CA2369000C - Fluidic connection system and method - Google Patents

Fluidic connection system and method Download PDF

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Publication number
CA2369000C
CA2369000C CA002369000A CA2369000A CA2369000C CA 2369000 C CA2369000 C CA 2369000C CA 002369000 A CA002369000 A CA 002369000A CA 2369000 A CA2369000 A CA 2369000A CA 2369000 C CA2369000 C CA 2369000C
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Prior art keywords
membrane
tube
extending
sheath
conduit
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CA002369000A
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French (fr)
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CA2369000A1 (en
Inventor
David S. Zamierowski
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KCI Licensing Inc
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KCI Licensing Inc
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Priority to US332,699 priority Critical
Priority to US07/332,699 priority patent/US4969880A/en
Application filed by KCI Licensing Inc filed Critical KCI Licensing Inc
Priority to CA 2049948 priority patent/CA2049948C/en
Publication of CA2369000A1 publication Critical patent/CA2369000A1/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of CA2369000C publication Critical patent/CA2369000C/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
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Abstract

A condom catheter includes a membrane with an inner contact surface, an outer surface, and a pair of cover panels with perimeters and edge strips. The panels are joined together at a seam extending transversely along their edge strips. A tube opening extends between the edge strips and is open at the membrane inner and outer surfaces. A tube means or sheath includes a proximate end extending through the tube opening and terminating at the membrane inner surface and a distal end terminating in spaced relation from the membrane outer surface. Adhesive is applied to the membrane inner contact surface for releasably fastening the membrane on a patient's skin.

Description

i ., 29974-2 FLUIDIC CONNECTION SYSTEM AND METHOD
This application is a divisional of Canadian patent application Serial No. 2,049,948 filed April 3, 1990 in the name of David S. Zamierowski.
Background of the Invention Field of the Invention.
The present invention relates generally to fluidic connection systems, and in particular to systems for draining liquids from and introducing liquids to patients.
Description of the Relevant Art.
Various types of fluidic connection systems have heretofore been devised to meet the requirements of particular applications. In the medical field, fluidic connection systems find many applications, including wound dressings and systems for introducing fluids to and removing fluids from patients.
Wound dressings are typically applied over various types of wounds to promote healing and to reduce the risk of infection. Although various types of dressing materials have been successfully employed, membranes comprising semi-permeable materials are often preferred because they can increase patient comfort and lower the risk of infection.
Semi-permeable membranes generally pass moisture vapors, but are generally impervious to liquids. Thus, they can promote healing by permitting a wound site to "breathe".

1 However, a problem can arise with semi-permeable 2 membranes when they are placed over draining wounds because 3 they tend to retain fluid. For example, surgical wounds 4 often tend to drain for a post-operative period of about forty-eight hours. The fluid that can accumulate under such 6 a semi-permeable membrane during a draining period can 7 macerate the underlying tissue, cause infection and 8 otherwise inhibit healing. A procedure for alleviating this 9 problem involves periodically piercing the membrane, IO draining the accumulated fluids and resealing the membrane 11 opening. However, such a procedure is time-consuming for 12 health care professionals and, unless it is conducted at 13 relatively frequent intervals, can be relatively ineffective 14 in dealing with the problems associated with trapped fluid accumulation. Other procedures which involve opening or 16 changing wound dressings tend to have problems associated 17 with exposing a wound to a greater- risk of infection and can 18 be uncomfortable for patients.
19 Another disadvantage with many previous wound dressings is that they are not designed to accommodate the 21 introduction of various liquid medications, such as 22 antibiotics and growth factor solutions. The application of 23 growth factor solutions may be particularly important in the 24 regeneration of skin graft donor sites.
Catheters are another type of fluidic connection system 26 with medical applications. They are commonly used for 27 withdrawing fluids from or introducing fluids to patients°
28 bodies. For example, urethral catheters are inserted into 29 the bladder through the urethra fo:r withdrawing urine.
Typical applications for urethral catheters include patients who are incontinent or have otherwise lost voluntary control of their bladder functions, e.g. a paraplegic with a spastic bladder condition. However, patients fitted with urethral catheters are often subjected to risks of bladder and urinary tract infections.
To avoid some of these infection risks, condom catheters have been devised which typically include a body for placement over the penis and a bellows-type distal end for resisting kinks and for connection to a drain tube.
However,;condom catheters are susceptible to slippage and can be difficult to maintain in place unless they are taped to the patient's penis. Furthermore, there can be difficulties in effectively draining sudden surges of urine, which often back up and cause leakage problems.
Heretofore there has not been available a fluidic connection system and method with the advantages and features of the present invention.
Summary of the Tnvention According to one aspect the invention provides a condom catheter for attachment to a penis, which includes:
(a) a membrane including: (1) an inner, skin contact surface: (2) an outer surface; (3) a first panel including an edge strip and a perimeter; (4) a second panel including an edge strip and a perimeter; (5) a seam extending transversely across said membrane and comprising said panel edge strips attached together; and (6) a tube opening extendinct throuah said seam between said membrane inner and outer surfaces; (b) adhesive on said membrane inner contact surface; and (c) tube means including a proximate end extending through said tube opening and a distal end, said tube means including a passage extending between and open at said ends.
According to another aspect the invention provides a method of catheterizing a penis, which comprises the steps of: (a) adhering a membrane comprising first and second panels each including a skin contact surface, an outer surface and a perimeter with an edge to the penis; (b) forming a seam, the seam having opposite ends and extending transversely across said membrane by adhesively engaging said panel contact surfaces along strips adjacent to said edges thereof; (c) providing an opening open at said panel edges and at said contact surface between said strips and intermediate said opposite ends of the seam; (d) extending a sheath with a proximate end having an opposed pair of longitudinally-extending slits forming an opposed pair of tabs through said tube opening; (e) positioning a mouth open to a passage of said sheath and formed between said tabs at said seam adjacent to said skin contact surfaces; and (f) placing said tube mouth distal to and approximately in alignment with the meatus of said penis.
Objects and Advantages of the Preferred Embodiments The principle objects and advantages of the present invention include: to provide a wound dressing; to provide such a dressing which promotes the evacuation of drainage fluids; to provide such a dressing which permits the introduction of liquid medications; to provide such a dressing which includes a semi-permeable membrane for releasable, adhesive attachment to the skin surface surrounding a wound; to provide such a dressing which protects against infection; to provide such a dressing which promotes healing; to provide such a dressing which is economical to manufacture, efficient in operation, capable of a long operating life and particularly well adapted for the proposed usage thereof; to provide a wound treatment 5 method; to provide a fluidic connection system and method;
to provide such a connection system and method which are adaptable to various applications; to provide such a connection system and method which can be utilized as a 1 condom catheter; to provide such a connection system and 2 method which are suitable far securing percutaneous tubing;
3 to provide such a connection system which infrequently 4 requires changing; and to provide such a connection system and method which promote patient comfort, reduce risk of 6 infection, are usable with catheters of various 7 configurations and which are easy to apply and use.

