CA2310852A1 - Method for promoting hematopoietic and mesenchymal cell proliferation and differentiation - Google Patents

Method for promoting hematopoietic and mesenchymal cell proliferation and differentiation

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CA2310852A1
CA2310852A1 CA 2310852 CA2310852A CA2310852A1 CA 2310852 A1 CA2310852 A1 CA 2310852A1 CA 2310852 CA2310852 CA 2310852 CA 2310852 A CA2310852 A CA 2310852A CA 2310852 A1 CA2310852 A1 CA 2310852A1
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Kathleen E. Rodgers
Gere S. Dizerega
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University of Southern California (USC)
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University Of Southern California
Kathleen E. Rodgers
Gere S. Dizerega
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    • C12N5/06Animal cells or tissues; Human cells or tissues ; Not used, see subgroups
    • C12N5/0602Vertebrate cells
    • C12N5/0634Cells from the blood or the immune system
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61KPREPARATIONS FOR MEDICAL, DENTAL, OR TOILET PURPOSES
    • A61K38/00Medicinal preparations containing peptides
    • A61K38/04Peptides having up to 20 amino acids in a fully defined sequence; Derivatives thereof
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    • C12N5/0602Vertebrate cells
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    • C12N5/06Animal cells or tissues; Human cells or tissues ; Not used, see subgroups
    • C12N5/0602Vertebrate cells
    • C12N5/0652Cells of skeletal and connective tissues; Mesenchyme
    • C12N5/0662Stem cells
    • C12N5/0663Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSC)
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    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
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    • A61K2035/124Materials from mammals; Compositions comprising non-specified tissues or cells; Compositions comprising non-embryonic stem cells; Genetically modified cells the cells being hematopoietic, bone marrow derived or blood cells
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    • C12N2501/32Angiotensins [AT], angiotensinogen
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    • C12N2502/00Coculture with; Conditioned medium produced by
    • C12N2502/11Coculture with; Conditioned medium produced by blood or immune system cells

Abstract

The present invention fulfills a need in the art for methods that promote hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem and lineage-specific cell proliferation and differentiation by growth in the presence of angiotensinogen, angiotensin I
(AI), AI analogues, AI fragments and analogues thereof, angiotensin II (AII), AII analogues, AII fragments and analogues thereof and AII AT2 type 2 receptor agonists.

Description

wo ~nsso~ PCTNS98n3390~
METHOD FOR PROMOTING HEMATOPOIETIC AND MESENCIiXMAL
CELL PROLIFERATION AND DIFFERENTIATION
Cross Reference This application claims priority from U.S. Provisional Application No.
60/066,593 filed November 26, 1997.
Field of the Invention io This present invention relates to methods for use in accelerating the proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic and mesenchymal cells.
Background of the Invention Bone marrow contains pluripotent stem cells that are capable of reconstituting either the hematopoietic system or a wide range of mesenchymal tissues. The mechanisms by which hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells produce a range of progenitor cell types are quite dissimilar.
The hematopoietic system is composed of a multitude of cell generations ranging from the terminally differentiated to very primitive hematopoietic progenitor 2o cells (HPC). (Traycoff, et al., Experimental Hematology 24:299-306, 1996).
HPC are pluripotent progenitor cells that possess the ability to terminally differentiate into hematopoietic lineage-specific progenitor cells {HLSPC). Hematopoiesis is an ongoing process, and therefore HPC must provide a continuous source of HLSPC, which in turn can differentiate into red cells, platelets, monocytes, granulocytes and lymphocytes. (Prockop, Science 276:71-74, 1997). HPC proliferate either by "self wo ~n~ rcrps9sns39o renewal", to produce HPC-type progeny cells, or with accompanying differentiation, to produce HLSPC. (Traycoff, et al., supra).
HPC transplantation therapy has been successful for a variety of malignant and inherited diseases and also provides myelopoietic support for patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy or radiotherapy. (Emerson, Blood 87:3082-3088, 1996).
However, stem cell transplantation has been limited by several features.
First, acquiring a sufficient quantity of stem cells to achieve benefit after transfusion requires either extensive, operative bone marrow harvests or extensive pheresis procedures. (Emerson, supra). Next, even under these circumstances, only a limited to number of useful cells is obtained. Finally, mature blood cell regeneration after transfusion is slow, so that little direct therapeutic benefit is seen for periods of 1 to 3 weeks. (Emerson, supra).
The . development of in vitro culture techniques for hematopoietic cells combined with technologies for isolating relatively pure populations of HPC
and HLSPC has made possible their ex vivo expansion. (Alcorn and Holyoake, Blood Reviews 10:167-176, 1996, which is incorporated by reference herein).
Successful ex vivo expansion of HPC, both by self renewal and proliferation with differentiation, promises many clinical benefits, such as reduction of the number and duration of leucapheresis procedures required for autologous transplantation, thus reducing the 2o risk of disease contamination in the apheresis products. (Alcorn and Holyoake, supra). Furthermore, ex vivo expansion may render inadequate HPC populations in peripheral blood and umbilical cord blood sufficient for autologous transplantation and adult allogeneic transplantation respectively. Finally, ex vivo expansion of HPC
will greatly increase their utility as gene therapy vehicles. (Alcorn and Holyoake, supra). Similarly, ex vivo expansion of HLSPC promises substantial clinical benef ts, -such as re-infusion of expanded populations of myeloid precursor cells to reduce the period of obligate neutmpenia following autologous transplantation, the generation of natural killer cells for use in adoptive immunotherapy protocols, generation of megakaryocyte precursors to alleviate post-transplant-associated thrombocytopenia and more efficient generation of delivery systems for gene therapy. (Alcorn and Holyoake, supra).
Human bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, and peripheral blood progenitor cells mobilized by chemotherapy and/or cytokine treatment have been shown to be l0 effective sources of HPC for transplantation following the administration of high-dose therapy to treat malignancy. (Holyoake, et al., Blood 87:4589-4595, 1996).
Whatever the source of hematopoietic cells, most studies have used cultured cell populations selected on the basis of HPC-specific surface antigens, such as CD34.
These cells can be readily obtained by a number of techniques. (Alcorn and Holyoake, supra). The results of several clinical trials using ex vivo expanded hematopoietic cells suggests that a fairly small number of HPC cultured ex vivo under appropriate conditions can initiate hematologic reconstitution. (Emerson, supra).
Survival and proliferation of HPC in ex vivo culture requires a combination of synergizing growth factors; the choice of cytokine/growth factor combination and 2o culture system used will largely determine the fate of cells used to initiate the culture.
{Alcorn and Holyoake, supra). In vivo, blood cell production is thought to be regulated locally by interactions of hematopoietic stem cells with a variety of cell-bound and secreted factors produced by adjacent bone marrow stromal cells.
(Alcorn and Holyoake, supra). The addition of growth factors and cytokines to the.
culture wo .~ns~aa . PCT/US98n5390 medium is intended to compensate for the absence of stroma-associated activities.
Growth factors and cytokines that have been shown to increase production of HPC (in various combinations) include granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte/macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), stem cell factor (SCF), macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), and interleukins 1, 3, 6, , and i 1 (Reviewed in Takaku, J. Cancer Res. Clin. Oncol. 121:701-709, 1995; Holyoake, et al., supra). Conversely, inclusion of macrophage inhibitory protein-la (MIP-la), tumor necrosis factor a (TNF-a) or transforming growth factor (3 (TGF[3) in most expansion cultures reported to date results in decreased HPC and HLSPC yields.
l0 (Emerson, supra).
A great deal of effort has gone into defining the optimal conditions for ex vivo culture of hematopoietic cells. Methods that increase the ex vivo proliferation of HPC
will greatly increase the clinical benefits of HPC transplantation. This is true both for increased "self renewal", which will provide a larger supply of HPC capable of reconstituting the entire hematopoietic system, and for proliferation with differentiation, which will provide a larger supply of lineage-specific progenitor cells.
Similarly, methods that increase in vivo proliferation of HPC will enhance the utility of HPC transplantation therapy by rapidly increasing local concentrations of HPC
(and HLSPC) in the bone marrow. Furthermore, methods that result in the 2o differentiation of HPC and HLSPC are useful in providing populations of specific cell types for use in cell therapy.
Transfection of mammalian HPC has been accomplished. (Larochelle, et al., Nature Medicine 2:1329-1337, 1996). Thus, methods that increase the proliferation of HI'C and HLSPC are also useful in rapidly providing a large population of transfected cells for use in gene therapy.
Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are pluripotent progenitor cells that possess the ability to differentiate into a variety of mesenchymal tissue, including bone, cartilage, tendon, muscle, marrow stroma, fat and dermis as demonstrated in a number of organisms, including humans (Bruder, et al., J. Cellul. Biochem. 56:283-294 (1994). The formation of mesenchymal tissues is known as the mesengenic process, which continues throughout life, but proceeds much more slowly in the adult than in the embryo (Caplan, Clinics in Plastic Surgery 21:429-435 (1994). The mesengenic 1o process in the adult is a repair process but involves the same cellular events that occur during embryonic development (Reviewed in Caplan, 1994, supra). During repair processes, chemoattraction brings MSC to the site of repair where they proliferate into a mass of cells that spans the break. These cells then undergo commitment and enter into a specific lineage pathway (differentiation), where they remain capable of proliferating. Eventually, the cells in the different pathways terminally differentiate (and are no longer able to proliferate) and combine to form the appropriate skeletal tissue, in a process controlled by the local concentration of tissue-specific cytokines and growth factors (Caplan, 1994, supra).
Recently, it has been hypothesized that the limiting factor for MSC-based 2o repair processes is the lack of adequate numbers of responsive MSC at the repair site (Caplan, 1994, supra). Thus, it has been suggested that by supplying a sufficient number of MSC to a specific tissue site the repair process can be controlled, since the repair site will supply the appropriate exposure to lineage-specific growth factors and differentiation molecules (Caplan, 1994, supra). Towards this end, several.
animal wo .~n~ PCTNS98n5390 studies have demonstrated the feasibility of using autologous MSC for repair of -various defects associated with mesenchymal tissue. {For review, see Caplan, et al., in The Anterior Cruciate Ligament: Current aad Future Concepts, ed. D.W.
Jackson, Raven Press, Ltd. NY pp.405-417 (1993). Recent work has demonstrated the feasibility of collection, ex vivo expansion in culture, and intravenous infi~sion of MSC in humans {Lazarus, et al., Bone Marrow Transplantation 16:557-564 (1995);
Caplan and Haynesworth, U.S. Patent No. 5,486,359). Further, MSC of animal origin have been transfected with retroviruses and have achieved high level gene expression both in vitro and in vivo (Allay, et al., Blood 82:477A (1993). Thus, the manipulation of MSC via such techniques seems a promising tool for reconstructive therapies and may be useful for gene therapy.
MSC therapy can serve as a means to deliver high densities of repair-competent cells to a defect site when adequate numbers of MSC and MSC lineage-specific cells are not present in vivo, especially in older and/or diseased patients. In order to efficiently deliver high densities of MSC to a defect site, methods for rapidly producing large numbers of MSC are necessary. While MSC have been exposed to a number of growth factors in vitro, only platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) showed mitotic activity (Caplan et al., 1994, supra), while none have been demonstrated to independently induce differentiation. Methods that increase the ex vivo proliferation 2o and differentiation of MSC will greatly increase the utility of MSC
therapy.
Similarly, methods that increase in vivo proliferation and differentiation of MSC will enhance the utility of MSC therapy by rapidly increasing local concentrations of MSC
at the repair site.

