CA2351435A1 - Multifocal contact lens with aspheric surface - Google Patents

Multifocal contact lens with aspheric surface Download PDF

Info

Publication number
CA2351435A1
CA2351435A1 CA 2351435 CA2351435A CA2351435A1 CA 2351435 A1 CA2351435 A1 CA 2351435A1 CA 2351435 CA2351435 CA 2351435 CA 2351435 A CA2351435 A CA 2351435A CA 2351435 A1 CA2351435 A1 CA 2351435A1
Authority
CA
Canada
Prior art keywords
contact lens
lens
eccentricity
power
bottom portion
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
CA 2351435
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
William Rovani
L. Lawrence Chapoy
John B.W. Lett
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Wesley-Jessen Inc
Original Assignee
Wesley-Jessen Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US11245498P priority Critical
Priority to US60/112,454 priority
Application filed by Wesley-Jessen Inc filed Critical Wesley-Jessen Inc
Priority to PCT/US1999/029917 priority patent/WO2000036457A1/en
Publication of CA2351435A1 publication Critical patent/CA2351435A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

Links

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G02OPTICS
    • G02CSPECTACLES; SUNGLASSES OR GOGGLES INSOFAR AS THEY HAVE THE SAME FEATURES AS SPECTACLES; CONTACT LENSES
    • G02C7/00Optical parts
    • G02C7/02Lenses; Lens systems ; Methods of designing lenses
    • G02C7/04Contact lenses for the eyes
    • G02C7/041Contact lenses for the eyes bifocal; multifocal
    • G02C7/044Annular configuration, e.g. pupil tuned
    • GPHYSICS
    • G02OPTICS
    • G02CSPECTACLES; SUNGLASSES OR GOGGLES INSOFAR AS THEY HAVE THE SAME FEATURES AS SPECTACLES; CONTACT LENSES
    • G02C7/00Optical parts
    • G02C7/02Lenses; Lens systems ; Methods of designing lenses
    • G02C7/04Contact lenses for the eyes
    • G02C7/041Contact lenses for the eyes bifocal; multifocal
    • G02C7/042Simultaneous type
    • GPHYSICS
    • G02OPTICS
    • G02CSPECTACLES; SUNGLASSES OR GOGGLES INSOFAR AS THEY HAVE THE SAME FEATURES AS SPECTACLES; CONTACT LENSES
    • G02C7/00Optical parts
    • G02C7/02Lenses; Lens systems ; Methods of designing lenses
    • G02C7/04Contact lenses for the eyes
    • G02C7/048Means for stabilising the orientation of lenses in the eye

Abstract

A contact lens (10) is disclosed having a front surface (14) and a back surface (16). The lens (10) contains a continuously varying aspheric surface on one or more of these surfaces.

Description

MULTIFOCAL CONTACT LENS WITH ASPHERIC SURFACE
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
The present invention relates to an improved lens design. More specifically, the present invention relates to an improved multifocal lens using one or more aspheric surfaces for vision correction.
A spherical lens has a front and back surface with each surface having a constant radius of curvature. The focal power of the spherical lens is also constant. As you move along the lens in a radial direction from the center point to the periphery, the optical power of the spherical lens does not change except for smaller order effects due to optical aberration.
An aspheric lens on the other hand has a non-constant radius of curvature on one or both of its front and back surfaces. The focal power of the aspheric lens changes as you move along the radius of the lens. This feature is the basis for a multifocal vision correcting lens.
The degree to which an aspheric lens departs from a spherical lens is measured by the eccentricity parameter e. If e=0, the lens has a spherical surface. If e=1 the lens has a parabolic surface; if a>1 the lens has a hyperbolic surface, and if a<1 the lens has an elliptical surface.
One use of the aspheric lens, particularly a contact lens, is to correct presbyopia (a vision condition associated with age). Over time the presbyopic patient loses visual accommodation (i.e., the ability of the eye to change optical power in order to adjust focus for different viewing distances) such that objects at near or intermediate viewing distances are not seen clearly without the aid of a near power lens. The aspheric lens compensates for presbyopia by providing a range of optical power including that required for far, near, and intermediate viewing distances. Generally, by increasing the eccentricity e, the range of optical power provided by the aspheric lens increases such that the value of a may in principle be adjusted for eariy or advanced presbyopia.
However, there appears to be a maximum eccentricity value which is useful.
With current designs with a values below approximately 0.8, additional near power of up to approximately +1.50 D is possible. This is suitable for early to moderate presbyopia. For moderate to advanced presbyopia +1.50 to +2.50 D (or more) of additional near power are required. However, if the eccentricity a is increased above approximately 0.8 to provide this increased level of additional near power, it is found that the quality of distance vision becomes so compromised as to be unacceptable to most patients.
In U.S. Patent No. 4,704,016, a multifocal contact lens is disclosed.
The major viewing area of the lens is divided into a multiplicity of near and distant vision viewing zones. The wearer is able to simultaneously look through at least two zones of different power. One way of creating the zones is to form a series of concentric rings using a lathe. The annular area of the tens is cut alternately for distant and for near vision correction. The eccentricity of the surface is varied in dependence on the radius but there is no dependence on the equatorial angle cp. Another technique disclosed in the patent is to incorporate segments of material having a different refractive index from that of the body of the lens. The eccentricity of these lenses is also independent of the equatorial angle cp. These lenses do not solve the problem of channeling too much light into the near vision portion of the lens.
U.S. Patent No. 4,898,461 discloses a lens similar to U.S. Patent No.
4,704,016. Like the foregoing disclosure the lens has a plurality of alternating focal power zones. Here, the focal power varies continuously in the radial direction within each zone and in the transition area between each zone. The eccentricity of these lenses is independent of the equatorial angle cp. These lenses also do not solve the problem of channeling too much light into the near vision portion of the lens.
Another contact lens design has been proposed for achieving near and distant vision correction known as the translating design. Translating designs attempt to exploit the fact that when a wearer looks down to read, a contact WO 00/36457 PCfNS99l19917 lens rides up on the wearer's cornea. Translating designs thus attempt to place an optical zone with the distance power over the pupil of the eye when the patient is looking straight ahead and an optical zone with the near power over the pupil when the patient is looking down to read. However, sufficient and reliable translation has not been achieved to make the lens satisfactory in most applications. Also, the comfort of translating designs is often unacceptable to many patients.
There is a need for an improved multifocal lens which eliminates some or all of these problems found in the prior art lens designs.
SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
The present invention provides, according to a first aspect, a contact lens having a front surface, a back surface and an apex. The lens defines a series of adjacent points at a fixed distance from the apex. The series of adjacent points on the lens having a continuously varying power, the series of adjacent points extending across an arc of at least 120°.
According to another aspect of the invention, the contact lens includes a front surface and a track surface. One of the front surface and the back surface is an aspheric surface wherein the eccentricity varies continuously as a function of the angle cp.
According to yet another aspect of the invention, a bottom portion of the lens has an eccentricity that varies continuously as a function of the angle cp and a top portion of the lens has a substantially constant eccentricity as a function of the angle cp.
According to a further aspect of the invention, the lens includes two side portions that have an eccentricity that varies continuously as a function of the angle cp and top and bottom portions that have a substantially constant eccentricity as a function of the angle cp.
The lens of the present invention has several advantages over prior lenses including an enhanced visual acuity at near and distance powers. In addition, the present invention overcomes the add power problem of previous aspheric lenses while retaining the advantages of an aspheric lens, i.e., to provide an intermediate vision capability.
These and other aspects and features of the invention will be further understood when considered in conjunction with the following detailed description of the embodiments of the invention.
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
Figure 1 illustrates a perspective view of an embodiment of the present invention and the cylindrical coordinate system (p, cp, z) used to describe the embodiment;
Figure 2 illustrates an embodiment of the present invention positioned on an eye along with an angular coordinate system used to describe the embodiment.
Figure 3 is a diagram illustrating a ray tracing method used in the calculation of the Add power as a function of half chord diameter;
Figure 4 is a graph showing the Add power as a function of the half chord diameter for em~n for a first embodiment (BC represents base curve;
BVP represents back vertex power; a represents eccentricity; D represents Diopter);
Figure 5 is a graph showing the Add power as a function of the half chord diameter for emax for a first embodiment (BC represents base curve;
BVP represents back vertex power; a represents eccentricity; D represents Diopter);
Figure 6 is a graph showing the angular dependence of eccentricity for first, second and third embodiments of the present invention (e-1 represents the eccentricity in the first embodiment; e-2 represents the eccentricity in the second embodiment; e-3 represents the eccentricity in the third embodiment;
cp represents the equatorial angle); and Figure 7 is a contour map of the aspheric surface according to an embodiment of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS AND THE
PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
The invention has presently found particular application as a lens for vision correction. However, the invention is considered to have far ranging 5 applications and potential adaptations and should not be so limited.
A preferred embodiment of the invention is shown in Figure 1 as a contact lens 10. The lens 10 has an optically transparent body 12 with a front surface 14 and a back surface 16. The back surface 16 is basically concave shaped and is adapted to fit the curvature of the wearer's eye in a conventional manner. The front surface 14 includes an aspheric surface having an eccentricy a that varies continuously as a function of the equatorial angle cp across a portion of the lens.
To describe this eccentricity, reference is made to the cylindrical coordinate system depicted in Figure 1. In Figure 1 the z-axis is also the optical axis of the lens, and the orientation of the lens is such that it is concave in the direction of the positive z-axis. This particular orientation of the lens with respect to the z-axis in Figure 1 is one which is commonly assumed for the programming of computer controlled lathes used in lens manufacture. Although other coordinate systems could be used, the cylindrical coordinate system chosen provides the advantage that standard forms for the conic sections may be used to specify the aspheric profile of the surface in terms of an angle dependent eccentricity variable e.
In the cylindrical coordinate system of Figure 1 the position of an arbitrary point P is specified in terms of the parameters p, cp and z. The parameter p is the radial distance of the point from the z-axis. The parameter cp is the angle between the xz-plane and the plane that contains both the z-axis and the point P. The parameter z is the distance along the z-axis. These parameters may assume the following ranges of values:
-~ s z s Osps 0°scps360°