8 Other objects and advantages of this invention will 9 become apparent from the following description~taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein are set 11 forth, by way of illustration and example, certain 12 embodiments of this invention.
13 The drawings constitute a part of this specification 14 and include exemplary embodiments of the present invention and illustrate various objects and features thereof.

17 Brief Deacri tion of the Drawings 19 Fig. 1 is a top perspective view of a wound dressing embodying the present invention.
21 Fig. 2 is an enlarged, vertical, cross-sectional view 22 of the dressing taken generally along line 2-2 in Fig. 1.
23 Fig. 3 is a top plan view of the dressing.
24 Fig. 4 is an enlarged, fragmentary, bottom perspective view of the dressing, particularly showing a proximate end 26 of the tube.
27 Fig. 5 is an enlarged, fragmentary, top perspective 28 view of the dressing, particularly showing a tube closure 29 clip.

1 Fig. 6 is an enlarged, fragmentary, vertical, cross-a sectional view of the dressing, parti<:ularly showing the 3 tube connected to a vacuum source.
4 Fig. 7 is an enlarged, fragmentary, vertical, cross sectional view of the dressing, particularly showing a C resealable injection port mounted on a distal end of the '1 tube .
8 Fig. 8 is a top perspective view of a wound dressing 9 comprising a first modified embodimeni~ of the present invention.
11 Fig. 9 is a top plan view of a wo and dressing 12 comprising a second modified embodiment of the present 1:3 invention with an intermediate materi<il layer between the 14 wound site and a cover membrane.
1.5 Fig. 10 is an enlarged, fragmentary, vertical, cross-lfi sectional view of the second modified wound dressing 17 embodiment, taken generally along line 10-10 in Fig. 9.
18 Fig. 11 is a perspective view of a fluidic connection 19 system comprising a third modified embodiment of the present invention, shown in combination with a drain conduit and 2:L fluid connection vessel for use as a condom catheter and 2:Z urine collection system.
23 Fig. 12 is a top plan view of th<= connection system 24 being applied as a condom catheter.
Fig. 13 is an enlarged, vertical,, cross-sectional view 2b of the connection system taken genera:Lly along line 13-13 in 27 Fig. 12.
28 Fig. 14 is an enlarged, fragmentary, vertical, cross-2!3 sectional view of the connection system, particularly showing a funnel end of an inner conduit.

1 Fig. i5 is a top plan view of. the connection system.
2 Fig, 16 is a side elevations)- view of the connection 3 system.

Detailed Description of the Preferred Embodiments 7 I. Introduction and Environment As required, detailed embodiments of the present invention are disclosed hereins however, it is to be 11 understood that the disclosed embodiments are merely 12 exemplary of the invention, which may be embodied in various 13 forms. Therefore, specific structural and functional 14 details disclosed herein are not to be interpreted as limiting, but merely as a basis for the claims and as a 16 representative basis for teaching ~Dne skilled in the art to 17 variously employ the present invention in virtually any 18 appropriately detailed structure.
19 Certain terminology will be u:;ed in the following description for convenience and rei=erence only and will not 21 be limiting. For example, the words "upwardly", 22 "downwardly", "rightwardly" and "lE~ftwardly" will refer to 23 directions in the drawings to which reference is made. The 24 words "inwardly" and "outwardly" will refer to directions ,25 toward and away from, respectively, the geometric center of 26 the structure being referred to. Said terminology will 27 include the words specifically mentioned, derivatives 28 thereof and words of similar import.