wo ~nss~ rcrnrs9sns39o Methods that allow for. ex vivo differentiation of MSC would also provide an -important tool for cell therapy. MSCs from various species have been differentiated in vitro into colonies of osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes in response to dexamethasone, 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3, or BMP-2. (Prockop, Science 276:71-74, 1997) For example, ex vivo culturing of MSC to produce chondrocytes can be used to resurface joint cartilage in patients with degenerative arthritis or in reconstructive plastic surgery in patients with osteoarthritis. Similarly, treatment of MSC
to differentiate into osteoclasts can be used for implantation into poorly healing bone.
Furthermore, methods that enhance the proliferation of lineage-specific to descendants of MSC, including but not limited to bone marrow stromal cells, osteoclasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes, will enhance the therapeutic utility of MSC
therapy by increasing the concentration of lineage-specific cell types at appropriate repair sites.
Thus, there exists a need in the art for methods that increase the proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic and mesenchymal pluripotent and lineage-specific cells that are useful in rapidly providing a large population of such cells for use in cell therapy and for making a large population of transfected cells for use in gene therapy.
2o Summary of the Invention The present invention fulfills a need in the art for methods that promote hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem and lineage-specific cell proliferation and differentiation by growth in the presence of angiotensinogen, angiotensin I
(AI), AI

7 _ analogues, AI fragments and analogues thereof, angiotensin II (AII), All analogues, All fragments and analogues thereof and All AT2 type 2 receptor agonists.
Brief Description of the Drawings Figure 1 is a graph showing the elect of AIi on the phagocytic capability of marine macrophages.
Figure 2 is a graph showing the effect of All on the phagocytic capability of rat macrophages.
Figure 3 is a graph showing the effect of All on respiratory burst function in rat 1o peritoneal macrophages.
Figure 4 is a graph showing the effect of All on respiratory burst function in human PBMC.
Figure 5 is a graph showing the effect of AII(1-7) (SEQ. ID. N0:4) on respiratory burst function in rat peritoneal macrophages.
Figure 6 is a graph showing the effect of GSD 24B (SEQ ID N0:31 ) on respiratory burst function in rat peritoneal macrophages.
Figure 7 is a graph showing the effect of GSD 22A (SEQ ID N0:18) on respiratory burst function in rat peritoneal macrophages.
Figure 8 is a graph showing the effect of GSD 28 (SEQ ID N0:37) on respiratory 2o burst function in rat peritoneal macrophages.
Figure 9 is a graph showing the effect of All on proliferation in response to pokeweed mitogen.
Figure 10 is a graph showing the effect of All on rat bone marrow cultures.
Figure 11 is a graph showing the effect of All on rat bone marrow cultures.

wo 99nss~a rcrius9sns39o Figure 12 is a graph showing the effect of All on marine HSC cultures. w Fignre 13 is a graph showing the effect of All on marine HSC cultures.
Figure 14 is a graph showing the effect of All on marine HSC cultures.
Figure 15 is a graph showing the effect of All on marine HSC cultures.
Figure 16 is a graph showing the effect of All on marine HSC cultures. .
Figure 17 is a graph showing the effect of All on marine HSC cultures.
Figure 18 is a graph showing the effect of AII(1-7) (SEQ ID N0:4) on MSC
proliferation.
Figure 19 is a graph showing the effect of GSD 22A (SEQ ID N0:18) on MSC
1o proliferation.
Figure 20 is a graph showing the effect of GSD 24B (SEQ ID N0:31) on MSC
proliferation.
Figure 21 is a graph showing the effect of GSD 28 (SEQ ID N0:37) on MSC
proliferation.
~5 Figure 22 is a graph showing the effect of All on alkaline phosphatase expression by MSC.
Figure 23 is a graph showing the effect of All on GM-CSF secretion by mouse mesenchymal stem cells.
2o Detailed Description Of The Invention Within this application, unless otherwise stated, the techniques utilized may be found in any of several well-known references such as: Molecular Cloning: A
Laboratory Manual (Sambrook, et al., 1989, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press), Gene Expression Technology (Methods in Enzymology, Vol. 185, edited by D.

WO 99IZ6644 .PCTNS98/25390 Goeddel, 1991. Academic Press, San Diego, CA), "Guide to Protein Purification"
in Methods in Enzymology (M.P. Deutshcer, ed., (1990) Academic Press, Inc.); PCR
Protocols: A Guide to Methods and Applications (Innis, et al. 1990. Academic Press, San Diego, CA), Culture of Animal Cells: A Manual of Basic Technique, 2"d Ed.
(R.I.
Freshney. 1987. Liss, Inc. New York, NY), and Gene Transfer and Expression Protocols, pp. 109-128, ed. E.J. Murray, The Humana Press Inc., Clifton, N.J.).
As defined herein, the term "HPC" refers to any hematopoietic pluripotent progenitor cells capable of giving rise to a wide variety of differentiated hematopoietic cell types. Among cell types included within this definition are CD34+
to bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMC) (Berardi, et al., Blood 86:2123-2129, 1995), PBSC (Fritsch, et al., Bone Marrow Transplantation 17:169-178, 1996), cobblestone area forming cells (CAFC) (Lemieux, et al., Blood 86:1339-1347, 1995) and 5-FU BM cells (Alcorn and Holyoake, Blood Reviews 10:167-176, 1996). As defined herein, the term "HLSPC" refers to hematopoietic lineage-specific progenitor cells, and includes the progeny of HPC that are committed to a cell-specific differentiation path. As defined herein, mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are pluripotent progenitor cells that possess the ability to differentiate into a variety of mesenchymal tissue, including bone, cartilage, tendon, muscle, marrow stroma, fat and dermis. As defined herein, "proliferation" encompasses both cell self renewal and cellular proliferation with accompanying differentiation. As defined herein "differentiation" refers to any cellular processes that distinguish a non-committed cell type finm a more lineage committed cell type.
U.S. Patent No. 5,015,629 to DiZerega (the entire disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference) describes a method for increasing the. rate of healing of wound tissue, comprising the application to such tissue of angiotensin II
(AII) in an amount which is sufficient for said increase. The application of All to wound tissue significantly increases the rate of wound healing, leading to a more rapid re-epithelialization and tissue repair, The term All refers to an octapeptide present in humans and other species having the sequence Asp-Arg-Val-Tyr-Ile-His-Pro-Phe [SEQ ID NO:1 ]. The biological formation of angiotensin is initiated by the action of renin on the plasma substrate angiotensinogen. The substance so formed is a decapeptide called angiotensin I (AI) which is converted to All by the converting enzyme angiotensinase which removes the C-terminal His-Leu residues from AI.
All 1o is a known pressor agent and is commercially available.
Studies have shown that All increases mitogenesis and chemotaxis in cultured cells that are involved in wound repair, and also increases their release of growth factors and extracellular matrices (diZerega, U.S. Patent No. 5,015,629; Dzau et. al., J. Mol. Cell. Cardiol. 21:S7 (Supp III) 1989; Berk et. al., Hypertension 13:305-14 (1989); Kawahara, et al., BBRC 150:52-9 (1988); Naftilan, et al., J. Clin.
Invest.
83:1419-23 (1989); Taubman et al., J. Biol. Chem 264:526-530 (1989); Nakahara, et al., BBRC 184:811-8 (1992}; Stouffer and Owens, Circ. Res. 70:820 (1992);
Wolf, et al., Am. J. Pathol. 140:95-107 (1992); Bell and Madri, Am. J. Pathol. 137:7-12 (1990). In addition, All was shown to be angiogenic in rabbit corneal eye and chick 2o chorioallantoic membrane models (Fernandez, et al., J. Lab. Clin. Med.
105:141 (1985); LeNoble, et al., Eur. J. Pharmacol. 195:305-6 (1991). Therefore, All may accelerate wound repair through increased neovascularization, growth factor release, reepithelialization and/or production of extracellular matrix.

wo ~n~wao Pc-rnrs9sizs39o A peptide agonist selective for the AT2 receptor (AII has 100 times higher -affinity for AT2 than AT 1 ) has been identified. This peptide is p-aminophenylalanine6-All ["(p-NH2-Phe)6-AII)"], Asp-Arg-Val-Tyr-Ile-Xaa-Pro-Phe [SEQ ID N0.36] wherein Xaa is p-NH2-Phe (Speth and Kim, BBRC 169:997-1006 (1990). This peptide gave binding characteristics comparable to AT2 antagonists in the experimental models tested (Catalioto, et al., Eur. J. Pharmacol. 256:93-97 (1994);
Bryson, et al., Eur. J. Pharmacol. 225:119-127 (1992).
The effects of All receptor and All receptor antagonists have been examined in two experimental models of vascular injury and repair which suggest that both All receptor subtypes (AT1 and AT2) play a role in wound healing (Janiak et al., Hypertension 20:737-45 (1992); Prescott, et al., Am. J. Pathol. 139:1291-1296 (1991);
Kauffman, et al., Life Sci. 49:223-228 ( 1991 ); Viswanathan, et al., Peptides i 3:783-786 (1992); Kimura, et al., BBRC 187:1083-1090 (1992).
Many studies have focused upon AII(1-7) (AII residues 1-7) or other fragments of All to evaluate their activity. AII(1-7) elicits some, but not the full range of effects elicited by AII. Pfeilschifter, et al., Eur. J. Pharmacol. 225:57-62 (1992);
Jaiswal, et al., Hypertension 19(Supp. II):II-49-II-55 (1992); Edwards and Stack, J.
Pharmacol. Exper. Ther. 266:506-510 (1993); Jaiswal, et al., J. Phanmacol.
Exper.
Ther. 265:664-673 (1991); Jaiswal, et al., Hypertension 17:1115-1120 (1991);
Portsi, 2o et a., Br. J. Pharmacol. 111:652-654 ( 1994).
As hereinafter defined, a preferred class of ATZ agonists for use in accordance with the present invention comprises AII, All analogues or active fragments thereof having p-NH-Phe in a position corresponding to a position 6 of AII. In addition to peptide agents, various nonpeptidic agents (e.g., peptidomimetics) having the wo ~nssa~ pcrps9sns~o requisite AT2 agonist activity-are further contemplated for use in accordance with the present invention.
The active All analogues, fragments of All and analogues thereof of particular interest in accordance with the present invention are characterized as comprising a sequence consisting of at least three contiguous amino acids of groups Rl-R8 in the sequence of general formula I
Ri _RZ_Rs_Ra_Rs_R6_Rys in which R' and R2 together form a group of formula 1o X-RA-RB-, wherein X is H or a one to three peptide group and a peptide bond between RA and RB is labile to aminopeptidase A cleavage;
R3 is selected from the group consisting of Val, Ala, Leu, norLeu, Ile, Gly, Pro, Aib, Acpc and Tyr;
R4 is selected from the group consisting of Tyr, Tyr(P03)2, Thr, Ser, homoSer and azaTyr;
RS is selected from the group consisting of Ile, Ala, Leu, norLeu, Val and Gly;
R6 is His, Arg or 6-NHz-Phe;
2o R' is Pro or Ala; and R8 is selected from the group consisting of Phe, Phe(Br), Ile and Tyr, excluding sequences including R4 as a terminal Tyr group.