Accordingly, the parameters p, cp and z can represent any point P on, or in, the lens 10.
For convenience, the origin O of the cylindrical coordinate system coincides with the apex of the front surface of the lens 10, and the z-axis coincides with the optical axis of the lens which can be offset from the geometrical axis. Then if we let:
a = e(cp) = eccentricity as a function of the angle cp 9 = 9(~P) = 1 - e2 J =l (~P) = 1/g = 1/(1-e2) ro = apical radius of the aspheric surface = optical radius for the apical power then for any given value of cp the relationship between p and z may be expressed as follows:
(a) For the case where the front surface is aspheric and the center of the lens 10 has a focal power adapted for distance vision:
p2 = 2roz - jz2 (where 0 < a < 1 and j > 1 }
with p = p(cp, z) _ (2roz - jz2)'~2 and z = (P2/ro)/[1 + (1 -jP2/r 2)~~z~ and (b) For the case where the back surface is aspheric and the center of the lens 10 has focal power adapted for distance vision:
p2 = 2roz - gz2.
with z) _ (2roz - gz2)'~2 P=P(~P
and z = (P2/ra)/[1 + (1 - gP2/r 2}~iz~
As shown, the cp dependence of p (cp, z) in the above equations is determined entirely by the variables j or g which in turn are functions only of e(~P)~
The present invention encompasses embodiments where the center of the lens has a power adapted for near vision or for distance vision. However, for illustration purposes, only the center distance embodiments will be discussed. The present invention also encompasses embodiments that have aspheric surfaces on either the front or back surface, or on both surfaces.

Only the front surface configuration is illustrated in the embodiments discussed below.
Given the relationship between p and z, the following description is directed to three different embodiments, each using a different function e(cp).
As those of ordinarily skill in the art will recognize, other relationships between a and cp come within the scope of the present invention. For example, factors such as the desired additional near power, the centration and movement of the lens on the eye, and patient characteristics such as pupil size may lead to other preferred relationships between e(cp).
For each of the embodiments, it is convenient and conventional to further describe an angular orientation with respect to the lens in terms of a clock face. Figure 2 shows the lens 10 mounted on an eye 18 between the upper eyelid 20 and the lower eyelid 22. Looking at the front surface 14 of the lens 10 the 12 o'clock position is up, the 6 o'clock position is down, and the o'clock and 9 o'clock positions are to the right and left respectively. In order to make the angle cp of Figure 1 consistent with the ophthalmic system for specifying angular orientation with respect to the eye, the positive x-axis is placed at the 3 o'clock position and the positive y-axis is placed at the 12 o'clock position in Figure 2. The positive z-axis is therefore pointing out of the patient's eye (i.e., out of the page) in Figure 2. In contrast to Figure 1 the lens on the eye is now concave in the direction of the negative z-axis.
Fortunately, this difference between the manufacturing system of Figure 1 and the ophthalmic system of Figure 2 is not a source for confusion, since only a change in the sign of z is required to switch from one system to the other.
In the first embodiment, the near correction will be concentrated in the 4 to 8 o'clock region with an eccentricity that is greater than approximately 0.8. The 10 to 2 o'clock region will have distance correction with an eccentricity that is less than approximately 0.8. And, over the entire lens 10, the eccentricity could be on average approximately 0.8. However, other eccentricity values can be implemented on a lens construed in accordance with the present invention.

The eccentricity changes continuously from its maximum value emax at 6 o'clock and its minimum value em;n at 12 o'clock in the first embodiment.
The function of e(cp) is described as follows:
e(cp) = A - Bsin (cp) for cp = 0° to 360°
where the constants A and B are defined by A = (emax '~' emin)/2 and B = (emax - emin)/2 Or emax = e(270°) = A + B and em;n = e(90°) = A - B
A second embodiment of the present invention has a configuration where the function e(cp) remains constant at its minimum value in the top half of the lens (from 9 o'clock to 12 o'clock to 3 o'clock) and the function e(cp) changes continuously (from 3 o'clock to 6 o'clock to 9 o'clock) to a maximum value at 6 o'clock. The second embodiment may offer a slightly better distance vision but slightly worse near vision than the first embodiment. The following equations define the function e(cp) for this embodiment:
e(cp) = A for cp= 0° to 180°
e(cp) = A-Bsin(cp) for cp = 180° to 360°
where the constants A and B are defined by A = em;n and B = emax - emin Or emax = e(270°) = A + B and emin = e(90°) = A
The function e(cp) does not have to be sinusoidal to be cyclical in cp. A
third embodiment has a configuration where the function e(cp) remains constant at its minimum value in a top region (from 10 o'clock to 12 o'clock to 2 o'clock) and remains constant at its maximum value in an inferior region (from 4 o'clock to 8 o'clock). In the nasal and temporal regions function e(cp) changes linearly between a maximum and a minimum level. The following equations describe the function e(cp) for this embodiment:
e(~) = emax -(emax - emin)(~ + 30°)160° for cp = 0° t0 30°
e(~) = emin for cp = 30° to 150°
e(t~) = em;n + (emax - emin)(~p - 150°)/60° for cp = 150°
to 210°
e(c~) = emax for c~ = 210° to 330°
e(cp) = emax - (emax - emin)(~p - 330°)/60° for cp = 330°
to 360°