1 Referring to the drawings in more detail, the reference 2 numeral 10 generally designates a wound dressing embodying 3 the present invention. The dressing 10 is adapted for 4 protecting and treating a variety of wounds, such as that shown at 12. 6aithout limitation on the generality of the 6 useful applications of the present invention, the dressing 7 10 may be applied over burns, cuts, scrapes and ulcers of 8 various types, e.g. diabetic, decubit.us, peripheral 9 vascular disease, venous stasis and trauma ulcers.
Skin ulcers are a common problem among many diabetics, 11 and are often brought on by poor blood circulation and nerve 12 damage associated with diabetes. The treatment of such 1~ ulcers often involves grafting skin from a relatively 14 healthy donor site to an ulcerous wound site. Split thickness surgical skin graft techniques may be employed to lE~ obtain skin grafts from donor sites that can then heal 1T spontaneously. . Full thickness skin grafts, on the other lE~ hand, generally require closure of they donor site. It will 1u be appreciated from the following description that the wound dressing and treatment method of the present invention is 21 particularly well adapted for the protection and 22 regeneration of skin graft donor sites, by providing a single 23 dressing which facilitates both fluid drainage and growth 24 factor introduction"
The wound site 12 is surrounded by healthy skin 16. A
26 fibrin layer 18 forms at the wound site 12 from fibrinogen 27 by the action of thrombin and the clotting of blood (Figs.
28 2 and 6). Surgical wounds, including those associated with 29~

a skin grafts, normally drain fluid. The fluid drainage from a surgical wound is generally heaviest during a post-operative period of about forty-eight hours.
II. Wound Dressing 10 5 The wound dressing 10 generally comprises a cover membrane 22 with an interior portion 24 surrounded by a perimeter 26. The membrane 22 includes a skin contact surface 28 with an adhesive coating 30. The membrane 22 preferably comprises a breathable semi-permeable material characterized by 10 an ability to pass moisture vapors and an imperviousness to liquids. The adhesive coating 30 should likewise be semi-permeable. Such membrane materials are commercially available, an example being material referred to as "Tagoderm"*~ Which is available from the 3M (Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing) Company of St. Paul, Minnesota. Other semi-permeable materials are available and can be successfully employed with the present invention. A protective backing 23 is placed over the adhesive coating 30 on the membrane skin contact surface 28 until the membrane 22 is ready for application.
The membrane 22 comprises a pair of panels 19 with inner, upturned edges 20 which can be adhesively joined together to form a seam 21 which extends transversely across the membrane 22 and projects generally upwardly therefrom. The panels 19 can be secured together at the seam 21 by the adhesive coating 30 to form the seam 21.
A tube or sheath 34 includes a proximate end 36 located under the membrane 22 and a distal or free end 38. The tube 34 can be inserted through the seam 21 which forms an Trade-mark 20149-602 CA 02369000 2oo2-oi-o~

opening 32 between the panel edge strips 20 at approximately the centre of the membrane 22. A relatively short length o'f the tube 34 adjacent to its proximate end 36 is shown under the membrane 22, but greater lengths of the tube 34 could be placed under the membrane 22. As shown in Fig. 4, the tube proximate end 36 is open, and adjacent to the proximate end 36 an opening is formed. Preferably the tube opening 39 projects downwardly, i.e. away from the membrane skin contact surface 28. The short length of the tube 34 which is located under the membrane 22 can be releaseably secured to the skin contact surface 28 by the adhesive coating 30, preferably with the tube opening 39 facing downwardly.
The tube 34 can comprise, for example; a flexible, plastic tube of the type that is commonly used as a protective sheath for protection of sterility for percutaneous intravenous catheter placement. Such sheaths are commercially available from Aero International, Inc. of Reading, Pennsylvania.
At its distal end 38, the tube 34 is adapted for: 1) closure with a variety of suitable closure devices: 2) connection to various active and passive fluid collection devices for draining and evacuating fluid from the wound site;
and 3) connection to various fluid source devices for actively and passively introducing fluid to the wound site.
Fig. 5 shows s bifurcated clip 240 for releaseably closing and sealing the distal end 238 of tube 134, which is folded upon itself as shown.