WO gg~~ PCTNS98/25390 Compounds falling within the category of AT2 agonists useful in the practice of the invention include the All analogues set forth above subject to the restriction that R6 is p-NH2-Phe.
In one class of preferred embodiments, RA is suitably selected from Asp, Glu, Asn, Acpc (1-aminocyclopentane carboxylic acid), Ala, Me2Gly, Pm, Bet, Glu(NH2), Gly, Asp(NH2) and Suc. RB is suitably selected from Arg, Lys, Ala, Orn, Ser(Ac), Sar, D-Arg and D-Lys. Particularly preferred combinations for RA and RB are Asp-Arg, Asp-Lys, Glu-Arg and Glu-Lys.Particularly preferred embodiments of this class include the following: AII, AIII or AII(2-8), Arg-Val-Tyr-Ile-His-Pro-Phe [SEQ
ID
1o N0:2]; AII(3-8), also known as desl-AIII or AIV, Val-Tyr-Ile-His-Pm-Phe [SEQ ID
N0:3]; AII(1-7), Asp-Arg-Val-Tyr-Ile-His-Pro {SEQ ID N0:4]; AII(2-7). Arg-Val-Tyr-Ile-His-Pro [SEQ ID NO:S]; AII(3-7), Val-Tyr-Ile-His-Pro [SEQ ID N0:6];
AII(5-8), Ile-His-Pro-Phe [SEQ ID N0:7]; AII(1-6), Asp-Arg-Val-Tyr-Ile-His [SEQ
ID N0:8]; AII(1-5), Asp-Arg-Val-Tyr-Ile [SEQ ID N0:9]; AII(1-4), Asp-Arg-Val-Tyr [SEQ ID NO:10]; and AII(1-3), Asp-Arg-Val [SEQ ID NO:11]. Other preferred embodiments include: Arg-norLeu-Tyr-Ile-His-Pro-Phe [SEQ ID N0:12] and Arg-Val-Tyr-norLeu-His-Pro-Phe [SEQ ID N0:13]. Still another preferred embodiment encompassed within the scope of the invention is a peptide having the sequence Asp-Arg-Pro-Tyr-Ile-His-Pro-Phe [SEQ ID N0:31 ]. AII(6-8), His-Pro-Phe [SEQ ID
N0:14] and AII(4-8), Tyr-Ile-His-Pro-Phe [SEQ ID NO:15] were also tested and found not to be effective.
Another class of compounds of particular interest in accordance with the present invention are those of the general formula II

wo ~n~w pc~rius9sns39o R2-R3-Ra-Rs-R6-R~-Rs _.
in which R2 is selected from the group consisting of H, Arg, Lys, Ala, Orn, Ser(Ac), Sar, D-Arg and D-Lys;
R3 is selected from the group consisting of Val, Ala, Leu, norLeu, Ile, Gly, Pro, Aib, Acpc and Tyr;
Ra is selected from the group consisting of Tyr, Tyr(P03)2, Thr, Ser, homoSer and azaTyr;
Rs is selected from the gmup consisting of Ile, Ala, Leu, norLeu, Val and Gly;
R6 is His, Arg or 6-NH2-Phe;
R' is Pro or Ala; and Rs is selected from the group consisting of Phe, Phe(Br), Ile and Tyr.
A particularly preferred subclass of the compounds of general formula II has the formula R2-R3-Tyr-Rs-His-Pro-Phe [SEQ ID N0:16]
wherein R2, R3 and Rs are as previously defined. Particularly preferred is angiotensin III of the formula Arg-Val-Tyr-Ile-His-Pro-Phe [SEQ ID N0:2].
Other preferred compounds include peptides having the structures Arg-Val-Tyr-Gly-His-Pro-Phe [SEQ ID N0:17J and Arg-Val-Tyr-Ala-His-Pro-Phe [SEQ ID N0:18]. The fragment AII(4-8) was ineffective in repeated tests; this is believed to be due to the exposed tyrosine on the N-terminus.

wo ~ns~aa pc~rnrs9sns39o In the above formulas; the standard three-letter abbreviations for amino acid residues are employed. In the absence of an indication to the contrary, the L-form of the amino acid is intended. Other residues are abbreviated as follows:

Abbreviation for Amino Acids Me2Gl N,N-dimeth 1 1 c 1 Bet 1-carboxy-N,N,N-trimethyhnethanaminium hydroxide inner salt etaine Suc Succin 1 Phe r -bromo-L- hen lalan 1 azaTyr aza-a'-homo-L- os 1 A c 1-aminoc clo entane carbox lic acid Aib 2-aminoisobu 'c acid Sar N-meth 1 1 c 1 sarcosine It has been suggested that All and its analogues adopt either a gamma or a beta turn (Regoli, et al., Pharmacological Reviews 26:69 (1974). In general, it is believed that neutral side chains in position R3, RS and R' may be involved in maintaining the appropriate distance between active groups in positions R4, R6 and Rg 1o primarily responsible for binding to receptors and/or intrinsic activity.
Hydrophobic side chains in positions R3, RS and R8 may also play an important role in the whole conformation of the peptide and/or contribute to the formation of a hypothetical hydrophobic pocket.
Appropriate side chains on the amino acid in position R2 may contribute to affinity of the compounds for target receptors and/or play an important role in the conformation of the peptide. For this reason, Arg and Lys are particularly preferred w as R2.
For purposes of the present invention, it is believed that R3 may be involved in the formation of linear or nonlinear hydrogen bonds with RS (in the gamma turn model) or R6 (in the beta turn model). R3 would also participate in the first turn in a beta antiparallel structure (which has also been proposed as a possible structure). In contrast to other positions in general formula I, it appears that beta and gamma branching are equally elective in this position. Moreover, a single hydrogen bond may be sufficient to maintain a relatively stable conformation. Accordingly, R3 may 1o suitably be selected from Val, Ala, Leu, norLeu, Ile, Gly, Pro, Aib, Acpc and Tyr.
With respect to R4, conformational analyses have suggested that the side chain in this position (as well as in R3 and RS) contribute to a hydrophobic cluster believed to be essential for occupation and stimulation of receptors. Thus, R4 is preferably selected from Tyr, Thr, Tyr (PO3)2, homoSer, Ser and azaTyr. In this position, Tyr is is particularly preferred as it may form a hydrogen bond with the receptor site capable of accepting a hydrogen from the phenolic hydroxyl (Regoli, et al. (1974), supra).
In position R5, an amino acid with a ~i aliphatic or alicyclic chain is particularly desirable. Therefore, while Gly is suitable in position R5, it is preferred that the amino acid in this position be selected from Ile, Ala, Leu, norLeu, Gly and 20 Val.
In the All analogues, fragments and analogues of fragments of particular interest in accordance with the present invention, R6 is His, Arg or 6-NH2-Phe. The unique properties of the imidazole ring of histidine (e.g., ionization at physiological pH, ability to act as proton donor or acceptor, aromatic character) are believed to WO 99/Z6644 .PCT/US98/25390 contribute to its particular utility as R6. For example, conformational models suggest that His may participate in hydrogen bond formation (in the beta model) or in the second turn of the antiparallel structure by influencing the orientation of R'.
Similarly, it is presently considered that R' should be Pro in order to provide the most desirable orientation of R8. In position R8, both a hydrophobic ring and an anionic carboxyl terminal appear to be particularly useful in binding of the analogues of interest to receptors; therefore, Tyr and especially Phe are preferred for purposes of the present invention.
Analogues of particular interest include the following:
to TABLE 2 Angiotensin II Analogues All Amino Acid Sequence Analogue Sequence Identifier Name Analo a -Ar -Val- -Val-His-Pro-Phe SE ID NO:

Analo a Asn-Ar -Val-T-Val-His-Pro-Phe SE ID NO:

Analo a Ala-Pro-Gl -Ar -De-T -Val-His-Pro-PheSE ID NO:

Analo a Glu-Ar -Val-T-Ile-His-Pro-Phe SE ID NO:

Analo a As -L s-Val-T-IIe-His-Pro-Phe SE ID NO:

Analo a -Ar -AIa-T -Ile-His-Pro-Phe SE ID NO:

~

Analo 7 As -Ar -Val-Thr-Ile-His-Pro-Phe SE ID NO:

Analo a -Ar -Val-T -Leu-His-Pro-Phe SE ID NO:

Analo a As -Ar -Val-T-Ile-Ar -Pro-Phe SE ID NO:

Anaio 10 Ar -Val-T -Ile-His-Ala-Phe SE ID NO:

Analo 11 As -Ar -Va1-T-Ile-His-Pro-T SE ID NO:

Analo a Pro-Ar -Val-T-Ile-His-Pro-Phe SE ID NO:

Analo a As -Ar -Pro-T-Ile-His-Pro-Phe SE ID NO:

Analo a A -Ar -Val-To3 -Ile-His-Pro-Phe SE ID NO:

Analo a -Ar -norLeu-T SE ID NO:
-Ile-His-Pro-Phe 33 ' Analo e A -Ar -Va1-T-norLeu-His-PraPhe SE m NO: 34 Analo a As -Ar -Val-homoSer-T SE ID NO:
17 -Ile-His-Pro-Phe 35 Analo a -Ar -Val-T -Ile-His-Pro-Ile SE ID N0:

The polypeptides of . the instant invention may be synthesized by any conventional method, including, but not limited to, those set forth in J. M.
Stewart and J. D. Young, Solid Phase Peptide Synthesis, 2nd ed., Pierce Chemical Co., Rockford, Ill. (1984) and J. Meienhofer, Hormonal Proteins and Peptides, Vol. 2, Academic Press, New York, (1973) for solid phase synthesis and E. Schroder and K.
Lubke, The Peptides, Vol. 1, Academic Press, New York, (1965) for solution synthesis. The disclosures of the foregoing treatises are incorporated by reference herein.
In general, these methods involve the sequential addition of protected amino acids to a growing peptide chain (LJ.S. Patent No. 5,693,616, herein incorporated by reference in its entirety). Normally, either the amino or carboxyl group of the first amino acid and any reactive side chain group are protected. This protected amino acid is then either attached to an inert solid support, or utilized in solution, and the next amino acid in the sequence, also suitably protected, is added under conditions amenable to formation of the amide linkage. After all the desired amino acids have been linked in the proper sequence, protecting groups and any solid support are removed to afford the crude polypeptide. The polypeptide is desalted and purified, preferably chromatographically, to yield the final product.
Preferably, peptides are synthesized according to standard solid-phase methodologies, such as may be performed on an Applied Biosystems Model 430A
peptide synthesizer (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, Calif.), according to manufacturer's instructions. Other methods of synthesizing peptides or peptidomimetics, either by solid phase methodologies or in liquid phase, are well known to those skilled in the art.