The three sample functions for e(cp) presented above are expressed in terms of the quantities, emax and e~pin. These quantities are functions of the distance power, the desired near Add power, the base curve, center thickness, and the refractive index of the lens material. To calculate a specific example for illustration purposes, the following baseline values are used:
Base Curve 8.800 mm Center Thickness 0.130 mm Refractive Index 1.412 Apical Back Vertex Power +1.00 D
Target Add for em," +1.25 D at a 1.6 mm half chord diameter Target Add for emax +2.50 D at a 1.6 mm half chord diameter Front Apical Radius 8.6539 mm The 1.6 mm half chord diameter (the distance from the center axis to a point on the surface) corresponds to a 3.2 mm pupil diameter. The front apical radius value is what is needed to provide the chosen apical back vertex power.
The Add power may be found by various methods such as by direct mathematical computation, by graphical construction, by ray tracing, and the like. For example, applying the baseline values above to the aspheric front surface distance center configuration, the Add power as a function of half chord diameter may then be computed by tracing rays for an axial object at infinity as shown in Figure 3. The eccentricity of the front surface is then adjusted until the desired Add power is achieved. For example, emin = 0.7588 provides a +1.25 D Add power at a 1.6 mm half chord diameter. Similarly, emax = 0.8527 provides a +2.50 D Add power at the same 1.6 mm half chord diameter. The Add power profiles found by ray tracing for these values of emaX
and em;n at other half chord diameters are plotted in Figures 4 and 5.
The angular dependence of the functions e(cp) for the three embodiments are illustrated in Figure 6. In Figure 6, all three functions are calculated for the same values of emax and em;", hence, all have the Add power profiles shown in Figure 4 for 12 o'clock and in Figure 5 for 6 o'clock. As stated previously, the appropriate function e(cp) depends on several factors and must be selected based on the particular application. Factors such as ease of manufacture, cost and overall lens performance should be considered. For example, the second embodiment may offer slightly better distance vision but at the cost of slightly worse near vision than the first 5 embodiment. It may be desirable to simplify the angle dependence further for the sake of manufacturing ease or cost. Thus, the result of the sinusoidal function in a{cp) might be approximated by a sinusoidal function in p which is expressed in terms of p",ax and pm~~ instead of emax and em;n~
The aspheric surface resulting from the first functional relationship, 10 e(cp) = A - B sin (cp}, is represented by a contour map in Figure 7. To obtain the contours in the figure, the cross-section of the~aspheric surface is plotted in the XY plane for constant values of z. Note that the variation of p with cp is small and that all of the contours in the figure may appear to be circles.
However, they are not circles. To better illustrate that the contours actually deviate slightly from perfect circles, a few sample values of p are also given.
At z = 0.100 mm it may be seen that p is 1.3066 mm at 12 o'clock and 1.3016 mm at 6 o'clock. Thus, the difference between the maximum and minimum value of p is only 5 microns at this value of z. Near the apex, at z = 0.010 mm, the difference between the maximum and minimum p is only a tenth of a micron, while at z = 0.700 mm the difference is about 100 microns. This value of z corresponds to an aspheric optical zone of roughly 6.6 mm.
Lenses employing the present invention may be made on conventional manufacturing equipment such as a lathe. If a lathing process is used, then the axis of the spindle is most conveniently the Z-axis of the cylindrical coordinate system of Figure 1, and the position of the cutting tool during lathing is given by p(cp, z). During each revolution of the spindle the cutting tool must alternately move closer to and farther from the spindle axis as it cycles through the minimum and maximum p values for the current value of z.
As discussed above for the surface in Figure 7, the magnitude of the excursion of the cutting tool over its range of values during each rotation cycle is only a fraction of a micron near the apex of the surface. At larger z values, the magnitude of the excursion of the cutting tool increases to something on the order of 100 microns or more depending on the size of the aspheric optical zone.
Although specific values for refractive index, base curve, center thickness, back vertex power, and Add power targets are given for the sample lens computation discussed above, the form of the equations and the method of calculation is general and can be applied to other values. One method of manufacturing the present invention is to select an existing sphere or toric fens series and then graft the desired aspheric optical zone onto the front surface. In this approach the main computational task for each member of the lens series will be to calculate the required emax and em~n values which provide the desired Add powers.
It may be desirable to evaluate a range of values for emaX and emir, to investigate the relationship between the calculated power, the measured power, and the clinical power effect. In the above discussion, the calculated apical power is used as a designation for the distance power. However, since the power changes continuously with the aspheric profile, it is possible that the clinical distance power effect is somewhat more plus (or less minus) than the apical power. Also, the designated Add power in the above discussion is based arbitrarily on the calculated Add power at a 1.6 mm half chord diameter. The useful attainable Add power is limited by the degree of asphere-induced image degradation that most wearers will accept.
The lens body 12 can be constructed from material to form a hard, gas permeable, or soft contact lens. While the size of lens may be adjusted to suit a wearer's eye size, the preferred outer diameter is within the range of approximately 8.Omm to 15.5mm. The aspheric surface can be on the front or back surfaces or both. The power can be center distance or near. And, if needed a toric feature may be added to one of the surfaces. In the described preferred embodiments the asphericity is on the front surface, the toric surface, if required, would be on the base curve, and the center of the lens is designed for distance correction with the peripheral part of the optical zone designed for near correction.

WO 00/36457 PCTlUS99/29917 To provide the necessary stabilization to orient the region of maximum Add power at the 6 o'clock position on the eye, any of a number of methods to prevent lens rotation may be used. For example, a conventional prism ballast may be used to achieve rotational stability.
In manufacturing embodiments of the present invention, coordinate systems are chosen by convention, and the system adopted for this discussion is selected primarily because the equations for p(cp,z) can then be written in a very concise form. Since the function e(cp) may be selected such that it is smooth and continuous over the whole surface, machining should not be difficult. Machining of the lenses can be done directly using a fast tool servo system. Suitable machines are provided by Moore and Rank-Pneumo.
Lenses may also be formed by molding starting from masters which are manufactured according to the disclosed mathematical functions to drive the tooling. An alternate mathematical formulation is to use spherical harmonics or other appropriate expansion that provides a series expansion in terms of an amplitude moderated by an angular term. The equipment selected for the fabrication process may require a different coordinate system, but once this is identified it should be relatively straighttorward to perform the necessary transformations between the two systems.
The embodiments described above and shown herein are illustrative and not restrictive. The scope of the invention is indicated by the claims rather than by the foregoing description and attached drawings. The invention may be embodied in other specific forms without departing from the spirit of the invention. For example, linear and non-linear changes in eccentricity come within the scope of the present invention. Changes that come within the scope of the claims are intended to be embraced herein.

Claims (30)

1. A contact lens comprising:
a front surface, a back surface and an apex, the lens defining a series of adjacent points at a fixed distance from the apex, the series of adjacent points on the lens having a continuously varying power, the series of adjacent points extending across an arc of at least 120°.
2. The contact lens of claim 1 wherein the front surface is an aspheric surface.
3. The contact lens of claim 1 wherein the back surface is an aspheric surface.
4. The contact lens of claim 1 wherein the series of adjacent points extend across a bottom portion of the lens.
5. The contact lens of claim 4 wherein a second series of adjacent points at a fixed distance from the apex extend across a top portion of the lens, the second series of adjacent points defining a substantially constant power.
6. The contact lens of claim 5 wherein the second series of adjacent points extend across an arc of 180°.
7. The contact lens of claim 6 wherein the top portion has a minimum power and the bottom portion includes a maximum power.
8. The contact lens of claim 1 wherein the series of adjacent points are on a side portion of the lens.
9. The contact lens of claim 8 wherein the lens includes a plurality of predefined regions, each region having a substantially constant power along an arc of points equal distance from a center of the lens.
10. The contact lens of claim 9 wherein the top portion has a minimum power and the bottom portion includes a maximum power.
11. The contact lens of claim 1 wherein the lens has a geometrical center and an optical center, the optical center being offset from the geometrical center.
12. A contact lens comprising:
a front surface and a back surface, one of the front surface and the back surface being an aspheric surface wherein an eccentricity of the aspheric surface varies continuously as a function of the angle ~.
13. The contact lens of claim 12 wherein the eccentricity varies according to the following equation:
e(~) = A - B sin (~) for ~ = 0° to 360°
where the constants A and B are defined by A = (e max + e min)/2 and B = (e max - e min)/2 e max = e(270°) = A + B and e min = e(90°) = A - B
14. The contact lens of claim 13 wherein the aspheric surface is the front surface.
15. The contact lens of claim 14 wherein the aspheric surface is the back surface.
16. A contact lens comprising:
a top portion and a bottom portion, the top portion having a constant eccentricity as a function of the angle ~, the bottom portion having an eccentricity that varies continuously as a function of the angle ~.
17. The contact lens of claim 16 wherein the top portion has an eccentricity to provide a distance correction power and the bottom portion has an eccentricity to provide, in part, a near correction power.
18. The contact lens of claim 17 wherein the near correction power has a maximum correction power where the angle ~ is in the range 225°-315°.
19. The contact lens of claim 18 wherein the near correction power has a maximum correction power where the angle ~ is 270°.
20. The contact lens of claim 19 wherein the eccentricity of the bottom portion varies by the function:
e(~) = A - B sin (~) for ~ = 180° to 360°
where the constants A and B are defined by A = e min and B = e max - e min e max = e(270°) = A + B and e min = e(90°) = A
21. The contact lens of claim 20 wherein the top portion and the bottom portion are on a back surface.
22. The contact lens of claim 21 wherein the top portion and bottom portion are on a front surface.
23. The contact lens of claim 22 wherein the lens includes a ballast.
24. A contact lens comprising:
a top portion and a bottom portion, and two opposite side portions, the top portion having a first eccentricity along a selected arc, the bottom portion having a second eccentricity different from the first eccentricity along the selected arc and the side portions having an eccentricity that that varies continuously as a function of the angle ~ along the selected arc.
25. The contact lens of claim 24 wherein the top portion has an eccentricity that provides a distance correction power and the bottom portion has an eccentricity that provides a near correction power.
26. The contact lens of claim 25 wherein the first side portion is found at ~ = 150° to 210° and the second side portion is found at ~ = 330° to 360° and 0° to 30°.
27. The contact lens of claim 26 wherein the eccentricity of the side portions varies according to the following equations:
e(~) = e max - (e max - e min)(~ + 30°)/60° for ~ = 0° to 30°
e(~) = e min + (e max - e min)(~ - 150°)/60° for ~ = 150°
to 210°
e(~) = e max - (e max - e min)(~ - 330°)/60° for ~ = 330°
to 360°
28. The contact lens of claim 27 wherein the top portion and the bottom portion are on a front surface.
29. The contact lens of claim 28 wherein the lens includes a prism ballast.
30. A contact lens comprising:
a front surface and a back surface, one of the front surface and the back surface being an aspheric surface wherein an eccentricity of the aspheric surface varies continuously as a function of the angle ~, wherein a near correction power is located between 30°-150° and a distance correction power is located between 210°-330°.
CA 2351435 1998-12-16 1999-12-15 Multifocal contact lens with aspheric surface Abandoned CA2351435A1 (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11245498P true 1998-12-16 1998-12-16
US60/112,454 1998-12-16
PCT/US1999/029917 WO2000036457A1 (en) 1998-12-16 1999-12-15 Multifocal contact lens with aspheric surface

