conjunction with the boost switch 606. The body and neck are connected by a flex joint, and the boost switch 606 is depressed by an activation via the neck. The boost switch 606 is pinched between the body and neck while pressure is applied to the brush head 100. The boost switch 606, the on/off switch 610, and battery source 614 are inter-connected with the PCB 604. As described, the transducer is mounted behind the bristles. As shown, the hinge in the neck activates the boost switch when the user presses the unit up against their teeth, with the switch 610 in the front and finger rest provided with a soft over mold in the back. A boost switch button may be located on the body and depresses the boost switch 606. The boost switch thus may be provided separately as a = manually activated switch by the user and may also incorporate a soft over mold if desired.
Fig. 6A further illustrates that the flexible bar boost switch construction may provide the flex bar as a molded as part of the neck 1008. A flex bar lock secures the flex bar to the neck of the toothbrush. A flex joint/seal/button is trapped and compressed between the neck and the body of the toothbrush. This serves as a movable joint, button Page 12 of 30 cap, and body seal. The boost switch 606 and the PCB 604 are positioned at the flex bar.
Signals from the PCB 604 are conducted to the transducer via wires. The sound pressure from the transducer is conducted through the seal/transmission plate and through the brush head 100.
By adding the small motor 610 with an eccentric weight 616 it is possible to produce additional low frequency vibration effects for the entertainment of the user. The pattern 618 of these vibrations can be controlled and synchronized and modulated by the music chip on the PCB. The magnitude of these vibrations can be made great enough to also provide cleaning benefits to the user's teeth.
In other embodiments the boost switch may be physically implemented in different ways to accomplish the sound boosting feature. In one embodiment, the boost switch may be implemented using a by-pass switch. Fig. 7A is a schematic diagram of the bypass switch as it relates to other components of the described embodiments. A
limiting resistor, e.g., of 100 ohms, resistor 710 is in series with the transducer 700 and the PCB 702, suppressing the sound pressure produced by the transducer 700. A
bypass switch 708 is placed in parallel with the limiting resistor 710 of 100 ohms.
When the bypass switch 708 is activated it effectively shorts out the limiting resistor 710 of 100 ohms, thereby allowing for maximum sound production. Additionally Fig. 7A
illustrates the connections between the on/off switch 706 and the PCB 702 and the battery source 704 and the PCB 702.
Fig. 7B illustrates another embodiment in which an activation signal is provided by the boost switch 708 to the signal source on the PCB 702. The data from the boost switch 708 can be used to trigger volume levels on the PCB 702, as well as other function Page 13 of 30 such as timers and continuous use detection in order to measure the duration and technique of brushing. Additionally Fig. 7B illustrates the connections between the on/off switch 706 and the PCB 702, the battery source 704 and the PCB 702, and the transducer 700 and the PCB 702.
Fig. 7C illustrates another embodiment where the boost switch is implemented as a force sensor 708 such as an Interlink Electronics Force sensing Resistor FRS
#0004.
This device produces an analog signal proportional to the pressure applied to it. The PCB
702 can measure this pressure signal and respond to the user to indicate if too much pressure or too little pressure is being applied to the brush by the user.
Additionally Fig.
7C illustrates the connections between the on/off switch 706 and the PCB 702, the battery source 704 and the PCB 702, and the transducer 700 and the PCB 702.
Figs. 8A-C illustrate how the denta-mandibular boost switch controls sound in response to force applied to the brush head by employing the flexible joint and boost switch. The figures illustrate the manner in which the boost switch may be activated with respect to handle 800. When no pressure is applied to the user's teeth 806 by the device, as shown in Fig. 8A, a slight sound 804 may be perceived by the user, indicating the signal source is on and operating and the boost switch remains open 802. As shown in Fig. 8B, once contact is made with the user's teeth 806 at 10-20 grams of force, sound 808 is perceived through the denta-mandibular sound transmitting process at a volume, e.g., nearly 20 dB louder. Additionally the force applied is not enough to depress the boost switch 802. As more pressure is applied to the user's teeth 806, as shown in Fig.