1 Fig. 6 shows a vacuum tube end 91 inserted in the tube 2 distal end 381and secured therein by ties or ligatures 43.
3 The vacuum tube 41 fluidically communicates with a suction 4 or vacuum source 42 for actively draining fluid from the wound site. The suction or vacuum source 42 may comprise a 6 relatively simple, hand-actuated bulb or bellows, or it may 7 comprise a more sophisticated motorized pump which can be 8 actuated at predetermined time intervals or in response to 9 wound site conditions such as an accumulation of fluid under the membrane 22.
11 Fig. 7 shows an injection porn 44 sealed to the tube 12 distal end 38 by a band 45. The injection port 44 includes 13 a sleeve 47 which can extend into i:he tube 34 to protect it 14 from needle puncture. The injection port 44 can be of the type which is designed for reuse and which automatically 16 reseals after being punctured by a syringe needle. It will 17 be appreciated that a wide variety of devices can be 18 employed for connecting the tube distal end 38 to various 19 liquid medication sources.
21 III. Treatment He~thod 23 According to the treatment method of the present 24 invention, the protective backing 23 is removed from the ,25 membrane contact surface 28 to expose the adhesive coating 26 30 and the membrane 22 is placed over a wound site 12 with 27 its contact surface 28 down. The membrane perimeter 26 is 28 pressed against the healthy skin 16 surrounding the wound 29 site 12 to preferably form a relatively liquid-tight adhesive bond therebetween. Various adhesive preparations 1 are commercially available for supplementing the bonding 2 action of the adhesive coating 30 in bonding the membrane 3 contact surface 28 to the healthy ski 16, The membranes 22 4 may be provided in various sizes to accomodate wounds of different sizes. A sufficiently large membrane 22 should 6 normally be selected to provide ample overlap of the 7 perimeter 26 over the healthy skin 16 to insure a good band 8 therebetween.
9 The tube distal end opening 39 may be placed directly over the approximate center of the wound site 12, or it may 11 be placed eccentrically or at a depending location with 12 respect to the wound site 12. A dependent or lower position 13 for the opening 39 with respect to the wound site 12 may be 14 preferred to facilitate fluid drainage. The dressing l0 may be applied promptly after a wound is inflicted, e.g.
16 immediately after the graft removal procedure and a skin 17 graft operation. To reduce the risk of infection, it may be 18 advisable to promptly cover the open 'wound site 12. The 19 wound dressing 10 may be kept in a sterile package until it is needed. Such sterile packages and packaging techniques 21 are well known, Far example, ethylene oxide may be used to 22 sterilize the dressing ZO prior to pl;~cement in a suitable 23 sterile package. The protective backing 23 is removed from 24 the membrane 22, thereby exposing its adhesive-coated contact surface 28.
26 With the membrane 22 thus secured, a chamber 46 is 27 formed between the wound site 12 and ithe membrane contact 28 surface 28, and is surround by the meanbrane perimeter 26.
29 The chamber 46, fluidically communicates with the membrane opening 32. In an evacuation mode of operation, such as 1 might be desirable for forty-eight hours or so after removal 2 of a split-thickness skin graft at ai donor site, fluid 20 3 which accummulates in the chamber 4E. is communicated through 4 the opening 32 and thence through the tube 34 far collection and disposal. In a passive evacuation mode of operation, 6 the fluid 20 is evacuated through capillary action, or by 7 gravity with the opening 32 at a deF~endent, lower location 8 in relation to the wound site 12. ~~uch a capillary, passive 9 drainage action may be sufficient for draining the wound site 12 in many situations. Alternatively, an active 11 evacuation mode of operation involves attaching the tube 34 12 to the suction/vacuum source 42 whereby the fluid 20 is 13 positively drawn from the wound site l2~and the chamber 46.
14 Such an active evacuation mode of operation may be preferred when the dressing 10 is used in connection with a 16 hydrophilic colloidal material (hydr~ocolloid), as will be 17 explained in more detail hereinafter.
18 It may be desirable to operate the wound dressing 10 in 19 an introduction mode of operation whereby medications such as antibiotics and growth factor solutions are introduced to 21 the wound site 12. In this mode of operation, the tube 22 distal end 38 is connected to a liquid solution source, 23 which may comprise a syringe or any of various liquid 24 containers for passive, gravity-induced introduction.
Various adaptors, valves and injection needle ports are 26 available for fluidically coupling t:he tube 34 to a wide 27 variety of liquid solution sources. For example, many such 28 connectors and adaptors are available from Aero 1 International, Inc. of Reading, Pennsylvania. Such 2 connecting devices are commonly used in connection with the 3 intravenous introduction of various liquid solutions.
4 In an active introduction mode of operation, solutions 5 may be pumped through the tube 34 ixato the chamber 46 for 6 application to the wound site 12.
7 The evacuation and introduction treatment steps can be 8 timed and sequenced as necessary to achieve the treatment 9 objectives. For example, treatment of a skin graft donor 10 site may involve fluid withdrawal and drainage for about two 11 days immediately following the skin graft operation, 12 followed by treatment steps comprising the introduction of 13 antibiotics andjor growth factor solutions to the wound 14 site. The evacuation and introduction steps can be 15 alternated, and the intervals between such steps can be 16 progressively increased or decreased as necessary to 17 facilitate healing. As the wound heals, progressively 18 smaller amounts of fluid will ooze tiherefrom and the 19 frequency and duration of the drainay a operations can be correspondingly reduced and finally c9iscontinued altogether.
21 It will be appreciated that the wound dressing and 22 treatment method of the present invexition are broadly 23 concerned with introducing fluid to wound sites and 24 evacuating fluid therefrom. The fluid introduction and evacuation procedures described herein can be performed 26 indefinitely without having to change the dressing 10. The 27 tube 34 cooperates with the membrane 22 to permit the same 28 dressing 10 to be used for both proced ores, which may be 2~

1 alternated as often as necessary. Infection risks and 2 patient discomfort can be reduced by minimizing wound 3 dressing changes.
4 The removal of toxins and bao teria from wounds is an important aspect of the fluid drainage phase of the healing 6 process. The wound dressing of the present invention 7 facilitates removal of serum and other secretions to 8 minimize the risk of infecting the wound site and macerating 9 the tissue thereat. Growth factor solutions can be important in promoting healing, and antibiotics can be 11 important in preventing and treating infection. Hence, a 12 comprehensive wound treatment can be implemented with the 13 wound dressing and treatment method of the present 14 invention.
The wound dressing 10 can be employed to irrigate a 15 wound whereby fluid is introduced and then removed.
17 The operation of the wound dressing 10 is largely a 18 matter of fluid mechanics, and the function of the wound 19 dressing 10 would probably be determined by such factors and variables as: 1) fluid viscosity; f.) permeability of the 21 membrane 22; 3) cross-sectional area of the tube 34 and the 22 area of its opening 39; 4) the integrity of the seal around 23 the membrane perimeter 26; 5) the drawing power of the 24 suction or vacuum source 42; 6) coagulation of the serum or .25 other fluid; 7) the area of the fluid collection chamber 46;
26 8) the length of the tube 34; and 9) gravity and the 27 relative positions of various components. Naturally,.
28 varying one or more of these factors or variables could 29 change the operation of the system. It is anticipated that, applying such well-known principles of fluid mechanics, all 1 of the wound dressing components could be properly sized and 2 designed. For example, the tube ope=ning 39 could be 3 enlarged, or multiple openings coulc9 be provided to increase 4 the rate of fluid flow into the tubs 34. The rate of fluid flow can further be increased by locating the tube distal 6 end 38 at a dependent area within the chamber 46, i.e. below 7 the level of most of the wound site 12. The tube 34 can 8 extend downwardly to a collection s~.te below the level of 9 the wound site 12 to facilitate gravity drainage.
It is further anticipated that some fluids will resist 11 drainage because of their viscositie~s or because they tend 12 to coagulate. Drainage of such fluids can be effected by 13 irrigating the wound site 12.