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
CA2351435A1 true CA2351435A1 (en) 2000-06-22

Family

ID=22343990

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
CA 2351435 Abandoned CA2351435A1 (en) 1998-12-16 1999-12-15 Multifocal contact lens with aspheric surface

Country Status (7)

Country Link
US (1) US6808262B2 (en)
EP (1) EP1147448A4 (en)
JP (1) JP2002532751A (en)
AU (1) AU2365300A (en)
CA (1) CA2351435A1 (en)
NO (1) NO20012383L (en)
WO (1) WO2000036457A1 (en)

Families Citing this family (120)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5782396A (en) 1995-08-28 1998-07-21 United States Surgical Corporation Surgical stapler
US5865361A (en) 1997-09-23 1999-02-02 United States Surgical Corporation Surgical stapling apparatus
US6773107B2 (en) * 2000-08-17 2004-08-10 Novartis Ag Soft translating contact lens for presbyopia
CA2421948C (en) 2000-09-12 2009-12-22 Anamed, Inc. System for packaging and handling an implant and method of use
US8668735B2 (en) 2000-09-12 2014-03-11 Revision Optics, Inc. Corneal implant storage and delivery devices
US6520638B1 (en) * 2001-08-14 2003-02-18 Johnson & Johnson Vision Care, Inc. Methods for designing multifocal ophthalmic lenses
US7574947B2 (en) * 2002-05-29 2009-08-18 Massachusetts Institute Of Technology Rotary fast tool servo system and methods
US7275468B2 (en) * 2002-05-29 2007-10-02 Massachusetts Institute Of Technology Rotary fast tool servo system and methods
US7765905B2 (en) * 2002-05-29 2010-08-03 Massachusetts Institute Of Technology Magnetic micropositioner and method of providing the same
US7437980B2 (en) * 2002-05-29 2008-10-21 Massachusetts Institute Of Technology Flux-biased electromagnetic fast tool servo systems and methods
ES2380101T3 (en) 2002-10-04 2012-05-08 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Instrument set for a surgical stapling device.
EP1545334B1 (en) 2002-10-04 2006-12-13 Tyco Healthcare Group LP Surgical stapler with universal articulation and tissue pre-clamp
US9138226B2 (en) 2005-03-30 2015-09-22 Covidien Lp Cartridge assembly for a surgical stapling device
US7617961B2 (en) * 2002-10-04 2009-11-17 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Tool assembly for surgical stapling device
US7494039B2 (en) * 2003-06-17 2009-02-24 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Surgical stapling device
US7159750B2 (en) * 2003-06-17 2007-01-09 Tyco Healtcare Group Lp Surgical stapling device
US7101042B2 (en) 2003-08-12 2006-09-05 S.I.B. Investments Llc Multifocal contact lens
US6929366B2 (en) 2003-08-12 2005-08-16 S.I.B. Invesrements Llc Multifocal contact lens
WO2005020792A2 (en) * 2003-08-21 2005-03-10 Revision Optics, Inc. Method for keratophakia surgery
WO2005043266A2 (en) * 2003-10-31 2005-05-12 Massachusetts Institute Of Technology Variable reluctance fast positioning system and methods
US7776086B2 (en) * 2004-04-30 2010-08-17 Revision Optics, Inc. Aspherical corneal implant
EP1719468A1 (en) * 2004-12-17 2006-11-08 Zimmer GmbH Intervertebral stabilization system
US7780055B2 (en) * 2005-04-06 2010-08-24 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Loading unit having drive assembly locking mechanism
CA2563147C (en) 2005-10-14 2014-09-23 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Surgical stapling device
US7296890B2 (en) * 2005-10-25 2007-11-20 Truform Optics Contact lens with controlled shape
US9539143B2 (en) 2008-04-04 2017-01-10 Revision Optics, Inc. Methods of correcting vision
US8057541B2 (en) 2006-02-24 2011-11-15 Revision Optics, Inc. Method of using small diameter intracorneal inlays to treat visual impairment
US7322695B2 (en) * 2006-03-27 2008-01-29 Johnson & Johnson Vision Care, Inc. Multifocal contact lenses
US8708210B2 (en) 2006-10-05 2014-04-29 Covidien Lp Method and force-limiting handle mechanism for a surgical instrument
US8608043B2 (en) 2006-10-06 2013-12-17 Covidien Lp Surgical instrument having a multi-layered drive beam
US7866525B2 (en) * 2006-10-06 2011-01-11 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Surgical instrument having a plastic surface
US8162953B2 (en) 2007-03-28 2012-04-24 Revision Optics, Inc. Insertion system for corneal implants
US9271828B2 (en) 2007-03-28 2016-03-01 Revision Optics, Inc. Corneal implant retaining devices and methods of use
US9549848B2 (en) 2007-03-28 2017-01-24 Revision Optics, Inc. Corneal implant inserters and methods of use
US20080297721A1 (en) * 2007-05-29 2008-12-04 Amitava Gupta Lens designs for treating asthenopia caused by visual defects
US8747466B2 (en) * 2007-08-27 2014-06-10 Amo Groningen, B.V. Intraocular lens having extended depth of focus
US20090062911A1 (en) * 2007-08-27 2009-03-05 Amo Groningen Bv Multizonal lens with extended depth of focus
US8974526B2 (en) 2007-08-27 2015-03-10 Amo Groningen B.V. Multizonal lens with extended depth of focus
US8740978B2 (en) * 2007-08-27 2014-06-03 Amo Regional Holdings Intraocular lens having extended depth of focus
US9216080B2 (en) 2007-08-27 2015-12-22 Amo Groningen B.V. Toric lens with decreased sensitivity to cylinder power and rotation and method of using the same
US8061576B2 (en) 2007-08-31 2011-11-22 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Surgical instrument
US7954685B2 (en) 2007-11-06 2011-06-07 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Articulation and firing force mechanisms
US7862176B2 (en) * 2007-11-24 2011-01-04 Truform Optics Method of fitting rigid gas-permeable contact lenses from high resolution imaging
WO2009101202A1 (en) 2008-02-15 2009-08-20 Amo Regional Holdings System, ophthalmic lens, and method for extending depth of focus
US7780290B2 (en) 2008-02-21 2010-08-24 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Toric intraocular lens with spatially-variant astigmatism
US8439498B2 (en) 2008-02-21 2013-05-14 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Toric intraocular lens with modified power characteristics
US7753521B2 (en) * 2008-03-31 2010-07-13 Johnson & Johnson Vision Care, Inc. Lenses for the correction of presbyopia and methods of designing the lenses
JP2011516180A (en) 2008-04-04 2011-05-26 レヴィジオン・オプティックス・インコーポレーテッド Corneal inlay design and method for correcting vision
US8231219B2 (en) * 2008-04-24 2012-07-31 Amo Groningen B.V. Diffractive lens exhibiting enhanced optical performance
US7871162B2 (en) * 2008-04-24 2011-01-18 Amo Groningen B.V. Diffractive multifocal lens having radially varying light distribution
US7789283B2 (en) 2008-06-06 2010-09-07 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Knife/firing rod connection for surgical instrument
US8701959B2 (en) 2008-06-06 2014-04-22 Covidien Lp Mechanically pivoting cartridge channel for surgical instrument
US7942303B2 (en) 2008-06-06 2011-05-17 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Knife lockout mechanisms for surgical instrument
US7896214B2 (en) 2008-09-23 2011-03-01 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Tissue stop for surgical instrument
US7988028B2 (en) 2008-09-23 2011-08-02 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Surgical instrument having an asymmetric dynamic clamping member