WO 99/26644 .PCT/US98/25390 Alternatively, the peptides can be produced via recombinant DNA
technologies. Techniques for recombinant production of the peptides of the invention are well known in the art and can be found in references such as Gene Expression Technology (Methods in Enzymology, Vol. 185, edited by D. Goeddel, 1991.
Academic Press, San Diego, CA), "Guide to Protein Purification" in Me. thods in Enzymology (M.P. Deutshcer, ed., (1990) Academic Press, Inc.); PCR Protocols:
A
Guide to Methods and Applications (Innis, et al. 1990. Academic Press, San Diego, CA), Although All has been shown to increase the proliferation of a number of cell to types in vitro, it does not necessarily increase the proliferation of all cell types.
Studies have shown that All accelerates cellular proliferation through the production of transforming growth factor ~i (TGF(3) (Gibbons et al., J. Clin. Invest.
90:456-461 (1992). Thus, since only PDGF is known to be mitogenic for MSC, an ability of All to effect MSC proliferation would be unexpected. Furthermore, as Emerson (supra) has shown that inclusion of TGF-~ in most expansion cultures resulted in a decreased HPC and HLSPC yield, it is unexpected that AII, through the action of TGF-(3, would be of benefit in such situations. No studies have reported that All has an effect on the differentiation of either HPC or MSC.
In one aspect of the present invention, a method of increasing ex vivo HPC and 2o HLSPC proliferation by exposure to angiotensinogen, angiotensin I (AI), AI
analogues, AI fragments and analogues thereof, angiotensin II (AII), All analogues, All fragments and analogues thereof and All AT2 type 2 receptor agonists is disclosed. Experimental conditions for the isolation, purification, ex vivo growth and in vivo mobilization of HPC and HLSPC have been reported (Berardi, et aL, Blood 86(6):2123-2129, 1995; Fritsch, et al., Bone Marrow Transplantation 17:169-178, 1996; LaRochelle, et al., Nature Medicine 12:1329-1337, 1996; Traycoff, et al., Experimental Hematology 24:299-306, 1996; Holyoake, et al., Blood 87:4589-4595, 1996; Lemieux, et al., Blood 86:1339-1347, 1995 ; Talinadge, et al., Bone Marrow transplantation 17:101-109, 1996; Bodine, et al., Blood 88:89-97, 1996; all references hereby incorporated by reference herein.) In one embodiment of the invention, HPC are isolated from bone marrow, peripheral blood or umbilical cord blood. HPC is then selected for in these samples.
HPC-enriched samples are cultured under appropriate growth conditions, in the presence of angiotensin II (AII), All analogues, All fragments and analogues thereof and/or All AT2 type 2 receptor agonists. HPC proliferation is assessed at various time points during culture.
In a preferred embodiment, HPC and HLSPC are isolated from bone marrow aspirates from the posterior iliac crest. CD34+ HPC are isolated from the aspirate by attaching a biotinylated monoclonal antibody specific for CD34 (available from Becton Dickinson, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) to a streptavidin affinity column (Ceprate SC; CellPro, Bothell, WA, USA) and passing the aspirate through the column, followed by appropriate column washing and stripping, according to standard techniques in the art. CD34+ HPC are suspended in culture medium and incubated in 2o the presence of between 0.1 ng/ml and 1 mg/ml angiotensin II (AII), All analogues, All fragments ~ and analogues thereof and/or All AT2 type 2 receptor agonists.
The cells are expanded for a period of between 8 and 21 days and cellular proliferation with accompanying differentiation is assessed via phase microscopy following standard methylcellulose colony formation assays (Berardi, et al., supra) at various WO y~~~ PCTNS98/25390 points during this time period. Similarly, "self renewal" of HPC is assessed periodically by reactivity to an antibody directed against CD34+.
In a further preferred embodiment, HPC that have been cultured in the presence of angiotensin II (AII), All analogues, All fi~ag~ments and analogues thereof and/or All AT2 type 2 receptor agonists are used for autologous transplantation, to reconstitute a depleted hematopoietic system. Prior to transplantation, the cells are rinsed to remove all traces of culture fluid, resuspended in an appropriate medium and then pelleted and rinsed several times. After the final rinse, the cells are resuspended at between 0.7 x 106 and 50 x 106 cells per ml in an appropriate medium and reinfused to into a subject through intravenous infilsions. Following transplantation, subject peripheral blood samples are evaluated for increases in the number of HPC, HLSPC, and more mature blood cells at various time points by standard flow cytometry and cell sorting techniques. (Talmadge, et al., supra).
In another aspect of the present invention, a method of increasing ex vivo MSC
and lineage-specific mesenchymal cell proliferation by exposure to angiotensinogen, AI, AI analogues, AI fragments and analogues thereof, AII, All analogues, All fragments and analogues thereof and All AT2 type 2 receptor agonists is disclosed.
Experimental conditions for the isolation, purification and in vitro growth of lineage-specific mesenchymal cells, such as bone-marrow derived stromal cells, have been 2o reported (Johnson and Dorshkind, Blood 68(6):1348-1354 (1986); hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety). Other reports describe different conditions for culturing lineage-specific mesenchymal cells in vitro (Bab, et al., J.
Cell Sci.
84:139-151 (1986); Benayahu, et al., J. Cellular Physiology 140:1-7 (1989);
both references hereby incorporated by reference in their entirety). .

wo ~nssoa PCTNS98n5390 In one embodiment of the present invention, MSC are isolated fibm bone marrow aspirates finm the posterior iliac crest and/or femoral head cancellous bone, purified, resuspended in appropriate growth medium, counted and diluted to an appropriate concentration to seed in tissue culture plates. Purified MSC are cultured in an appropriate growth medium and growth conditions in a humidified atmosphere.
The cells are allowed su~cient time to attach to the tissue culture dish, whereupon non-attached cells are discarded. Adherent cells are placed in growth medium at 37°
C in a humidified atmosphere in the presence of between 0.1 ng/ml and 1 mg/ml angiotensinogen, AI, AI analogues, AI fragments and analogues thereof, AII, All 1o analogues, All fragments and analogues thereof and/or All AT2 type 2 receptor agonists. 'The cells are expanded for a period of between 2 and 21 days and cellular proliferation is assessed at various time points during this time period.
Subsequent medium changes are performed as needed. When the primary cultures are nearly confluent, the cells are harvested for reinfusion into a subject. Cells are examined microscopically to verify the absence of contamination. The cells are rinsed to remove all traces of culture fluid, resuspended in an appropriate medium and then pelleted and rinsed several times. After the final rinse, the cells are resuspended at between 0.7 x 106 and 50 x 106 cells per ml in an appropriate medium and reinfused into a subject through intravenous infusions. Subjects are evaluated for MSC
proliferation in vivo by means of a repeat diagnostic bone marrow aspirate and biopsy to be compared with the original aspirate and biopsy. In a preferred embodiment, in vivo proliferation is assessed by reactivity to an antibody directed against a protein known to be present in higher concentrations in proliferating cells than in non-proliferating cells, such as proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, or cyclin). Such WO 99/26644 PCTNS98~25390 antibodies are commercially available from a number of sources, including Zymed Laboratories (South San Francisco, California).
In a preferred embodiment, isolated MSC are placed into Dulbecco's medium MEM (DMEM-LG) (Gibco, Grand Island, NY, USA). The cells are purified by a series of steps. Initially, the cells are pelleted and resuspended in complete medium.
The cells are centrifuged through a 70% Percoll (Sigma, St. Louis, MO, USA) gradient at 460X g for 15 minutes, the top 25% of the gradients are transferred to a tube containing 30 ml of complete medium and centrifuged to pellet the cells, which will then be resuspended in complete medium, counted and diluted to seed in 100-mm io plates at 50 x 106 nucleated cells per plate.
In a further preferred embodiment, purified MSC are cultured in complete medium at 37 °C in a humidified atmosphere containing 95% air and 5%
C02 and the cells are allowed to attach for 3 days, whereupon non-adherent cells are removed by changing the culture medium. Cellular proliferation of adherent cells and the presence of normal MSC morphology are assessed by phase microscopy at various time points during the subsequent growth period. Subsequent medium changes are performed every four days. When the primary cultures are nearly confluent, the cells are detached with 0.25% trypsin containing 0.1 mM EDTA (Gibco) and either diluted and replated as second passage cells, or used for reinfusion into a subject.
Preferably, cells are rinsed free of culture fluid using Tyrode's solution (Gibco). After the final rinse, cells are placed in Tyrode's solution and placed in an incubator at 37 ° C for one hour in order to shed serum proteins. The Tyrode's solution is removed and the cells are preferably placed into TC 199 medium (Gibco) supplemented with 1 %
serum albumin. The cells are rinsed a number of times with this medium and after the final rinse MSC are resuspended in TC199 plus 1% serum albumin. Subsequently, MSC -are injected slowly intravenously over 15 minutes. Evaluation of subsequent bone marrow aspirates are conducted up to 8 weeks after injection.
In a preferred embodiment, assessment of the in vivo proliferative effect of angiotensinogen, AI, AI analogues, AI fragments and analogues thereof, AII, All analogues, All fragments and analogues thereof and All AT2 type 2 receptor agonists on MSC and mesenchymal lineage-specific cells is done by histochemical evaluations of various tissues. In a preferred embodiment, in vivo proliferation of MSC
and mesenchymal lineage-specific cells is assessed by reactivity to an antibody directed 1o against a protein known to be present in higher concentrations in proliferating cells than in non-proliferating cells, such as proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, or cyclin).
In a further aspect of the present invention, the effect of the angiotensinogen, AI, AI
analogues, AI fragments and analogues thereof, AII, All analogues, All fragments and analogues thereof and All AT2 type 2 receptor agonists on HPC, HLSPC, MSC
and mesenchymal lineage-specific cell differentiation are assessed by examination of changes in gene expression, phenotype, morphology, or any other method that distinguishes a cell undergoing differentiation from a progenitor cell. In one embodiment, MSC are incubated with angiotensinogen, AI, AI analogues, AI
2o fragments and analogues thereof, AII, All analogues, All fragments and analogues thereof or All AT2 type 2 receptor agonists as described above. MSC are then tested for the production of colony stimulating factors into the culture supernatant as a demonstration of . MSC differentiation. In a preferred embodiment, the colony stimulating factor tested for is granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor.
-p gg~ PCTNS98/2.5390 In another preferred embodiment, macrophage differentiation to an elicited or -activated state is assessed after exposure to angiotensinogen, AI, AI
analogues, AI
fragments and analogues thereof, AII, All analogues, All fragments and analogues thereof or All AT2 type 2 receptor agonists, as described above. The macrophages are assessed for phagocytotic ability by any of the well known art methods, including but not limited to determination of the number of macrophages that have ingested opsonized yeast particles, and the number of yeast per macrophage ingested.
In another preferred embodiment, the respiratory burst activity of leukocytes is assessed after exposure to angiotensinogen, AI, AI analogues, AI fragments and analogues thereof, AII, All analogues, All fragments and analogues thereof or All AT2 type 2 receptor agonists, as described above. The leukocytes are assessed for respiratory burst activity by any method known in the art, including but not limited to the ability to generate hydrogen peroxide via the respiratory burst system.
In another aspect of the present invention, angiotensinogen, AI, AI analogues, AI fragments and analogues thereof, AII, All analogues, All fragments and analogues thereof or All AT2 type 2 receptor agonists are used to increase in vivo HPC, HLSPC, MSC and mesenchymal lineage-specific cell proliferation. For use in increasing proliferation of HPC, HI,SCP, MSC and mesenchymal lineage-specific cells, AII, All analogues, All fragments and analogues thereof and All AT2 type 2 receptor agonists may be administered orally, parentally, by inhalation spray, rectally, or topically in dosage unit formulations containing conventional pharmaceutically acceptable carriers, adjuvants, and vehicles. The term parenteral as used herein includes, subcutaneous, intravenous, intramuscular, intrastennal, intratendinous, intraspinal, intracranial, intrathoracic, infusion techniques or intraperitoneally.