IV. First Modified 8mboc3iment 110 17 Figure 8 shows a wound dressing 110 comprising a 18 first modified embodiment of the present invention wherein a 19 relatively small membrane 122 is provided and functions as a patch for a larger wound cover 115 with an opening 117 for 21 receiving a distal end 138 of a tube 134. The primary wound 22 cover 115 is selected to cover a wound site 112, and is 23 placed thereover in the normal fashion. The wound dressing 24 110 can be placed on the primary wour.~d cover 115 in a location chosen to enhance fluid introduction and/or 26 evacuation. For example, to enhance the evacuation of fluid 27 by gravity, it may be desirable to form the opening 117 at a 28 relatively low position of the wound site 112. Thus, fluid 29 will tend to flow to the tube 134 by .gravity. To facility 3~~ the introduction and distribution of :Fluid, it may be 20149-602 ~ 02369000 2002-O1-07 desirable to locate the wound dressing 110 at a relatively high position on the wound cover 115. In fact, two or more wound dressings 110 could be placed on a single, primary wound cover 115, with a lower wound dressing 110 being provided for fluid evacuation and an upper wound dressing 110 being provided for fluid introduction.
In the practice of the treatment method of the present invention, the wound dressing 110 provides for considerable flexibility in locating the wound dressing 110 in an appropriate location on the wound site 112. After the primary wound cover 115 is positioned, the opening 117 is formed at the chosen location and the wound dressing 110 may be applied, much like a patch, with the tube distal end 138 extending through the primary wound cover opening 117. It will be appreciated that wound dressings 110 may be changed as needed without changing the primary wound cover 115.
V. Second Modified Embodiment 210 A wound dressing 210 comprising a second modified embodiment of the present invention is shown in Figs. 9 arid 10 and includes an intermediate layer of material 250 between a wound site 212 and a cover membrane 222. The intermediate material layer 250 can comprise a variety of materials with varying properties such as: 1) absorbency; 2) wicking or capillary action; and 3) surface contact action. The intermediate material layer is primarily located in a chamber 246 formed between the wound 212 and the membrane 222.

1 As a first example of an intermediate material layer 2 250, several hydrophilic colloid materials (i.e.
3 hydrocolloids) are available which would tend to absorb 4 fluids. For example, Envisan wound cleaning pads and paste are available from Marion Laboratories, Inc. of Kansas City, 6 Missouri and comprises spherical, hydrophilic Heads of 7 Dextranomer, 0.1 to 0.3mm in diameter; polyethylene glycol 8 3000 in the pad; polyethylene glycol 600; and water QS
9 enclosed in a polyamide net bag in the pad or available in a metal foil packet for the paste. The Envisan dextraminer 11 beads function to absorb fluid and facilitate healing by 12 drawing fluid from the wound. Excess fluid can be drained 13 from the intermediate material layer 250 to prolong its 14 effectiveness. Other hydrocolloids are commercially available and may be employed with the wound dressing 210 of 16 the present invention, e.9. dextranimers available under the 17 trademark "Debrisan".
18 Alternatively, the intermediate material layer 250 can 19 comprise a mesh or sheet of synthetic material which is generally nonabsorbent and would tend to wick fluid from the 21 wound site 212 to a tube distal end 238. For example, rayon 22 available under the trademark Owens non-adherent surgical 23 dressing from the Davis & Geck division of American Cyanamid 24 Company of Danbury, Connecticut could be used to form such an intermediate material layer 250, and material available 26 from Marion Pferrell Dow, Inc. of Kansas City, Missouri under 27 the trademark "Envinet" could also be employed. Such 28 materials may be referred to as "surface active°', i.e.
2~9 promoting fibrin sealing on the wound surface. Such materials can also satisfy a capillary purpose whereby fluid 1 is wicked from the wound for collection in the chamber 246 2 and ultimately for drainage. with many such materials, a 3 balance is struck between surface action and capillary 4 action, i.e. one such function is often maximized at the 5 expense of the other. For example, Owens rayon is generally 6 considered to be relatively surface active, but may provide 7 less capillary action than other materials. Envinet mesh, 8 on the other hand, provides greater capillary action, but 9 may provide less surface action as compared to the rayon 10 material.
11 Other materials that can be used for the intermediate 12 material layer 250 include polyurethane foam and 13 polyurethane mesh.
14 The wound dressing 210 can be used according to methods 15 for use with the other wound dressings 10 and 110, and 16 includes the additional step of placing the intermediate 17 material layer 250 over the wound site 212. It will be 18 appreciated that there may be a number of materials suitable 19 for the intermediate layer 254 to achieve various 20 objectives.