8C, the boost switch 810 is depressed. Specifically, the boost switch 810 is depressed when the force applied to the user's teeth 806 is approximately 40 grams. The level of Page 14 of 30 increase in perceived volume is exaggerated by the boost switch 810 to produce a much louder sound 812. The volume increase is nearly 20 dB more than the volume when minimal pressure is applied as in Fig. 8B.
Figs. 9A-C illustrates indicia bearing surfaces for toothbrush embodiments, and Figs. 10A-C are side views of toothbrush embodiments illustrating toothbrush handles including over mold features for the front recess/ switch push-button 1002, and rear landing gear/ finger guard 1004. Decorative artwork may be provided as a label, e.g., Deco Art 900 in Fig. 9B positionable at the toothbrush handle 902, or other indicia or the like may be provided directly at handle 902, neck 904 (Fig. 9A), or at the back portion of the toothbrush head for carrying indicia 906 (Fig. 9C). Figs. 10A-C side views show the toothbrush handles including over mold features at the front recess/ switch push-button 1002, and rear landing gear/ finger guard 1004. The described embodiment of the brush shape allows for a multiple of considerations. The body is triangular to permit comfortable holding by youth arid adult hands. A recessed switch is provided to prevent accidental operation of the switch on the body. Also on the body is a thumb break and finger guard that conforms the user's hand for proper holding. The body length is appropriate for comfortable holding, and the finger guard doubles as a perch so the brush can horizontal postioned. The flat face of the body permits easy decoration, which may contain such information as music artist picture and song name indicia.
Figs. 11A-B illustrate an alternative embodiment that accommodates removable cartridges containing signal source data to be used by the denta-mandibular toothbrush. As illustrated in Figs. 11A-B, the embodiments may include a removable cartridge 1104. In this embodiment, the removable cartridge 1104 may contain the PCB
Page 15 of 30 itself or data to be transferred to the PCB once the removable cartridge 1104 is inserted into the toothbrush 1100, e.g., at bottom handle portion 1102. The removable cartridge 1104 may contain signal source data so that each removable cartridge 1104 contains a unique collection of songs or verbal instructions. The image 1106 on the removable cartridge 1104 indicates to the user the signal source data that is on the removable cartridge 1104. Various embodiments are contemplated in connection with the removable component architecture. To this end, components such as the removable cartridge 1104 may be provided for additional content, media or functionality;
alternately, the neck and brush head assembly of the toothbrush 1100 also may be provided as a modular component. The brush body 1102 in its most basic form may be provided to include simply the batteries and controls, and optionally a motor as discussed herein if desired. With the brush body 1102 including therein only batteries and controls, in its most basic form, a combination other components may be introduced as external modules. The brush body 1102 may include additional components, e.g., including digital memory and/or computer integrated circuit devices as the removable cartridge 1104. The transducer component in the neck and brush head assembly of the toothbrush 1100 also may be provided as a separate removable modular component.
Additionally the computer and memory maybe provided either as separate components or in a single integrated circuit, for instance a speech chip or the like such as a single chip controller for providing a sound and speech processing. The transducer, digital memory and/or computer integrated circuit devices alternately may be provided as part of the neck and brush head assembly of the toothbrush 1100 as a separate external modular component.
Page 16 of 30 Figs. 12A-B illustrates an alternative embodiment in which the denta-mandibular toothbrush contains an adaptor capable of uploading and downloading data.
Herein the toothbrush is provided with an adaptor capable of uploading and downloading data such as an USB adaptor. The adaptor 1208 is connected to the PCB and is located at the bottom of the body 1202. A cap 1206 covers the adaptor 1208 as to give the toothbrush a uniform look and to protect the adaptor 1208 when it is not in use. The adaptor 1208 allows the PCB to download signal source data to be stored onto the PCB
memory.
There is a remote pad 1204 located on the toothbrush body 1202 that allows the user to cycle through the downloaded signal source data to select the sound to be transmitted through the neck and brush head 1200.