wo ~ns~wa PCTNS98n5390 In a further embodiment of the present invention, a method of increasing in vivo HPC, HLSPC, MSC and lineage-specific mesenchymal cell proliferation by exposure to angiotensinogen, AI, AI analogues, AI fragments and analogues thereof, AII, All analogues, All fragments and analogues thereof and All AT2 type 2 receptor agonists is disclosed, either in the presence or absence of other growth factors and cytokines.
The dosage regimen for increasing in wivo proliferation or differentiation of HPC, HLSCP, MSC and lineage-specific mesenchymal cell with angiotensinogen, AI, AI analogues, AI fragments and analogues thereof, AII, All analogues, All fragments 1o and analogues thereof and All AT2 type 2 receptor agonists is based on a variety of factors, including the type of injury, the age, weight, sex, medical condition of the individual, the severity of the condition, the route of administration, and the particular compound employed. Thus, the dosage regimen may vary widely, but can be determined routinely using standard methods. Dosage levels of the order of between 0.1 nglml and 100 mg/ml angiotensinogen, AI, AI analogues, AI fragments and analogues thereof, angiotensin II (AII), All analogues, All fragments and analogues thereof and/or All AT2 type 2 receptor agonists are useful for all methods of use disclosed herein.
The angiotensinogen, AI, AI analogues, AI fragments and analogues thereof, 2o AII, All analogues, All fragments and analogues thereof and All AT2 type 2 receptor agonists may be made up in a solid form (including granules, powders or suppositories) or in a liquid form (e.g., solutions, suspensions, or emulsions). The angiotensinogen, AI, AI analogues, AI fragments and analogues thereof, AII, All analogues, All fragments and analogues thereof and All AT2 type 2 receptor agonists wo s~n~ . PCTNS98n5390 may be subjected to conventional pharmaceutical operations such as sterilization and/or may contain conventional adjuvants, such as preservatives, stabilizers, wetting agents, emulsifiers, buffers etc.
While angiotensinogen, AI, AI analogues, AI fragments and analogues thereof, AII, All analogues, All fragments and analogues thereof and All AT2 type 2 receptor agonists can be administered as the sole active pharmaceutical agent, they can also be used in combination with one or more other agents. When administered as a combination, the therapeutic agents can be formulated as separate compositions that are given at the same time or different times, or the therapeutic agents can be to given as a single composition.
For administration, the angiotensinogen, AI, AI analogues, AI fragments and analogues thereof, AII, All analogues, All fragments and analogues thereof and All AT2 type 2 receptor agonists are ordinarily combined with one or more adjuvants appropriate for the indicated route of administration. The compounds may be admixed with lactose, sucrose, starch powder, cellulose esters of alkanoic acids, stearic acid, talc, magnesium stearate, magnesium oxide, sodium and calcium salts of phosphoric and sulphuric acids, acacia, gelatin, sodium alginate, polyvinylpyrrolidine, and/or polyvinyl alcohol, and tableted or encapsulated for conventional administration. Alternatively, the compounds of this invention may be dissolved in 2o saline, water, polyethylene glycol, propylene glycol, carboxymethyl cellulose colloidal solutions, ethanol, corn oil, peanut oil, cottonseed oil, sesame oil, tragacanth gum, and/or various buffers. Other adjuvants and modes of administration are well known in the pharmaceutical art. The carrier or diluent may include time delay WO ggPCTNS98/25390 material, such as glyceryl monostearate or glyceryl distearate alone or with a wax, or other materials well known in the art.
In a preferred embodiment of the present invention, the angiotensinogen, AI, AI analogues, AI fragments and analogues thereof, AII, All analogues, All fragments and analogues thereof and All AT2 type 2 receptor agonist is administered topically.
A suitable topical dose of active ingredient of angiotensinogen, AI, AI
analogues, AI
fragments and analogues thereof, AII, All analogues, All fragments and analogues thereof and/or All AT2 type 2 receptor agonists is 1 mg/ml administered twice daily.
For topical administration, the active ingredient may comprise from 0.001% to 10%
to w/w, e.g., from 1% to 2% by weight of the formulation, although it may comprise as much as 10% w/w, but preferably not more than 5% w/w, and more preferably from 0.1 % to 1 % of the formulation.
Formulations suitable for topical administration include liquid or semi-liquid preparations suitable for penetration through the skin {e.g., liniments, lotions, ointments, creams, or pastes) and drops suitable for administration to the eye, ear, or nose.
The present invention, by providing a method for enhanced proliferation of HPC and HLSPC, will greatly increase the clinical benefits of HPC
transplantation.
This is true both for increased "self renewal", which will provide a larger supply of 2o HPC capable of reconstituting the entire hematopoietic system, and for proliferation with differentiation, which will provide a larger supply of lineage-specific progenitor cells, for more rapid reconstitution of mature, functioning blood cells.
Similarly, methods that increase in vivo proliferation of HPC will enhance the utility of HPC
transplantation therapy by rapidly increasing local concentrations of HPC (and wo .~ns~ Pcrius9sns39o HLSPC) in the bone marrow, .and thereby more rapidly producing functioning blood cells.
Similarly, methods that increase the proliferation of MSC and mesenchymal lineage-specific cells, will greatly increase the utility of MSC therapy in the repair of skeletal tissues such as bone, cartilage, tendon and ligament. More rapid production of large numbers of MSC and mesenchymal lineage-specific cells will permit more efficient delivery of high densities of these cells to a defect site and more rapid in vivo amplification in the local concentration of stem and lineage-specific cells at an appropriate repair site.
1o The method of the present invention also increases the potential utility of HPC
and HLSPC as vehicles for gene therapy in hematopoietic disorders, as well as MSC
and mesenchymal lineage-specific cells as vehicles for gene therapy in skeletal disorders by more efficiently providing a large number of such cells for transfection, and also by providing a more efficient means to rapidly expand transfected HPC, HLSPC, MSC and mesenchymal lineage-specific cells.
The present invention may be better understood with reference to the accompanying examples that are intended for purposes of illustration only and should not be construed to limit the scope of the invention, as defined by the claims appended hereto.
Example 1. Macrophage Differentiation: Phagocytosis Resident peritoneal macrophages have very little phagocytic activity.
Exposure of macrophages to inflammatory or activating agents will increase this macrophage fiinction. Resident peritoneal macrophages were harvested from -mice or Sprague Dawley rats and resuspended at a concentration of 1 x 106 cellslml in -phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Five separate 0.5 ml cell aliquots were placed on a glass coverslip in a 35 mm petri dish. Prior to incubation, either 0.5 ml of PBS, AII, or All analogues or fragments at between 1-1000 ug/ml final concentration was added to the individual cover slips. The dishes containing the cover slips were then incubated at 37°C for 4 hours, after which the cover slips were washed 3 to 6 times with PBS. Opsonized yeast particles (Sigma Chemical Co.) (yeast opsonized with adult serum from the same species as that under study) were added to the cover slips and incubated for 2 hours, after which the cover slips were again washed with PBS
and inverted onto a glass slide. The number of macrophages that ingested yeast and the number of yeast per macrophage ingested was then determined microscopically.
At least 100 macrophages per coverslip were counted. The data from this study are summarized in Tables 3 and 4 and Figures 1 and 2. Table 5 describes the All analogues and fragments used in these studies.
Table 3. Effect of All on the P6agocytic Capability of Murine Peritoneal Macrophages Concentration of All (pg/ml) # Macrophages with Yeast Yeast #

Ingesting 1 1 6.5 16.7 25.6 # Yeast/M0 0.01 0.01 0.24 0.58 1.00 Table 4. Effect of All on the P6agocytic Capability of Rat Peritoneal Macrophages Numberof Macrophages with Yeast (Yeast Number) % wlYeast#/Cell 0 1-3 4-6 >_7 (Peptide) 4~8~~

AII-0 88 2 0 0 2.2 0.04 100 90 30 20 0 35.7 1.14 1000 50 54 40 25 70.4 2.86 AII(1-7)-0 90 3 0 0 3.2 0.06 100 100 21 5 0 20.6 0.53 1000 90 30 10 0 30.8 0.85 GSD22A-0 90 1 0 0 1.1 0.02 100 100 26 5 0 23.7 0.59 1000 100 22 1 0 18.7 0.40 GSD 24-B-0 100 2 0 0 2.0 0.04 100 100 25 5 0 23.1 0.58 1000 100 10 0 0 9.1 0.18 GSD28-0 100 1 0 0 1.0 0.02 100 100 1 0 0 1.0 0.02 1000 100 1 0 0 1.0 0.02 Table 5. Designation for Analogues Name Abbreviation Sequence SEQ ID NO:

GSD 28 Ilea-AB DRVYIHPI SEQ ID N0:37 GSD 24B Pro3-All DRPYIHPF SEQ ID N0:31 GSD 22A Ala4-AIII RVYAHPF SEQ ID N0:18 AII(1-7) DRVYIHP SEQ ID N0:4 Exposure to 10 pg/ml or greater All tremendously increased the phagocytic capability of peritoneal macrophages. Less than 1% of cells were phagocytic in the resident population (0.01 yeast per cell observed). After exposure to All this increased to over 25% phagocytic at the highest concentration with on average 1 yeast observed per macrophage (25 fold increase in the number of macrophages able to phagocytose and a 100-fold increase in the number of particles phagocytized).