US8215532B2 (en) 2008-09-23 2012-07-10 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Tissue stop for surgical instrument
US8628544B2 (en) 2008-09-23 2014-01-14 Covidien Lp Knife bar for surgical instrument
US8292154B2 (en) 2009-04-16 2012-10-23 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Surgical apparatus for applying tissue fasteners
US8127976B2 (en) 2009-05-08 2012-03-06 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Stapler cartridge and channel interlock
US8132706B2 (en) 2009-06-05 2012-03-13 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Surgical stapling apparatus having articulation mechanism
US8342378B2 (en) 2009-08-17 2013-01-01 Covidien Lp One handed stapler
US8418907B2 (en) 2009-11-05 2013-04-16 Covidien Lp Surgical stapler having cartridge with adjustable cam mechanism
US8894204B2 (en) 2010-12-17 2014-11-25 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Ophthalmic lens, systems and methods having at least one rotationally asymmetric diffractive structure
WO2011075651A1 (en) 2009-12-18 2011-06-23 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Limited echelette lens, systems and methods
US9931200B2 (en) 2010-12-17 2018-04-03 Amo Groningen B.V. Ophthalmic devices, systems, and methods for optimizing peripheral vision
US8256896B2 (en) 2010-02-25 2012-09-04 Abbott Medical Optic Inc. Toric optic for ophthalmic use
US8348127B2 (en) 2010-04-07 2013-01-08 Covidien Lp Surgical fastener applying apparatus
US8862447B2 (en) 2010-04-30 2014-10-14 Amo Groningen B.V. Apparatus, system and method for predictive modeling to design, evaluate and optimize ophthalmic lenses
US8469948B2 (en) 2010-08-23 2013-06-25 Revision Optics, Inc. Methods and devices for forming corneal channels
WO2012037154A2 (en) 2010-09-13 2012-03-22 The Regents Of The University Of Colorado, A Body Corporate Extended depth of field optics with variable pupil diameter
US8899461B2 (en) 2010-10-01 2014-12-02 Covidien Lp Tissue stop for surgical instrument
US8308041B2 (en) 2010-11-10 2012-11-13 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Staple formed over the wire wound closure procedure
US9271728B2 (en) 2011-06-09 2016-03-01 Covidien Lp Surgical fastener applying apparatus
US9451959B2 (en) 2011-06-09 2016-09-27 Covidien Lp Surgical fastener applying apparatus
US9289209B2 (en) 2011-06-09 2016-03-22 Covidien Lp Surgical fastener applying apparatus
US8763876B2 (en) 2011-06-30 2014-07-01 Covidien Lp Surgical instrument and cartridge for use therewith
US20130012958A1 (en) 2011-07-08 2013-01-10 Stanislaw Marczyk Surgical Device with Articulation and Wrist Rotation
US9724095B2 (en) 2011-08-08 2017-08-08 Covidien Lp Surgical fastener applying apparatus
US9539007B2 (en) 2011-08-08 2017-01-10 Covidien Lp Surgical fastener applying aparatus
US9155537B2 (en) 2011-08-08 2015-10-13 Covidien Lp Surgical fastener applying apparatus
JP5944005B2 (en) 2011-10-21 2016-07-05 リヴィジョン・オプティックス・インコーポレーテッド Corneal graft storage and delivery device
US9016539B2 (en) 2011-10-25 2015-04-28 Covidien Lp Multi-use loading unit
US8740036B2 (en) 2011-12-01 2014-06-03 Covidien Lp Surgical instrument with actuator spring arm
US10299815B2 (en) 2012-01-19 2019-05-28 Covidien Lp Surgical instrument with clam releases mechanism
US8864010B2 (en) 2012-01-20 2014-10-21 Covidien Lp Curved guide member for articulating instruments
US8979827B2 (en) 2012-03-14 2015-03-17 Covidien Lp Surgical instrument with articulation mechanism
TWI588560B (en) 2012-04-05 2017-06-21 布萊恩荷登視覺協會 Lenses, devices, methods and systems for refractive error
EP2908773A4 (en) 2012-10-17 2016-07-27 Holden Brien Vision Inst Lenses, devices, methods and systems for refractive error
US9201250B2 (en) 2012-10-17 2015-12-01 Brien Holden Vision Institute Lenses, devices, methods and systems for refractive error
US9526497B2 (en) 2012-05-07 2016-12-27 Covidien Lp Surgical instrument with articulation mechanism
US9232944B2 (en) 2012-06-29 2016-01-12 Covidien Lp Surgical instrument and bushing
US9364217B2 (en) 2012-10-16 2016-06-14 Covidien Lp In-situ loaded stapler
US9345480B2 (en) 2013-01-18 2016-05-24 Covidien Lp Surgical instrument and cartridge members for use therewith
US9561098B2 (en) 2013-03-11 2017-02-07 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Intraocular lens that matches an image surface to a retinal shape, and method of designing same
US9668728B2 (en) 2013-03-13 2017-06-06 Covidien Lp Surgical stapling apparatus
US9814463B2 (en) 2013-03-13 2017-11-14 Covidien Lp Surgical stapling apparatus
US9629628B2 (en) 2013-03-13 2017-04-25 Covidien Lp Surgical stapling apparatus
US9717498B2 (en) 2013-03-13 2017-08-01 Covidien Lp Surgical stapling apparatus
US9445810B2 (en) 2013-06-12 2016-09-20 Covidien Lp Stapling device with grasping jaw mechanism
US9662108B2 (en) 2013-08-30 2017-05-30 Covidien Lp Surgical stapling apparatus
US9867613B2 (en) 2013-12-19 2018-01-16 Covidien Lp Surgical staples and end effectors for deploying the same
US9848874B2 (en) 2014-02-14 2017-12-26 Covidien Lp Small diameter endoscopic stapler
AU2015228543A1 (en) 2014-03-10 2016-09-29 Amo Groningen B.V. Enhanced toric lens that improves overall vision where there is a local loss of retinal function
US9757126B2 (en) 2014-03-31 2017-09-12 Covidien Lp Surgical stapling apparatus with firing lockout mechanism
US9668733B2 (en) 2014-04-21 2017-06-06 Covidien Lp Stapling device with features to prevent inadvertent firing of staples
CN106714731B (en) 2014-04-21 2019-09-27 阿莫格罗宁根私营有限公司 Improve Ophthalmoligic instrument, the system and method for peripheral vision
US9861366B2 (en) 2014-05-06 2018-01-09 Covidien Lp Ejecting assembly for a surgical stapler
US10039545B2 (en) 2015-02-23 2018-08-07 Covidien Lp Double fire stapling
US10085749B2 (en) 2015-02-26 2018-10-02 Covidien Lp Surgical apparatus with conductor strain relief
US10285698B2 (en) 2015-02-26 2019-05-14 Covidien Lp Surgical apparatus
US9918717B2 (en) 2015-03-18 2018-03-20 Covidien Lp Pivot mechanism for surgical device
US10299789B2 (en) 2015-05-05 2019-05-28 Covidie LP Adapter assembly for surgical stapling devices
US10117650B2 (en) 2015-05-05 2018-11-06 Covidien Lp Adapter assembly and loading units for surgical stapling devices
US10039532B2 (en) 2015-05-06 2018-08-07 Covidien Lp Surgical instrument with articulation assembly
US9987012B2 (en) 2015-07-21 2018-06-05 Covidien Lp Small diameter cartridge design for a surgical stapling instrument
US10064622B2 (en) 2015-07-29 2018-09-04 Covidien Lp Surgical stapling loading unit with stroke counter and lockout
US10045782B2 (en) 2015-07-30 2018-08-14 Covidien Lp Surgical stapling loading unit with stroke counter and lockout
US10213204B2 (en) 2015-10-02 2019-02-26 Covidien Lp Micro surgical instrument and loading unit for use therewith
US10426601B2 (en) 2016-02-09 2019-10-01 Amo Groningen B.V. Progressive power intraocular lens, and methods of use and manufacture
US9933633B1 (en) 2016-11-08 2018-04-03 Paul Douglas Becherer Bifocal contact lenses providing reduced glare and blurriness in dim lighting