While there have been illustrated and described particular embodiments of the present invention, it will be appreciated that numerous changes and modifications will occur to those skilled in the art, and it is intended in the appended claims to cover all those changes and modifications which fall within the true spirit and scope of the present invention.
Page 17 of 30

Claims (46)

1. A device to communicate sound to a user by the transmission of signals through the user's mouth to the user's ear, the device comprising:
a signal source configured to produce signals corresponding to sound, music, or instructional material;
a transducer operatively associated with the signal source to produce vibrations from the signals corresponding to sound, music, or instructional material;
a sound-transmitting element operatively associated with the transducer to which the transducer can transmit vibrations;
a power source associated with the signal source;
a tension controller responsive to pressure applied by the device to the user's mouth and operatively associated with the transducer, the transducer responsive to the tension controller and modulating the vibrations produced thereby in response to the tension controller, the modulation of the vibrations produced by the transducer adjusting the vibrations transmitted by the sound transmitting element, so as to modulate the volume of the sounds perceived by the user based on the pressure applied by the device to the user's mouth;
a housing;
an independent-selective-activity structure, associated with the sound-transmitting element and housing, configured for use in a selectable activity different from denta-mandibular sound transmission;
where the sound-transmitting element can transmit the vibrations to the user's mouth upon contact of the element with the mouth, so that the vibrations travel from the mouth to the user's ear where they can be perceived by the user as sounds; and where the sound-transmitting element is positioned adjacent to the transducer so that vibrations transmitted from the transducer to the sound-transmitting element are sufficient to be perceivable by the user as sound when the sound-transmitting element is in contact with the user's mouth.
2. The device of claim 1, where the independent-selective-activity structure comprises a toothbrush and the selectable activity is practicing good oral hygiene.
3. The device of claim 1, where the signal source comprises a programmable microchip.
4. The device of claim 3, where the programmable microchip comprises an adaptor capable of uploading and downloading data.
5. The device of claim 1, where the sound-transmitting element comprises toothbrush bristles.
6. The device of claim 1, where the transducer comprises an electromagnetic coil assembly and a metal plate.
7. The device of claim 1, where the transducer comprises a piezo-electric crystal.
8. The device of claim 1, where the power source comprises a battery.
9. The device of claim 1, where the power source comprises a series of batteries.
10. The device of claim 1, where the tension controller comprises at least one of a boost switch, a force sensor, a bypass switch, and a limiting resistor.
11. The device of claim 1, where the housing comprises a replaceable head and neck assembly and a handle.
12. The device of claim 11, where the replaceable head and neck assembly comprises the signal source, transducer, and sound-transmitting element.
13. The device of claim 11, where the replaceable head and neck assembly comprises the transducer and sound transmitting element.
14. The device of claim 11, where the handle comprises a motor, gear box, and grip handle to produce a reciprocating action at the toothbrush bristles.
15. A device to communicate sound to a user by the transmission of signals through the user's mouth to the user's ear, the device comprising:
a signal source configured to produce signals corresponding to sound, music, or instructional material;
a transducer operatively associated with the signal source to produce vibrations from the signals corresponding to sound, music, or instructional material;
a sound-transmitting element operatively associated with the transducer to which the transducer can transmit vibrations;
a power source associated with the signal source;
a tension controller responsive to pressure applied by the device to the user's mouth and operatively associated with the transducer, the transducer responsive to the tension controller and modulating the vibrations produced thereby in response to the tension controller, the modulation of the vibrations produced by the transducer adjusting the vibrations transmitted by the sound transmitting element, so as to modulate the volume of the sounds perceived by the user based on the pressure applied by the device to the user's mouth;
a mechanical lever-pivot;
a housing; and an independent-selective-activity structure, associated with the sound-transmitting element and housing, configured for use in a selectable activity different from denta-mandibular sound transmission;
where the sound-transmitting element can transmit the vibrations to the user's mouth upon contact of the element with the mouth, so that the vibrations travel from the mouth to the user's ear where they can be perceived by the user as sounds;
where the mechanical lever-pivot is placed in between the sound-transmitting element and the transducer so as to transmit vibrations from the transducer to the sound-transmitting element to be perceivable by the user as sound when the sound-transmitting element is in contact with the user's mouth.