21 A closure patch 251 is provided for placement over the 22 tube distal end 238 and is adapted for securing it in a 23 folded configuration to the membrane 222. The closure patch 24 251 can be used in conjunction with a bifurcated clip 240 as shown in Figs. 9 and 10, and permits convenient access to 26 the tube distal end 238 for coupling it to various devices 27 such as those described herein, allowing future reuse of the 28 tube or intermittent function. Alternatively, the tube can 1 be severed at the surface of the meambrane, allowing the 2 closure patch 251 or a similar patch of the same material as 3 the wound dressing 10 to permanentl;Y seal the tube site.

Vy. Third Modified Embodiment 31~

7 A fluitlic connection system 3117 comprising a third 8 modified embodiment of the present invention is shown in 9 Figs. 11-16. Without limitation on the generality of useful applications of the fluitlic connection system 310, it is 1I shown in connection with a urine collection system 312 and 12 functions as a condom catheter. The connection system 310 13 generally includes a membrane assembly 314 and a tube 14 assembly 316.
The membrane assembly 314 includes a membrane 318 with 16 an inner or skin contact surface 320, an peter surface 322, 17 a perimeter 324 and an interior portion 326. As shown in 18 Fig. 11, the membrane 318 comprises first and second panels 19 328, 330.
The panels 328, 330 include inner contact surfaces 329, 21 outer surfaces 331, perimetet-s 333, and edges 335 with edge 22 strips 332 which are joined together in opposing relation to 23 form a seam 334 extending transversely across the membrane 24 318 between opposite sides of its perimeter 324. A tube opening 336 extends through the seam 334 approximately in 26 the middle thereof and is open at the membrane inner and 2~ outer surfaces 320, 322m 28 An adhesive layer 338 substantia:Lly covers the membrane inner surface 320 and releasably secures a two-piece protective backing 340 (e. g. paper, p7!_astic or some other 1 suitable material). The backing 340 can form a transverse 2 seam 342 with a pair of unattached edge strips 344 adapted 3 to be grasped for pulling off the backing 340. The membrane 4 318 of the fluidic connection system 310 can comprise a semi-permeable material.
6 The tube assembly 316 includes an outer tube or sheath 7 346 with proximate and distal ends 348, 350 and a passage 8 347 extending therebetween. The proximate end 348 extends 9 through the tube opening 336 and has a bifurcated configuration with a pair of longitudinally-extending, 11 opposed slits 352 forming an oppoeed pair of tabs 354 each 12 placed against a respective panel contact surface 320 (Fig.
13 11). The tabs 354 can be secured to the respective panel Z4 inner surfaces 320 by the adhesive 338 thereon. However, for many applications of the connecting system 310 it may be 16 preferrable for the tabs 354 not to have adhesive on them.
17 The tabs 354 form a mouth 356 open at the outer tube 18 proximate end 398 and located adjacent to the membrane inner 19 surface 320. The outer tube or sheath 346 can comprise a flexible, collapsible., impervious material.
21 The tube assembly 316 also includes an inner tube or 22 conduit 358 with a proximate end 360 including a funnel 362, 23 a distal end 364, and a conduit bore 366 extending between 24 and open at the conduit ends 360 and 364.
An annular connector/seal band 372 receives the conduit 26 358 and includes enlarged-diameter end flanges 374 with a 27 reduced-diameter, annular channel or waist 376 therebetween.
28 The connector or seal band 372 can be integrally farmed with 29 the conduit and thus permanently fixed in position thereon, or, alternatively, the band 372 can slideably receive the 1 conduit for adjustable repositioning. Preferrably the band 2 372, in either configuration, forms a relatively fluid-tight 3 seal on the conduit 358. The band 372, like the funnel 362, 4 can be slid through the sheath passage 347 for placement proximal to the sheath distal end 350 (Fig. 15). Helt or 6 tie means 378 can be provided for sea:lingly fastening the 7 sheath 346 to the band 372. ~s shown in Fig. 15, the 8 belt/tie means 378 can comprise ligatures 380, which can be 9 wrapped around the sheath 346 for tiglhtening it against the band channel 376. Belt/tie means 378 can comprise other 11 suitable fasteners, such as strips with hook-and-loop 12 fasteners (i.e. fasteners available u~'der the trademark 13 "Velcro"), rubber or elastic bands, plastic coated wire 14 twist ties, etc. Multiple bands 372 can be used for connecting and sealing the sheath 346 and the conduit 358.
16 The conduit distal end can project distally from the 17 sheath distal end 350 (Fig. 15) for connection to tubing 382 1B by a suitable tubing connector, such as the multi-diameter, 19 double male-ended ("Christmas Tree") connector 384 shown in Figs. 11 and 15. The tubing 382 can :Lead to a suitable 21 fluid collection vessel 386, which can be positioned remote 22 from the patient.