WO 99/26644 PCI'/US98I25390 As shown in Table 4, both concentrations of the peptides tested (with the -exception of GSD 28) elevated that phagocytic capability of rat macrophages.
However, none of the analogues resulted in the magnitude of an effect observed with AII. This suggests that All and, to a lesser extent, All analogues will stimulate macrophage differentiation to an elicited or activated state, which leads to the ingestion and clearance of bacteria and cellular debris.
Example 2 Leukocyte D fferentiation: Respiratory Burst The respiratory burst of leukocytes {macrophages and polymorphonuclear l0 neutrophils) is one component of the mediator system used to kill bacteria.
As with phagocytosis, the level of this respiratory burst activity in resident macrophages is low. With differentiation, either to an elicited (inflammatory) or activated state, this functional activity is significantly elevated. Studies were conducted to assess the effect of in vitro exposure of marine or rat peritoneal macrophages and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to various concentrations of All on the capacity to generate hydrogen peroxide via the respiratory burst system. For the human studies, five different donors were examined.
The marine or rat peritoneal cells were harvested by lavage with 5-15 ml of cold PBS with 0.5% bovine serum albumin. The human PBMC were harvested by 2o venipuncture from nonmal human volunteers and isolated from peripheral blood by Ficoll Hypaque density centrifugation. After isolation, the cells were resuspended at 1 x lOb cells/ml and placed at 100 ~,1 per well into 96 well plates. The cells were incubated with various concentrations of All or All analogues and fragments for 4 hours at 37°C. The cells were then preloaded with a fluorescent probe for hydrogen WO 99/26644 PGTNS98~25390 peroxide, 2,7 dichlorofluorescein acetate, which is nonfluorescent in the absence of -hydrogen peroxide. Fifteen minutes later, 10 ng/ml of phorbol myristate acetate (+pMA) or PBS (-PMA) was added to stimulate the production of hydrogen peroxide.
One hour after stimulation the level of fluorescence produced was measured on a Cytofluor 2350 multiwell fluorometer. Representative results from this study are shown in Figures 3-8.
In the absence of PMA or peptide, no hydrogen peroxide production is observed. Some variability in the response to All was seen (i.e. the concentration of All necessary to increase the level of this function); however, in all studies All 1o increased the ability of leukocytes to generate hydrogen peroxide both alone and in response to stimulation with PMA. Further, the effect of pre-exposure to analogues and fragments of All (GSD 22A, GSD 24B, GSD 28 and AII(1-7)) on the respiratory burst activity of PBMC was assessed (Figures 5-8). For all analogues and fragments, a much higher concentration of the peptide was needed to increase the respiratory burst activity. Up to 100 times more of these analogues were necessary;
however, an increase in the respiratory burst capacity was observed for all analogues tested. The analogues were able to stimulate that function both in the presence and absence of PMA. These data indicate that All was able to stimulate the differentiation of monocytes/macrophages from three species.
Example 3. Proliferative response of human lymphocytes Upon stimulation of lymphocytes with mitogen or antigen, these cells undergo blastogenesis and proliferation. In the absence of such stimuli, proliferation is seldom observed. One method to measure cellular proliferation in a short term assay is via WO 9g~ PCT/US98/Z5390 measurement of the amount of the nucleotide thymidine that is incorporated into newly synthesized DNA. The effect of All on the proliferation of human PBMC in the presence and absence of pokeweed mitogen ("PWM") was assessed.
Human PBMC were collected from normal volunteers and isolated via Ficoll Hypaque (Sigma Chemical, St. Louis) density centrifugation. After isolation of the buffy coat, the cells were washed 3X to remove the Ficoll Hypaque, counted in trypan blue (0.01%) and resuspended at a concentration of 1 x 106 cells/ml in RPMI

containing 10% fetal calf serum and antibiotics. A 100 pl aliquot of cells was added to each well. Thereafter, various concentrations (0.1 to 1000 p,g/ml final 1o concentration) of All in RPMI 1640 containing 10% FCS and antibiotics were added to various wells in triplicate. To the appropriate wells, PWM (20 ~,g/ml final concentration) was added. These plates were incubated at 37°C in 5% C02 for 48 hours. Subsequently, 0.5 p,Ci of 3H-thymidine was added to each well, which were incubated at 37°C for an additional 24 hours prior to harvest by a multiwell automated sample harvester (Skatron) onto glass fiber filters. These filters were dried, placed in scintillation fluid and the amount of thymidine incorporated was determined by beta counting. The results are shown in Figure 9.
In the absence of mitogen, no increase in thymidine incorporation was observed after exposure to AII. However, in two separate experiments (cells from 2 2o different donors) All was shown to increase the amount of thymidine incorporated 50% to 100% in response to PWM. These data show that All is able to increase the proliferation of cells from the hematopoietic lineage (e.g. lymphocytes).

p 99PCTNS98/25390 Example 4 Rat Mesenchymal item Cell Proliferation These studies were conducted to determine the effect that All would have on the proliferation of MSC. Bone marrow cells were harvested from the femur and tibia of female Sprague Dawley rats by flushing the bones with Dulbecco's Minimal Essential Medium-High Glucose ("DMEM-HG") with a syringe and an 18 gauge needle. These cells were cultured in 24 well plates at 5 x 103 cells/mm2 in DMEM-HG containing selected lots of fetal calf serum (FCS) and antibiotics (complete medium) at 37°C incubator containing 5% C02 in air. Twenty-four hours after the initiation of the cultures the medium and nonadherent cells were aspirated and fresh to medium was added. To each of these several wells, complete medium with (1 to 100 pg/ml) or without All was added. The migration of cells from the clones and their proliferation was followed by microscopic examination. Every 4 days the old medium was removed and fresh medium was added to the cultures.
The data from these experiments are shown in Figures 10 and 11. Addition of All to the cultures significantly increased the number of sites from which the MSC
were migrating (CFU) and the size (number of cells) of the colonies formed.
This occurred only in the presence of serum that in itself would support MSC
growth, albeit to a lesser extent. As can be seen, All caused an increase in the number of MSC in a concentration dependent manner at all time points examined in the presence of two different serum lots. These data support the hypothesis that All can increase the proliferation of rat MSC.

WO 99/Zb644 PCfNS98I25390 Example 5 Effect of Angiotensin II on Marine Progenitor Cells HPC were harvested from C57B1/6 mice by immunomagnetic amity chromatography and placed in semi-solid cultures with optimal growth medium.
At various times after initiation of culture, the formation of colonies and the size of the colonies (number of cells/colony) were assessed microscopically.
Female C57B1/6 mice were purchased from Simonson and used as a source of bone marrow cells in this study. The bone marrow was harvested, either from untreated mice or from mice injected with 5-fluorouracil (5-FLn (3 mg/mouse;
approximately 150 mg/kg) in the tail vein 48 hours before harvest, from the femur and 1o tibia of mice by flushing with phosphate buffered saline (PBS), pH 7.4, containing 2%
fetal bovine serum (FBS) with a 21-gauge needle. The eluant from the flushing was centrifuged and the pellet was resuspended at 4 x 10' nucleated cells/ml in PBS
containing PBS containing 2% FBS and 5% normal rat serum.
The reagents for immunomagnetic labeling were purchased from Stem Cell Technologies, Inc. (Vancouver, BC). Biotin-labeled monoclonal antibodies to the following marine lineage-specific cell surface antigens were included in a cocktail for HPC enrichment and used according to the manufacturer's instructions: CDS (Ly-1), CD45-R (B220), CDllb (Mac-1), Myeloid Differentiation Antigen (Gr-1) and Erythroid Cells (TER 119) Ten ~,l of antibody cocktail was added for each of the 2 2o sets of bone marrow (normal and S-FU-treated), mixed and allowed to incubate at 4°C
for 15 minutes. The cells were then resuspended at 4 x 10' cells/ml in PBS
containing 2% FBS. The antibody cocktail was then washed out and 100 ~.1 anti-biotin tetramer was added for each ml of cells. The suspension was mixed and incubated at 4°C for wo .~n~ PCTNS98n5390 15 minutes. Sixty ~1 of magnetic colloid was then added for each ml of cells, the combination was mixed and incubated at 4°C for 15 minutes to yield the immunomagnetically-labeled bone marrow cells.
A column containing a stainless steel matrix was prepared by washing the matrix with PBS followed by washing with PBS containing 2% protein. The immunomagnetically-labeled bone marrow cells were loaded onto the column and unlabeled cell-containing medium (enriched HPC) was collected in the flow through fraction at a flow rate of 0.2 ml/minute. Medium was added to the top of the column so that it did not run dry until 8 to 10 ml of enriched HPC were harvested.
to Approximately 2% of the cells loaded onto the column were isolated in the enriched HPC fractions.
The enriched HPC cell fractions were diluted into a semi-solid medium containing 0.9% methylcellulose in alpha minimal essential medium (alpha MEM), 30% fetal calf serum, 1 % bovine serum albumin, 10'~ M 2-mercaptoethanol, 2 mM
L-glutamine, and 2% conditioned medium containing colony stimulating factors.
The conditioned medium was supernatant from splenocyte cultures (1 x 106 cells/ml) incubated for 48 hours in RPMI 1640 containing 10 p.g/ml pokeweed mitogen {PVVM), 10% FCS, and antibiotics. Various concentrations of AII, between 0 and pg/ml were added in a small volume to the wells of microtiter dishes, to which 2o between 2 x 104 cells/ml for the normal and 2.5 x 104 cells/ml for the 5-FU
treated cells. The cells were incubated at 37°C and 5% C02 for 14 days. At day 14 only, macroscopic cell colonies were observed in the wells containing enriched HPC
from untreated (normal) mice treated with 10 pg/ml (18 macroscopic colonies) and WO 99lZ6644 .PCT/US98/25390 ~.g/ml All (100 macroscopic colonies). Microscopic evaluation of the cells was w performed at various days after initiation of incubation, and the results are summarized in Figures 12-17.
Figures 12-14 and 16 represent the number of colonies containing more than a certain number of cells/colony as a function of the duration and concentration of All exposure {Figures 12-14 for normal cells; Figure 16 for 5-FU treated cells.) Figures and 17 represent the number of cells per colony seen after incubation of from normal (Figure 15) or 5-FU treated (Figure 17) mice with various concentrations of All as a function of time. The results clearly demonstrate that HPC colony size 10 increases proporkionately with exposure to increased concentrations of AII, and thus that All increases HPC proliferation.
Example 6. Effect of All Analogues and Fragments on Rat Mesenchymal Stem Cell Proliferation 15 These studies were conducted to determine the effect that inclusion of All analogues and fragments in the cell culture of MSC would have on the proliferation of these cells. Bone marrow cells were harvested from the femur and tibia of female Sprague Dawley rats by flushing the bones with Dulbecco's Minimal Essential Medium-High Glucose ("DMEM-HG") with a syringe and an 18 gauge needle.
2o These cells were cultured in 24 well plates at 5 x 103 cells/mm2 in DMEM-HG
containing selected lots of fetal calf serum (FCS) and antibiotics (complete medium) at 37°C incubator containing 5% C02 in air. Twenty-four hours after the initiation of the cultures the medium and nonadherent cells were aspirated and fresh medium was added. To each of these several wells, complete medium with {1 to 100 ~g/ml) or WO 99n6644 PCT/US98/25390 without All analogues and fragments {see Table 5) was added. The migration of cells from the clones and their proliferation was followed by microscopic examination.
Every 4 days the old medium was removed and fresh medium was added to the cultures.
Addition of All analogues or All fragments to these cultures had a profound effect on the number of sites from which MSC were migrating (CFL)) and the size (number of cells) of the colonies formed. The results from these studies can be seen in Figures 18-21. As can be seen, All analogues and fragments caused an increase in the number of MSC at all time points examined. These data indicate that All to analogues and fragments can increase the proliferation of rat MSC.
Example 7. Di, f~''erentiation of MSC that have undergone proliferation in the presence of AII.
Mesenchymal stem cells isolated from bone marmw and grown under appropriate conditions can express characteristics of multiple cell types, including cells involved in the generation of bone, cartilage, muscle and tendons.
Osteogenic cells (cells that can form bone tissue) express the enzyme alkaline phosphatase when cultured in medium that drives them toward their osteogenic differentiation.
2o Bone marrow from female Sprague Dawley rats were harvested by flushing the femur with medium. The cells were placed in culture dishes 9 cm2 in diameter, allowed to adhere overnight, and then placed in DMEM-LG medium containing antibiotics and 10% fetal calf serum together with varying concentrations of AII. At various times after culture initiation, the cells were washed with Tyrode's buffer and placed in osteogenic medium (DMEM-LG containing 10% fetal calf serum, 100 nM