16. The device of claim 15, where the independent-selective-activity structure comprises a toothbrush and the selectable activity is practicing good oral hygiene.
17. The device of claim 15, where the signal source comprises a programmable microchip.
18. The device of claim 17, where the programmable microchip comprises an adaptor capable of uploading and downloading data.
19. The device of claim 15, where the sound-transmitting element comprises toothbrush bristles.
20. The device of claim 15, where the transducer comprises an electromagnetic coil assembly and a metal plate.
21. The device of claim 15, where the transducer comprises a piezo-electric crystal.
22. The device of claim 15, where the tension controller comprises a torsion bar.
23. The device of claim 15, where the tension controller comprises at least one of a boost switch, a force sensor, a bypass switch, and a limiting resistor.
24. The device of claim 15, where the housing comprises a head and neck assembly and a handle, wherein the head and neck assembly comprises the sound-transmitting element.
25. The device of claim 15, where the housing comprises a head and neck assembly and a handle, wherein the handle contains the power source, source signal, and transducer.
26. A toothbrush device for communicating sound to a user by the transmission of sound signals, the device comprising:
a toothbrush housing comprising a brush head assembly;
a signal source configured to produce signals corresponding to sound, music, or instructional material;
a transducer in the brush head assembly operatively associated with the signal source to produce vibrations from the signals corresponding to sound, music, or instructional material inside the mouth of the user;
a power source associated with the signal source; and a tension controller responsive to pressure applied by the device to the user's mouth, the tension controller comprising a flex joint associated with the transducer, the transducer responsive to the flex joint and modulating the vibrations produced thereby in response to the flex joint, the modulation of the vibrations produced by the transducer adjusting the vibrations transmitted to the user's mouth, so as to modulate the volume of the sounds perceived by the user based on the pressure applied by the device to the user's mouth.
27. The device of claim 26, where the independent-selective-activity structure comprises a toothbrush and the selectable activity is practicing good oral hygiene.
28. The device of claim 26, comprising a sound-transmitting element operatively associated with the transducer to which the transducer can transmit vibrations.
29. The device of claim 28, where the sound-transmitting element can transmit the vibrations in the user's mouth so the sound travels from the mouth to the user's ear, and where a mechanical lever-pivot is placed in between the sound-transmitting element and the transducer so that vibrations transmitted from the transducer to the sound-transmitting element are sufficient to be perceivable by the user as sound when the transducer is in the user's mouth.
30. The device of claim 26, where the signal source comprises a programmable microchip.
31. The device of claim 30, where the programmable microchip comprises an adaptor capable of uploading and downloading data.
32. The device of claim 26, where the tension controller further comprises at least one of a boost switch, a force sensor, a bypass switch, and a limiting resistor.
33. The device of claim 26, where the housing comprises a head and neck assembly and a handle, wherein the handle contains the source signal and tension controller.
34. A method for adjusting the volume of a sound in a device to communicate the sound to a user by the transmission of vibrations through the user's teeth, the method comprises the following operations:
using a tension controller to determine the amount of pressure applied by the device to the user's mouth;
producing vibrations with a transducer; and modulating the vibrations produced by the transducer in response to the tension controller to adjust the volume of the sound perceived by the user based on pressure applied by the device to the user's mouth.
35. A method as described in claim 34, where modulating the vibrations comprises using a torsion bar to control the gap spacing between an electromagnetic coil and a metal plate in the transducer.
36. A method as described in claim 34, where modulating the vibrations comprises using a diaphragm to control the gap spacing between an electromagnetic coil and a plate in the transducer.
37. A method as described in claim 34, where modulating the vibrations comprises using a spring to control the gap spacing between an electromagnetic coil and a plate in the transducer.