Family Cites Families (188)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
USRE25286E (en) 1962-11-13 Bifocal corneal contact lens
US1955047A (en) * 1931-12-03 1934-04-17 Howard D Beach Spectacle lens
US2405989A (en) 1941-08-12 1946-08-20 Beach Lens Corp Lens
BE533468A (en) * 1953-11-25
US3004470A (en) 1956-07-28 1961-10-17 Zeiss Ikon A G Stuttgart Multiple focal length lens
US3037425A (en) * 1957-04-09 1962-06-05 Carle John Trevor De Bifocal corneal contact lens
US3031927A (en) * 1958-03-03 1962-05-01 Plastic Contact Lens Company Bifocal corneal contact lens
US3034403A (en) * 1959-04-03 1962-05-15 Neefe Hamilton Res Company Contact lens of apparent variable light absorption
DE1158281B (en) 1961-08-03 1963-11-28 Wilhelm Peter Soehnges Cornealkontaktlinse
US4153349A (en) * 1961-12-27 1979-05-08 Npd Technologies, Inc. Soft contact lens with thin edge
US3298771A (en) * 1963-04-24 1967-01-17 Jetru Inc Stepped zone lenses for wide-angle oculars
US3279878A (en) 1964-04-20 1966-10-18 Plastic Contact Lens Company Bi-focal corneal contact lens
US3482906A (en) 1965-10-04 1969-12-09 David Volk Aspheric corneal contact lens series
US3472581A (en) 1966-09-26 1969-10-14 Leonard Bronstein Fused multifocal corneal contact lenses
USRE29229E (en) * 1967-11-20 1977-05-24 E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And Company Contact lens having an index of refraction approximating that of human tears
US3614218A (en) 1969-07-09 1971-10-19 Leonard Bronstein Fused eccentric trifocal corneal contact lens
US3623800A (en) 1969-10-16 1971-11-30 David Volk Ophthalmic lens of changing power
US3662040A (en) * 1970-01-08 1972-05-09 Uroptics International Inc Technique for lathe grinding multifocal contact lenses
US4310283A (en) * 1970-01-23 1982-01-12 LeRoy LaSalle Method for handling pipe
US3726587A (en) * 1971-03-09 1973-04-10 C Kendall Bifocal corneal contact lens and method of making same
US3711191A (en) * 1971-09-16 1973-01-16 L Tagnon Aberration corrected ophthalmic progressive power lenses
US4055378A (en) 1971-12-31 1977-10-25 Agfa-Gevaert Aktiengesellschaft Silicone contact lens with hydrophilic surface treatment
US3937566A (en) * 1972-03-06 1976-02-10 Wesley-Jessen Inc. Process for producing contact lenses
US3751138A (en) * 1972-03-16 1973-08-07 Humphrey Res Ass Variable anamorphic lens and method for constructing lens
US3794414A (en) * 1972-05-12 1974-02-26 Jessen Inc Wesley Multiple focal contact lens
US3950082A (en) * 1973-01-10 1976-04-13 David Volk Ophthalmic lens for presbyopia and aphakia
US3866249A (en) * 1974-03-07 1975-02-18 Leonard Flom Posterior chamber artificial intraocular lens
US4010496A (en) * 1975-10-01 1977-03-08 Neefe Charles W Bifocal lens which positions within the anterior chamber
US4073579A (en) * 1976-06-09 1978-02-14 American Optical Corporation Ophthalmic lens with locally variable index of refraction and method of making same
US4262370A (en) * 1976-08-04 1981-04-21 Bausch & Lomb Incorporated Sutureless intraocular lens
US4302081A (en) 1977-04-22 1981-11-24 Tsuetaki George F Fused bifocal contact lens
US4340283A (en) 1978-12-18 1982-07-20 Cohen Allen L Phase shift multifocal zone plate
US4210391A (en) 1977-09-14 1980-07-01 Cohen Allen L Multifocal zone plate
US4338005A (en) 1978-12-18 1982-07-06 Cohen Allen L Multifocal phase place
US4162122A (en) 1977-09-14 1979-07-24 Cohen Allen L Zonal bifocal contact lens
US4195919A (en) * 1977-10-31 1980-04-01 Shelton William A Contact lens with reduced spherical aberration for aphakic eyes
US4525043A (en) * 1977-11-11 1985-06-25 Leonard Bronstein Contact lens
US4199231A (en) * 1978-08-21 1980-04-22 Evans Carl H Hydrogel contact lens
US4274717A (en) * 1979-05-18 1981-06-23 Younger Manufacturing Company Ophthalmic progressive power lens and method of making same
US4418991A (en) 1979-09-24 1983-12-06 Breger Joseph L Presbyopic contact lens
US4324461A (en) * 1979-11-26 1982-04-13 Salvatori Ophthalmics, Inc. Contact lens for non-rotational orientation
FR2486666B1 (en) 1980-07-09 1983-07-22 Essilor Int
GB2086605A (en) 1980-11-03 1982-05-12 Breger Joseph Laurance Improved bivision contact lens for the treatment of presbyopia
DE3265356D1 (en) * 1981-04-29 1985-09-19 Pilkington Perkin Elmer Ltd Artificial eye lenses
JPS645682B2 (en) * 1981-06-19 1989-01-31 Hoya Corp
US4450593A (en) * 1981-11-09 1984-05-29 Lynell Medical Technology Inc. Intraocular and contact lens construction
US4573998A (en) * 1982-02-05 1986-03-04 Staar Surgical Co. Methods for implantation of deformable intraocular lenses
US4504982A (en) * 1982-08-05 1985-03-19 Optical Radiation Corporation Aspheric intraocular lens
US4573775A (en) * 1982-08-19 1986-03-04 Vistakon, Inc. Bifocal contact lens
US4466705A (en) 1982-09-30 1984-08-21 Michelson Paul E Fluid lens
US4890913A (en) * 1982-10-13 1990-01-02 Carle John T De Zoned multi-focal contact lens
GB2129155B (en) 1982-10-13 1987-05-20 Ng Trustees & Nominees Ltd Bifocal contact lenses
EP0109753B1 (en) * 1982-10-27 1988-07-27 Pilkington Plc Bifocal contact lens comprising a plurality of concentric zones
US4580882A (en) 1983-04-21 1986-04-08 Benjamin Nuchman Continuously variable contact lens
US4549794A (en) 1983-05-05 1985-10-29 Schering Corporation Hydrophilic bifocal contact lens
US4593981A (en) * 1983-05-06 1986-06-10 Master Contact Lens Labs Inc. Bifocal contact lens
US4512039A (en) * 1983-05-24 1985-04-23 Lieberman David M Method of offsetting postoperative astigmatism with an intraocular lens
US4676610A (en) * 1983-07-22 1987-06-30 Sola International Holdings Ltd. Method of making progressive lens surface and resulting article
DE3332313A1 (en) * 1983-09-07 1985-04-04 Titmus Eurocon Kontaktlinsen Multifocal, especially bifocal intraocular artificial eye lens
US4636049A (en) * 1983-09-20 1987-01-13 University Optical Products Co. Concentric bifocal contact lens
US4519794A (en) * 1983-10-11 1985-05-28 Sneider Vincent R Valve control of nozzle flow from disposable syringe
US4732148A (en) * 1983-11-17 1988-03-22 Lri L.P. Method for performing ophthalmic laser surgery
DE3343891C2 (en) 1983-12-05 1986-06-05 Optische Werke G. Rodenstock, 8000 Muenchen, De
US4636211A (en) * 1984-03-13 1987-01-13 Nielsen J Mchenry Bifocal intra-ocular lens
US4582402A (en) * 1984-04-16 1986-04-15 Schering Corporation Color-imparting contact lenses
US4704017A (en) 1984-04-16 1987-11-03 Schering Corporation Process for manufacturing colored contact lenses
US4640595A (en) * 1984-05-02 1987-02-03 David Volk Aspheric contact lens
CS246212B1 (en) 1984-06-18 1986-10-16 Otto Wichterle Toric contact lens with centre of gravity shifted towards its border,mould for its production and method of moulds production
US4581031A (en) * 1984-06-22 1986-04-08 Koziol Jeffrey E Prismatic intraocular lens
DE3430334C2 (en) 1984-08-17 1987-02-05 Optische Werke G. Rodenstock, 8000 Muenchen, De
CA1265688A (en) * 1984-10-17 1990-02-13 Alain Rainville Bi-focal corneal lens and method of making the same
DE3439551A1 (en) * 1984-10-29 1986-04-30 Inprohold Ets One-piece lens implantation
FR2573876A1 (en) 1984-11-26 1986-05-30 Vinzia Francis multifocal lens, process for the preparation of this lens and use as a contact lens or as an intraocular implant for replacing the crystalline
US4614413A (en) 1985-02-05 1986-09-30 Obssuth George A Contact lens
US4668240A (en) * 1985-05-03 1987-05-26 Schering Corporation Pigment colored contact lenses and method for making same
EP0201231A3 (en) 1985-05-03 1989-07-12 THE COOPER COMPANIES, INC. (formerly called CooperVision, Inc.) Method of treating presbyopia with concentric bifocal contact lenses
US4693572A (en) 1985-06-03 1987-09-15 Fused Kontacts Of Chicago, Inc. Monocentric bifocal corneal contact lens
US5484432A (en) * 1985-09-27 1996-01-16 Laser Biotech, Inc. Collagen treatment apparatus
US4752123A (en) * 1985-11-19 1988-06-21 University Optical Products Co. Concentric bifocal contact lens with two distance power regions
US4728182A (en) * 1985-11-25 1988-03-01 Kelman Charles D Bi-focal contact lens
US4890912A (en) * 1986-01-24 1990-01-02 Rients Visser Trifocal eye-contact lens
US4666446A (en) * 1986-05-06 1987-05-19 Koziol Jeffrey E Intraocular lens with converging and diverging optical portions
EP0248489A3 (en) 1986-06-02 1989-09-06 Gregory N. Miller Contact lens and method of making same
US4710193A (en) 1986-08-18 1987-12-01 David Volk Accommodating intraocular lens and lens series and method of lens selection
US4702573A (en) 1986-08-25 1987-10-27 Morstad David P Variable powered contact lens
US4759763A (en) 1986-11-03 1988-07-26 Precision-Cosmet Co., Inc. Foldable intraocular lens
US5225858A (en) 1987-06-01 1993-07-06 Valdemar Portney Multifocal ophthalmic lens
US5270744A (en) * 1987-06-01 1993-12-14 Valdemar Portney Multifocal ophthalmic lens
US5166711A (en) 1987-06-01 1992-11-24 Valdemar Portney Multifocal ophthalmic lens
US5166712A (en) 1987-06-01 1992-11-24 Valdemar Portney Multifocal ophthalmic lens
US4898461A (en) * 1987-06-01 1990-02-06 Valdemar Portney Multifocal ophthalmic lens
US4917681A (en) * 1987-08-24 1990-04-17 Nordan Lee T Intraocular multifocal lens
US4769033A (en) 1987-07-02 1988-09-06 Nordan Lee T Intraocular multifocal lens
US5326348A (en) 1987-07-02 1994-07-05 Nordan Lee T Intraocular multifocal lens
US5074877A (en) 1987-07-02 1991-12-24 Nordan Lee T Intraocular multifocal lens
US5019099A (en) * 1987-07-02 1991-05-28 Nordan Lee T Intraocular multifocal lens method for correcting the aphakic eye
US4909621A (en) * 1987-08-17 1990-03-20 Evans Cyril C H Method of making hydrogel contact lenses having aspheric front surfaces
US5158572A (en) 1987-09-10 1992-10-27 Nielsen James Mchenry Multifocal intraocular lens
US4869588A (en) 1987-09-14 1989-09-26 Opticorp, Inc. Non-progressive multifocal ophthamic lenses