dexamethasone and 0.05 mM ascorbic acid) for 4 days prior to assessment of the level of alkaline phosphatase activity per well. Briefly, the wells were washed with Tyrode's buffer and 1 ml alkaline phosphatase substrate solution (SO mM
glycine, pH
10.5, containing 1 mM magnesium chloride and 2.5 mM p-nitrophenyl phosphate) to each well. Fifteen minutes after addition of this aqueous substrate, the buger was removed from the culture and mixed with 1 ml of 1N sodium hydroxide to stop the reaction. The absorbance of the resultant mixture at 405 nm was then determined via spectroscopy. The level of alkaline phosphatase activity is expressed as the level of absorbance per culture dish. These data are shown in Figure 22 and demonstrate that l0 All can accelerate the proliferation of cells that express alkaline phosphatase when placed in medium appropriate to induce osteogenic differentiation.
Example $. Induction of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation by All Studies have also shown that exposure of marine bone marrow stem cells to All increases the formation of colonies in the absence of exogenous colony stimulating factors. As these factors are necessary for the formation of colonies, these data suggested that All may have stimulated non-hematopoietic cells (i.e.:
mesenchymal cells) to release the necessary colony stimulating factors. This was further confirmed by data from cultures of further purified hematopoietic progenitor 2o cells. After fiu~ther purification of lineage-negative bone marrow cells to those that express the protein Scal, which eliminates mesenchymal cells from the culture, All increased the number and size of colonies formed only in the presence of exogenous colony stimulating factors (U.S. Application Serial No. 09/012,400, hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety).

qrp gg/~44 PCT/US98/25390 One factor whose _ production is induced during differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells is granulocyte-macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Therefore, the effect of All on the differentiation of mesenchymal cells was assessed by the production of colony stimulating factors, specifically GM-CSF, into the culture supernatant.
Bone marrow cells were harvested from the femur and tibia of C57B1/6 mice (Baffin and Kingdom, Gilroy, CA) with saline containing 2% fetal calf serum.
Thereafter, the red blood cells were lysed by brief exposure to a hypotonic ammonium chloride solution. The nucleated cells were then resuspended in 3 ml of SX
phosphate 1o buffered saline (PBS; pH 7.2) and rapidly layered over 7 ml of Percoll (70%
Percoll gradient separation). This combination of nucleated bone marrow cells and Percoll were centrifuged at 1800 rpm for 20 minutes. After centrifugation, the cells in the upper 25% of the Percoll gradient were harvested and washed 3 times with PBS
to remove excess Percoll. The cells were then resuspended at 4 x 105 cells/ml in alpha ~ 5 minimal essential medium containing 10% horse serum, 10% fetal calf serum and 5 x 10-5 M 2-mercaptoethanol. These cells were cultured overnight in 24-well plates to allow adherence to the tissue culture plastic. Thereafter, the non-adherent cells were removed by washing with PBS and the medium was replaced with fresh medium containing various concentrations of angiotensin II (AII) (0.01- 100 pg/ml).
Twenty 2o four, 48, or 72 hours after addition of AII, supernatants were harvested and frozen until the time of assay.
After all samples were collected, the level of GM-CSF in the supernatant was measured by Quantikine ELISA (R & D Systems, Minneapolis, Ml~ according to the manufacturer's instructions. As shown by the data shown in Figure 23, exposure to wo ~~ pcrms~s~o All at concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 100 pg~ml induced an increase in the -production of GM-CSF by marine mesenchymal stern cells. These data demonstrate that All can induce mesenchymal stem cell differentiation. -WO 99/26644 PCT/US98n5390 SEQUENCE LISTING
<170> PatentIn Ver. 2.0 <210> 1 <211> 8 <212> PR't' <213> Artificial Sequence <220>
<223> Description of Artificial Sequence:angiotensin II
<400> 1 Asp Arg Val Tyr Ile His Pro Phe WO 99n6644 PCT/US98/25390 <210> 2 ' <211> 7 <212> PRT
<213> Artificial Sequence <220>
<223> Description of Artificial Sequence:AII2-8 <400> 2 Arg Val Tyr Ile His Pro Phe <210> 3 <211> 6 WO 99/26644 .PCTNS98l25390 <212> PRT
<213> Artificial Sequence <220>
<223> Description of Artificial Sequence:AII(3-8) <400> 3 Val Tyr Ile His Pro Phe <210 > 4 <211> 7 <212> PRT
<213> Artificial Sequence wo .~n~ pcrius9sns39o <220>
<223> Description of Artificial Sequence:AII(1-7) <400> 4 Asp Arg Val Tyr Ile His Pro <210> 5 <211> 6 <212> PRT
<213> Artificial Sequence <220>
<223> Description of Artificial Sequence:AII(2-7) wo ~n~ Pcrnrs9sns39o <400> 5 Arg Val Tyr Ile His Pro <210> 6 <211> 5 <212> PRT
<213> Artificial Sequence <220>
<223> Description of Artificial Sequence:AII(3-7) <400> 6 wo _~ns~a Pcnus9sns39o Val Tyr Ile His Pro <210> 7 <211> 4 <212> PRT
<213> Artificial Sequence <220>
<223> Description of Artificial Sequence:AII(5-8) <400> 7 Ile His Pro Phe WO 99n6644 PCT/US98/25390 <210> 8 <211> 6 <212> PRT
<213> Artificial Sequence <220>
<223> Description of Artificial Sequence:AII(1-6) <400> S
Asp Arg Val Tyr Ile His <210> 9 <211> 4 <212> PRT
<213> Artificial Sequence <220>
<223> Description of Artificial Sequence:AII(1-5) <400> 9 Asp Arg Val Tyr Ile <210> 10 <211> 4 <212> PRT

wo ~n6ta4 Pc'riusnns39o <213> Artificial Sequence <220>
<223> Description of Artificial Sequence:AII(1-4).
<400> 10 Asp Arg Val Tyr <210> 11 <211> 3 <212> PRT
<213> Artificial Sequence wo ~n~w rcr~s9sns39o <220>
<223> Description of Artificial Sequence:AII(1-3) <400> 11 Asp Arg Val <210> 12 <211> 7 <212> PRT
<213~ Artificial Sequence <220>
<223> Description of Artificial Sequence:AII analogue WO 99IZ6644 _PCT/US98/Z5390 <400> 12 ' Arg Nle Tyr Ile His Pro Phe <210> 13 <211> 7 <212> PRT
<213> Artificial Sequence <220>
<223> Description of Artificial Sequence:AII analogue <400> 13 Arg Val Tyr Nle His Pro Phe wo ~n~ pc~rys9sns39o <210> 14 <211> 3 <212> PRT
<213> Artificial Sequence <220>
<223> Description of Artificial Sequence:AII(6-8) <400> 14 His Pro Phe WO 99n6644 PCTNS98/25390 <210> 15 <211> 5 <212> PRT
<213> Artificial Sequence <220>
<223> Description of Artificial Sequence:AII(4-S) <400> 15 Tyr Ile His Pro Phe <210> 16 <211> 6 wo ~ns~wa rcrn_ls9sns~o <212> PRT
<213> Artificial Sequence <220>
<223> Description of Artificial Sequence:AII analogue class <400> 16 Xaa Xaa Tyr Xaa His Pro Phe <210> 17 <211> 7 <212> PRT

WO 99/Z6644 .PCTNS98/Z5390 <213> Artificial Sequence <220>
<223> .Description of Artificial Sequence:AII analogue <400> 17 Arg Val Tyr Gly His Pro Phe <210> 18 <211> 7 <212> PRT
<213> Artificial Sequence wo .99n~ Pcrius9sns39o <220>
<223> Description of Artificial Sequence:AII analogue <400> 18 Arg Val Tyr Ala His Pro Phe <210> 19 <211> 8 <212> PRT
<213> Artificial Sequence <220>
<223> Description of Artificial Sequence:AII analogue i wo .~nss~4 rcnus9sns39o <400> 19 Asp Arg Val Tyr Val His Pro Phe <210> 20 <211> 8 <212> PRT
<213> Artificial Sequence <220>
<223> Description of Artificial Sequence:AII Analogue 2 <400> 20 Asn Arg Val Tyr Val His Pro Phe <210> 21 <211> 11 <212> PRT
<213> Artificial Sequence <220>
<223> Description of Artificial Sequence:AII Analogue 3 <400> 21 Ala Pro Gly Asp Arg Ile Tyr Val His Pro Phe wo ~ns~ . PCT/US98n5390 <210> 22 <211> 8 <212> PRT
<213> Artificial Sequence <220>
<223> Description of Artificial Sequence:AII Analogue 4 <400> 22 Glu Arg Val Tyr Ile His Pro Phe <210> 23 <211> 8 w0 99n6644 . PCTNS98n5390 <212> PRT
<213> Artificial Sequence <220>
<223> Description of Artificial Sequence:AII Analogue 5 <400> 23 Asp Lys Val Tyr Ile His Pro Phe <210> 24 <211> 8 <212> PRT
<213> Artificial Sequence wo ~ns~wa rcrnrs9sns39o <220>
<223> Description of Artificial Sequence:AII Analogue 6 <400> 24 Asp Arg Ala Tyr Ile His Pro Phe <210> 25 <211> 8 <212> PRT
<213> Artificial Sequence <220>

<223> Description of Artificial Sequence:AII Analoge 7 <400> 25 Asp Arg Val.Thr Ile His Pro Phe <210> 26 <211> 8 <212> PRT
<213> Artificial Sequence <220>
<223> Description of Artificial Sequence:AII Analogue 8 <400> 26 wo ~n~ PCTNS98n5390 Asp Arg Val Tyr Leu H-is Pro Phe --<210> 27 <211> 8 <212> PRT
<213> Artificial Sequence <220>
<223> Description of Artificial Sequence:AII Analogue 9 <400> 27 Asp Arg Val Tyr Ile Ar.g Pro Phe wo ~n~w rcr~s9sns39o <210> 28 <211> 8 <212> PRT
<213> Artificial Sequence <220>
<223> Description of Artificial Sequence:AII Analogue 10 <400> 28 Asp Arg Val Tyr. Ile His Ala Phe <210> 29 <211> 8 <212> PRT
<213> Artificial Sequence <220>
<223> Description of Artificial Sequence:AII Analogue 11 <400> 29 Asp Arg Val Tyr Ile His Pro Tyr <210> 30 <211> 8 <212> PRT

wo .99ns~ rcnus9sns39o <213> Artificial Sequence <220>
<223> Description of Artificial Sequence:AII Analogue 12 <400> 30 Pro Arg Val Tyr Ile His Pro Phe <210> 31 <211> 8 <212> PRT
<213> Artificial Sequence wo ~ns~ PCTNS98n5390 <220>
<223> Description of Artificial Sequence:AII Analogue 13 <400> 31 Asp Arg Pro Tyr Ile His Pro Phe <210> 32 <211> 8 <212> PRT
<213> Artificial Sequence <220>
<223> Description of Artificial Sequence:AII Analogue 14 ~vo ~n~w PCT/US98/25390 <400> 32 Asp Arg Val pTyr Ile His Pro Phe <210> 33 <211> 8 <212> PRT
<213> Artificial Sequence <220>
<223> Description of Artificial Sequence:AII Analogue 15 <400> 33 Asp Arg Nle Tyr Ile His Pro Phe <210> 34 <211> 8 <212> PRT
<213> Artificial Sequence <220>
<223> Description of Artificial Sequence:AII Analogue 16 <400> 34 Asp Arg Val Tyr Nle His Pro Phe WO 99n6644 PCT/ITS98/25390 <210> 35 <211> 9 <212> PRT
<213> Artificial Sequence <220>
<223> Description of Artificial Sequence:AII Analogue 17 <400> 35 Asp Arg Val hSer Tyr Ile His Pro Phe <210> 36 wo .~nsso~ PCTNS98n5390 <211> 8 <212> PRT
<213> Artificial Sequence <220>
<223> Description of Artificial Sequence:p-aminophenylalanine 6 All <400> 36 Asp Arg Val Tyr Ile Xaa Pro Phe <210> 37 <211> 10 <212 > PRT