38. A method as described in claim 34, where modulating the vibrations comprises using a bellows assembly to control the gap spacing between an electromagnetic coil and a plate in the transducer.
39. A method as described in claim 34, where using a tension controller to determine the amount of pressure applied by the device to the user's mouth comprises using a flex joint located between a head and neck assembly and a handle, in which the flex joint activates a switch as the head and neck assembly applies sufficient pressure to the user's mouth, the transducer modulating the vibrations in response to the switch.
40. A method as described in claim 34, where using a tension controller to determine the amount of pressure applied by the device to the user's mouth comprises using a boost switch that provides an activation signal to a signal source.
41. A method as described in claim 34, where using a tension controller to determine the amount of pressure applied by the device to the user's mouth comprises using a bypass switch and a limiting resistor that provides an activation signal to a signal source.
42. A method as described in claim 34, where using a tension controller to determine the amount of pressure applied by the device to the user's mouth comprises using a force sensor that provides an activation signal to a signal source.
43. A device to communicate sound to a user by the transmission of signals to the user's ear, the device comprising:
a signal source configured to produce signals corresponding to sound, music, or instructional material;
a transducer operatively associated with the signal source to produce vibrations from the signals corresponding to sound, music, or instructional material, a sound-transmitting element operatively associated with the transducer to which the transducer can transmit vibrations in the user's mouth;
a power source associated with the signal source;
a housing;
an independent-selective-activity structure, associated with the sound-transmitting element and housing, configured for use in a selectable activity different from denta-mandibular sound transmission; and a tension controller responsive to pressure applied by the device to the user's mouth, the tension controller associated with the transducer, the transducer responsive to the tension controller and modulating the vibrations produced thereby in response to the tension controller, the modulation of the vibrations produced by the transducer adjusting the vibrations transmitted by the sound transmitting element, so as to modulate the volume of the sounds perceived by the user based on the pressure applied by the device to the user's mouth;
where the sound-transmitting element is positioned adjacent to the transducer so that vibrations transmitted from the transducer to the sound-transmitting element are sufficient to be perceivable by the user as sound when the sound-transmitting element is in contact with the user's non-sound conductive tissue.
44. The device of claim 43, where the sound-transmitting element can transmit the vibrations in the user's mouth so the sound travels from the mouth to the user's ear, and where a mechanical lever-pivot is placed in between the sound-transmitting element and the transducer so that vibrations transmitted from the transducer to the sound-transmitting element are sufficient to be perceivable by the user as sound when the sound-transmitting element is in the user's mouth.
45. The device of claim 43, where the tension controller comprises at least one of a boost switch, a force sensor, a bypass switch, and a limiting resistor.
46. The device of claim 43, where the housing comprises a head and neck assembly and a handle, wherein the handle contains the source signal and tension controller.
CA 2559039 2004-12-08 2005-11-30 Apparatus and method for boosting sound in a denta-mandibular sound-transmitting entertainment toothbrush Active CA2559039C (en)

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US60/652,791 2005-02-14
PCT/US2005/043245 WO2006062778A3 (en) 2004-12-08 2005-11-30 Apparatus and method for boosting sound in a denta-mandibular sound-transmitting entertainment toothbrush

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US8544132B2 (en) 2008-05-07 2013-10-01 John Gatzemeyer Interactive toothbrush and removable audio output module

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US8225449B2 (en) 2005-05-03 2012-07-24 Colgate-Palmolive Company Interactive toothbrush
US8544132B2 (en) 2008-05-07 2013-10-01 John Gatzemeyer Interactive toothbrush and removable audio output module
US8918940B2 (en) 2008-05-07 2014-12-30 Colgate-Palmolive Company Interactive toothbrush and removable audio output module

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WO2006062778A2 (en) 2006-06-15 application
CA2559039A1 (en) 2006-06-15 application
EP1820283A2 (en) 2007-08-22 application
EP1820283A4 (en) 2010-03-03 application
WO2006062778A3 (en) 2007-02-08 application

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