JP2756670B2 (en) 1987-11-30 1998-05-25 旭光学工業株式会社 Progressive multifocal spectacle lens
US4869587A (en) 1987-12-16 1989-09-26 Breger Joseph L Presbyopic contact lens
JP2576054B2 (en) * 1988-02-29 1997-01-29 株式会社ニコン Progressive multifocal lens
CA1316728C (en) 1988-04-01 1993-04-27 Michael J. Simpson Multi-focal diffractive ophthalmic lenses
US4932970A (en) * 1988-05-17 1990-06-12 Allergan, Inc. Ophthalmic lens
FR2632079B1 (en) * 1988-05-27 1990-09-28 Capez Pierre multifocal contact lens
US5050095A (en) 1988-05-31 1991-09-17 Honeywell Inc. Neural network auto-associative memory with two rules for varying the weights
US4923296A (en) * 1988-07-14 1990-05-08 Erickson Paul M Oriented simultaneous vision bifocal contact lenses or the like utilizing introaocular suppression of blur
KR0141607B1 (en) * 1988-07-20 1998-07-01 엘.코헨 알렌 Multifocal optical device
US5076683A (en) 1988-09-14 1991-12-31 Allergan, Inc. Spuncast compound contact lens
FR2642854B1 (en) 1989-02-03 1991-05-03 Essilor Int optical lens simultaneous vision for the correction of presbyopia
FR2642855B1 (en) * 1989-02-06 1991-05-17 Essilor Int optical lens for correcting astigmatism
US5298033A (en) * 1989-03-14 1994-03-29 Ciba-Geigy Corporation Ultraviolet absorbing lenses and methods of manufacturing thereof
US5080472B1 (en) * 1989-07-21 1995-10-31 Ioptex Research Inc Multifocal optical lens
US5002382A (en) * 1989-12-07 1991-03-26 Leonard Seidner Multifocal corneal contact lenses
US4971432A (en) 1989-12-07 1990-11-20 Koeniger Erich A Bifocal contact lens
US5024517A (en) * 1989-12-07 1991-06-18 Leonard Seidner Monovision corneal contact lenses
AU7130391A (en) 1990-03-08 1991-09-12 Breger, Joseph Laurence Multifocal simultaneous vision lenses
GB9008582D0 (en) 1990-04-17 1990-06-13 Pilkington Diffractive Lenses Method and contact lenses for treating presbyobia
GB9008577D0 (en) 1990-04-17 1990-06-13 Pilkington Diffractive Lenses Rigid gas permeable lenses
FR2661519B1 (en) 1990-04-25 1992-07-31 Essilor Int A method for facilitating the achievement of a progressive ophthalmic lens and lens (s) ophthalmic (s) phase (s) correspond (s).
US5181053A (en) * 1990-05-10 1993-01-19 Contact Lens Corporation Of America Multi-focal contact lens
US5779696A (en) 1990-07-23 1998-07-14 Sunrise Technologies International, Inc. Method and apparatus for performing corneal reshaping to correct ocular refractive errors
US5220359A (en) * 1990-07-24 1993-06-15 Johnson & Johnson Vision Products, Inc. Lens design method and resulting aspheric lens
US5173723A (en) * 1990-10-02 1992-12-22 Volk Donald A Aspheric ophthalmic accommodating lens design for intraocular lens and contact lens
US5071244A (en) 1990-10-03 1991-12-10 Ross Richard M Soft bifocal contact lens
US5112351A (en) * 1990-10-12 1992-05-12 Ioptex Research Inc. Multifocal intraocular lenses
US5160463A (en) * 1990-10-30 1992-11-03 Pilkington Visioncare, Inc. Method of manufacturing a contact lens
US5170192A (en) 1990-11-29 1992-12-08 Pilkington Visioncare, Inc. Oxygen permeable bifocal contact lenses and their manufacture
US5139325A (en) 1991-01-25 1992-08-18 Oksman Henry C Wide depth of focus power add to intraocular and contact lenses
US5141301A (en) 1991-04-25 1992-08-25 Morstad David P Soft bifocal contact lens
US5125729A (en) * 1991-05-03 1992-06-30 Les Laboratoires Opti-Centre Inc. Multifocal contact lens
US5106180A (en) * 1991-05-30 1992-04-21 Robert Marie Multifocal ophthalmic lens
US5198844A (en) * 1991-07-10 1993-03-30 Johnson & Johnson Vision Products, Inc. Segmented multifocal contact lens
US5483304A (en) * 1991-07-26 1996-01-09 Hanita Lenses Multifocal contact lens
DE4125707C2 (en) 1991-08-02 1994-08-04 Hecht Gmbh Kontaktlinsen An apparatus for manufacturing a bifocal contact lens and thus produced contact lens
US5245366A (en) 1991-10-31 1993-09-14 Svochak Jan B Bifocal contact lens and method of making same
FR2683642B1 (en) 1991-11-12 1994-01-14 Essilor Internal Cie Gle Optique progressive multifocal ophthalmic lens.
FR2683643B1 (en) 1991-11-12 1994-01-14 Essilor Internal Cie Gle Optique progressive multifocal ophthalmic lens.
WO1993014434A1 (en) 1992-01-06 1993-07-22 Seiko Epson Corporation Contact lens
CZ282423B6 (en) * 1992-01-28 1997-07-16 Johnson & Johnson Vision Products, Inc. Multifocal refraction lens and process for producing mould for moulding thereof
DE4232915A1 (en) 1992-10-01 1994-04-07 Hohla Kristian An apparatus for shaping the cornea by removing tissue
US5344447A (en) 1992-11-12 1994-09-06 Massachusetts Institute Of Technology Diffractive trifocal intra-ocular lens design
US5872613A (en) * 1992-11-23 1999-02-16 Innotech, Inc. Method of manufacturing contact lenses
US5528321A (en) * 1992-11-23 1996-06-18 Innotech, Inc. Method of manufacturing contact lenses
US5406341A (en) * 1992-11-23 1995-04-11 Innotech, Inc. Toric single vision, spherical or aspheric bifocal, multifocal or progressive contact lenses and method of manufacturing
US5296880A (en) * 1992-12-03 1994-03-22 Metro Optics Of Austin, Inc. Bifocal contact lens
FR2701770B1 (en) * 1993-02-18 1995-05-12 Essilor Int ophthalmic lens with simultaneous vision for the correction of presbyopia and such set of two ophthalmic lenses for a given wearer.
US5771088A (en) * 1993-03-27 1998-06-23 Pilkington Barnes Hind, Inc. Contact lens designed to accommodate and correct for the effects of presbyopia
US5526071A (en) * 1993-03-31 1996-06-11 Permeable Technologies, Inc. Multifocal contact lens and method for preparing
US5619289A (en) * 1993-03-31 1997-04-08 Permeable Technologies, Inc. Multifocal contact lens
US5422687A (en) * 1993-03-31 1995-06-06 Menicon Co., Ltd. Contact lens wherein central correction region has a center 0.2-2.4mm offset from lens geometric center and a diameter of 0.8-3.5mm
US5404183A (en) * 1993-03-31 1995-04-04 Seidner; Leonard Multifocal contact lens and method for preparing
US5493350A (en) * 1993-03-31 1996-02-20 Seidner; Leonard Multipocal contact lens and method for preparing
US5691797A (en) 1993-03-31 1997-11-25 Permeable Technologies, Inc. Multifocal contact lens
IL109375D0 (en) * 1993-04-26 1994-07-31 Ciba Geigy Ag Multifocal contact lens
US5395356A (en) * 1993-06-04 1995-03-07 Summit Technology, Inc. Correction of presbyopia by photorefractive keratectomy
US5436678A (en) 1993-09-30 1995-07-25 Wilmington Partners L.P. Aspheric multifocal contact lens
US5532768A (en) 1993-10-04 1996-07-02 Menicon Co., Ltd. Contact lens
DE4337369A1 (en) 1993-11-02 1995-05-04 Rodenstock Optik G Spectacle lens with progressive effect
US5446508A (en) 1994-02-18 1995-08-29 Bmc Industries, Inc. Progressive power lens
US5517260A (en) * 1994-03-28 1996-05-14 Vari-Site, Inc. Ophthalmic lens having a progressive multifocal zone and method of manufacturing same
US5803923A (en) 1994-09-15 1998-09-08 Jugvir I. Singh-Derewa Presbyopia correction using a protected space pattern, methods and apparatus
GB2295686B (en) 1994-11-30 1998-05-06 Carle John Trevor De Bifocal contact lenses
US5574518A (en) 1995-01-10 1996-11-12 Les Laboratoires Opti-Centre Inc. System incorporation two different sphero-non-spherical contact lenses for correcting presbytia
US5652638A (en) 1995-05-04 1997-07-29 Johnson & Johnson Vision Products, Inc. Concentric annular ring lens designs for astigmatism
US5650838A (en) 1995-05-04 1997-07-22 Johnson & Johnson Vision Products, Inc. Programmable smooth junctions on lenses
US5715031A (en) * 1995-05-04 1998-02-03 Johnson & Johnson Vision Products, Inc. Concentric aspheric multifocal lens designs
US5682223A (en) 1995-05-04 1997-10-28 Johnson & Johnson Vision Products, Inc. Multifocal lens designs with intermediate optical powers
US5684560A (en) 1995-05-04 1997-11-04 Johnson & Johnson Vision Products, Inc. Concentric ring single vision lens designs
IL117937D0 (en) 1995-05-04 1996-08-04 Johnson & Johnson Vision Prod Combined multifocal toric lens designs
IL118065D0 (en) 1995-05-04 1996-08-04 Johnson & Johnson Vision Prod Aspheric toric lens designs
IL118064D0 (en) 1995-05-04 1996-08-04 Johnson & Johnson Vision Prod Concentric annular ring lens designs for astigmatic presbyopes
US5608471A (en) * 1995-07-03 1997-03-04 Westcon Contact Lens Co., Inc. Soft, bifocal contact lens
US5864379A (en) * 1996-09-27 1999-01-26 Dunn; Stephen A. Contact lens and process for fitting
US5724120A (en) * 1995-10-02 1998-03-03 Svochak; Jan B. Multifocal contact lens and method and apparatus for making the same
US5812237A (en) 1995-11-27 1998-09-22 Roddy; Kenneth C. Ophthalmic no-line progressive addition lenses
US5702440A (en) 1996-01-26 1997-12-30 Allergan Multifocal ophthalmic lens for dim-lighting conditions
JPH09251143A (en) * 1996-03-14 1997-09-22 Nikon Corp Progressive focus lens
NZ332017A (en) * 1996-03-15 2000-06-23 Scient Optics Inc Contact lens fit for asymmetric aspherical cornea
US5891132A (en) * 1996-05-30 1999-04-06 Chiron Technolas Gmbh Opthalmologische Systeme Distributed excimer laser surgery system
US5831713A (en) * 1996-05-30 1998-11-03 Fritsch; Michael H. Underwater contact lens
US5815237A (en) 1996-07-01 1998-09-29 Bausch & Lomb Incorporated Contact lens and method for making the same
US5754270A (en) * 1996-11-08 1998-05-19 Unilens Corp., Usa Multifocal lens utilizing rapid power shift transition zone
US5835187A (en) 1996-11-22 1998-11-10 Wilmington Partners L.P. Aspheric multifocal contact lens having concentric front surface
US5898473A (en) * 1997-04-25 1999-04-27 Permeable Technologies, Inc. Multifocal corneal contact lens
US5815236A (en) 1997-06-27 1998-09-29 Bausch & Lomb Incorporated Contact lens and method for making the same
US5935140A (en) 1997-07-31 1999-08-10 Buratto; Lucio Method for modifying the curvature of the cornea
US6109749A (en) * 1997-11-04 2000-08-29 Bernstein; Paul R. Soft bifocal contact lenses