24 QII. Applications and O~~eration 26 The fluidic connector 310 can be utilized for a variety 27 of fluidic connection applications without the inner tube or 28 conduit assembly 358. For example, the fluidic connection 2~ system 310 can function as a wound dressing which operates in a manner similar to the wound dressings 10, 110 and 210 1 described above. In such applications the membrane 318 can 2 comprise a semi-permeable, plastic, film adherrent dressing 3 sheet, such as those commercially available under the trade 4 names "Op-Site°', "Tagaderm", and "Bio-Occlusive"" The outer tube or sheath 346 can be utilized as a two-way conduit for 6 draining wound exudate and for introducing liquids to the 7 wound. The liquids introduced could comprise, for example, 8 aqueous solutions for irrigating the wound and growth 9 factors for promoting healing. Epidermal growth factor ("EGF") is available from Vicron. Platelet derived growth 11 factor is available from the Curate~ch Corporation. Such 12 growth factors can accelerate healing and re-13 epithelialization of wound sites. Without limitation on a 14 wide variety of wounds that can be treated with such dressings, they are particularly suitable for partial 16 thickness wounds, such as skin graft donor sites. Drainage 17 and liquid application can be alternated without having to 18 intermittently change the membrane 318. Frequent dressing 19 changes can be painful to skin wound patients and burdensome to health care personnel.
21 As with the previously described application of the 22 wound dressing 110 shown in Fig. 8, the cannection system 23 310 can be applied at any desired location on a larger patch 24 or membrane, and can be used in various multiple "25 combinations, if desired. For example, one connection 26 system 310 can be used for introducing fluids, and another 27 connection system 310 can be used fear draining fluids, with 28 both connection systems 310 operating simultaneously if 29 desired.

1 To promote efficient drainage, the connection system 2 310 can be located at a dependent part of a larger dressing.
3 Alternatively, mechanical suction equipment can be connected 4 for promoting drainage.
5 Another application of the fluidic connection system 6 310 is placement over percutaneous catheters, drain tubes, 7 etc. Such tubes present infection risks where they 8 penetrate the skin surface, and can require frequent 9 application of antibiotics to reduce the risk of infection.
10 Percutaneous tubes are often sutured in place at the stab 11 wound locations where they penetrate the skin, and the 12 sutures are further susceptible to infection and can cause 13 swelling and patient irritation. The connection system 310 14 can be placed over such a percutaneous drain tube or 15 catheter site, with the tubing extending through the sheath 16 346 in the manner of the conduit 358. The tubing can be 17 secured, for example with one or mare bands 372, to protect 18 against traction forces which might otherwise tend to pull 19 the tubing loose. By utilizing a semi-permeable, breathable 20 material for the membrane 318, the skin surrounding a 21 percutanious tubing entry site can be protected against 22 maceation.
23 For use as a condom catheter in .a urine collection 24 system 312, the backing 340 can be removed from the first 25 panel 328, which is then adhesively secured to the ventral 26 side 389 and the lateral sides 391 of a flaccid penis 388 2'7 with the urethra orifice or meatus 39~D directed at the 28 sheath mouth 356 and the sheath tabs :354 placed on the top 2~ and bottom of the glans or penile head 392 (Fig. 13). The 1 second panel 330, with the backing 340 removed, can then be 2 adhered to the penile dorsal side 394 and to the first 3 panel 328.
The procedure described abom=_ provides a relatively secure attachment of the connection system 310 to the penis 6 388, since the penile shaft 396 and the penile head 392 7 provide substantial areas of attachment. The attachment can 8 further be enhanced by prestretch9.ng the flaccid penis to 9 provide maximum contact area.
The connection system 310 described above can be 11 utilized as a complete condom catheter by fluidically 12 connecting the sheath distal end 350 to a suitable urine 13 vessel, for example with a band such as that shown at 45 in 14 Fig. 7. Alternatively, the inner tube or conduit 358 can then be inserted through the sheath passage 347 in its open, 16 distal end 350. The funnel 362 can be placed against the 17 glens 392 over the meatus 390, and can be secured in this 18 position by fastening the sheath 346 to the band 372 with 19 the sheath 346 slightly in tension and the conduit 358 slightly an compression. The funnel 362 can comprise a 21 moldable plastic material, and its end can be rolled or 22 flanged as shown in Fig. 14 far patient comfort. However, 23 in operation the funnel 362 is not required to form a fluid-24 tight seal with the glens 392, and it is anticipated that ~25 the funnel 362 may slip distally away from the glens 392.
26 The funnel 362 cooperates with the connection system 310 to 27 direct a surge of urine into the conduit 358. Urine which 28 escapes the funnel 362 can collect in an interstitial space 29 397 between the sheath 346, the conduit 358, the glens 392 and the band 372. Urine in the interstitial space 397 can 1 drain to the funnel 362 for evacuation through the conduit 2 358. Placement and sizing of the sheath 346, the conduit 3 358 and the band 372 can be adjusted to vary the volume of 4 the interstitial space 397.
The procedure for applying the connection system 310 6 can be varied according to the conditions of particular 7 patients and the preferences of persons applying it.
8 Properly adherred to a patient, the collection system 310 9 should be functional for a relatively long period of time, and a semi-permeable membrane mate vial can be utilized to 11 enhance patient comfort.
12 Other useful applications of the connection system 310 13 include placement over circumferentially injured limbs and 14 phalanges for draining exudates andi~or introducing liguids.
For example, an injured hand could be treated by securing 16 the connection system 310 at the wrist, a forearm could be 17 treated by adhering the fluitlic connection system 310 at 18 the elbow, etc.
1g Yet another application is for accessory connections whereby various fluid devices and connectors could be 21 combined in systems attached to patients for appropriate 22 treatment and diagnostic procedures. Such additional 23 accessories include Jackson-Pratt and Blake suction tubin 24 devices, Y-connectors, sampling ports, "Injectaport"
devices, fluid pumps and various fluid reservoirs. Hand-26 actuated bulbs could be placed in they tubing, and valvin 27 could be placed where it is needed.
28 ~ further application of the fluitlic connection s stem Y
2g 310 would involve placing the membrane 318 over an intermediate material layer 250 as de;5cribed in connection za 1 with the wound dressing 210 compr:Lsing a second modified 2 embodiment of the present invention (Figs. 9 and 10). An 3 inner tube or conduit such as that. shown at 358 could then 4 be extended through the sheath 34E~, secured thereto by a band or bands 372, and the inner tube or conduit distal end 6 364 could be placed beneath the intermediate material layer 7 250 adjacent to the tissue surface at the wound site 212, or 8 the conduit distal end 364 could be embedded within the 9 intermediate material layer 250. The inner tube or conduit 358 could then be used for draining exudate from or 11 introducing fluids to the wound 212.
12 It is to be understood that while certain forms of the 13 present invention have been illustrated and described 14 herein, it is not to be limited to the specific forms or arrangement of parts described and shown.