<213> Artificial Sequence <220>
<223> Description of Artificial Sequence:angiotensin I
<400> 37 Asp Arg Val Tyr Ile His Pro Phe His Leu

Claims (22)

1. A method of accelerating the differentiation of mesenchymal stem and lineage-specific cells comprising contacting the mesenchymal stem and lineage-specific cells with an amount effective to accelerate differentiation of mesenchymal stem and lineage-specific cells of at least one active agent comprising a sequence consisting of at least three contiguous amino acids of groups R1-R8 in the sequence of general formula I

in which R1 and R2 together form a group of formula X-R A-R B-, wherein X is H or a one to three peptide group and a peptide bond between R A and R B is labile to aminopeptidase A cleavage;
R3 is selected from the group consisting of Val, Ala, Leu, norLeu, Ile, Gly, Pro, Aib, Acpc and Tyr;
R4 is selected from the group consisting of Tyr, Tyr(PO3)2, Thr, Ser, homoSer and azaTyr;
R5 is selected from the group consisting of Ile, Ala, Leu, norLeu, Val and Gly;
R6 is His, Arg or 6-NH2-Phe;
R7 is Pro or Ala; and R8 is selected from the group consisting of Phe, Phe(Br), Ile and Tyr, excluding sequences including R4 as a terminal Tyr group.
2. The method of claim 1 wherein the active agent is selected from the group consisting of AII, AIII, SEQ ID NO:2, SEQ ID NO:3, SEQ ID NO:4, SEQ ID NO:5, SEQ ID NO:6, SEQ ID NO:7, SEQ ID NO:8, SEQ ID NO:9, SEQ ID NO:10, SEQ ID
NO:11, SEQ ID NO:12, SEQ ID NO:13, SEQ ID NO:31, and SEQ ID NO: 37.
3. The method of claim 1 wherein the concentration of active agent is between about 0.01 ng/kg and about 10.0 mg/kg.
4. An improved cell culture medium for growth of mesenchymal stem and lineage-specific cells, wherein the improvement comprises addition to the cell culture medium of an amount effective to accelerate differentiation of mesenchymal stem and lineage-specific cells of at least one active agent comprising a sequence consisting of at least three contiguous amino acids of groups R1-R8 in the sequence of general formula I

in which R1 and R2 together form a group of formula X-R A-R B-, wherein X is H or a one to three peptide group and a peptide bond between R A and R B is labile to aminopeptidase A cleavage;
R3 is selected from the group consisting of Val, Ala, Leu, norLeu, Ile, Gly, Pro, Aib, Acpc and Tyr;
R4 is selected from the group consisting of Tyr, Tyr(PO3)2, Thr, Ser, homoSer and azaTyr;

R5 is selected from the group consisting of Ile, Ala, Leu, norLeu, Val and Gly;
R6 is His, Arg or 6-NH2-Phe;
R7 is Pro or Ala; and R8 is selected from the group consisting of Phe, Phe(Br), Ile and Tyr, excluding sequences including R4 as a terminal Tyr group.
5. The improved cell culture medium of claim 5 wherein the active agent is selected from the group consisting of AII, AIII, SEQ ID NO:2, SEQ ID NO:3, SEQ
ID NO:4, SEQ ID NO:S, SEQ ID NO:6, SEQ ID NO:7, SEQ ID NO:8, SEQ ID NO:9, SEQ ID NO:10, SEQ ID NO:11, SEQ ID NO:12, SEQ ID NO:13, SEQ ID NO:31, and SEQ ID NO: 37.
6. The improved cell culture medium of claim 4 wherein the concentration of active agent is between about 0.01 ng/ml and about 10.0 mg/ml.
7. A kit for the differentiation of mesenchymal stem and lineage-specific cells, comprising:
(a) an amount effective to accelerate differentiation of mesenchymal stem and lineage-specific cells of at least one active agent comprising a sequence consisting of at least three contiguous amino acids of groups R1-R8 in the sequence of general formula I:

in which R1 and R2 together form a group of formula X-R A-R B-, wherein X is H or a one to three peptide group and a peptide bond between R A and R B is labile to aminopeptidase A cleavage;

R3 is selected from the group consisting of Val, Ala, Leu, norLeu, Ile, Gly, Pro, Aib, Acpc and Tyr;
R4 is selected from the group consisting of Tyr, Tyr(PO3)2, Thr, Ser, homoSer and azaTyr;
R5 is selected from the group consisting of Ile, Ala, Leu, norLeu, Val and Gly;
R6 is His, Arg or 6-NH2-Phe;
R7 is Pro or Ala; and R8 is selected from the group consisting of Phe, Phe(Br), Ile and Tyr, excluding sequences including R4 as a terminal Tyr group; and (b) instructions for using the amount effective of active agent as a cell culture medium supplement.
8. The kit of claim 7 further comprising cell growth medium.
9. The kit of claim 7 further comprising a sterile container.
10. The kit of claim 7 wherein the active agent is selected from the group consisting of AII, AIII, SEQ ID NO:2, SEQ ID NO:3, SEQ ID NO:4, SEQ ID NO:5, SEQ ID NO:6, SEQ ID NO:7, SEQ ID NO:8, SEQ ID NO:9, SEQ ID NO:10, SEQ ID
NO:11, SEQ ID NO:12, SEQ ID NO:13, SEQ ID NO:31, and SEQ ID NO: 37.
11. The kit of claim 7 wherein the concentration of active agent is between about 0.01 ng/ml and about 10.0 mg/ml.
12. A method of accelerating the differentiation of mesenchymal stem and lineage-specific cells comprising contacting the mesenchymal stem and lineage-specific cells with an amount effective to accelerate differentiation of mesenchymal stem and lineage-specific cells of at least one active agent comprising a sequence consisting of at least three contiguous amino acids of groups R2-R8 in the sequence of general formula II

R2-R3-R4-R5-R6-R7-R8~~

in which R2 is selected from the group consisting of H, Arg, Lys, Ala, Orn, Ser(Ac), Sar, D-Arg and D-Lys;
R3 is selected from the group consisting of Val, Ala, Leu, norLeu, Ile, Gly, Pro, Aib, Acpc and Tyr;
R4 is selected from the group consisting of Tyr, Tyr(PO3)2, Thr, Ser, homoSer and azaTyr;
R5 is selected from the group consisting of Ile, Ala, Leu, norLeu, Val and Gly;
R6 is His, Arg or 6-NH2-Phe;
R7 is Pro or Ala; and R8 is selected from the group consisting of Phe, Phe(Br), Ile and Tyr.
13. The method of claim 12 wherein the active agent is selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO:2, SEQ ID NO:17, and SEQ ID NO:18.
14. The method of claim 12 wherein the concentration of active agent is between about 0.01 ng/ml and about 10.0 mg/ml.
15. An improved cell culture medium for growth of mesenchymal stem and lineage-specific cells, wherein the improvement comprises addition to the cell culture medium of an amount effective to accelerate differentiation of mesenchymal stem and lineage-specific cells of at least one active agent comprising a sequence consisting of at least three contiguous amino acids of groups R2-R8 in the sequence of general formula II

in which R2 is selected from the group consisting of H, Arg, Lys, Ala, Orn, Ser(Ac), Sar, D-Arg and D-Lys;
R3 is selected from the group consisting of Val, Ala, Leu, norLeu, Ile, Gly, Pro, Aib, Acpc and Tyr;
R4 is selected from the group consisting of Tyr, Tyr(PO3)2, Thr, Ser, homoSer and azaTyr;
R5 is selected from the group consisting of Ile, Ala, Leu, norLeu, Val and Gly;
R6 is His, Arg or 6-NH2-Phe;
R7 is Pro or Ala; and R8 is selected from the group consisting of Phe, Phe(Br), Ile and Tyr.
16. The improved cell culture medium of claim 15 wherein the active agent is selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO:2, SEQ ID NO:17, and SEQ ID
NO:18.
17. The improved cell culture medium of claim 15 wherein the concentration of active agent is between about 0.01 ng/ml and about 10.0 mg/ml.
18. A kit for the differentiation of mesenchymal stem and lineage-specific cells, comprising:
(a) an amount effective to accelerate differentiation of mesenchymal stem and lineage-specific cells of at least one active agent comprising a sequence consisting of at least three contiguous amino acids of groups R2-R8 in the sequence of general formula II

in which R2 is selected from the group consisting of H, Arg, Lys, Ala, Orn, Ser(Ac), Sar, D-Arg and D-Lys;
R3 is selected from the group consisting of Val, Ala, Leu, norLeu, Ile, Gly, Pro, Aib, Acpc and Tyr;
R4 is selected from the group consisting of Tyr, Tyr(PO3)2, Thr, Ser, homoSer and azaTyr;
R5 is selected from the group consisting of Ile, Ala, Leu, norLeu, Val and Gly;
R6 is His, Arg or 6-NH2-Phe;
R7 is Pro or Ala; and R8 is selected from the group consisting of Phe, Phe(Br), Ile and Tyr;
and (b) instructions for using the amount effective of active agent as a cell culture medium supplement.
19. The kit of claim 18 further comprising cell growth medium.
20. The kit of claim 18 further comprising a sterile container.
21. The kit of claim 18 wherein the active agent is selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO:2, SEQ ID NO:17, and SEQ ID NO:18.
22. The kit of claim 18 wherein the concentration of active agent is between about 0.01 ng/ml and about 10.0 mg/ml.
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US6730775B1 (en) 1999-03-23 2004-05-04 University Of Southern California Methods for limiting scar and adhesion formation
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US8557958B1 (en) 2012-06-18 2013-10-15 Tarix Pharmaceuticals Ltd. Compositions and methods for treatment of diabetes
US8633158B1 (en) 2012-10-02 2014-01-21 Tarix Pharmaceuticals Ltd. Angiotensin in treating brain conditions
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US9333233B2 (en) 2014-02-25 2016-05-10 Tarix Pharmaceuticals Ltd. Methods and compositions for the delayed treatment of stroke
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