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
AU2365300A (en) 2000-07-03
US20020036748A1 (en) 2002-03-28
JP2002532751A (en) 2002-10-02
EP1147448A1 (en) 2001-10-24
NO20012383L (en) 2001-08-09
WO2000036457A1 (en) 2000-06-22
NO20012383D0 (en) 2001-05-15
EP1147448A4 (en) 2008-12-10
US6808262B2 (en) 2004-10-26

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3617116A (en) Method for producing a unitary composite ophthalmic lens
US4274717A (en) Ophthalmic progressive power lens and method of making same
EP0722573B1 (en) Asymmetric aspheric contact lens
EP0742465B1 (en) Multifocal toric contact lenses
JP4195091B2 (en) Improved single-field lens
ES2301232T3 (en) Toricas ophthalmic tapes.
EP0809127B9 (en) Multifocal lens for eyeglasses and eyeglass lens
US5570143A (en) Toric lens with axis mislocation latitude
CA2426455C (en) Ophthalmic lenses for high order aberration correction and processes for production of the lenses
EP1590703B1 (en) Opththalmic lenses
EP1529235B1 (en) Contact lenses
US5428412A (en) Method for treating myopia with an aspheric corneal contact lens
JP4780259B2 (en) Eccentric protective eye wear
KR101302317B1 (en) Ophthalmic Lens Element for Myopia Correction
TWI322284B (en) Rotationally stabilized contact lenses
US6186625B1 (en) Multifocal ophthalmic lens
US5173723A (en) Aspheric ophthalmic accommodating lens design for intraocular lens and contact lens
EP0741314A2 (en) Concentric aspheric multifocal lens designs
US6364483B1 (en) Simultaneous multifocal contact lens and method of utilizing same for treating visual disorders
US5880809A (en) Contact lens
AU606519B2 (en) Multiple contour diffractive lens
US5349395A (en) Multiple focus corneal contact lens and method for treating myopia
EP0809126A1 (en) Gradient index multifocal lens, spectacle lens, and manufacture of gradient index multifocal lens
US6142624A (en) Wide field spherical lenses and single design spectacle frames therefor
AU2008343047B2 (en) Lens surface with combined diffractive, toric, and aspheric components

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
EEER Examination request
FZDE Dead