Claims (7)

1. A condom catheter for attachment to a penis, which includes:
(a) a membrane including:
(1) an inner, skin contact surface;
(2) an outer surface;
(3) a first panel including an edge strip and a perimeter;
(4) a second panel including an edge strip and a perimeter;
(5) a seam extending transversely across said membrane and comprising said panel edge strips attached together; and (6) a tube opening extending through said seam between said membrane inner and outer surfaces;
(b) adhesive on said membrane inner contact surface; and (c) tube means including a proximate end extending through said tube opening and a distal end, said tube means including a passage extending between and open at said ends.
2. The invention of claim 1 wherein said tube means includes:
(a) an opposed pair of longitudinally-extending slits at said proximate end;

(b) an opposed pair of tabs formed between said slits, each said tab being adhered to a respective panel inner contact surface; and (c) a mouth open between said tabs at said tube means proximate end.
3. The invention of claim 2 wherein said tube means includes:
(a) an outer sheath comprising a flexible, collapsible material and having a proximate end and a distal end with a passage extending therebetween;
(b) an inner, tubular conduit extending through said sheath passage and including conduit proximate and distal ends and a conduit bore extending between said conduit ends;
(c) an annular band with enlarged proximate and distal ends and a bore extending between said end, said bore receiving said conduit and a reduced-diameter waist between said ends; and (d) belt means circling said sheath adjacent to the distal end of the sheath and securing said sheath to said band waist.
4. A method of catheterizing a penis, which comprises the steps of:
(a) adhering a membrane comprising first and second panels each including a skin contact surface, an outer surface and a perimeter with an edge to the penis;
(b) forming a seam, the seam having opposite ends and extending transversely across said membrane by adhesively engaging said panel contact surfaces along strips adjacent to said edges thereof;
(c) providing an opening open at said panel edges and at said contact surface between said strips and intermediate said opposite ends of the seam;
(d) extending a sheath with a proximate end having an opposed pair of longitudinally-extending slits forming an opposed pair of tabs through said tube opening;
(e) positioning a mouth open to a passage of said sheath and formed between said tabs at said seam adjacent to said skin contact surfaces; and (f) placing said tube mouth distal to and approximately in alignment with the meatus of said penis.
5. The invention of claim 4, which includes the further steps of:
(a) extending a conduit with proximate and distal ends and a bore extending therebetween through said sheath passage;
(b) placing said conduit proximate end in proximity to and in alignment with said meatus; and (c) fluidically sealing said sheath to said conduit.
6. The invention of claim 4, which includes the further steps of:
(a) adhering said first panel to the ventral side of said penis;

(b) adhering said second panel to the dorsal side of said penis; and (c) adhering said first and second panels to each other.
7. The invention of claim 5, which includes the additional steps of:
(a) providing a funnel on said conduit proximate end; and (b) placing said funnel against the head of said penis in covering relation over said meatus.
CA002369000A 1989-04-03 1990-04-03 Fluidic connection system and method Expired - Lifetime CA2369000C (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US332,699 1989-04-03
US07/332,699 US4969880A (en) 1989-04-03 1989-04-03 Wound dressing and treatment method
CA 2049948 CA2049948C (en) 1989-04-03 1990-04-03 Fluidic connection system and method

Publications (2)

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CA2369000A1 CA2369000A1 (en) 1990-10-18
CA2369000C true CA2369000C (en) 2007-02-06

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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
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US9452248B2 (en) 2003-10-28 2016-09-27 Smith & Nephew Plc Wound cleansing apparatus in-situ

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US7846141B2 (en) 2002-09-03 2010-12-07 Bluesky Medical Group Incorporated Reduced pressure treatment system
GB0224986D0 (en) 2002-10-28 2002-12-04 Smith & Nephew Apparatus
US7128735B2 (en) 2004-01-02 2006-10-31 Richard Scott Weston Reduced pressure wound treatment appliance
US7708724B2 (en) 2004-04-05 2010-05-04 Blue Sky Medical Group Incorporated Reduced pressure wound cupping treatment system
US7776028B2 (en) 2004-04-05 2010-08-17 Bluesky Medical Group Incorporated Adjustable overlay reduced pressure wound treatment system
US7998125B2 (en) 2004-05-21 2011-08-16 Bluesky Medical Group Incorporated Hypobaric chamber treatment system
US8062272B2 (en) 2004-05-21 2011-11-22 Bluesky Medical Group Incorporated Flexible reduced pressure treatment appliance

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9452248B2 (en) 2003-10-28 2016-09-27 Smith & Nephew Plc Wound cleansing apparatus in-situ

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Publication number Publication date
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